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Thread: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

  1. #1
    Member Karnifexlol's Avatar
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    Default FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Hi guys,

    So I have 2 tickets for the Atoms for Peace show at the Hollywood Bowl on October 16th for sale. I bought these tickets on the first day of the sale and paid 98 dollars for 2 of them after convenience fees and such. I'm willing to sell the tickets to anyone in the LA, or Orange County areas (I'm from Chino Hills) for face value @ 70 bucks cash only. There are still tickets to the show available, but unless you wanna drive out to the Bowl and buy them, you'll be paying 98 dollars for paperless tickets after all the TicketMaster fees. If you're interested, I will call TicketMaster and request that the tickets be sent to me in paper form and we can set up a meet after I receive them. Unfortunately, they are non-refundable. That's why I'm doing this. But TicketMaster assured me over the phone, that I could have the tickets mailed to me even though it's an optional paperless event, meaning no purchaser credit-card required on entry.

    Tickets are good for section Q1, Row 10, Seats 57 and 59. It's the smaller section of Q1 that is closer to the center and has less seats in front of it. 57 is also an aisle seat. (Just in case you're not familiar, Q1 is all odd numbers, so there is no seat 58. 57 and 59 are next to each other haha)

    Feel free to reply in thread with any questions/concerns, or PM me with contact info if interested.

    Thanks guys
    Last edited by Karnifexlol; 06-22-2013 at 09:15 PM. Reason: added date of show and seat info

  2. #2

    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    I'm not interested in the tickets but you might wanna say what section they are in.....

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    Coachella Junkie WhyTheLongFace's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Yeah I might be interested. Plus I live by you but where are the seats located?
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    Member Karnifexlol's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by ameeps View Post
    I'm not interested in the tickets but you might wanna say what section they are in.....
    Quote Originally Posted by WhyTheLongFace View Post
    Yeah I might be interested. Plus I live by you but where are the seats located?
    Edited the original post with seat info. Thanks guys, I forgot. Derp.

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    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    What's the difference between Chino and Chino Hills?

    Also, did you realize that you were paying 100 bucks for row Q at the time?
    Whiskey Sour

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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    CHINO HILLS

    A Great Place To Be!
    Chino Hills is well known for its high quality of life and beautiful rural atmosphere. The community, with its growing population of 75,655, boasts 3,000 acres of publicly-owned open space, 41 parks, 39 miles of trails, and five community buildings.

    Ranked #34 on the "100 Best Places to Live" list by Money Magazine
    Chino Hills’ reputation is known in the national arena as well, the City of Chino Hills has been ranked #34 on Money magazine’s 2012 list of the “100 Best Places to Live.” According to the CNN/Money website, the list includes “the top 100 terrific cities that offer what American families care about most - strong job opportunities, great schools, low crime, quality health care, plenty to do, and a true sense of community.” Cities with a population between 50,000 and 300,000 were considered. Chino Hills appeared on the list before -- in 2005 with a ranking of #68.

    100 Best Communities For Young People 2 Years in a Row
    America’s Promise Alliance announced that Chino Hills was named as one of the “100 Best Communities for Young People” for 2012. Thanks to great partnerships and the hard work of many agencies and individuals who make a difference in the lives of young people, this is the second year Chino Hills made the list. The national award recognized our community for providing outstanding and innovative services and programs that make Chino Hills an outstanding place for youth to live, learn and grow.

    Ranked 13th Safest Place to Live in the United States
    Not only is Chino Hills a place where people want to live, it’s also a safe City in which to live. Based on June 2008 FBI statistics, Chino Hills was ranked as the 13th Safest City in the United States.

    6th Highest Median Household Income in the Nation
    According to the Income, Earnings, and Poverty Data from the 2007 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau, Chino Hills ranked 6th in the United States with a Median Household Income of $100,371.

    Recreation in Chino Hills
    Recreation is a priority in Chino Hills and Big League Dreams Chino Hills Sports Park is definitely a recreation destination! This 33-acre multi-use sports facility attracts tournaments, visitors, and new commercial ventures to Chino Hills. Chino Hills is also home to the McCoy Equestrian & Recreation Center. This beautiful 20-acre facility includes two lighted arenas, covered bleachers, a gazebo, a community building, and trail connections. The McCoy residence has been transformed into a beautiful community facility that is perfect for receptions and small parties.

    Attractive to Commercial Developers
    Chino Hills’ strong demographics and its location at the convergence of Orange, Riverside, Los Angeles, and San Bernardino Counties make it attractive to commercial developers. The City’s high average household income of $106,825 (in 2006) is second only to the exclusive community of Indian Wells in the Inland Empire. Prominent retailers, like Trader Joe's, H & M, and XXI Forever, have chosen to locate in Chino Hills. Many high-end national retailers have locations in Chino Hills.

    Residents Have Attained a High Level of Education
    Chino Hills is also home to a professional workforce. Nearly 41.2% of Chino Hills’ adult residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher and the community ranks among the top 17 Southern California cities in its share of residents employed as scientist, professionals, or managers.

    Excellent Schools
    Our Chino Valley Unified School District schools lead the County in API results. There are 10 elementary schools, two middle schools, and two high schools in the City of Chino Hills. The District's goal of "Increasing Academic Rigor" has paid off, as evidenced by the following accomplishments:
    Seven Chino Hills elementary schools have scored above 900 in API for 2011
    Three Chino Hills elementary schools and both middle schools have scored above 800 in API for 2011
    Both Chino Hills high schools have scored above 800 in API for 2011
    Country Springs Elementary School was designated as a Blue Ribbon School in 2007
    Four Chino Hills elementary schools and one middle school have been designated as a California Distinguished School

    "One of California's Best Kept Secrets"
    Dr. John Husing, an expert on the economics of the Inland Empire, has taken a magnifying glass to the community and considers Chino Hills to be “one of Southern California’s best kept secrets.”



    CHINO


    Chino is a city in San Bernardino County, California, United States. It is located in the western end of the Riverside-San Bernardino Area and it is easily accessible via the Chino Valley (71) and Pomona (60) freeways.
    Chino is bounded by Chino Hills to the west, unincorporated San Bernardino County (near Montclair) to the north, Ontario to the northeast, unincorporated San Bernardino County to the southeast, and unincorporated Riverside County to the south. The population was 77,983 at the 2010 census.
    Chino and its surroundings have long been a center of agriculture and dairy farming, serving the considerable demands for milk products in Southern California and much of the southwestern United States. Chino's rich agricultural history dates back to the Spanish land grant forming Rancho Santa Ana del Chino. The area specialized in orchard, row crops and dairy. Downtown Chino is home to satellite branches of the San Bernardino County Library and Chaffey Community College, the Chino Community Theatre, the Chino Boxing Club and a weekly Farmer's Market. In 2008, the city of Chino was awarded the prestigious "100 Best Communities for Youth" award for the second time in three years.[2] Chino hosted shooting events for the 1984 Summer Olympics at the Prado Olympic Shooting Park in the Prado Regional Park. Two California state prisons for adults (California Institution for Men and California Institution for Women), as well as the Heman G. Stark Youth Correctional Facility, lie within the city limits.[3]
    The land grant on which the town was founded was called Rancho Santa Ana del Chino. Santa Ana is Spanish for Saint Anne, but the exact meaning of "Chino" has been explained in different ways. One explanation is that the "Chino," (curly-haired person or mixed-race person) was the chief of the local Native American village.[4] The president of the Chino Valley Historical Society, drawing on US Civil War-era letters, designates the "curl" referenced in the toponym as that at the top of the grama grass that abounded in the valley.[5]
    Contents [hide]
    1 History
    2 Economy
    2.1 Top employers
    3 Education
    4 Geography
    5 Demographics
    5.1 2010
    5.2 2000
    6 Politics
    7 Attractions
    8 Chino in popular culture
    9 References
    10 External links
    History[edit]

    The first inhabitants of Chino in modern times were the Tongva, who had a settlement called Wapijangna in the Santa Ana River watershed. Some residents of Wapijanga were baptized at Mission San Gabriel, which was established in 1771. The Spanish crown claimed the land, at least nominally, until Mexican independence was finalized and possession fell to the Mexican government.
    Some twenty years later, Mexican governor of Alta California Juan Bautista Alvarado granted Rancho Santa Ana del Chino to Antonio Maria Lugo of the prominent Lugo family. Two years later, his successor, Governor Micheltorena, granted an additional three leagues to Lugo's son-in-law Isaac Williams, who took charge of the rancho. Williams kept large quantities of horses and cattle, which attracted the envy of raiding Native Americans as well as unscrupulous whites. One of the latter was James Beckwourth, who, in 1840, posed as an otter hunter and stayed at Rancho Chino to determine the location of the area's animals, which he then reported to Walkara, the Ute mastermind of the raids.
    Early in the Mexican-American War, the Battle of Chino took place at Williams' rancho. The battle ended prior to the arrival of the Mormon Battalion, dispatched on behalf of the United States, who instead labored in the rancho's agricultural harvest and constructed a grist mill.
    During the California Gold Rush, the rancho was a popular stopover for travelers, and in the mining fury, coal was discovered there. In 1850, California was admitted to the union, and the process of separating privately held lands from the public domain began. The Williams claim to the Chino Rancho was patented in 1869.
    Richard Gird was the next owner of the Rancho. Beginning in 1887, his land was subdivided and laid out. It became the 'Town of Chino,' and incorporated into a city in 1910.[6] Sugar beets, corn, and alfalfa were raised there.
    The Chino Valley, located at the foot of an alluvial plain with fertile topsoil reaching depths of 4 feet, was an agricultural mecca from the 1890s up through the mid 20th century. Sugar beets were a significant part of the economy in the early 1900s, followed by sweet corn (marketed as "Chino corn" throughout the Pacific coast area), peaches, walnuts, tomatoes, and strawberries. The city's official logo/crest features an overflowing cornucopia.
    The dairy industry flourished from the 1950s through the 1980s, with dairy-friendly zoning in the southwest corner of San Bernardino County encouraging many ethnic Dutch families to locate there and become the cornerstone of the industry. Chino's large, highly efficient dairies made it the largest milk-producing community in the nation's largest milk-producing state.
    Because of its pastoral setting and rural flavor, Chino was a popular site for Hollywood crews to shoot "midwestern" settings. 1960's movies included "Bus Riley's Back in Town" starring Ann-Margret and Michael Parks; "The Stripper", with Jo Anne Woodward, and the mid-60s TV series Twelve O'Clock High, re-fashioning Chino's rural airport as a British airfield with quonset huts among farm fields.
    Many historical elements of Chino were frantically demolished for speculation. A large house was demolished to build 'Value Fair' now a defunct shopping area on the corner of Walnut and Central. The City Central—Old Town, was demolished for the Courts, Police and City Hall, and now faces obsolescence as the courts, police and City Hall look for better places.[citation needed] The lower area of the city has always been prone to flooding, and Prado Dam areas are hazardous in times of rain. Race relations reached city wide proportions in the late 60s with many patrol cars burned. Chicano versus White and Chicano versus Black racial animosities have always been present since the late 60s in the Chino region.[citation needed]
    In the 1970s, Chino developed into a small suburban city, forming the western anchor of the Inland Empire region, and now the city's development has gradually taken on a more middle-class character. There are still many industrial areas as well as farm animals such as goats and chickens. According to the 2004 FBI UCR, the city had about 3.6 violent crimes per 1,000 population, which is typical for an American suburb, and its property crime below average.
    Economy[edit]

    Top employers[edit]
    According to the City's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[7] the top employers in the city are:
    # Employer # of Employees
    1 Chino Valley Unified School District Over 1,000
    2 California Institution for Men Over 1,000
    3 California Institution for Women 500-1,000
    4 Chino Valley Medical Center 500-1,000
    5 Wal-Mart fewer than 500
    6 Hussmann fewer than 500
    7 Best Buy fewer than 500
    8 Nature's Best fewer than 500
    9 Mission Linen Supply fewer than 500
    10 Target fewer than 500
    11 Omnia Furniture fewer than 500
    12 AEP Industries fewer than 500
    13 J. C. Penney fewer than 500
    14 Farmers Insurance Group fewer than 500
    15 ClosetMaid fewer than 500
    Education[edit]

    Chino is a part of the Chino Valley Unified School District.
    Chino has had 10 elementary schools:
    El Rancho Elementary (Closed in 2008-2009 School Year)
    Alicia Cortez Elementary
    Newman Elementary
    E.J. Marshall Elementary
    Dickson Elementary
    Anna Borba Fundamental
    Howard Cattle Elementary
    Richard Gird Elementary (Closed in 2008-2009 School Year)
    Edwin Rhodes Elementary
    Cal Aero Preserve Academy
    Chino has 3 junior high schools:
    Briggs Junior High School
    Ramona Junior High School
    Magnolia Junior High School
    Chino has 3 high schools:
    Don Antonio Lugo High School
    Buena Vista High School
    Chino High School
    Chino has 1 charter school:
    Oxford Preparatory Academy
    Chino has 1 Fundamental School:
    Lyle S. Briggs Fundamental School (K-8th Grade)
    Chino is serviced by a satellite center of Chaffey College, a community college.
    Geography[edit]

    Chino is located at 34°1′4″N 117°41′24″W (34.017765, -117.689990)[8]. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 29.7 square miles (77 km2). 29.6 square miles (77 km2) of it is land and 0.04% is water.
    Chino is a suburb in San Bernardino County, located 33 miles (53 km) from the county seat, San Bernardino.
    Los Angeles, 35 miles (56 km)
    Riverside, 26 miles (42 km)
    Santa Ana, 30 miles (48 km)
    Anaheim, 24 miles (39 km)
    Demographics[edit]

    Historical populations
    Census Pop. %±
    1910 1,444

    1920 2,132 47.6%
    1930 3,118 46.2%
    1940 4,204 34.8%
    1950 5,784 37.6%
    1960 10,305 78.2%
    1970 20,411 98.1%
    1980 40,165 96.8%
    1990 59,682 48.6%
    2000 67,168 12.5%
    2010 77,983 16.1%
    2010[edit]
    The 2010 United States Census[9] reported that Chino had a population of 77,983. The population density was 2,629.9 people per square mile (1,015.4/km²). The racial makeup of Chino was 43,981 (56.4%) White, 4,829 (6.2%) African American, 786 (1.0%) Native American, 8,159 (10.5%) Asian, 168 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 16,503 (21.2%) from other races, and 3,557 (4.6%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 41,993 persons (53.8%).
    The Census reported that 70,919 people (90.9% of the population) lived in households, 164 (0.2%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 6,900 (8.8%) were institutionalized.
    There were 20,772 households, out of which 9,979 (48.0%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 12,426 (59.8%) were married couples living together, 3,041 (14.6%) had a female householder with no husband present, 1,469 (7.1%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 1,185 (5.7%) unmarried couples, and 147 (0.7%) homosexuals. 2,840 households (13.7%) were made up of individuals and 1,020 (4.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.41. There were 16,936 families (81.5% of all households); the average family size was 3.72.
    The population was spread out with 19,737 people (25.3%) under the age of 18, 8,530 people (10.9%) aged 18 to 24, 25,091 people (32.2%) aged 25 to 44, 18,954 people (24.3%) aged 45 to 64, and 5,671 people (7.3%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.2 years. For every 100 females there were 105.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.2 males.
    There were 21,797 housing units at an average density of 735.1 per square mile (283.8/km²), of which 14,315 (68.9%) were owner-occupied, and 6,457 (31.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 2.1%; the rental vacancy rate was 6.4%. 49,280 people (63.2% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 21,639 people (27.7%) lived in rental housing units.
    2000[edit]
    As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 67,168 people, 17,304 households, and 14,102 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,190.5 inhabitants per square mile (1,232.0/km²). There were 17,898 housing units at an average density of 850.2 per square mile (328.3/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 55.7% White, 7.8% African American, 0.9% Native American, 4.9% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 25.6% from other races, and 4.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 47.4% of the population.
    There were 17,304 households out of which 47.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.5% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.5% were non-families. 14.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.4 and the average family size was 3.8.
    In the city the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 12.3% from 18 to 24, 34.2% from 25 to 44, 19.2% from 45 to 64, and 5.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 124.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 133.1 males.
    The median income for a household in the city was $55,401, and the median income for a family was $59,638. Males had a median income of $35,855 versus $30,267 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,574. About 6.3% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.0% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.
    Politics[edit]

    In the state legislature Chino is located in the 29th Senate District, represented by Republican Bob Huff, and in the 61st Assembly District, represented by Democrat Norma Torres. Federally, Chino is located in California's 42nd congressional district, which is represented by Republican Ken Calvert.
    Attractions[edit]
    Quote Originally Posted by SepaGroove View Post
    You shouldn't feel uncool for not going to EDC, you should feel uncool because you are uncool.

  7. #7
    Milkshake suprefan's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by fatbastard View Post
    What's the difference between Chino and Chino Hills?

    Also, did you realize that you were paying 100 bucks for row Q at the time?
    Theres probably nicer homes in Chino Hills. The ones that didnt turn into meth labs?



    And this is in the wrong sub forum?

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    Coachella Junkie HunterGather's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets


  9. #9
    Member Karnifexlol's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by fatbastard View Post
    What's the difference between Chino and Chino Hills?

    Also, did you realize that you were paying 100 bucks for row Q at the time?
    Yea, what Gay said. lol. Chino Hills is just a newer area. Annoying, yuppie, Christian, conservative town. lol.

    And tbh, I just clicked best available when buying the tickets through my iPhone app. I looked later and they were actually good for the price-range I wanted to pay. All the rest were either taken or behind mine in the same section. Face value = $35 per ticket, but after fees and such, came out to $47.15 per ticket. Pretty fuckin crazy. I really just want $70 bucks for them so that I break even on the Disclosure tickets I bought for the same day.

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    Milkshake suprefan's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Cause driving to San Diego for Disclosure is much better than waiting for the L.A. dates to get announced in August?

  11. #11
    Member Karnifexlol's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by suprefan View Post
    Cause driving to San Diego for Disclosure is much better than waiting for the L.A. dates to get announced in August?
    I'm making a little trip out of it and staying in Gaslamp for fun. Is that ok with you? Or do I need to explain myself further? lol...

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    Old Gay Guy gaypalmsprings's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    History
    1850
    In an effort to establish a town on San Diego's waterfront, San Franciscan William Heath Davis begins developing land near what is now the foot of Market Street. For his own family, Davis builds a pre-framed lumber "salt box" house, one of the first residences in town. The Oldest surviving structure in San Diego's New Town was actually built on the East Coast and shipped around Cape Horn. After an economic depression causes Davis' venture to fail, his town becomes known as Rabbitville after its principal inhabitants.

    1867
    A stout and bearded Alonzo Horton, 54, arrives in San Diego from San Francisco. After looking over Old Town, he decides the best place for the city to develop is down by the waterfront. Determined to build a new downtown on the site of Davis' failure, Horton purchases at auction some 800 acres of land on the waterfront for approximately 33 cents an acre (some historians credit Horton with paying 27 cents an acre). Two years later, he pays $4,000 for a 160-acre parcel needed to sew up the section known as the Horton Addition.

    Read more about: Alonzo Horton and the Gaslamp Quarter Renaissance

    1869
    Horton spends about $50,000 to build a wharf at the end of 5th Avenue which makes this and adjacent streets the backbone of the fast-developing city. On March 24, Horton sells $5,500 worth of commercial and residential lots in one day. His new town begins to boom.

    1870
    After building Horton Hall at 6th and F -- the first public theater, with 400 seats for lectures -- Horton opens the town's first bank, the course, is named bank president.



    1880's
    San Diego's booming prosperity attracts prostitutes and gamblers, including Wyatt Earp, who runs three gambling halls. Gradually, San Diego commerce begins moving north of Market Street. The abandoned area to the south becomes a redlight district known as the Stingaree, a name probably derived from the fierce stingray fish in San Diego Bay. It is said you could be stung as badly in the Stingaree as in the bay. Read more about Wyatt Earp

    1885
    The original Chinese Mission School opens in rented facilities at the First Presbyterian Church at 8th and D (now Broadway). The Mission becomes a social center and a catalyst for interaction between Caucasians and Asians in San Diego. It also provides an opportunity for Chinese, and later Japanese, immigrants to learn English and receive religious instruction.

    1887
    Feisty, red-haired call girl Ida Bailey takes up residence at a house of ill repute in the Stingaree. Here you can find 350 prostitutes working in 120 bordellos. The Stingaree's 71 saloons boast names such as the Turf, Oasis, First and Last Chance, Saloon, Old Tub of Blood and Legal Tender

    1888
    San Diego's 1880s real estate boom ends. By the end of the decade the population has dropped from 40,000 to 16,000.

    1894
    Alonza Horton makes a deal city fathers can't refuse: he sells them a valuable half-block of land for $10,000, stipulating that it must remain a park forever. Under the agreement, the city agrees to pay Horton $100 a month with no interest and no down payment. In the event of Horton's death, the city would acquire the property outright. The city fathers underestimated Horton's endurance. In April 1903 a spry, 89-year-old Horton cashed the final payment. Today Horton's park fronts Horton Plaza and has been renamed Horton Plaza Park.

    1903
    Madame Ida Bailey opens up her own fancy parlor house at 530 4th Avenue called the Canary Cottage. In the pale yellow house set behind a white picket fence, she and her girls "entertain" downtown's well-groomed gentlemen with fat wallets, including the mayor and chief of police.

    1909
    Having lost most of his properties through tax sales and foreclosures, Alonzo Horton dies at the Agnew Sanitarium. On his 95th birthday he tells a newspaper reporter, "It's the most beautiful place in the world to me, and I had rather have the affection and friendly greeting of the people of San Diego than all the rulers in the world." Ironically, the same year in San Leandro, California, William Heath Davis also dies financially impoverished.

    1912
    Influenced by a wave of citizen morality, police raid the Stingaree and arrest 138 prostitutes operating out of sleeping rooms on the upper floors of the district's buildings. One hundred thirty-six promise to leave the city; two agree to reform their ways. The next morning, however, one changes her mind. The other was found to be insane.

    1913
    With the red lights of the Stingaree officially turned off, San Diego becomes unpopular as a liberty port for the Navy. Seven hundred ninety-seven men aboard several warships vote for San Francisco as their favorite liberty port. San Diego gets only 17 votes.

    1914
    Ah Quin, Labor contractor for the California Southern Railroad, comes to a tragic end when he is struck and killed by a motorcycle at 3rd and J. He dies one of the wealthiest Chinese in Southern California.

    1920
    The Chinese Benevolent Society is founded to protect the interests of all Chinese citizens in San Diego. The Society is housed in the building at 428 3rd Avenue, in front of which Chinese holidays are traditionally celebrated.


    Post World War II to the early 1970s

    Following World War II, the suburbs outside of Downtown San Diego experience an influx of new residents and businesses, leaving the Gaslamp Quarter as the home of tattoo parlors, seedy bars, pawn shops, and locker clubs. Adult businesses, including peep shows, massage parlors, and adult bookstores, continue to converge on the Gaslamp for the next 20 to 30 years.

    1974
    Business and property owners band together, under the leadership of former City Councilmember Tom Hom, petition the City Council to aid in revitalizing of the Gaslamp Quarter. The San Diego City Council provides $100,000 to rehabilitate the Gaslamp Quarter, as well as to develop design guidelines to preserve the district's historic aesthetic. One of the first buildings to be restored was the Buel-Town Company Building (current home of the Old Spaghetti Factory). Restorations to the Pacific Hotel and the Keating soon followed.

    1976

    The Gaslamp Quarter Urban Design and Development Manual is adopted by the City Council. The guidelines gained acceptance and the the City of San Diego adopted a Planned District Ordinace for the Gaslamp Quarter, which established design and use guidelines for the redevelopment of the Gaslamp as a National Historic District.

    1980
    The Gaslamp Quarter is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    1982
    Developers and restoration experts are encouraged to continue restoring the Gaslamp's Victorian buildings, leading to one of the most profound joint urban preservation efforts in San Diego history. Business and property owners form a Business Improvement District (BID) named the Gaslamp Quarter Association in an effort to protect the historic district.

    1986
    The idea of the Gaslamp Archway on 5th Ave. and L St. is first conceived.

    1990
    The Gaslamp Quarter Archway is installed and funded by redevelopment funds overseen by Centre City Development Corporation. The Gaslamp Quarter Archway was designed by Harman Nelson, architect, and built by Roy Flahive of Pacific Sign Construction Company.

    1991
    The Gaslamp Quarter Archway is officially completed and dedicated. The sign is significant in that it uses neon, incandescent and flourescent light fixtures to present a beautiful, vibrant display. The Gaslamp Quarter Archway was symbolic as a declaration that the City of San Diego was committed to continuing the redevelopment of Downtown. It serves as an icon for other cities to look to the Gaslamp Quarter as an example of successful redevelopment. Learn more about the Gaslamp Quarter Archway refurbishment in 2013: http://www.gaslamp.org/archway

    Today
    The Gaslamp Quarter has successfully transformed into a premier shopping, dining and entertainment district. With over 200 restaurants, bars, nightclubs and lounges, and countless boutiques, art galleries and shops to peruse, the Gaslamp has established itself both as the playground of hip, eclectic San Diegans and as an elite urban destination.
    Quote Originally Posted by SepaGroove View Post
    You shouldn't feel uncool for not going to EDC, you should feel uncool because you are uncool.

  13. #13
    Member Karnifexlol's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    You're so informative! haha

  14. #14
    Coachella Junkie WhyTheLongFace's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    I love GPS
    Voted Best Black Board Member 2010

  15. #15
    Old Gay Guy gaypalmsprings's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by WhyTheLongFace View Post
    I love GPS
    Then why the long face?
    Quote Originally Posted by SepaGroove View Post
    You shouldn't feel uncool for not going to EDC, you should feel uncool because you are uncool.

  16. #16
    Member HAIRYGOOMBA's Avatar
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    Default Re: FOR SALE: (2) Atoms for Peace @ Hollywood Bowl tickets

    Quote Originally Posted by gaypalmsprings View Post
    Then why the long face?
    Because longer is better?
    For all intensive porpoises presale finally sold out

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