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Thread: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

  1. #211
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Can someone do dubstep please?

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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Hahahahaha, dubstep

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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    lol
    2012: Coachella Weekend Two & Roskilde

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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Kiwi Pop (Most of these are going to be compilations)

    1.The Clean-Anthology



    Really you just need the first disc. This is kind of the ground zero for what most people consider the New Zealand Underground sound-lo fi, trebly guitars that jangle and pop, fast tempos, a mix of punk and reverence for 60s sounds. The Clean were the band that galvanized the scene after the Enemy, the first punk band on the South Island, threw everyone for a loop. The Clean were three guys (David and Hamish Kilgour and Bob Scott) who played shows for a few years in Dunedin and then Auckland, gave Flying Nun, their record label, both its start and its first number one hit, and wrote a mess of fantastic pop tracks.

    Tally Ho-their first single, and one of their best.

    Point That Thing Somewhere Else-The Clean at their most psychedelic.

    Anything Could Happen-Just a superb song.

    2.The Chills-Submarine Bells



    The Chills were well on track to being the great lost band from New Zealand when they put this out. By this point, they had been a band for over 10 years, gone through around 20 members, released 5 uniformly excellent singles and put out one completely unrecognized album full of short, peppy rock tracks. Then in 1991 they went big, signed to Slash Records in the US and released Submarine Bells, which will wind up being their signature release. This is full of big sounding indie pop, replete with strings, reverb, dense lyrics and incredible melodies. They start it off with Heavenly Pop Hit, one of the best songs in their catalog and a truly spectacular pop song, full of build and vocal trading and great sounds. The rest of the album is good, but Heavenly Pop Hit is perfection.

    Heavenly Pop Hit (Bonus-Uber-90s video!)

    3.Tall Dwarfs-Hello Cruel World



    Tall Dwarfs is two guys, Alec Bathgate and Chris Knox. They were both part of The Enemy, a notorious punk band from Dunedin fronted by Knox, who would frequently wind up cut and bloody on stage in tribute to Iggy Pop. They then formed a new-wavey band called Toy Love who made a decent record for a major label in Australia and quickly dissolved. Tall Dwarfs was their response to the major label bullshit-defiantly lo-fi, their recordings were all made on Knox's 4-track and featured no drums, instead gaining percussion from pots, pans, toys and whatever they could find. Hello Cruel World is a compilation of their first four EPs, and its a hell of a release. The CD contains every track from these, so it's an undertaking at over 20 songs, but these short psychedelic bursts make the listen easy. Knox has a weird voice and this isn't for everyone, but after listening to the tracks on here, you can definitely hear the striking influence the band has had throughout the indie scene, from Yo La Tengo to Jay Reatard to Neutral Milk Hotel (Fun fact-Knox is friends with Mangum, and booked him a show when he came to visit in 2001, not knowing that Neutral Milk Hotel had stopped as an active concern. They performed the show, and that was the last full NMH show.)

    All My Hollowness To You

    Nothing's Going to Happen

    4.Straightjacket Fits-Hail



    The NZ indie scene was small and, as a result, very incestuous, with bands constantly shifting and sharing members (Case in point-Martin, the man behind the Chills, plays the organ on the early Clean stuff.) Straightjacket Fits formed out of the ashes of the Doublehappys, who were the second iteration of The Stones, one of the original bands who, along with the Chills, The Verlaines (We'll get to them) and the Sneaky Feelings, were on the seminal Dunedin Double EP, the first major release from Flying Nun (all recorded in Chris Knox's living room on his 4-track). By this point, Straightjacket Fits had grown from the bluesy punk they had played in the early 80s to a noisy, psychedelic pop band. They could have blown up with the alternative boom if they had better distribution in the US, but sadly they didn't have much recognition outside of New Zealand at the time. By the time they came to California in 1993, they were falling apart. But here, in 1988, they released a record packed with rocking gems. Check the videos below for proof.

    She Speeds

    Hail

    5.This Kind of Punishment-This Kind of Punishment



    New Zealand, in addition to producing great indie pop, is also home to a lo fi experimental scene that's long been productive. This Kind of Punishment were one of the early bands, releasing stuff in the 80s on Flying Nun and Xpressway, the tape-only label that became the main documentor of the noise scene in the 80s. This Kind of Punishment is the Jeffries Brothers, Peter and Graeme. They make spare, haunting tracks with ominous overtones and dark piano pieces. Their subsequent albums would develop more nuance and range, but the first one is their purest statement, full of dread and sounding vaguely like Joy Division or early Bauhaus but decidedly lo fi and noisy. A really cool band well worth checking out.

    I couldn't find any videos of songs from the first album, so here's Immigration Song, the first track off their third album

    6.The Dead C-Eusa Kills



    The Dead C are probably the most well known experimental band out of New Zealand. A long running concern, they have been performing since the mid 80s, constantly releasing material and performing in New Zealand. Despite the fact that they mostly remain over there, their following is much larger in England and the US than it is in their home country. They spin out long, dense improvised tracks that meander from psychedelia to noise to free-jazz inspired rock to traditional song craft. Eusa Kills is a good place to start, as it is slightly more song focused, and also available to find in the US (most of these are really hard to track down in physical format.)

    Again, no videos from this album, so here's a live recording from Philadelphia

    7.Snapper-Shotgun Blossom



    Every time I read about these guys, they are referenced as an early predecessor to Stereolab's sound. I don't hear that so much, but they do have the slinky bass lines and organ tones. Snapper, to me, is more rock than Stereolab, and they retain some of the menace of the darker Velvet Underground work. Peter Gutteridge, who is the main songwriter, was a member of the Clean and the Chills (that's him playing lead guitar on Point That Thing Somewhere Else). This album is a dark one, sounding quite a bit like JAMC at points and (yup) Stereolab in others, all while retaining their own sound. I don't know what happened to them, but this is a fantastic record.

    Snapper and the Ocean.

    8.The Bats-Daddy's Highway



    The Clean went on Hiatus after their single and two EPs, and Robert Scott, the drummer, decided to form the Bats. Really, any Bats record you get will be a perfect intro, as they're all essentially the same. They do acoustic, lilting indie/twee stuff, and they do it perfect. Each song on here is a little gem of acoustic indie pop, a style they were the forefathers of and really perfected. They still release records and tour, and might even be coming to the US soon, as the Clean are playing some shows.

    Treason-Their best song

    9.The Verlaines-Bird Dog



    The Verlaines were the distinguished band of the whole scene. They began recording and performing early, being one of the four bands on the Dunedin Double EP. They recorded a number of fantastic albums, eventually moving to the US for a few years and recording in increasingly high fidelity. They never sounded like a band that should have been Lo-Fi, and the increased fidelity here helps. Graeme Downes, the constant force behind the Verlaines, is a professor of musical composition, and his intelligence and understanding of orchestration shows. There's lots of subtle structural work here that makes the album scream for repeated listens, in addition to the fact that Downes has a hell of a way with melodies and soaring song structures. Simply a great band, and this was their finest hour.

    CD, Jimmy Jazz and Me

    Makes No Difference

    10.Bird Nest Roys-Bird Nest Roys



    They get forgotten even amongst Kiwi Pop fans as a second rate band, but don't believe it for a second. This album is chock full of pop gems. The Roys had a way of writing a melody that didn't hit right away-it developed and twisted and slowly came about, and they made songs that were excellent because of it. This one is probably the easiest, most accessible listen on the list, and may very well be a good introduction into the whole NZ sound.

    Jaffa Boy-their most known single
    Last edited by bmack86; 09-19-2010 at 10:33 PM.
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    foof roberto73's Avatar
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Nice work, Bryan. These are all top-notch picks. I know I asked you about Bailter Space last week, but do you also know Able Tasmans? They're another one you might consider checking out, if you don't already know them. They're so close in spirit and style to The Chills and The Verlaines that they probably don't need to be on this list, but their 1987 debut, A Cuppa Tea and a Lie Down, is first-rate guitar pop.
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Quote Originally Posted by mountmccabe View Post
    Bathory - Under the Sign of the Black Mark. The Swedish band Bathory were playing full fledged black metal from the start. This album, from 1987 was them at the peak of their powers... or at least they started presaging Viking Metal (which'd be a separate writeup.) Track: "Equimanthorn"

    THIS. God, Bathory was so awesome. My favourite album of theirs is "Hammerheart" but that's when frontman Quarthon ended his black metal phase and went into a Viking phase.

    Would be way cool if someone could write a primer on the top Viking metal albums. Don't know enough about the genre myself to do it.

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    A Cuppa Tea and a Lie Down was my other thought for position 10, as they're both sorely overlooked indie pop albusm from the kiwi scene. Love me some Able Tasmans.
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  8. #218
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Nice list, Bryan.
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    I might just have to toss up links to those ten tonight in the Group.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Still-ill View Post
    2. Swans - Soundtracks for the Blind
    I listened to the first disc of this front to back for the first time today, holy shit. Helpless Child is amazing.

    But, someone should really do a legitimate Post Rock list. I mean, a list that is mainly comprised of albums that have elements of Post Rock really isn't a Post Rock list at all, when it all comes down to it. No offense meant to Stilldo.
    Last edited by TallGuyCM; 09-23-2010 at 12:21 AM.
    5/01 - Sleater-Kinney - Palladium
    5/03 - Lightning Bolt/Liturgy - Echoplex
    5/05 - Thee Oh Sees - The Smell
    5/08 - The Acid - El Rey (?)
    5/14 - Melody's Echo Chamber - Roxy (?)


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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Yeah, it's a masterpiece. I see what you mean about my list, but I feel that another list would be kind of superfluous, considering that I feel that 9/10 of those albums are definitely post-rock. The only one that might not be is Red, but that is only if you consider where it fell in the progression. And lets face it, it's much more interesting to listen to that album than anything Explosions in the Sky put out.
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  12. #222
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    I say a list that shows the full range of post rock makes is more interesting to me than a list that sticks to a very strict definition.

    And yeah, Cooks, Hammerheart is a beast. I would not be able to do much of a Viking Metal one myself; I haven't been taken with much beyond Amon Amarth. Which is to say they've been enough for me.
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    I don't think another post rpock list would be superfluous at all, but i also don't think there is anything wrong with Still-ill's list. There are plenty other albums to fill a good list with though.
    last.fm
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    6/3/15 - Sufjan Stevens @ Dorothy Chandler // 7/15/15 - Shellac @ Regent // 7/31/15 - Melt Banana w/Torche @ Roxy

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    Quote Originally Posted by TallGuyCM View Post
    I mean, a list that is mainly comprised of albums that have elements of Post Rock really isn't a Post Rock list at all, when it all comes down to it.
    It's actually completely a post rock list, when it all comes down to it.

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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    nothing more exciting than arguing genre definitions.

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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    You're a genre.
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    Ol' Codger/post-blues
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums



    Anyone have any other genre input? A thread like this really needs to stay on the first page.
    5/01 - Sleater-Kinney - Palladium
    5/03 - Lightning Bolt/Liturgy - Echoplex
    5/05 - Thee Oh Sees - The Smell
    5/08 - The Acid - El Rey (?)
    5/14 - Melody's Echo Chamber - Roxy (?)


    Quote Originally Posted by Grant View Post
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    I'm working on an early industrial debuts one but real life is getting in the way of internet projects.

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    I'm not forgetting about this. Andrew and I have a collaborated list that needs write-ups. Perhaps I can talk with him and solidify it this week.

    Those of you with unfinished work would be praised should you find the time.

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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Can someone complete an electronic list?
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Daft Punk
    "Sandstorm"
    C+C Music Factory
    "Satisfaction"
    that Missy Elliott song
    Tangerine Dream soundtracks
    Super Mario Bros.
    internet meme techno remix

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    Crazy Frog
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Chicago Blues

    The Chicago sound was created, mostly, by players who grew up in the South and cut their teeth playing and recording in the Delta, then moved north during the second Great Migration following WWII. I could drone on and on about the sound and how it formed through the necessity of amplification (which, in turn, presented a whole new palette of sounds and effects for musicians to experiment with and popularize with great success) and the crucial role this music served as the link between blues and R&B/rock and roll. But I won’t. If you like the sounds presented here, I’m certain you’ll perform your own research and realize the immense impact that Chicago blues had on nearly all subsequent forms of rock and roll and popular music in general. In no particular order:

    1. James CottonBest of the Verve Years

    Cotton recorded hits with Howlin’ Wolf and Muddy Waters (Waters alternated between Cotton and Little Walter during the 50s) before striking out on his own and forming the Jimmy Cotton Blues Quartet with Otis Spann on the keys. This guy could fucking play a mean harmonica. Pretty much all that needs to be said. He still records and plays shows, go see him if given the opportunity. This album contains a good number of Cotton’s earliest solo work and represents what is generally considered to be Cotton’s most fertile period artistically. The collection includes his entire first album on Verve as well as 9 other tracks from his next two Verve Albums, showcasing his virtuosity and blast-furnace sound.

    2. Big Bill BroonzyGood Time Tonight

    Bill Broonzy moved to Chicago and began recording in the decade before World War II. Broonzy did not play much of the dark, brooding blues of the Delta but, rather, played upbeat “happy blues,” if such a term can exist. A fine and able guitarist, Broonzy was a hell of a composer and songwriter, writing over 300 compositions during his career. Lyrically, his songs were clever and well-written, often risqué and riddled with double-entendre. Even the sleaziest songs seem somewhat tame because they are told in a manner that separates them from most bawdy blues songs about squeezing lemons and such. Mostly. His ode to whiskey-dick, “Whiskey and Good Time Blues” is a bit more direct, and is also quite funny. This collection is nothing special or too out of the ordinary, but it includes twenty tracks that span 1930-1940, including some unreleased gems, presenting a fine sample of early Chicago blues.

    3. Sonny Boy WilliamsonBluebird Blues

    Sunny Boy Williamson (not to be confused with Sonny Boy Williamson II aka Aleck Miller, a talented harpist who assumed Sonny Boy’s name after the original was murdered in the late 1940s. Sonny Boy II was actually important in the Chicago scene in the 1950s) is the most important blues harmonica player ever. Ever. There has not been one blues harpist since Sonny Boy that has not borrowed greatly from his style. Sonny Boy’s success came in being able to synthesize older solo styles from the Delta into a new bluesier sound that sounded equally good solo or with a band. Williamson singlehandedly transformed the harmonica from inter-verse filler into a lead instrument. Stylistically, Sonny Boy played with a very dexterous sound, equal parts smooth and raw, bending notes and taking runs like a clarinet or saxophone. Williamson had a slight stammer, which is apparent in the elongated vowels on the slower songs and slight stutters during the upbeat numbers. Strangely, this made his vocals sound a bit more urgent and expressive, and this vocal “style” has been imitated by many blues singers, essentially becoming a style unto itself (listen to Waters bite this style on the live record Fathers and Sons). His songs have become standards, covered by every blues band on the planet. This compilation is part of a very good series on the blues, and I highly recommend the entire series (the Blind Willie McTell set is superb). They have collected a lot of Sonny Boy’s most well-known and influential tracks. Plus, it’s hard not to like a comp that includes a song titled “Sloppy Drunk Blues.” Few individuals had such massive impact on the Chicago scene, and blues in general, as Sonny Boy Williamson.


    4. Howlin WolfHowlin’ Wolf (“Rocking Chair” record)

    EDIT: Shit. This section got deleted and I'm too lazy to fix it. This is a REALLY good record. Check out Hubert Sumlin's spiky guitar lines, they nicely complement Wolf's visceral singing and harp playing. This is absolutely essential listening for all fans of blues.

    5. Muddy WatersThe Best of Muddy Waters

    Not much more can be said about Muddy Waters that hasn’t already been said countless times. His music occupies one of the rare pivot points of popular music, where we have music before Muddy Waters and we have music after Muddy Waters. In terms of impact, influence, visibility, and his role as a blues cherry-popper for most folks, Waters might be the most important blues musician to ever live. He is “the blues” for a lot of people. When we hear the stop-riff style he helped popularize, we identify it as “the blues.” THE blues. Waters found massive commercial success recording for Chess and created one of the most famous bands in history, the archetype for the modern rock and roll band: drums (Elgin Evans), harmonica (Little Walter), piano (Otis Spann), guitar (Jimmy Rogers), bass (Willie Dixon). Sounds simple. It is. It wasn’t new, Sonny Boy Williamson had done it a decade earlier, but it had never sounded like this.
    This Chess compilation disc from the late 1950s includes all of his best sides for Chess. I’m not sure if it’s still in print, but I am certain there are other Chess compilations. In the 60s Waters adopted more of a rural folk-blues persona to cash in on the folk revival. These songs aren’t bad, they just aren’t nearly as good or interesting. Avoid Electric Mud like the plague, it’s quite terrible.

    6. Jimmy ReedI’m Jimmy Reed

    Jimmy Reed’s music is like your favorite local dive or breakfast at Mike & Rhondas in Flagstaff: it’s nothing fancy, it might even seem woefully ill-equipped at times, but god damn it if it doesn’t hit the spot every time. Jimmy Reed is more important to popular music than the majority of people will ever realize, the sound of his records permeates rock and roll and modern blues to the point that we have forgotten their origin. His songs have been covered by an endless list of bands and artists in the 60s and 70s were obsessed with Reed. Talk to Keith Richards and he'll tell you there were three names he, Mick, and Brian idolized in the early days: Reed, Berry, and Diddley. Shit, don't ask Keith, just listen to the Stones' early output. You still hear him name-checked by Leon Russell and Neil Young and others. Reed had more records on the R&B and Pop charts in the mid-50s and early 60s than Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, and most other well-known bluesman. Not a great singer, harpist, or guitarist, Reed’s success at the time was largely the result of his rhythm guitarist and childhood friend Eddie Taylor. Taylor’s muted boogie riffs, played on the bass strings of the guitar, have become such a fixture of the blues that people have a hard time separating it from what they consider “blues.” Not only that, this stuff makes people want to get up and dance and boogie and have a good time. Reed was a simple, yet oddly gifted songwriter (he’s one of my favorite lyricists) whose songs are catchy, heart breaking, and just plain good. Key tracks include “Honest I Do,” “You Don’t Have To Go,” “Ain’t That Loving You,” “You Got Me Dizzy.” Also worth checking out this compilation (), which gathers the best of his sides for Vee-Jay, including those previously mentioned, “Big Boss Man,” “Bright Lights, Big City,” and “Going to New York.” Vee-Jay recordings are the only recordings of his really worth listening to, as debilitating alcoholism and undiagnosed epilepsy wracked his talent in later years.

    7. Elmore JamesBlues After Hours

    Elmore James was a retardedly good slide guitarist. My brain hurts just thinking about it. He’s very nice to listen to. He was known for his heavily amplified and nearly howling guitar (an old hollow body, unbelievably) and his gripping, powerful voice. Ignore the tacky cover and take a listen to the raw, beautiful fury within. Key tracks include “Dust My Blues (aka Dust My Broom), James’ most well-known song, a cover of a Robert Johnson song, “Blues Before Sunrise” and pretty much everything. It’s really good. This is his first and his best, although Sky Is Crying comes at a close second. Interested parties should check out the compilation Shake Your Moneymaker: The Best of the Fire Sessions, it represents a good cross-section of his hits recorded between 1959-1961 for Fire records when James was still in his prime and really cutting into it.

    8. Little WalterChess 50th Anniversary Collection

    Little Walter was to blues harmonica what Charlie Parker was to the alto saxophone or Hendrix to the electric guitar: his virtuosity and vision redefined what was possible on the instrument and influenced nearly everyone who has come after. The first person known to play while cupping his hands around a mic, Walter, to put it bluntly, fucking killed like nobody had ever heard before. Using the mic, he was able achieve a raw, punchy mid-range and wailing, shrieking high notes that could be heard over amplified guitars and ripping horn sections in noisy clubs. Walter experimented with distortion and echo and managed to get some pretty awesome and fucked up sounds. While recording for Chess in the 50s, he scored more top ten hits than label mates Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, and Sonny Boy Williamson II. Included here are his 12 charting singles, as well as 8 others that do nothing less than rock the house. “Juke,” “Blues With a Feeling,” “My Babe,” and “Key to the Highway” are some of his best known, but pretty much the whole compilation is stacked with essential tracks.

    9. Buddy GuyA Man and the Blues

    Buddy Guy’s first record as a band leader is also his best, it is blues perfection. He is normally the deathly loud, heavily distorted bridge between Chicago blues and rock and roll, although this record shows a cleaner, crisper sound from Guy. Soulful and dramatic, with high-wire guitar and rock-solid rhythm, it is hard to accurately state how good this record is. If you were wise enough to pick up one of the reissues on Record Store Day this year, you know what I’m talking about. There’s not a bad song on this album, “Sweet Little Angel” is sublime and “One Room Country Shack” could be a definitive statement of what the blues are all about. Utterly brilliant playing by the whole band (Otis Spann, the best Chicago blues pianist, on the keys, Muddy’s drummer Fred Below, and the criminally underrated guitarist Wayne Bennett). The horns bring a wonderful danceable groove to the songs and really tie the room together. Guy’s vocals are clean and soulful, and a bit high-pitched, not as gravelly and partied out as it has been for decades. I’m not a huge fan of Buddy Guy’s overall body of work, but this album is fucking transcendent. Listen to it.

    10. Butterfield Blues BandEast-West

    Harpist and vocalist, Paul Butterfield and guitarist Mike Bloomfield were what we like to call hipsters. They were affluent white college kids who hung out with Muddy Waters and Little Walter and James Cotton & co. in the blues clubs in South Chicago and generally considered themselves too cool for “white” music. Instead they spent their time soaking up blues and r&b and posturing as streetwise bluesmen. However, these hipsters turned out to be enormously talented blues musicians who became very well respected by their peers in Chicago. They even helped provide exposure for the Chicago scene to white folkie/hipster/hippie audiences and secured Waters, James Cotton, and others spots at west coast festival that the Butterfield Blues Band had been booked to play. Butterfield was the first white blues artist to not merely mimic black artists, but to actually create and contribute to the form. Some argue the first record is better but, for me, this record is a much more expansive and free-feeling endeavor as they explore sounds outside the traditional blues idiom. Two jazzy extended jams on the album show the band exploring outside traditional Chicago blues, incorporating modal jazz and Indian ragas (“East-West” is the best, and likely only, raga you’ll ever hear played by a blues band. Shit gets crazy, and it’s great). Bloomfield’s playing is fluid and incendiary and Butterfield’s harp is funky and distorted and totally irresistible. The rhythm section is tight as hell. Funky. Piano is ripping throughout, although “Get Out of My Life, Woman” serves up some very tasty treats from key man Mark Naftalin. And Bishop actually contributes some solos to the record, unlike the first. This was the last album to feature the “classic” lineup of the band, as Bloomfield would leave to start Electric Flag and Bishop would go solo. This album is an interpretation of the Chicago blues that managed to influence the scene and have enormous impact on the genre. Essential listening.

    HONORABLE MENTIONS: Tampa Red (slide guitarist and progenitor of the Chicago sound), Willie Dixon, Sonny Boy Williamson II, Magic Sam, Junior Wells, Earl Hooker (very good and in-demand slide guitarist, John Lee’s brother), Otis Spann.
    Last edited by greghead; 11-21-2010 at 08:05 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by thelastgreatman View Post
    No Taj Mahal or Ry Cooder? Fuck this thread.

  25. #235
    Chest Rockwell Gribbz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Thanks, greghead. Looking forward to listening.

    Levitation Festival - 5/8 - 5/10 - Carson Creek Ranch
    Courtney Barnett - 6/5 - The Mohawk
    The Avett Brothers - 6/27 - Whitewater Amphitheater
    Death Grips - 7/18 - The Mohawk

  26. #236
    Coachella Junkie greghead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    You're welcome, gribbz, I hope you enjoy it all. I certainly do. If this stuff really tickles your fancy, get back at me and I'll get you a list of some less obvious choices.
    Quote Originally Posted by thelastgreatman View Post
    No Taj Mahal or Ry Cooder? Fuck this thread.

  27. #237
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Laptop Music?
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Yea I think a lot of men think they are bad ass, but a 12 year old with a AK can take me out I know ...... cr****

  28. #238
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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Paging Jared to the Primer thread.

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    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Pretty much.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Yea I think a lot of men think they are bad ass, but a 12 year old with a AK can take me out I know ...... cr****

  30. #240

    Default Re: Primer: 10 Essential Albums

    Two days ago I came across this thread doing a Google search looking for new music. I cannot thank everyone whose made lists enough. I filled my iTunes with all kinds of stuff i normally would have never known about. I enjoyed the math rock list for sure, but I couldn't help but be reminded of a genre that was once but not so much so now, near and dear to my heart... Math Metal. As stated I don't really keep up with it or listen to it too often anymore, but I do feel it's worth people knowing about for sure. As far as metal goes I find these bands have and probably still do make the most interesting, complex, and sophisticated form of it. For that reason I wanted to get some names out and I hope if you haven't had the chance to hear any of them enlighten you to some serious musicianship. Also this is my first damn post on the board! Nothing like hitting the ground running right? I'd like input on my choices for sure.. as I've said i haven't kept up much so if there are any new "classic" albums in the genre i wouldn't know... these are the best places to start though.

    Math Metal/Math core as defined by Wikipedia. "Mathcore is a rhythmically complex and dissonant style of metalcore. It has its roots in bands such as Converge, Botch, and the Dillinger Escape Plan. The term mathcore is suggested by analogy with math rock. Both math rock and mathcore make use of unusual time signatures.

    Yawn. It's like reading a text book in school, and not a very good one at that. This fails to mention math metal bands being hugely influenced by jazz. This shows up most pronounced in the drumming. It also fails to mention the widely used tactic of "sweep picking" (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweep_picking). Also fails to take note of the lyrics. Math metal is assuredly not known for its lyrics or anything to do with vocals really; however, most math metal does have some pretty interesting things going on beneath the vocal surface. There is often a very tongue in cheek mentality with math metal lyrics and song titles. This creates an interesting dichotomy with the ultra aggressiveness of the music. They do also tend to skew a tad violent and aggressive, but it is metal after all. I know this is still a kind of shotty description of math metal but I'm ready to let the music speak for itself!

    Into the Moat - The Design
    Ultra aggressive, highly technical math metal. Not to much needs to be said about these guys, they don't really innovate the genre much, they just make impressive music within it. You will notice many of the common themes in math metal used throughout, complex time signatures, jazz influenced drumming, sweep picking. One slightly different feel is their use of a lower vocal sound.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4m0h9E1bHM

    Lye By Mistake - Arrangements for Fulminating Vective
    Easily the most jazz influenced band on here. Yes even though Candiria has actual jazz parts, Lye By Mistake incorporate fairly traditional parts as well and I feel jazz influences the heavier parts more so than any other tech band as well. The best sweep picking I have ever witnessed. I'm unsure if this band is still going and touring, if so do yourself a favor and go see them. It's amazing watching everyone's jaws drop to floor the second the guitar starts into it. They are moderately experimental as well as far as the usage of some glitch noise electronics and vocal effects.
    http://www.youtube.com/v/258nrUvoKJc...n_US&rel=0


    Red Chord - Fused Together In Revolving Doors
    When it comes to this band I feel the need to at least mention the tapdance of metal genre naming. This album in my eyes is completely Math Metal.. others disagree.. when it came out a new genre definition was being thrown around "Deathcore". Death metal combined with hardcore for lack of me wanting to go into it further. Red Chord I feel went much more into that direction with their subsequent releases; however, Fused Together is firmly rooted in ridiculous time signatures, jazz inspired drumming, aggressive time changes, the whole shebang. They skew towards death metal in the vocal department and there highly effective use of chugging parts and harmonics. This album is really really really heavy.. it uses a deeper crunchier guitar tone as well, which aligns itself more towards death metal as well.
    http://www.youtube.com/v/k4P96ARjrP8...n_US&rel=0


    Converge - Jane Doe
    I almost feel unable to do a write up for this.. I will be honest i never got much into Converge. I think it's because I was always told how they were the best and I had to love them. Of course being the free thinker i was then, I didn't give it much of a chance out spite i guess. I am aware though that Converge helped pave the way for this genre almost as much as Dillinger.. and this is the album where they truly for the math metal feel more so than the rest. I'm sorry i don't have more to say... just know this is a critical album and band for this and other metal/hardcore genres.
    http://www.youtube.com/v/gIB9Cai5kZ4...n_US&rel=0

    Candiria - The Process of Self Development
    Some may not consider them math metal, I obviously do. They have other more polished albums in the same vein as this as well, maybe even better albums (300 percent density), but I'm going with The Process because it is hailed as the classic Candiria album. They belong on the list I think because of there use of jazz and time signatures. They are highly influenced by jazz, so much so that they have actual straight traditional jazz breaks in their songs. The song structure they used for a while was made up of "chapters" they did not have choruses or verses per say, they broke songs up into separate chapters. The transitions among these chapters are where the technical use of time signature and stop start changes appear most obvious. If all that going on wasn't enough they also blend in hip hop to the mix, again so much so that they have a straight hip hop song on here too. They have since gone on to become a much more pop oriented band.. it's disappointing to say the least.
    http://www.youtube.com/v/dgPQVNhBWMg...n_US&rel=0

    Psyopus - Our Puzzling Encounters Considered
    Perhaps the most technical out of all the bands on here. That statement says a lot! They pull out all the tricks as far as time signature usage goes, I cannot even fathom figuring it all out. The sweep picks on display don't even make sense when really thought about. This album is very tongue and cheek lyrically, but also smart about it. The vocals seem to be what holds many people back from enjoying them as much as they should. If you can get past the vocals, you will be rewarded with some of the most awe inspiring guitar acrobatics you will hear anywhere.
    http://www.youtube.com/v/OVkYybYfYZM...n_US&rel=0


    Meshuggah- Destroy Erase Improve
    Like Botch, Meshuggah are their own beast in many ways. They are considered math metal because of their incredible technical use of time signatures and polyrythms. To some the music just sounds strange and off, but you are unsure why. Meshuggah won't necessarily wow you off the bat like Calculating Infinity or Our Puzzling Encounters Considered. They are widely conspired one of the most technically proficient bands in metal. I prefer this album over the maybe more praised Chaosphere, perhaps mostly due to my love of the song posted. It is the perfect example of Meshuggah being amazing on all levels of heavy music. From those opening notes you just feel like you want to punch faces.. and the breakdown.. ohhh the breakdown... ok sorry to get off track.. but seriously.. it's the perfect breakdown!
    http://www.youtube.com/v/vOd-T58qHLA...n_US&rel=0

    Botch - We Are the Romans
    This band has a much different take on the math metal sound than many of the post Calculating Infinity bands listed here. Botch were very technical, using delay effects and atypical time signatures throughout the album to create complex aggressive music;however, they didn't start and stop and go off on sweeping tangents like most math metal bands. Botch had groove, and humor. They were also very adept at writing hooks, not a typical thing thrown around math metal circles. The lyrics and song titles much smarter than most people would think from this genre. The album has an overwhelmingly epic feel in scope and technicality. One of the most classic metal/hardcore releases, perhaps ever. Probably even more appreciated now than when it came out. When it's finished you feel as if you've been in a battle and indeed "Manned the Ramparts". They died so your band doesn't have to.
    http://www.youtube.com/v/cSOe89oWneQ...n_US&rel=0

    Dillinger Escape Plan - Calculating Infinity
    This album is the ultimate representation of "Math Metal" When the term is used one automatically thinks of and compares whatever they are talking about to this album. Calculating Infinity is the Sgt. Pepper of math metal. Other bands were making fast aggressive technical metal before this album, including Dillinger themselves but on this one it all came together perfectly. The jazz influences, sweep picking, the dissonant guitar sounds, the tongue in cheek yet intelligent and brutal lyrics, and of course the atypical time signatures and immediate start and stop shifts of songs. If you don't like this you do not like math metal.
    http://www.youtube.com/v/Xnv2r9AZucA...n_US&rel=0

    bonus clip.. they used to be the most insane band to see live.. ive heard its not the same anymore but even so.. if you have the chance go..
    http://www.youtube.com/v/r-lxwlgyhhA...n_US&rel=0
    Last edited by asundaysmile; 12-20-2010 at 05:03 PM.

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