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schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 06:09 PM
My new word? I haven't used it lately at all aside from describing Weekend.

Let's talk about this one for a bit. I know Jared and Patrick have also seen it and could provide some insight. But what exactly is it that gives this film any kind of merit? How is it not Godard at (from what I've seen so far) his most self-indulgent? For anyone that's seen it, what specifically did you get out of it?

You also called Redland pretentious, so again, evidence suggests that what you really mean is that the movie in question is masterful. Of all the complaints to level at either picture, I can't see how either registers as unimportant - Weekend in particular.

It's been nearly four years since I've seen it, but here's what I had to say about it then:


Now THAT is a fucking film! A road movie in the purest sense of the word, tirelessly pitting all the participants of conflict (man, society, God, nature, and himself) against each other, "Weekend" is one of the most blistering indictments of the progression of humanity ever committed to film. A materialistic and dually unfaithful couple hits the road to go visit the woman's dying (and very wealthy) father, and ends up on what can sincerely be described as the highway to hell. Surrounded by violence, chaos, and lunacy to the most extreme degree, they encounter a series of brutal auto wrecks, roadside bandits, militant liberal philosophers, and finally a cannibalistic militia.....Godard's disapproving eye catches the apocalypse in all its pending absurdity. The film is a glorious, experimental, anarchic mess, shot primarily in a series of lengthy dolly pans and consistently informed by Godard's trademark punk-rock narrative aesthetic. I'd only previously seen "Breathless" - which, for all its stylistic innovation, seemed more a triumph of form over content. This one, however, is a most harmonious marriage between the two.

Funny enough, Jared responded to this by recommending Time of the Wolf. I think you're right about yourself taking Godard the same way I've taken Haneke based on our respective short samples, but to me, Weekend was wildly enjoyable while being a serious expansion of my horizons. This is one I really need Criterion to trick out and make available for me to purchase.

Down Rodeo
06-20-2011, 06:13 PM
I'm really glad to hear you liked Au Hasard Balthazar, Gabe!

And on another topic, I really like Weekend but I had some major problems with it right after I saw it, too. Godard was really aggressive in putting all his intellectual pre-occupations on display in that one.

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 06:20 PM
an official trailer for Bellflower. FINALLY

kbZ4EtsjpYA

I can't fucking wait to see this....and I just realized that USC screening is only a week from today. The next couple of weeks are going to be crazy for me:

Wednesday - Attack the Block (LAFF)
Thursday - La Dolce Vita (Egyptian)
Friday - Entrance (LAFF)
Saturday - Another Earth / The Future (LAFF)
Monday - Bellflower (USC)
Tuesday - Ziggy Stardust / Velvet Goldmine (New Beverly)
Thursday - Pink Floyd THE WALL (Egyptian)

Plus I'd like to squeeze in Monte Hellman's Road to Nowhere somewhere in there...

TallGuyCM
06-20-2011, 06:24 PM
See, I'm not nearly at the point in my experience with film yet where I walk away from something and realize that the intent of it was to be a "blistering indictment on the progression of humanity." Heavy stuff like that flat out goes over my head.

wmgaretjax
06-20-2011, 09:09 PM
Haneke and Godard share a lot in common. Although I think Godard's recent stuff is far more difficult (and... if you must... "pretentious") than anything Haneke has done.

TallGuyCM
06-21-2011, 01:12 AM
Throughout Weekend, it was obvious that Godard was pointing out the emptiness of people obsessed with material possessions (a la the scene where the woman freaks out because the designer hand bag is being burned in the car crash), but any further criticism of humanity as a whole was lost on me.

TallGuyCM
06-21-2011, 01:16 AM
I finally got around to watching the Criterion Bluray of Malick's The New World tonight that I've had at home for over a month. To no surprise, this completed the trifecta (along with The Thin Red Line and Days of Heaven) of the most visually profound movie experiences I've had in a home setting. Completely astounding.

It's been a definite blessing in disguise that it had taken me this long to get around to watching Malick's films for the first time. Having seen them all in the past few months in the absolutely flawless Bluray format was just perfect.

Having said that, to this day the most jaw dropping visuals I've seen have been the beginning and end of Silent Light...

SoulDischarge
06-21-2011, 07:12 AM
I would never argue that Weekend isn't self-indulgent. I just don't see that as an automatic flaw. It's been years since I've seen it, but I was taken with its anarchic spirit and self deprecating humor. It seems to be making serious points, only to totally mock them the next second. When considering my opinion on film, you should always remember I'm extremely fond of fascinating messes and imaginative semi-failures. I should really re-watch Weekend.

As for Au Hasard Balthazar, I think that may be the single most boring film I've ever seen. After reading up on it, I kind of began to understand why it was so well regarded (especially Ebert's Great Movies write up), but I think I was just distracted by the simplicity of it. This happens a lot to me with great classic art films. I can appreciate what they're going for and the craftsmanship and etc., but a lot of times they don't connect on a personal level and sitting through them feels like teeth pulling. I think I'm just too restless for great movies any more, which is why I barely watch anything but TV on DVD. I bet when I'm 40, I'm going to see a major resurgence in my film addiction.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-21-2011, 07:26 PM
Oh man, Class of 1984 is such a wonderfully trashy critique of due process. It's 1/3 over the top after school special cautionary tale, 1/3 political satire, and 1/3 violent revenge film, filled to the brim with spectacularly evil punk rockers. Featuring an amazingly insane appearance by Roddy McDowell, a chubby young Michael J. Fox, and a ridiculous theme song by Alice Cooper. This movie is so good.

schoolofruckus
06-21-2011, 08:12 PM
I rewatched The Temptation of St. Tony last night. Everything I said back in October holds true - it's a truly awe-inspiring satire of human virtue based on Dante, turning the glacial, observant visual rhythms of Bela Tarr into a perfect vessel for bleak visual comedy. On Netflix now. Watch.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-21-2011, 09:37 PM
I've seen three films each by Bergman and Bresson, and there are alarming parallels between my reactions to the films I chose to see. The first film I saw by each (The Seventh Seal and Diary of a Country Priest) severely disappointed, due to what I perceived as a repellent Christian perspective and grossly stagey qualities in the acting and writing. The second by each (The Virgin Spring and Pickpocket) were better in those regards, but still somewhat underwhelming. However, I recently broke through the ceiling with Bergman on Persona, and in turn, with Bresson this afternoon on Au Hasard Balthazar.



Have you seen Bergman's Smiles of a Summer Night? Such a sweetly melancholic film. At times boisterously funny, at others arch and wry. Danger lurking beneath the froth and fizz. I haven't quite seen that sense of late summer ennui captured on film like this. It probably seems "light" next to some of his weightier films dealing with grand existential crises. If I'm remembering it correctly, the great stage director Hal Prince, when adapting the film for the stage said he wanted the whole play to have a feeling of whipped cream with razor blades and the original movie has that feeling for me as well.

buddy
06-22-2011, 02:39 AM
just saw The Red Shoes, and i can't say enough that's already been said before. the sequence of the the red shoes opera is one of the best i've seen. it's beautifully shot, and well executed, among the other elements which take place within the film. i now understand the praise it's been given by directors such as Scorsese, etc. it's a shame it took me this long to see it. fantastic film.

wmgaretjax
06-22-2011, 07:55 AM
I think you're right about yourself taking Godard the same way I've taken Haneke based on our respective short samples, but to me, Weekend was wildly enjoyable while being a serious expansion of my horizons.

I really struggle with the rampant tendency for people to dismiss intellectual or difficult cinema as pretentious or self-indulgent in a snap judgment (yes, I would characterize a single viewing of many of these kinds of films as snap). Folks like Haneke and Godard are incredibly honest in their desire to engage the audience on a very taxing level. There is no bait and switch at play that should take anyone by surprise. That said, is there really anything wrong with spending years of your life making a film and to then require an audience to watch it two or three times before getting a good grasp on it? I don't believe that Haneke or Godard are making films solely for themselves (on the contrary, they have frequently addressed the integral role the audience plays in the creation of their films). Similarly, "pretentious" has become a meaningless word that is all too frequently used to promote a kind of lowest common denominator populism. /rant not directed at anyone in particular

Miroir Noir
06-22-2011, 08:36 AM
Your point is especially timely since so much of the film critic intelligentsia is having this precise conversation right now due to the recent "cultural vegetables" piece published in The New York Times Magazine and some of the more dismissive responses aimed at The Tree of Life.

Weekend never clicked for me. From an aesthetic and historical standpoint, it may be the most important film that he ever made. Unquestionably, it was a turning point for his filmmaking; I think there's little doubt that he was absolutely serious with those final title cards at the end of the film. The problem for me is not so much that the film gets swallowed up in its own ideas and alienation effects, but more that those ideas just aren’t all that interesting forty years later. The politics and radicalism seem so dated and forced. For me, it pales next to something like Masculin, féminin.

wmgaretjax
06-22-2011, 08:43 AM
The problem for me is not so much that the film gets swallowed up in its own ideas and alienation effects, but more that those ideas just aren’t all that interesting forty years later. The politics and radicalism seem so dated and forced. For me, it pales next to something like Masculin, féminin.

I think this is where the interesting discussion begins. It is supremely difficult to make radically political films that are timeless... I will, I'm currently very busy, make an argument for Weekend being one of those films once I get a chance to watch it again.

I have spoken a lot about "4" (Chetyre) a lot before (watch it on Netflix). I believe it to be a perfect example of a film that is deeply entrenched in period-specific political issues that transcends... but... it's only 6 years old. So I might be wrong.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 08:56 AM
Well spoken.

Personally, I rarely use the word "pretentious" because I don't like the connotations that come with it - some of which you refer to, others being raised in this ridiculous "cultural vegetables" debate. I can fully accept that films like The White Ribbon may very well take a long marination period over multiple viewings in order to begin to make sense, which puts them at a series of disadvantages. I don't consider myself to be afflicted with the impatience that is so prevalent in a lot of contemporary film viewing culture, at least not in the sense that I'm incapable of enjoying a slow or difficult film. My personal obstruction is that I have such a lengthy list of important cinema that I have yet to experience that it's difficult for me to give that sort of attention to a film that doesn't dig its hooks in at least somewhat after one viewing. Watching Time of the Wolf and The White Ribbon, there were moments that I found compelling, but at no point was I closer to "must see this again" than "can't fucking wait for this to end". When I still have literally thousands of films on my list to see - including majority or complete filmographies from people like Dreyer, Ozu, Kurosawa, Herzog, Fellini, Kieslowski, etc. - it's difficult if not impossible to sign up for 2-3 viewings of even the films I treasure most.

That said - I also have a personal policy to not give up on difficult filmmakers after only a handful of films that haven't worked for me. I basically HATED The Seventh Seal, but I kept trying Bergman every now and then, which led me to Persona. I didn't care much for Robert Altman until I saw McCabe and Mrs. Miller. I'm sure at some point I will watch Cache and/or The Piano Teacher because I can't accept not understanding why Haneke is considered a genius by someone like you (not to mention many, many others).

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 08:57 AM
I think this is where the interesting discussion begins. It is supremely difficult to make radically political films that are timeless... I will, I'm currently very busy, make an argument for Weekend being one of those films once I get a chance to watch it again.

I have spoken a lot about "4" (Chetyre) a lot before (watch it on Netflix). I believe it to be a perfect example of a film that is deeply entrenched in period-specific political issues that transcends... but... it's only 6 years old. So I might be wrong.

That's funny - 4 is the next film coming to my house.

wmgaretjax
06-22-2011, 09:19 AM
My personal obstruction is that I have such a lengthy list of important cinema that I have yet to experience that it's difficult for me to give that sort of attention to a film that doesn't dig its hooks in at least somewhat after one viewing.

Ah... I suspect you and I will struggle with this until the day we die.

Also, I'm glad you liked Persona. If it was going to be any Bergman film, it would be that one.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 09:24 AM
When I still have literally thousands of films on my list to see - including majority or complete filmographies from ... Ozu

Godspeed.

TallGuyCM
06-22-2011, 09:33 AM
I really struggle with the rampant tendency for people to dismiss intellectual or difficult cinema as pretentious or self-indulgent in a snap judgment (yes, I would characterize a single viewing of many of these kinds of films as snap).

I don't like the overuse of the word "pretentious" either, but sometimes there's no better way to describe something. I mainly reserve it for a response to something that comes off as no less than completely masturbatory, which (be it right or wrong) is the very impression that Weekend and, yes, Redland left me with.

That said, I watched the original Funny Games last night and liked it better than the American remake. The two films are very similar scene for scene, with the main difference that I noticed (without giving anything away) was in the original there were these long, extended shots of grief after the first big tragedy that I found to be very effective. Somehow, the whole premise of the film is a bit easier to believe taking place in Germany than it is here, haha.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 09:34 AM
One of my obstacles with Ozu - who is in the "complete filmographies yet to explore" column - is that I don't know where I should start; the other filmmakers listed have at least one film apiece in my queue. The house is now taking recommendations.

TallGuyCM
06-22-2011, 09:38 AM
Don't know if this is the best recommendation, but Bill Hader had a top 10 list on Criterion's site a few months ago and he said that Good Morning is one of his favorite movies. Take that for what it's worth though.

SoulDischarge
06-22-2011, 09:38 AM
I try to avoid the pretentious criticism as well, but there's one film I think it fits 100%: Nadja.

SoulDischarge
06-22-2011, 09:39 AM
I always hear Tokyo Story for Ozu, but I've yet to watch it.

Miroir Noir
06-22-2011, 09:51 AM
Tokyo Story is the standard Ozu entry on all time top ten lists. Late Spring is a good choice as well.

wmgaretjax
06-22-2011, 09:56 AM
I vote for Good Morning. Tokyo Story is a natural recommendation as well.

Down Rodeo
06-22-2011, 11:00 AM
It's usually a good idea to start with the most well-regarded film in any director's filmography...so in that case, I think Tokyo Story is the most logical starting point. That and Late Spring are the only Ozu films I've seen though.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 11:27 AM
Trailer for Cronenberg's A Dangerous Method is out there now...
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PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 11:30 AM
Troubling.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 12:11 PM
Yeah, that does not look good at all. That trailer plus Keira Knightley - who's basically only ever in trash apart from Atonement - are serious reason for concern. But ultimately Cronenberg, the subject matter and the male actors are enough to get me in the door.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 12:34 PM
Yeah, that does not look good at all. That trailer plus Keira Knightley - who's basically only ever in trash apart from Atonement - are serious reason for concern. But ultimately Cronenberg, the subject matter and the male actors are enough to get me in the door.

I pretty much agree with all of this.

Miroir Noir
06-22-2011, 01:07 PM
It's probably worth considering that neither of the last two Cronenberg films ended up being nearly as conventional as their trailers and advertising made them out to be.

Vasoline Groove
06-22-2011, 01:29 PM
The trailer looks interesting enough to me. Its definitely a subject that I'm intrigued about but I didn't know who Cassel was supposed to be. I looked it up and he's supposed to be Otto Gross, who seemes like someone a great movie could be made about.

I just think the period music makes it seem like a cheesy version of a Merchant Ivory film.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 01:32 PM
It's probably worth considering that neither of the last two Cronenberg films ended up being nearly as conventional as their trailers and advertising made them out to be.

Definitely worth considering. I had a similar thought....

KungFuJoe
06-22-2011, 01:32 PM
None of you fuckers are going to catch Detective Dee or The Yellow Sea at LAFF this week?

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 01:52 PM
I should probably try both of those, but I have a really hard time making it to big action films under most circumstances (although one of the circumstances in which I relent is "the movie has Transformers in it").

I'm seeing Attack the Block tonight. I hate that most of the films that caught my eye on the LAFF guide are those that already have distribution, but that's just the way it happened.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 02:11 PM
Now that it's safe, did anyone see Sucker Punch? The connective tissue was rancid and bubbling but the fantasy action sequences were absolutely masterful. Someone needs to give Snyder a project about mute ninjas.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 02:18 PM
I just can't do that one. Snyder is ABSOLUTELY a filmmaker that I've decided I can't get behind.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 02:20 PM
Unfortunately I even found the action sequences boring. Sucker Punch even as a really dumb action movie was incredibly disappointing on every level for me.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 02:33 PM
I don't know how to be bored by giant samurai with gatling guns.

More importantly, the fight choreography was world-class.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 02:38 PM
The first fight sequence was indeed brilliant. I got bored because of the same video game like formula that was given to each subsequent action scene, punctuated by the laborious explanations of the quests before each one. they just got less and less exciting with each go-around. The scale of the zombie nazi fight was pretty great, and the dragon was top notch though. The whole thing just became too repetitive in the end for me.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 02:42 PM
I get that. It really was the first sequence that surprised me, easily the best choreographed and executed Western fight scene I've seen in years. It's a real shame Snyder apparently writes at a 4th grade level.

KungFuJoe
06-22-2011, 04:01 PM
I suppose I should rent Sucker Punch and give it a go. I just got Green Hornet in the mail. I wonder which is the better of the two?


In other news, I wish I was in NYC for the NYAFF yet again, if only to see ZU up on the big screen.

PzveuOoPpYg

TallGuyCM
06-22-2011, 04:32 PM
None of you fuckers are going to catch Detective Dee or The Yellow Sea at LAFF this week?

This is what I'm seeing in the next week or so:

6/23 - Another Earth - LAFF
6/25 - The Future - LAFF
6/25 - The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman - LAFF
6/27 - Bellflower - USC

I'd like to see one or two things on Friday at the fest as well, any recommendations?

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 04:45 PM
When do you people find time for drinking?

TallGuyCM
06-22-2011, 04:50 PM
I just can't do that one. Snyder is ABSOLUTELY a filmmaker that I've decided I can't get behind.

Are you sure? The guy that gave us Watchmen and then followed it up with THIS?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/8e/Legend_of_the_Guardians_Poster.jpg

Seriously, what the fuck was that? I literally laughed out loud every time I saw a billboard for it when I was driving around.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 04:59 PM
It was a children's film based on a critically acclaimed series of books. Dude's got kids.

MissingPerson
06-22-2011, 05:01 PM
They're going to grow up with really fucked up ideas about both women and men.

HandBanana
06-22-2011, 05:02 PM
Holy crap. I had no idea he did that owl thing.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 05:03 PM
The trailer with that 30 Seconds to Mars song was epic.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 05:07 PM
Holy shit, Zack Snyder has 7 kids

HandBanana
06-22-2011, 05:13 PM
It's not a popular viewpoint I know, but I actually really liked Watchmen even though I absolutely understand that it doesnt work.
But its an interesting failure (at least on some levels) to me.
I dont tend to watch it as a full film, instead dipping into it for a few scenes and just enjoying the sprawl of it all a bit. It's got an icy tone to it and an atmospheric quality that I enjoy and there's some really terrific set pieces in there. And some pretty bad ones too.

higgybaby23
06-22-2011, 05:29 PM
Just watched Man On Wire. Possibly the most inspirational film I've ever seen.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 06:23 PM
This Attack the Block screening is nuts. It's not packed yet, bit the energy in and around this place is as feverish as anything I've seen in 6+ years of doing LAFF or AFI. That includes the Fountain premiere and that first-anywhere screening of The Fighter.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 06:28 PM
When do you people find time for drinking?

When we're not watching Sucker Punch.

Miroir Noir
06-22-2011, 07:38 PM
I spent probably 90% of The Watchmen wanting more Nixon. Yep, that's the kinda person I am -- boobs and explosions everywhere, and I am jonesing for more screen time for the fucking Nixon caricature.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 07:50 PM
When we're not watching Sucker Punch.

Oh, the accuralarity.

TallGuyCM
06-23-2011, 02:01 AM
It's not a popular viewpoint I know, but I actually really liked Watchmen even though I absolutely understand that it doesnt work.
But its an interesting failure (at least on some levels) to me.
I dont tend to watch it as a full film, instead dipping into it for a few scenes and just enjoying the sprawl of it all a bit. It's got an icy tone to it and an atmospheric quality that I enjoy and there's some really terrific set pieces in there. And some pretty bad ones too.

And it also has the worst and most tasteless use of music I've ever seen in a film.

schoolofruckus
06-23-2011, 07:28 AM
Attack the Block kicked a lot of ass. Like the films Edgar Wright has directed (he's an executive producer on this one), it's exactly the kind of conventional genre cinema that works for me - clever, character-driven, and deft at using formula to play with and against expectations. This movie follows a gang of South London teenagers whose otherwise normal night of robbing and causing mischief is interrupted by an alien invasion that seems to be targeted directly at them. The acting is fantastic, and one of the film's biggest strengths is that it allows the kids to feel both genuinely dangerous and genuinely teenaged at the same time. It's entertainment of the highest and purest form.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 07:38 AM
And it also has the worst and most tasteless use of music I've ever seen in a film.

Oh don't worry, the use of music in Sucker Punch was much worse.

HandBanana
06-23-2011, 07:44 AM
Yeah, Snyder has a hard time grasping much outside of the purely visual (he doesnt seem to understand subtext, nuanced characterization even in it's most overt ways, leaden music cues, etc) but theres something fascinating about the mess that is the Watchmen movie. Maybe it's just the source material showing through, but its such an odd animal. Particularly for a Big Hwood Blockbuster style film.

Grandma
06-23-2011, 08:07 AM
NO GODDAMNIT...

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/50125

schoolofruckus
06-23-2011, 08:08 AM
Oh don't worry, the use of music in Sucker Punch was much worse.

Unless "Hallelujah" is playing while the orderlies rape the little girls, I have to declare this impossible.

schoolofruckus
06-23-2011, 08:10 AM
NO GODDAMNIT...

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/50125

I can't wait until Jared weighs in on this...

garynvegas
06-23-2011, 08:25 AM
NO GODDAMNIT...

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/50125

I had the same thought when I read this last night. I was really hoping that Elba would get it.

HandBanana
06-23-2011, 08:29 AM
I love Elba and would have loved to see him take the role, but I think for a Tarantino flick this is probably a better fit in his usual odd cultural-pastiche aesthetic.
Tarantino knows what he's doing.

PotVsKtl
06-23-2011, 08:30 AM
Wait, what? I heard Tarantino was doing a Django film and assumed it was going to be a spaghetti Western. What's this slave bullshit?

wmgaretjax
06-23-2011, 08:44 AM
I can't wait until Jared weighs in on this...

huh... i have not liked a single film with him in it... but I guess I can kind of see it working... if anyone can do it, it'd be tarantino.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 08:46 AM
Unless "Hallelujah" is playing while the orderlies rape the little girls, I have to declare this impossible.

A really terrible cover of Where Is My Mind during a montage in which a character is going crazy and subsequently being admitted into an insane asylum is pretty high up there

PotVsKtl
06-23-2011, 08:50 AM
The music choices in Sucker Punch were absolutely abyssmal and, as noted, completely literal. Seriously, Snyder has got to be at least 2/3rds mentally retarded.

schoolofruckus
06-23-2011, 08:52 AM
Wait, what? I heard Tarantino was doing a Django film and assumed it was going to be a spaghetti Western. What's this slave bullshit?

It's basically a spaghetti Western that takes place in the world of slavery. Instead of a "Western", he's calling it a "Southern".


huh... i have not liked a single film with him in it... but I guess I can kind of see it working... if anyone can do it, it'd be tarantino.

I've liked a few films he's been in and I thought he was particularly good in Collateral. But this should definitely be his shining moment. I was reluctantly on board with the Will Smith idea, but this is much better to me.

I'm not reading Django in advance, but everything I've seen suggests that Idris Elba is far too physically imposing to make sense in the role.


A really terrible cover of Where Is My Mind during a montage in which a character is going crazy and subsequently being admitted into an insane asylum is pretty high up there

I stand corrected. I don't know if that's "worse", but I can wholly agree that it's comparably retarded.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 09:53 AM
Blaring white rabbit during one of the hallucination battle scenes was up there too.

M Sparks
06-23-2011, 12:06 PM
NO GODDAMNIT...

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/50125

Ugh.

Sleepingrock
06-23-2011, 02:49 PM
I just watched Bananas, and I think it is one of the first Woody Allen film's I have watched. Are all of his productions in the same style, and where should I start (Annie Hall?). He is quite a quirky fellow.

SoulDischarge
06-23-2011, 03:05 PM
All of his films before Annie Hall are goofy comedies in the same vein as Bananas. Then he started splitting his time between more serious comedy/dramas and trying to imitate Ingmar Bergman. Some time in the 90s he went back to doing trivial comedies, but they aren't as good as his early ones for the most part. Annie Hall is a great place to start.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 03:29 PM
Woodie Allen has a LOT of movies. I think I've seen nearly 30 of them and that's like half?

If you like Bananas, also check these out:
Sleeper
Love And Death
Zelig

And then after you've seen Annie Hall, which is must see, definitely check out:
Crimes & Misdemeanors
Deconstructing Harry
Play It Again, Sam
Hannah And Her Sisters
Bullets Over Broadway
Mighty Aphrodite
Radio Days
Sweet & Lowdown

TallGuyCM
06-23-2011, 03:41 PM
No Manhattan recommendation?

KungFuJoe
06-23-2011, 03:54 PM
This is what I'm seeing in the next week or so:

6/23 - Another Earth - LAFF
6/25 - The Future - LAFF
6/25 - The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman - LAFF
6/27 - Bellflower - USC

I'd like to see one or two things on Friday at the fest as well, any recommendations?

Sorry, not sure what would be good on Friday. Hope Another Earth is worth missing the awesomeness that will be the Detective Dee screening tonight at the Ford.

Also, psyched for Attack the Block even more so now that it seems to live up to the hype.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 06:30 PM
No Manhattan recommendation?

You know what, I forgot about Manhattan, that's a great one. Husbands & Wives would go on my list too.

TallGuyCM
06-24-2011, 01:11 AM
I really liked Another Earth tonight at LAFF. It didn't try to hide the fact that it didn't have the biggest budget, and the way it was shot was almost amateurish. But Brit Marling's performance was outstanding, and with the whole sci-fi story as an almost subplot the main focus of the film was the relationship between Marling and the man whose family she killed in a car accident.

I found the film to be very captivating, the music was really good, and overall it left me feeling very satisfied.

Premium Roast
06-24-2011, 05:21 AM
last two Allen movies I've seen have been pants. Do not recommend 'Stardust Memories', or 'Sleeper', which indeed is sleep inducing. May try tonight for 'Midnight in Paris' at the Santa Ana Regency 3.

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 06:57 AM
I had to kill some time in the Valley last night, and after seeing Attack the Block, I figured this was as good a time as any to check out Super 8. The two movies have a lot of similarities - each one is about a group of teenagers faced with the invasion of an "other" that threatens their tight-knit community - and pleasantly, they also have a lot of the same strengths. In its own Middle American way, Super 8 excels at creating believable, compelling and often touching relationships among its central adolescents - an always difficult feat, and one that makes this film worth seeing. As for the creature elements....there are some nice set pieces here (even the absurd train wreck is not without its thrills), but it's mostly silly and routine, lacking not only the sense of danger that Attack the Block expertly provided, but also the imagination (both in creature design and their characterization). It's very puzzling to me how a major Hollywood blockbuster (which, despite its modest $45 million budget, this certainly is) would match its low budget counterpart on all the intangible human qualities while falling short in the area where it should have some significant financial advantage: the ability to inspire unabashed awe.

In other words, Super 8 is a complete failure as a Spielberg homage, but as a result, it's a very fine movie. Although JJ Abrams needs to fuck off with the lens flare already.

canexplain
06-24-2011, 07:06 AM
I had to kill some time in the Valley last night, and after seeing Attack the Block, I figured this was as good a time as any to check out Super 8. The two movies have a lot of similarities - each one is about a group of teenagers faced with the invasion of an "other" that threatens their tight-knit community - and pleasantly, they also have a lot of the same strengths. In its own Middle American way, Super 8 excels at creating believable, compelling and often touching relationships among its central adolescents - an always difficult feat, and one that makes this film worth seeing. As for the creature elements....there are some nice set pieces here (even the absurd train wreck is not without its thrills), but it's mostly silly and routine, lacking not only the sense of danger that Attack the Block expertly provided, but also the imagination (both in creature design and their characterization). It's very puzzling to me how a major Hollywood blockbuster (which, despite its modest $45 million budget, this certainly is) would match its low budget counterpart on all the intangible human qualities while falling short in the area where it should have some significant financial advantage: the ability to inspire unabashed awe.

In other words, Super 8 is a complete failure as a Spielberg homage, but as a result, it's a very fine movie. Although JJ Abrams needs to fuck off with the lens flare already.


In a review I read of the movie it stated that: "8 MM is an old technology for making films.” Do younger people really not know what 8 MM is? I am thinking they do but who knows. Cr****

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 08:19 AM
last two Allen movies I've seen have been pants. Do not recommend 'Stardust Memories', or 'Sleeper', which indeed is sleep inducing. May try tonight for 'Midnight in Paris' at the Santa Ana Regency 3.

I can't even remember anything about Stardust Memories so I agree with you there, but Sleeper is pretty damn funny. I'm not nearly as much of a fan of Allen's slap sticky stuff, but this one has some pretty high points. It's really goofy though.

Miroir Noir
06-24-2011, 08:50 AM
I liked Stardust Memories; it was way more effective than some of his other "remake on a masterpiece from the arthouse canon" films. Crimes and Misdemeanors and Hannah and Her Sisters are my two personal favorites.

amyzzz
06-24-2011, 08:51 AM
I Although JJ Abrams needs to fuck off with the lens flare already.
What the fuck is up with that? It's just annoying.

HandBanana
06-24-2011, 08:56 AM
I thought the preponderance of lens flare in Star Trek was an aesthetic choice. Ya know: shiny, future, all that.

But it rarely made sense in Super 8. Why would a dirt hill at 3am cause a lens flare to occur?

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 09:15 AM
It was a story choice in Super 8, heralding the presence of the alien anytime it was near. That doesn't mean it's not lame and irritating.

amyzzz
06-24-2011, 09:16 AM
I remember being annoyed by it in Star Trek as well.

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 09:47 AM
It was annoying in Star Trek as well. It was an aesthetic choice, but one used to attempt a "cinematic" quality that was otherwise lacking in the TV-level compositions and action sequences. Part of why I responded positively to Super 8 is that it at least looked like a movie.

Miroir Noir
06-24-2011, 09:49 AM
Whenever I see lens flares, I automatically think of Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda.

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 09:57 AM
I usually think of Apocalypse Now. Between yours and my examples, we've clearly demonstrated that lens flare is not inherently objectionable. It's just bad when it's the only noteworthy element of a shot.

PotVsKtl
06-24-2011, 09:58 AM
In a review I read of the movie it stated that: "8 MM is an old technology for making films.” Do younger people really not know what 8 MM is? I am thinking they do but who knows. Cr****

No, they do not. They have absolutely no reason to possess this knowledge.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 09:59 AM
Everything i know about 8MM comes form the film of the same name.

SoulDischarge
06-24-2011, 10:20 AM
There is nothing wrong with Stardust Memories. Shut up.

M Sparks
06-24-2011, 10:36 AM
Seriously, no one mentioned Take The Money And Run in a discussion of early Woody movies? Admittedly, I haven't seen it in ages, but that was my gateway movie.

Also, it's incredibly stupid and dated, but there are some hilarious segments in Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex

Drinky hit most of the best later stuff, but Small Time Crooks was good fun.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 10:36 AM
There are still a good 30 Woody Allen movies I need to see.

Miroir Noir
06-24-2011, 11:38 AM
No refunds (http://www.theawl.com/2011/06/the-tree-of-life-no-refunds-sign)

amyzzz
06-24-2011, 11:39 AM
HAHAHA That's awesome. About 20 people walked out of the show I saw.

PotVsKtl
06-24-2011, 11:48 AM
This movie. This great evil. Where does it come from? How'd it steal into the world? What seed, what root did it grow from? Who's doin' this? Who's killin' us? Robbing us of life and light. Mockin' us with the sight of what we might've known. Does our ruin benefit the earth? Does it help the grass to grow, the sun to shine? Is this darkness in you, too? Have you passed to this night?
No refunds.
...

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 12:32 PM
8X_Ot0k4XJc

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-24-2011, 12:54 PM
Woodie Allen has a LOT of movies. I think I've seen nearly 30 of them and that's like half?

If you like Bananas, also check these out:
Sleeper
Love And Death
Zelig

And then after you've seen Annie Hall, which is must see, definitely check out:
Crimes & Misdemeanors
Deconstructing Harry
Play It Again, Sam
Hannah And Her Sisters
Bullets Over Broadway
Mighty Aphrodite
Radio Days
Sweet & Lowdown

These are great recommendations. In addition to MSparks' suggestion of Small Time Crooks (one of his flat out funniest films), I would add...

The Purpose Rose of Cairo (skip his new film and see this instead; much better nostalgia trip)
Manhattan Murder Mystery (a great mix of madcap and cerebral Woody)
Scoop (possibly the last film he'll play a major role in and great fun despite the mixed reviews)
Alice (my favorite Allen film, though most people consider it to be a minor work. His final film with Mia Farrow. Everything in this film just glows. It's whimsical, funny, sweet and melancholy. Just pure magic.)



There is nothing wrong with Stardust Memories. Shut up.

I love Allen, but this one leaves me flat as well.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 01:21 PM
Wow, I highly disliked Alice and Scoop did nothing for me. Manhattan Murder Mystery is fun, but it's problematic. Purple Rose is very high on my must-see list.

If you want to watch something interesting (not necessarily good), probably one of Allen's most minor works is Anything Else
http://l.yimg.com/eb/ymv/us/img/hv/allposters/34/1808406634p.jpg

Not only is it a by-the-number regurgitation of things Allen had done before, it's almost bewildering watching Biggs and Ricci stumble through the dialogue. In retrospect, I enjoy it mostly on that aspect alone. When Allen casts somebody else to play himself (in this case Biggs) and himself as a supporting character, it's generally zanier than his normal roles, so that's a bit fun too.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-24-2011, 01:38 PM
Wow, I highly disliked Alice and Scoop did nothing for me.
Yeah, I sometimes think I'm the only person in the world who adores Alice. It feels like a valentine to Farrow and to Manhattan, but not as explicitly as Annie Hall or Manhattan are. Scoop is a minor film to be sure, but I laughed heartily throughout.


Manhattan Murder Mystery is fun, but it's problematic.
Well, sure. This could be said of many of his films, though. I still think that when it comes to Woody, if the "fun" outweighs the "problematic" it's worth it.



Purple Rose is very high on my must-see list.
Such a lovely film. Can't wait for your review!


Oh, and? Slamming Alice but recommending Anything Else? Really? I know that was a qualified recommendation, but still. That film is just odious.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 01:41 PM
Well yeah, hahaha, Anything Else is terrible, but it's worth a watch for hardcore Allen fans as a curiosity alone.

I went into Alice really wanting to like it and found it really difficult to sit through

Vasoline Groove
06-24-2011, 01:46 PM
HAHAHA That's awesome. About 20 people walked out of the show I saw.

Thats hilarious. The couple right in front of us and the guy next to us left in the middle of the movie. I thought it was a great movie but maybe a little too long. The creation of the earth scenes were magnificent though. I think I want to buy it on blu-ray just so I can rewatch those scenes over and over and supply my own soundtrack.

buddy
06-24-2011, 01:51 PM
looking at Allen's body of work it's amazing how much quality stuff he's done, and still does, such as Midnight In Paris. just the fact that there's so many different recommendations says a lot.

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 01:52 PM
Thats hilarious. The couple right in front of us and the guy next to us left in the middle of the movie. I thought it was a great movie but maybe a little too long. The creation of the earth scenes were magnificent though. I think I want to buy it on blu-ray just so I can rewatch those scenes over and over and supply my own soundtrack.


You could just play these videos (http://nyerges.com/video/) - Autumnal was actually sampled by Malick during that sequence - and do the same thing. Or if you need a BluRay, the Stan Brakhage anthology from Criterion would probably do the trick.

Grandma
06-24-2011, 01:58 PM
I refuse to give my money to ANY theater that doesn't grant me the choice of a refund due to a bad show

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-24-2011, 02:00 PM
looking at Allen's body of work it's amazing how much quality stuff he's done, and still does, such as Midnight In Paris. just the fact that there's so many different recommendations says a lot.

So true. He's ridiculously prolific which isn't to say that he hasn't released his fair share of sub-par work. Drinkey's list reminded me about Deconstructing Harry which I don't think I've seen since the late 90s. That film is just tremendous fun. Woody got crazy with the "experimental" editing on that one too. I love that he was still willing to try new things in the autumn of his life.

You ended up enjoying Midnight in Paris, right? I really wanted to like that one, but beyond a decent Owen Wilson and a luminous Marion Cottillard (like, seriously, how gorgeous was she in that film?), I thought it had little else to recommend it.

buddy
06-24-2011, 02:10 PM
yeah, i wrote a response to it, and you awhile back. where i explained my thoughts, etc., but i'll just say i enjoyed it for much more than just wilson and cotillard, and you're right she is gorgeous.

Miroir Noir
06-24-2011, 02:21 PM
I refuse to give my money to ANY theater that doesn't grant me the choice of a refund due to a bad show

I don't understand this mentality. They should refund you if there is a technical problem that disrupts or ruins the show, but why is the theatre liable to you in the event that you simply didn't like the movie?

atom heart
06-24-2011, 02:26 PM
Zack Snyder is directing the new Superman movie. Patently uninteresting combination.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 02:27 PM
I don't understand this mentality. They should refund you if there is a technical problem that disrupts or ruins the show, but why is the theatre liable to you in the event that you simply didn't like the movie?

Yeah, that is outright dumb. the theater had nothing to do with your decision to purchase the ticket to that movie.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 02:28 PM
Zack Snyder is directing the new Superman movie. Patently uninteresting combination.

Old news, but yeah. There's been a lot of bizarre casting announcements trickling out.

HandBanana
06-24-2011, 02:32 PM
Yeah, that is outright dumb. the theater had nothing to do with your decision to purchase the ticket to that movie.

There was an adorable elderly couple behind us at our screening and the old man was explaining things to the old woman from time to time.

Somewhere around the middle he plainly said to her "I just have no idea whats going on"

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-24-2011, 02:42 PM
Ha! Same thing happened at the Arclight, but our old couple just got up and left about 1/3 of the way through.

TallGuyCM
06-24-2011, 02:43 PM
You could hear a fucking pin drop at our showing on opening night, the most polite crowd I've been around in a long time at the most important time.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 02:44 PM
I used to go see a lot of artsy fartsy films at a Laemmle's theater In Pasadena down here and for some reason the majority of the audiences for these films were 60+ and there were usually at least a dozen of them chattering incessantly throughout the movies. It caused me to pretty much just wait to see most independent movies on dvd.

Vasoline Groove
06-24-2011, 03:06 PM
You could just play these videos (http://nyerges.com/video/) - Autumnal was actually sampled by Malick during that sequence - and do the same thing. Or if you need a BluRay, the Stan Brakhage anthology from Criterion would probably do the trick.

Cool. Thats some good stuff.

I'm always looking for something visual to put on the screen when I'm listening to music. Just added the Brakhage anthology to the queue.

Grandma
06-24-2011, 03:18 PM
I don't understand this mentality. They should refund you if there is a technical problem that disrupts or ruins the show, but why is the theatre liable to you in the event that you simply didn't like the movie?

This is what I was referring to. If the film itself is beyond the pale shit, you should've known better beforehand. If the showing is ruined because of a technical malfeasance, some dipshit parent decides to bring their kids because they couldn't find babysitting or theres some loudmouth jackass/jackasses who decide to play commentator, i will demand a refund before investing anymore of my time. The way alot of these smaller theaters word that rule makes it appear very general which is what I don't agree with.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 03:21 PM
Oh yes, by all means you should be able to get a refund if your experience is impaired.

Premium Roast
06-24-2011, 04:34 PM
'Crooks' is really funny and recommended, but the real question of interest to certain folks is whether Allen is a good lover. Someone told me "I bet he is a tiger in bed", but I can't see it....he's too small. I wouldn't want to fuck him.

MissingPerson
06-24-2011, 04:58 PM
If the showing is ruined because of a technical malfeasance, some dipshit parent decides to bring their kids because they couldn't find babysitting or theres some loudmouth jackass/jackasses who decide to play commentator, i will demand a refund

Hold on. The theatre is not responsible for this kind of disruption - why should they be financially liable?

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 05:14 PM
Hold on. The theatre is not responsible for this kind of disruption - why should they be financially liable?

They have some responsibility to enforce a policy that prohibits it. If you report a disruptive audience member (doesn't matter whether it's talky kids or someone who thinks it's okay to text) and the theater doesn't do anything about it, then you're being deprived of what you paid for. Theaters run those "don't be an asshole" ads before each film for a reason.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-25-2011, 09:20 AM
My girlfriend and I saw Super 8 last night and we both LOVED it! I totally fell in love with all of those kids! I want to watch more of their non-alien fighting adventures. Seeing the final version of their own film during the credits was a real treat as well.

I do agree about lens flares...while it usually doesn't bother me a ton, it was outright distracting this time.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 09:55 AM
Nice...now make sure you see Attack the Block when it lands in July.

Jen and I watched Contact for the first time in 6 years last night. I'm going to say that not only is it on my shortlist of favorite movies, but it's maybe the boldest Hollywood film of the past several decades. Warner Bros. released some really risky fare in the 70s (The Devils, Performance, A Clockwork Orange), but Contact is a whole other type of risk - a big summer alien film from a director coming off of the Oscars and box office of Forrest Gump that essentially seeks the common ground between secular science and religious faith. It's every bit as high-reaching as The Tree of Life, and just as successful.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-25-2011, 09:56 AM
I don't think I've seen Contact since it was in the theater! I liked it then, but it would probably mean a lot more to me now...how old was I even when that came out, 14, 15?

EDIT: I was 15 - wow, can't believe that movie came out that long ago

wmgaretjax
06-25-2011, 10:11 AM
i think Contact is a good film. but it still leans heavily on hollywood story telling techniques (and mediocre acting from a ton of the supporting cast) that make it much less effective than it could have been.

obzen
06-25-2011, 10:19 AM
Contact is one of my favorite films, I didn't think anyone even remembered that flick.







The very beginning of the film is pretty neat.

SoulDischarge
06-25-2011, 10:36 AM
I never saw it, I always just figured it was straight out trash. I'll have to check it out some time.

All this talk about Woody Allen made me realize I hadn't seen some of his most loved films, so I watched Hannah & Her Sisters. It was pretty charming all around, although I definitely feel like it was nothing he hadn't covered before. The stuff with Michael Caine didn't completely work for me, probably because of the florid dialogue and I felt like there was a little bit of male fantasy wish fulfillment in how quick the affair happened, but everything else was great. It doesn't get much better than Allen trying to convert to Catholicism.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 10:42 AM
i think Contact is a good film. but it still leans heavily on hollywood story telling techniques (and mediocre acting from a ton of the supporting cast) that make it much less effective than it could have been.

The conventional aspects actually make me like it more. Specifically, I like seeing that this view of the universe - and this truly curious approach to science fiction - can exist in a decidedly mainstream movie.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 03:58 PM
Another Earth was a source of major ambivalence for me. The premise was fantastic, the film builds a terrifically chilly atmosphere (courtesy of some strong underlit photography and the portions of the score that are electronic), and I thought the ending was satisfying in the scope of the film's limited financial resources. But some of the execution is just terrible; Brit Marling's performance is decent, but every other actor in the film is somewhere between "incompetent" and "contemptibly incompetent". Marling's script is another major issue - there are some quality moments, but in addition to an abundance of awkward dialogue, there's a choice made in the film's central relationship that I found egregiously absurd, and severely undercutting whatever emotional inertia the film had fought so hard to build.

This is definitely worth checking out, but I can't help but feel disappointed.

wmgaretjax
06-25-2011, 04:33 PM
The conventional aspects actually make me like it more. Specifically, I like seeing that this view of the universe - and this truly curious approach to science fiction - can exist in a decidedly mainstream movie.

I guess... It's heartening in a way... but it feels like a lost opportunity. It's easy to imagine the film being as brilliant as Solaris at moments...

JebusLives
06-25-2011, 05:02 PM
Jen and I watched Contact for the first time in 6 years last night. I'm going to say that not only is it on my shortlist of favorite movies, but it's maybe the boldest Hollywood film of the past several decades. Warner Bros. released some really risky fare in the 70s (The Devils, Performance, A Clockwork Orange), but Contact is a whole other type of risk - a big summer alien film from a director coming off of the Oscars and box office of Forrest Gump that essentially seeks the common ground between secular science and religious faith. It's every bit as high-reaching as The Tree of Life, and just as successful.

Thing is, the book was much more about finding religious beauty within science. Carl Sagan was of course an atheist, but in my mind the best at evoking a sense of wonder from mundane reality. The ending was also a total cop-out... book had a much more satisfying conclusion, albeit a math-y one. Hollywood still did a good job with it, but it wasn't as daring as I'd hoped. Having said that, today it would never even get made.

Far as good hard-science movies, the only one i've seen recently that was any good was Moon.

sbessiso
06-25-2011, 05:05 PM
Zack Snyder is directing the new Superman movie. Patently uninteresting combination.

I weep for Kal-El.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 05:22 PM
Thing is, the book was much more about finding religious beauty within science. Carl Sagan was of course an atheist, but in my mind the best at evoking a sense of wonder from mundane reality. The ending was also a total cop-out... book had a much more satisfying conclusion, albeit a math-y one. Hollywood still did a good job with it, but it wasn't as daring as I'd hoped. Having said that, today it would never even get made.

Far as good hard-science movies, the only one i've seen recently that was any good was Moon.

See, I don't think Moon is all that advanced in terms of it's science. It's about cloning, but there's really no exploration of it - it's just a guy dealing with his personal reality.

JebusLives
06-25-2011, 05:49 PM
Yeah, it wasn't about science so much, but there was good science behind the story (Helium-3 harvesting, communications issues, cloning). I'm sick of future fantasy stories being mis-defined as science fiction. Ideally good science provides a foundation for a possibly non-science related story. 2001 is still the most accurate science fiction movie made, IMO, but the story itself is about the human race coming of age.

Contact is almost unique in that its a science fiction story actually about science.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 09:32 PM
Coincidentally to all the recent Woody Allen chatter here, we just watched Whatever Works. Woody's another filmmaker on whom I have a long way to go (I'd only seen Annie Hall and Match Point previously), and while I doubt Whatever Works would end up on anyone's list of his best work, there are few things that make me happier than watching Larry David be an asshole.

SoulDischarge
06-25-2011, 09:59 PM
Whoa. Get on some of those films suggested earlier. His work is an absolute delight to watch.

schoolofruckus
06-26-2011, 07:37 AM
We went and added a half dozen of his films to our queues when it was over.

TallGuyCM
06-26-2011, 08:37 AM
Miranda July's The Future is one of the oddest things I've ever seen. I wasn't at all familiar with her or her work going into it, but the things the characters talked about were completely nonsensical. I had gotten excessively drunk the night before, so my brain wasn't really firing on all cylinders as it was, and seeing this in that state was kind of perfect.

wmgaretjax
06-26-2011, 08:39 AM
Love love love Miranda July.

schoolofruckus
06-26-2011, 08:51 AM
We were also hungover for the afternoon screening of Another Earth and didn't feel like hanging out another two hours waiting for The Future to start. It'll be out here in early August; Cinefamily is also doing some tribute to her on July 26th, and I can't imagine the new film won't be included.

Chris, she's only done one other feature so far - Me and You and Everyone We Know. It's pretty fucking quirky, so the fact that I'm recommending it should tell you how much I dug it.

TallGuyCM
06-26-2011, 09:07 AM
Yeah, I plan on checking that out soon. She did a Q & A afterwards where people asked about that, her artistic process, why it took her so long to make another film, etc. Oh, and she has the most amazingly deep blue eyes ever. She was standing near the exit on the way out and I got an up close look. :D

Down Rodeo
06-26-2011, 11:56 AM
So I finally saw Tree of Life yesterday...I thought it was utterly magnificent and beautifully affirmed my worldview. It kept me glued to the screen throughout - I literally don't think I moved in my seat for the entire first 1/3 of the movie. I can't say any more that hasn't already been said on this board, so I'll just leave it at that.

Also, in talking with some of my friends afterwards, one of them told me "You know, it really wasn't as good as I expected. I feel like the same material was done much better in The Fountain." I immediately thought of Gabe :)

AlecEiffel
06-26-2011, 01:01 PM
I watched Me And You And Everyone We Know this morning based on the talk in this thread. I'm not sure how I feel about it yet, it wasn't terrible by any means but I thought the quirk was a bit too much sometimes, particularly from July's character. The youngest kid was fantastic, though. I could have watched hours of just that kid being a kid doing kid stuff.

TallGuyCM
06-26-2011, 01:15 PM
it wasn't terrible by any means but I thought the quirk was a bit too much sometimes, particularly from July's character.

This is exactly how I felt about her character in The Future and the film as a whole.

Down Rodeo
06-27-2011, 12:08 AM
Finally watched Another Year tonight. Mike Leigh can basically do no wrong. If there's a director out there that creates more compelling characters, I defy anyone to name him.

wmgaretjax
06-27-2011, 06:48 AM
I thought the quirk was a bit too much sometimes, particularly from July's character.

It's not a character. It's just her.

schoolofruckus
06-27-2011, 08:00 AM
Finally watched Another Year tonight. Mike Leigh can basically do no wrong. If there's a director out there that creates more compelling characters, I defy anyone to name him.

Sweet. I have this one waiting at home.

I watched a few movies yesterday...

King Kong - About 6 years after watching Peter Jackson's remake, I finally caught up with the original. There's a mandatory level of respect that must be paid to the vision behind this movie - and the conception of one of the earliest iconic characters that originated in cinema - but otherwise, it's difficult to look at this as anything more than an artifact. The human characters in this are as much of a drag as they were in the 2005 version, and the action scenes were, for obvious reasons, wildly inferior to what WETA delivered. It's my hope to someday see a rampaging gorilla movie that I can love without qualifications, but that day is nowhere in sight.

Un Chien Andalou - I'd been meaning to catch this in full since visiting the Dali exhibit at LACMA four years ago, and I only recently realized that it was short enough to watch on Netflix Instant any time I felt like it. Well, yesterday I felt like it....I haven't much profound analysis to add, but it is one HELL of a nightmare, and an obvious influence (perhaps THE obvious influence) on Lynch, Jodorowsky, Gilliam and basically every other filmmaker who makes films based in dream logic.

A Child Is Waiting - In trying to complete my Cassavetes filmography, I went into this (one of his three gun-for-hire films as a director) expecting very little. It stars Burt Lancaster as the head doctor of a school for mentally-challenged children, with Judy Garland as the new teacher who defies his methods by forging a personal relationship with a young autistic boy whose parents have essentially abandoned him. Apart from some decidedly un-Cassavetes flourishes of melodrama, it was quite a bit better than I expected. It's my understanding that neither Cassavetes nor producer Stanley Kramer were particularly fond of the way the film eventually turned out, as their visions of what and how the film intended to express were quite different - Kramer felt the film should advocate the confinement of special needs children to schools that are specialized in developing them, and thus shielding them from taunting from other children who don't understand them; Cassavetes, in typical fashion, wanted to express that such children have nothing wrong with them and are, in fact, often in better shape than people who would be considered "normal". Despite the occasional false note, the evident clash between these viewpoints produced a film that is much more complex and empathetic than it very easily could have been. Lancaster is great, as is Gena Rowlands as the central child's absent mother.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-27-2011, 08:55 AM
Complete the trilogy and watch the '70s version of King Kong with bearded Jeff Bridges. Parts of it are so awful it's hard not to laugh out loud. It's bizarre to me how nostalgic people get about that movie.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-27-2011, 09:00 AM
Oh yeah, I wanted to mention seeing the trailer for the new Twilight movie before Super 8 the other night...that was seriously one of the most ridiculous things I have ever seen. the entire theater was laughing throughout it.

HandBanana
06-27-2011, 09:02 AM
Checked out Contact last night based on this thread and was somewhat taken aback at how good it was. I avoided it for 14 years thinking it was gonna be on some Independence Day shit. Not a perfect film, but a pretty solid one and way better than my initial assumptions would have made it out to be.
It also reminded me how great an actress Foster can be when she's making actressing.

Miroir Noir
06-27-2011, 09:05 AM
and an obvious influence (perhaps THE obvious influence) on Lynch, Jodorowsky, Gilliam and basically every other filmmaker who makes films based in dream logic.
And Frank Black!

daxton
06-27-2011, 09:20 AM
Un Chien Andalou - I'd been meaning to catch this in full since visiting the Dali exhibit at LACMA four years ago, and I only recently realized that it was short enough to watch on Netflix Instant any time I felt like it. Well, yesterday I felt like it....I haven't much profound analysis to add, but it is one HELL of a nightmare, and an obvious influence (perhaps THE obvious influence) on Lynch, Jodorowsky, Gilliam and basically every other filmmaker who makes films based in dream logic.

I wrote a paper on Un Chien Andalou in school years back. I don't remember a ton about the analysis, but I do remember the film having a lot to do with Franco oppression, Catholicism, and Dali's sexual repression. A lot of the symbolism was lost on me for sure, but it doesn't take a genius to know it was a VERY important film for surrealism, Spain, and film in general.

Down Rodeo
06-27-2011, 11:29 AM
In light of my last post, here is what my "best of 2010" list would have looked like (ridiculously late, I know, but so what):

1. Another Year
2. Mother
3. Blue Valentine
4. The Temptation of St. Tony
5. The Ghost Writer
6. Vincere
7. Carlos
8. Valhalla Rising
9. Winter's Bone
10. Dogtooth
11. Everyone Else
12. Enter The Void
13. October Country
14. The Social Network
15. Inside Job

knytt
06-27-2011, 11:31 AM
First trailer for new Pixar movie looks decidedly dark..

tYg0VgPy6Uk

Miroir Noir
06-27-2011, 11:35 AM
Also, it is for a film that is mercifully not a sequel of a prior Pixar film!

AlecEiffel
06-27-2011, 02:48 PM
How To Train Your Dragon with a bear.

schoolofruckus
06-27-2011, 09:54 PM
I'm happy to report that Bellflower was fucking outstanding - a trippy, emotional, thrilling and seriously original explosion of internal violence made flesh. Like many films, it tracks the rise and fall of a relationship between the young and damaged, doing so with delicate observance and an attention to detail that distinguishes it from even above-average movie romances. The distinction continues when things go south, because whereas most relationship dramas entail someone getting dumped and going on a self-destructive emotional meltdown that results in professional/academic/friendship ruin, these characters literally pick up flamethrowers and try to fucking kill each other - among the other, more common outbursts and acts of deceit that feel as recognizably human as any intimate conflict I've ever witnessed. Painful as it was at times, I absolutely loved watching this pair of apocalypse-baited, post-adolescents get blindsided by the one thing they weren't preparing to fight off, and the way the film turns itself into an extroverted display of inner anguish is riveting.

It opens August 5th, apparently at the Nuart per the post-screening Q&A. You will be doing yourself a great disservice if you don't see it with a packed house.

menikmati
06-27-2011, 10:31 PM
How To Train Your Dragon with a brother bear.

fixed

suprefan
06-27-2011, 11:44 PM
I'm happy to report that Bellflower was fucking outstanding - a trippy, emotional, thrilling and seriously original explosion of internal violence made flesh. Like many films, it tracks the rise and fall of a relationship between the young and damaged, doing so with delicate observance and an attention to detail that distinguishes it from even above-average movie romances. The distinction continues when things go south, because whereas most relationship dramas entail someone getting dumped and going on a self-destructive emotional meltdown that results in professional/academic/friendship ruin, these characters literally pick up flamethrowers and try to fucking kill each other - among the other, more common outbursts and acts of deceit that feel as recognizably human as any intimate conflict I've ever witnessed. Painful as it was at times, I absolutely loved watching this pair of apocalypse-baited, post-adolescents get blindsided by the one thing they weren't preparing to fight off, and the way the film turns itself into an extroverted display of inner anguish is riveting.

It opens August 5th, apparently at the Nuart per the post-screening Q&A. You will be doing yourself a great disservice if you don't see it with a packed house.

One word.


MEDUSA

TallGuyCM
06-28-2011, 12:01 AM
Yes, Bellflower was absolutely excellent. Evan Glodell has a very bright future ahead of him.

getbetter
06-28-2011, 12:14 AM
I just watched Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in the Land of Demons and I thought of Star Wars: a New Hope because of a certain quote in the movie.I've been really enjoying this series,but in the back of my head I wish I would of discovered these films when i was a lot younger.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-28-2011, 09:49 AM
mU6TB8jet-Q&feature=player_embedded

This and this:

"The Tree of Life by Terrence Malick. I was a huge fan coming in, but this is definitely my favorite of his films. What I've loved about all of his films is the poetic nature of the visuals, and to me The Tree of Life is just two hours of poetry. It was just tender moments that were dealt with in a really thoughtful way, and it really informed the story. It was like looking back at a scrapbook of classic childhood events." - Washed Out ("Favorite Things" Pitchfork Interview with Ernest Greene)

http://pitchfork.com/features/guest-lists/7995-washed-out/

So much love for The Tree of Life, it's kind of amazing.

marooko
06-28-2011, 01:09 PM
‘WarGames’ remake coming from ‘King of Kong’ director


Great. Does Hollywood have to fuck everything up? Just re-release it, I'd actually go and watch. This, you couldn't pay me to sit through.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-28-2011, 01:25 PM
King of Kong is pretty great though. Has that guy ever done anything that wasn't a documentary?

marooko
06-28-2011, 01:29 PM
I myself have no Idea. I just don't like the re-make idea, it rarely ever turns out good.

schoolofruckus
06-28-2011, 02:05 PM
King of Kong is pretty great though. Has that guy ever done anything that wasn't a documentary?

He directed Horrible Bosses.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-28-2011, 02:10 PM
He directed Horrible Bosses.

Aha! I really hope that movie turns out to be good, because it looks pretty damn funny.

Grandma
06-28-2011, 02:38 PM
5 films you've watched more than 50 times
go...

Jurassic Park
The Right Stuff
Office Space
Star Wars: A New Hope
The Thing

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-28-2011, 02:40 PM
Big Trouble In Little China
Aliens
Robocop
Caddyshack
Die Hard

clumsy342
06-28-2011, 02:42 PM
50 times:


Slumber Party Massacre III
Pep Squad
Empire Records
Independence Day (not by choice)
And a slew of MST3K

buddy
06-28-2011, 03:06 PM
groundhog day
die hard
predator
naked gun
kindergarten cop/twins

amyzzz
06-28-2011, 03:07 PM
Star Wars
Empire Strikes Back
Return of the Jedi
Back to the Future
Office Space

Still-ill
06-28-2011, 03:32 PM
more than 50?

Kyliediscope
06-28-2011, 03:47 PM
My over 50 are just
Rocky Horror
Labyrinth
Goonies
I think that might be it.

wmgaretjax
06-28-2011, 03:53 PM
wow. you all have wasted an extraordinary amount of time.

HandBanana
06-28-2011, 04:04 PM
Yeah how dare you guys spend time out of your life doing something you enjoy.

boxofbox
06-28-2011, 04:05 PM
animalympics
teenage mutant ninja turtles
the little mermaid
moonwalker

i'm pretty sure I only watched movies more that 3x when I was younger than 10 y/o...

i was going to put Salo on my list, but I didn't want to come across as an extremely mature 10 y/o.

boxofbox
06-28-2011, 04:06 PM
wow. you all have wasted an extraordinary amount of time.

*takes a bow*

HandBanana
06-28-2011, 04:06 PM
Fucking Animalympics!

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-28-2011, 04:11 PM
wow. you all have wasted an extraordinary amount of time.

I'm pretty sure Big Trouble and Little China and Robocop I've seen around 150-200 times each.

HandBanana
06-28-2011, 04:13 PM
Time better spent pretending to read Proust

Kyliediscope
06-28-2011, 04:21 PM
They were childhood favorites of mine. You didn't watch movies over and over as a child?

wmgaretjax
06-28-2011, 04:25 PM
I'm pretty sure Big Trouble and Little China and Robocop I've seen around 150-200 times each.

holy shite. that's pretty extraordinary.

i've just never had the attention span necessary to sit through the same thing so many times. i've wasted my time in plenty of other ways... but even as a kid I don't think I watched something more than 10 times (maybe empire strikes back... but I don't think so).

although if I was to sit down and watch something 50 times... it'd probably include Robocop and Moonwalker.

HandBanana
06-28-2011, 04:26 PM
As a kid it can be easy.
I was a total "outdoor kid" growing up. I was always going outside and doing things, yet I still had that thing that all kids seem to have where I could not only watch a title multiple times, but sometimes IN A ROW.

I cant figure that one out.

marooko
06-28-2011, 04:35 PM
I can't say for sure it's been 50 or more, but pretty damn close. I put them in order of which I most likely have watched the most. Oh and I can almost guarantee I've watched Interview with the Vampire well over 50 times. Didn't have cable for a while and I may have taken it out of the DVD player 2-3 times. Love that flick.

Interview with the vampire
Heat
Goodfellas
Die hard (probably the entire series except for the latest one, hasn't been out long enough. But I'm sure I'm up to at least 10 on that one.)
Goonies
Clerks
Half Baked
Traffic

buddy
06-28-2011, 04:45 PM
the one most likely I've seen 50 is groundhog day. I started young on that one, and will most likely continue to watch for years to come.

schoolofruckus
06-28-2011, 04:57 PM
I'm not sure how many times I've seen the films I've seen the most, but I'm fairly certain they're some combination of The Big Lebowski (absolutely #1), Kingpin, The Land Before Time and Buffalo '66. Totally okay with the time spent on all four of those.

bmack86
06-28-2011, 04:59 PM
There's nothing I've seen 50 times probably, but I've seen:

Billy Madison
Empire Strikes Back
Little Nemo
Con Air
D2: The Mighty Ducks
Monty Python and the Holy Grail

So many times that I feel like I can watch them by closing my eyes.

Oh yeah, and definitely the Big Lebowski.

schoolofruckus
06-28-2011, 05:03 PM
Nuart calendar is up for July-October.....Bellflower is definitely there the week of August 5th. I'd encourage you guys to go on opening night and see the cast Q&A; it's one of those films that's so intimate and homemade - really, handcrafted, if you dig into the lore behind the making of it - that you're going to want to see the director and cast in action.

TallGuyCM
06-28-2011, 05:17 PM
I haven't seen anything anywhere near 50 times, unless you count coming home drunk and falling asleep with the TV on and Road Trip or something is on TBS and catching 15 minutes of it and passing out.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-28-2011, 06:07 PM
There was a summer when I was like 8 where my cousin and I watched Big Trouble In Little CHina literally every single day for 3 months, sometimes twice a day. And we made crazy costumes and acted the movie out as we watched it. I also watched The Crow easily 50 times in a year a or two between 7th and 8th grade. Oh, and the original Transformers The Movie from the '80s. That and The Crow I could watch on mute and recite every single line from. I could probably sing all of the crappy hair metal songs from the TF soundtrack too hahaha

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-28-2011, 06:09 PM
Also, i could put money on the fact that my sister has watched You've Got Mail, of all things, upwards of 1000 times. No joke.

SoulDischarge
06-28-2011, 06:44 PM
I don't know about 50, but at least 25 for

Beetlejuice
Yellow Submarine
Videodrome
a few John Waters flicks
Dead Alive

Most of the movies I really love I've seen at least 10 times. I like kind of living in them. They're comfort movies when I need something to entertain me or pick me up without fail. Also, a lot of movies that I've seen way too many times have been a result of needing to show them to all my friends. "You mean you haven't seen (TITLE)???? WE MUST WATCH NOWWWWW!"

guedita
06-28-2011, 07:03 PM
The only 2 movies I've watched over 50 times are Sleepless in Seattle and Waiting For Guffman

TallGuyCM
06-28-2011, 07:19 PM
Yellow Submarine

Fuck yeah.

CuervoPH
06-28-2011, 07:29 PM
There are certain movies I rewatch on at least an annual basis. I have a feeling I've watched "Apocalypse Now" over 50 times, as I can now recite most of the dialogue (with the exception of the added French plantation portion in "Apocalypse Now: Redux").

"The Sure Thing" and "Better Off Dead" are probably up there as well.

Down Rodeo
06-28-2011, 08:34 PM
I can't imagine watching any movie over 50 times...

But the one that takes the cake for me is Blazing Saddles. I've probably seen it at least 20 times.

schoolofruckus
06-28-2011, 08:43 PM
Yeah, that one's on my list as well.

lunatic core
06-28-2011, 09:25 PM
I have seen Natural Born Killers many many times.

I can pretty much do all the audio in the story beat by beat.

Also Goonies.

lunatic core
06-28-2011, 09:36 PM
Also Sucker Punch fucking sucked.

I could go into detail, but I doubt any is needed. I don't think I have spent so much time trying to figure out why I didn't like a movie before though. The movie stuck with me in the worst way possible.

TallGuyCM
06-29-2011, 12:32 AM
After the talk about it a few days ago, I watched Ozu's Tokyo Story tonight. As of now I'm pretty indifferent toward it...aside from the story moving at a mostly glacial pace, I just didn't get very much out of it. Which bums me out, Ozu is a director that I was excited to get into but I can't say I'm overly eager to check out the rest of his work anytime soon.

buddy
06-29-2011, 02:31 AM
American: The Bill Hicks Story (http://movies.netflix.com/WiMovie/American_The_Bill_Hicks_Story/70126749?trkid=496624) is now on netflix instant

M Sparks
06-29-2011, 09:53 AM
Thanks, was going to go look for it the other day and got sidetracked.

zircona1
06-29-2011, 09:58 AM
Ghostbusters
Spaceballs
Labyrinth
Cheech and Chong's Up in Smoke
Pulp Fiction

Miroir Noir
06-29-2011, 09:39 PM
Doubt I've made it 50 times on any of these, but:

Godfather
Part II
Apocalypse Now
Raging Bull
GoodFellas
Dr. Strangelove
Die Hard (currently on the background playing on basic cable)
Field of Dreams
Bull Durham
Lebowski
Rushmore
Tenenbaums
Groundhog Day

obzen
06-29-2011, 09:45 PM
lul, Jaws.

obzen
06-29-2011, 09:45 PM
And Casino, definitely.

Miroir Noir
06-29-2011, 09:47 PM
Casino! Frank Vincent finally gets his revenge on Joe Pesci!

Shit, I forgot Boogie Nights.

obzen
06-29-2011, 09:48 PM
Star Wars (all six), easily.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-29-2011, 10:04 PM
Looks like Die Hard is a clear constant in most of our lives.

Miroir Noir
06-29-2011, 10:12 PM
It spans the generations. I quote Die Hard with the old guys at work.

BKsaysAction!
06-29-2011, 10:24 PM
Ghostbusters
Goonies
Diehard
Escape from new york
Aliens
Reservoir dogs
Heat
Dirty Rotten Scoundrels
Star Wars IV
Ferris bueller's day off
army of darkness
Groundhogs day
Life Aquatic
Fight club
Hackers

BKsaysAction!
06-29-2011, 10:33 PM
and Raiders of the lost ark and Back to the future

TallGuyCM
06-29-2011, 11:01 PM
After seeing The Future over the weekend, I in no way expected to like Me and You and Everyone We Know as much as I did. But I absolutely loved it. I hope for Miranda's sake that The Future gets received well, but it's not half the film that her debut was. Me and You totally caught me off guard.

getbetter
06-29-2011, 11:06 PM
To watch a movie 50+ times is WAY TOO MANY times to watch a movie,unless your involved with the production.



Movies I've watch a lot but not 50+

Battle Royale
Team American
Pusher
Akira
Army of Darkness
Ninja Scroll

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-29-2011, 11:50 PM
This 50+ thing is insane. Outside of one's early childhood I can't imaging watching any film that many times. As a kid I probably saw Bedknobs & Broomsticks and Annie about 50 times. (My poor father).

That being said, my first job as a teenager was working at an independent video store. Remember those? The owners were very lax with the in-store movie selections so I probably, at least peripherally, caught The Jerk at least 50 times while working there. My manager was obsessed with the movie and insisted on playing it at least once a week. I grew up in a nearly all white suburb of San Diego and I still distinctly remember the day an African American family walked in to the store at the exact moment that Steve Martin says "Sir, you are talking to a n***er!"

SoulDischarge
06-30-2011, 12:02 AM
This 50+ thing is insane. Outside of one's early childhood I can't imaging watching any film that many times. As a kid I probably saw Bedknobs & Broomsticks and Annie about 50 times. (My poor father).

Ha. Me too. That third act was such a drag though.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-30-2011, 03:08 AM
Ha. Me too. That third act was such a drag though.

Right??? Don't tell Angela Lansbury, but I totally ffw'd through the third act. I still think that film's absolutely lovely, though. I always buy it for friends with 4 or 5 yr old kids and almost always get rave reviews back.

SoulDischarge
06-30-2011, 03:19 AM
I think we need to add Angela Lansbury to the official List Of Things That Will Turn Your Child Gay.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-30-2011, 03:40 AM
I think we need to add Angela Lansbury to the official List Of Things That Will Turn Your Child Gay.

Shhhhhh! How am I supposed to covertly turn every child in America into a mo if you give away all the secrets? It's too bad her film career post 1960s is so forgettable. She was so brilliant in Gaslight, The Picture of Dorian Gray and of course The Manchurian Candidate.

obzen
06-30-2011, 09:16 AM
Gotta throw Tombstone, Braveheart in the +50 club, so many good lines.

Down Rodeo
06-30-2011, 11:39 AM
Oh shit, definitely Tombstone. How could I forget about that one...

paulb
06-30-2011, 11:44 AM
Ferris Bueller
Tommy Boy

easily 25+

schoolofruckus
06-30-2011, 12:42 PM
Last night I caught a double feature at the New Bev:

Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars - D.A. Pennebaker's concert film of the last show on the Ziggy Stardust tour is essentially what you'd expect in most ways. It's a classical concert film that doesn't try to create artificial energy through its photography and editing, and while there are a few odd ideas - far too much focus on the audience during "Suffragette City", and an odd chronological double-back over the solo at the end of "Moonage Daydream" - it's still obviously compelling simply because it's Bowie and the Spiders performing. Mick Ronson, in particular, is a fucking STUD here - his solos on the aforementioned "Moonage Daydream" and "The Width of a Circle" are pure face melt. I clapped at the end because it's probably the closest I'll get to cheering for Bowie with a crowd. FML.

Velvet Goldmine - I hadn't seen this one before, and it was the main reason I went; ostensibly, this marginally-fictionalized story about a Bowie-esque rock star was a natural marquee neighbor for the Ziggy film. I enjoyed it quite a bit - Todd Haynes' distinct rhythm kept it compelling, and several of the performances (Christian Bale as the young journalist who personalizes the story, and Ewan McGregor as the Iggy Pop / Lou Reed / Mick Jagger composite) were terrific - but there was something that wasn't quite clicking for me. I skimmed through some reviews afterward, and Roger Ebert nailed it - the Bowie surrogate played by Jonathan Rhys Meyers just isn't as compelling as he should be. The film makes him out to be a hack of fleeting influence, whose best ideas are shamelessly lifted from other glam pioneers, and who is accused at one point of being a homosexual of convenience. That last part may or may not be critical, as it's a quality that the real-life Bowie has alluded to in hindsight; could that be something that Haynes intends to punish him for? Whatever the reason, this element of shortfall is only magnified on the heels of watching an Bowie let it rip in one of his signature performances. Still, Velvet Goldmine is probably the most "entertaining" Haynes film I've seen, and certainly worth spending a couple hours with.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-30-2011, 12:53 PM
I can't stand movies with made up rock stars or actors (even if they are obvious stand-ins for real life personalities). I can't buy-in to that nonsense. That being said, love the Grant Lee Buffalo song from that movie. He does a nice job of aping Bowie.

Nas4_QwWM54

schoolofruckus
06-30-2011, 01:06 PM
A lot of the Brian Slade songs were decent surface-level aping of real Bowie songs, but they lacked the excitement-factor of Bowie's actual music - to say nothing of the downgrade from interesting, unique Bowie lyrics to the insipid, sub-Linkin Park individuality in Slade's songwriting.

But again, on the other hand, the Curt Wild numbers (which I think McGregor actually sung) were awesome. My favorite musical number was actually the Jack Fairy number at the "Death of Glam" concert late in the film.

OoZ_L1lEcTc

Miroir Noir
06-30-2011, 01:10 PM
The "Satellite of Love" homage to Berlin Alexanderplatz in that film may be my favorite single scene Haynes has ever done:

SXESfMD01h8

schoolofruckus
06-30-2011, 01:29 PM
I need to watch Safe again. I haven't been head-over-heels for any of Haynes' films other than I'm Not There, but there's always an extraordinary intelligence at work within them. I also think that my recent aesthetic preferences would lead me to get much more out of Safe than I did the first time around.

amyzzz
06-30-2011, 01:31 PM
One of my favorite movies EVER. I love the songs, I love how the film portrays the longing of music fans, and that end scene with the journalist getting that button in his beer? Priceless. Christian Bale is really good in this film.

Miroir Noir
06-30-2011, 01:33 PM
Have you seen Poison? It's finally coming back into print on DVD (but sadly not Blu) in a well-appointed addition this summer.

SoulDischarge
06-30-2011, 01:33 PM
Safe is the best thing Todd Haynes has ever done (that I've seen).

schoolofruckus
06-30-2011, 01:35 PM
Have you seen Poison? It's finally coming back into print on DVD (but sadly not Blu) in a well-appointed addition this summer.

I watched Poison a couple months ago. A lot of it was fascinating, but it didn't set me on fire.

Also, the special edition is out already. I saw it on sale at Laser Blazer last weekend.

TallGuyCM
06-30-2011, 01:38 PM
It's on Netflix Instant, too.

Miroir Noir
06-30-2011, 01:39 PM
Good news; I should pay more attention to the DVD release calendar in Film Comment. And for the record, I like editions better than additions!

schoolofruckus
06-30-2011, 02:00 PM
After reading interviews with Haynes, it sounds like his inability to channel Bowie properly has nothing to do with what I originally surmised. In fact, it seems actually due to his focusing on the way Bowie (or any other rock icon) is seen by a fan, as opposed to an insider. Arthur (the Christian Bale character) has probably the most compelling narrative, and I think Haynes chose to portray his idols as ultimately hollow in order to highlight the discrepancy between the way Arthur sees them vs. the way they actually are. He went a little overboard in not making Slade interesting enough, but at least the intent makes some sense.

full on idle
06-30-2011, 02:02 PM
http://images.wikia.com/harrypotter/images/b/ba/Harry-Potter-1-.jpg

wmgaretjax
06-30-2011, 02:22 PM
Safe is the best thing Todd Haynes has ever done (that I've seen).

Easily one of the best films ever made.

And I think Gabe's last few comments about Velvet Goldmine are crucial. Haynes is always working on several levels at the same time that often come into direct conflict... As such, going in expecting the narrative and typical film-going incentive structure to string you along never works with him, because the first thing to go are the standard appeals for a movie (easily empathized characters, narrative give and take)... Not that Velvet Goldmine is a particularly incredible film... but it gets dismissed readily as an outright failure... when in reality it's not typically striving towards what everyone expects at the outset.

Haynes is an absolute genius and everyone should watch Mildred Pierce. Because it's the really, really fantastic.

amyzzz
06-30-2011, 02:26 PM
I need to put Safe on my queue. I watched it several years ago, and I think it is time to revisit it (especially since I felt similar to Julianne Moore's character at times this past year).

wmgaretjax
06-30-2011, 02:27 PM
shut up amy. julianne moore's character is a closeted gay man.

SoulDischarge
06-30-2011, 02:28 PM
Yeah. It's one of the few films I can think of that I can 100% defend. A lot of great films tend to be too commercial or too oblique or too dated or too dull or too campy, but I think that one maintains a fairly good balance of being interesting and purposeful while remaining fairly accessible and not devolving into melodrama or contrivance.

amyzzz
06-30-2011, 02:32 PM
I'm not allowed to identify with a closeted gay man? You shut up.

wmgaretjax
06-30-2011, 02:46 PM
go suck on a tailpipe

Miroir Noir
06-30-2011, 02:51 PM
Haynes is an absolute genius and everyone should watch Mildred Pierce. Because it's the really, really fantastic.

Agreed. Absolutely the most intelligent American filmmaker to emerge since 1980.

PotVsKtl
06-30-2011, 02:56 PM
It seems I may have misinterpreted Safe.

TallGuyCM
06-30-2011, 02:58 PM
It seems I may have misinterpreted Safe.

Same with I'm Not There for me. Mildred Pierce is high on the priority list, but I think I'll watch Safe tonight after the conversation in here today.

SoulDischarge
06-30-2011, 03:15 PM
I think of Safe as a modern Antonioni film, although with a bit less of his pretension (I know that's a sensitive word, but I think it applies).