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getbetter
06-03-2011, 01:05 PM
Yes, Matt and I got tickets for four of the films at the fest: Tyrannosaur, Another Earth, The Future, and The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman. $60 is pretty much all I can afford to put toward the fest, so that's all I'll be seeing, aside from lining up early in the rush line for Drive.

I'm very excited, and happy that this is all in mere weeks...

What day is that playing?

TallGuyCM
06-03-2011, 01:06 PM
Uncle Boonmee for me this weekend. How much of a mindfuck am I in for?

Not as much as you might think. Have you seen Tropical Malady?

Miroir Noir
06-03-2011, 01:22 PM
Not yet, but I did see Syndromes and a Century. I enjoyed it -- it reminded me a lot of Jarmusch's recent work and Van Sant's non-commerical stuff in its hypnotic pace.

TallGuyCM
06-03-2011, 01:24 PM
Syndromes is great, but go out of your way to watch Malady before seeing Boonmee. It's not imperative as far as the storyline goes, but Malady, aside from being one of my top 10 favorite films ever, just really sets the mood for Boonmee very well.

I saw Boonmee first actually, and after watching Malady the following week I REALLY wished I had watched them in order.

Miroir Noir
06-03-2011, 01:26 PM
Thanks. Sounds like a trip to the local film society rental shop is in order then!

DANCE MAGIC
06-03-2011, 01:27 PM
Have you seen Tropical Malady?

I think we may have discussed this before, but, as someone whose opinion i sort of value, it shocks me that you hold this movie in such high regard. I really want to see Uncle Boonmee, because I've heard it's great, but man, I hated Tropical Malady. HATED.

TallGuyCM
06-03-2011, 02:07 PM
Haha, we did discuss it before. If you didn't like Malady then Boonmee probably isn't for you either. I do enjoy our exchanges though, even if we often don't see eye-to-eye. :)

KungFuJoe
06-03-2011, 03:06 PM
Yes, Matt and I got tickets for four of the films at the fest: Tyrannosaur, Another Earth, The Future, and The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman. $60 is pretty much all I can afford to put toward the fest, so that's all I'll be seeing, aside from lining up early in the rush line for Drive.

I'm very excited, and happy that this is all in mere weeks...

Good choices. 3 shows in one day though, eh? I wish I could get to more screenings. I'm deciding on whether I want to try and see Tyrannosaur or The Innkeepers. I really wish someone on here could see The Yellow Sea and report back.

TallGuyCM
06-03-2011, 03:22 PM
Good choices. 3 shows in one day though, eh?

No, the only day where I'm even seeing two in one day is on the 25th with The Future and The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman.

malcolmjamalawesome
06-03-2011, 03:43 PM
Sorry if this is old old old old old news but just wondering if anyone had seen this Enter The Void-inspired thing

HAfFfqiYLp0

schoolofruckus
06-03-2011, 03:59 PM
Sorry if this is old old old old old news but just wondering if anyone had seen this Enter The Void-inspired thing

HAfFfqiYLp0

Yeah, it's lame. When I first heard about the idea, I thought it was going to be first-person from Kanye's eyes - which could have been great. But just ripping off the credit sequence is retarded.

schoolofruckus
06-03-2011, 04:00 PM
As for LAFF - I have tickets to Attack the Block (which was just added) on June 22nd and a back-to-back of Another Earth and The Future on June 25th.

HandBanana
06-03-2011, 04:10 PM
Sorry if this is old old old old old news but just wondering if anyone had seen this Enter The Void-inspired thing

HAfFfqiYLp0

Wish it would have taken the theme a bit further.

Still, it's a better video than the one for "Jesus Walks" where Kanye gets anally raped in a Parisian subway for nine minutes in one continuous hard-to-watch take.

But then, art is bravery and all that.

KungFuJoe
06-03-2011, 04:36 PM
As for LAFF - I have tickets to Attack the Block (which was just added) on June 22nd and a back-to-back of Another Earth and The Future on June 25th.

Fuck I really want to see Attack the Block too.

roberto73
06-03-2011, 05:37 PM
Tomorrow will be the best movie day I've had in a while: a double-feature of Tree of Life and Herzog's Cave of Forgotten Dreams. This is penance for having suffered through The Hangover Part II.

TallGuyCM
06-03-2011, 06:26 PM
Please report back! :D

schoolofruckus
06-04-2011, 11:34 AM
I watched Voyage in Time this morning; it might be my favorite non-fiction film. It's a travelogue that follows Andrei Tarkovsky and Tonino Guerra to a handful of distinctive Italian locales, as they try to figure out the screenplay and setting for their pending collaboration Nostalghia. Obviously, the subject matter alone is enough to fall in love with, but what really makes this film special is that it's shot just like one of Tarkovsky's fiction films. I wasn't expecting to see the master through his own eyes, but it really makes for a fascinating experience. I give it my highest recommendation, but you should watch Nostalghia first. Get the fuck to Laser Blazer or Cinefile or Vidiots and make a double feature out of it.

juloxx
06-04-2011, 11:52 AM
Sorry if this is old old old old old news but just wondering if anyone had seen this Enter The Void-inspired thing

HAfFfqiYLp0

It would be better if he smoked DMT

sonofhal
06-04-2011, 12:39 PM
Any recommendations on what to see at my closest arty movie theatre? Sorry, I haven't heard of any of these, and tonight is date night. If not these, then I might try to see the Nightmare on Elm St remake or Get Him to the Greek. :rolleyes

Casino Jack and the United States of Money (R, 118 min)

The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo (subtitled) (Not Rated, 152 min)

Harry Brown (R, 103 min)

Please Give (R, 90 min)

The Secret in Their Eyes (subtitled) (R, 129 min)

Going way back here, but I just watched The Secret in Their Eyes. What a totally splendid 2 hrs. It certainly isn't a date movie, but you missed an absolute gem that night. I always love a film that I can't second guess.

HandBanana
06-04-2011, 01:07 PM
The new Xmen is a surprisingly very good movie.
I tend to have a hard time connecting with superhero flicks due to the "this looks silly in daylight" factor, but the writing, direction, and acting are so good that I forget all about that here.

Def worth your $11

bobert
06-04-2011, 08:37 PM
I'm going to attempt a more detailed write-up for The Tree of Life at some point, but it's just not coming together right now. Suffice to say - I thought it was remarkable, and one of the most unforgettable experiences I've ever had in a theater. I'm inclined to think it's impossible to critique the film's story, or its storytelling, because not only is it trying to capture a scope that I've never seen attempted otherwise, but it's doing so with a language and rhythm that I also haven't seen. It's a movie that, among other things, essentially tries to capture the entirety of existence through the eyes of a child, and in many ways, I felt like my life and life in general have never been better represented on screen. It's also a film that, in spite of its immodest intellectual concerns, essentially functions on a level of pure emotion and intuition, as it addresses so many large concepts that it has no possibility of ever offering concrete hypotheses on them (let alone coherent conclusions). As such, it may be one of the rare films for which its supporters and detractors are both 100% accurate; I've read about a dozen reviews, split evenly between raves, measured approvals and definitive pans, and I can't think of a single comment that I haven't agreed with. This review (http://www.reverseshot.com/article/tree_life_space_between_spaces) is one of the finest I've ever read, and yet it contains a link mid-column to a pan by Robert Koehler; both are absolutely essential reading as one tries to comb through this monumentally special and historically unique work of art.

The closest thing I can liken this to is Where the Wild Things Are as filtered through the grammar of Sans Soleil, with a little bit of Red Desert and Koyaanisqatsi thrown in for good measure.

I'm going to see it again tomorrow.

Finally saw it tonight and found it to be one of the most overwhelming, gratifying experiences I can ever remember having at the cinema. A truly generous work of art. Something to marvel at and argue about in equal measure. I'll save everyone anymore hyperbole, but I'm going again tomorrow as well.

juloxx
06-05-2011, 12:11 AM
The new Xmen is a surprisingly very good movie.
I tend to have a hard time connecting with superhero flicks due to the "this looks silly in daylight" factor, but the writing, direction, and acting are so good that I forget all about that here.

Def worth your $11

are they still trying to jam a gay rights theme down our throats?..... pun not intended

atom heart
06-05-2011, 06:52 AM
If anyone's on the fence about seeing Xmen in theaters, don't. The storytelling is good to great but the movie was made in such a short time that it totally lacks polish. There are visual problems which won't be that apparent, on say, a TV or a computer screen, but that about slap you in the face when you're in the theater. That being said, the movie's strengths keep those moments from overwhelming the experience.

MissingPerson
06-05-2011, 07:03 AM
are they still trying to jam a gay rights theme down our throats?..... pun not intended

I'm really not sure how you could make an X Men movie that was true to the source and didn't have a civil rights theme running through it. It's the strength of the thing.

schoolofruckus
06-05-2011, 08:59 AM
I'm not too familiar with this guy but it doesn't seem like he's worth the effort of explanation.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-05-2011, 09:26 AM
Wish it would have taken the theme a bit further.

Still, it's a better video than the one for "Jesus Walks" where Kanye gets anally raped in a Parisian subway for nine minutes in one continuous hard-to-watch take.

But then, art is bravery and all that.

Heh, art.

schoolofruckus
06-05-2011, 09:27 AM
This is as good a time as any to mention that Jen and I watched The Kids Are All Right last night. We were really impressed. Aside from a handful of score cues and a few other moments that felt somewhat clumsy (Moore's big speech towards the end is more awkward than I think was intended, and maybe I'm crazy, but I thought the first onscreen kiss between she and Bening was handled a bit too preciously), I thought it was a sharply-observed family story with fine performances all around. Definitely better than at least half of its counterparts in the Best Picture race last year.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-05-2011, 09:51 AM
Definitely was surprised by how good of a family dramedy it was, and not some sort of HEY WE'RE LESBIANS WITH KIDS... THE WORLD IS CHANGING! movie. Though it was sort of both, they blended it very well. And with Mark Ruffalo, you can't go wrong. Minus Just Like Heaven, I haven't been disappointed with that man's career.

daxton
06-05-2011, 10:23 AM
This is as good a time as any to mention that Jen and I watched The Kids Are All Right last night. We were really impressed. Aside from a handful of score cues and a few other moments that felt somewhat clumsy (Moore's big speech towards the end is more awkward than I think was intended, and maybe I'm crazy, but I thought the first onscreen kiss between she and Bening was handled a bit too preciously), I thought it was a sharply-observed family story with fine performances all around. Definitely better than at least half of its counterparts in the Best Picture race last year.

I enjoyed The Kids Are All Right, but it seemed a little disingenuous. I watched Please Give around the same time I watched The Kids Are All Right and the two reminded me of each other somewhat. I really loved Please Give. You should watch it.

M Sparks
06-05-2011, 11:42 AM
HAfFfqiYLp0

It must be weird to be the absolute weakest link in everything you do, to be outshined by everyone you work with, and yet still put your name on it and reap the rewards.

iv3rdawG
06-05-2011, 04:29 PM
Anyone else see the trailer for Attenberg, Athina Rachel Tsangari's (Producer on Dogtooth) latest?

NSFW Trailer:

14761211

Been out for a while but for some reason I just got around to see it.

zircona1
06-05-2011, 04:55 PM
I watched Zero Effect last night. It's a really good underrated little film.

schoolofruckus
06-05-2011, 05:29 PM
I just finished Time of the Wolf. There were some striking images and moments scattered throughout, but as a whole, I continue to think it's a cruel joke (at my expense) that people consider Michael Haneke a great filmmaker.

TallGuyCM
06-05-2011, 05:36 PM
I think if you watch Caché you'll have a serious change of heart...

HandBanana
06-05-2011, 06:08 PM
Caché has a lot of Great Movie in it, but the resolution is too much stunt and not enough story. For me at least.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-05-2011, 07:35 PM
Oh, i thought I was the only one here who doesn't have a boner for Haneke

KungFuJoe
06-05-2011, 07:55 PM
I dug X-Men First Class. Caught it at the Regal Cinema downtown. Digital projection and great sound. Sure it had it's problems, but it could be my favorite in the series. It is great fun.

daxton
06-05-2011, 07:57 PM
I didn't know about Attenberg. Super excited. Thanks!

schoolofruckus
06-05-2011, 09:00 PM
Caché has a lot of Great Movie in it, but the resolution is too much stunt and not enough story. For me at least.

I feel like all three of Haneke's films I've seen (Time of the Wolf, Funny Games (US) and The White Ribbon, in descending order of preference) have some Great Movie in them. But his vision - always thematically and often visually - is absolutely repulsive, and I feel like his main objective is obfuscation for its own sake. There's some merit to his method (although I think a lot of people get on board simply because they feel bullied and confused), but I just can't have much affinity for an alleged artist who has this level of contempt for everyone on both sides of the screen.

TallGuyCM
06-05-2011, 09:14 PM
I feel like all three of Haneke's films I've seen (Time of the Wolf, Funny Games (US) and The White Ribbon, in descending order of preference) have some Great Movie in them. But his vision - always thematically and often visually - is absolutely repulsive, and I feel like his main objective is obfuscation for its own sake. There's some merit to his method (although I think a lot of people get on board simply because they feel bullied and confused), but I just can't have much affinity for an alleged artist who has this level of contempt for everyone on both sides of the screen.

Caché and The Piano Teacher are both fantastic, and are the two primary reasons that I consider him to be a great filmmaker.

Watch both of those, Gabe. The obfuscation (which I just had to look up its meaning) is there much more in the former than the latter, but I'd be surprised if those two films didn't change your perspective on him at least a bit.

bobert
06-05-2011, 09:17 PM
I'm pretty conflicted about Haneke, which is probably a compliment to him on some level. The dude likes to provoke.

TallGuyCM
06-05-2011, 09:20 PM
That's what I like about him. His films stay with me for much longer than the average filmmaker's do.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-05-2011, 11:17 PM
Saw Midnight in Paris tonight. Man, I really wanted to like this one. I'm one of those fools who follows Allen around hoping he'll have another great one in him. This film was just so forgettable. I will say that Owen Wilson was a surprisingly good stand-in for the Allen character and Marion Coitillard, as a mistress of Picasso, looked absolutely luminous every time she was on screen and it was amusing for a few minutes to see which literary or art great would show up next. There's Picasso arguing with Gertrude Stein! There's Hemingway getting soused and threatening to get into fights! I kept thinking of Purple Rose of Cairo throughout the whole thing; a film also obsessed with nostalgia and romanticism of past eras. But that film really was as charming and funny as it thought it was. Did anyone see You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger? Still haven't seen that one yet.

buddy
06-05-2011, 11:25 PM
i'm probably the same way in terms of trying to watch whenever he has a new movie, even though they haven't been up to par much of the time. i was really looking forward to seeing Midnight in Paris based on some of the positive reviews i've read. i'll probably still watch it. i haven't seen You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger, either.

sonofhal
06-05-2011, 11:26 PM
I watched Zero Effect last night. It's a really good underrated little film.

Great soundtrack too - It's what got me into Brendan Benson.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-05-2011, 11:29 PM
I would still encourage you to see it. The theatre at the Arclight was near capacity and everyone in there seemed to be utterly charmed. All I'll say is, I'm hardly one of Allen's harshest critics. I absolutely adore many of his "minor" films like Alice, Small Time Crooks, Hollywood Ending, Curse of the Jade Scorpion, etc. so for me to be kind of bored by an Allen picture is really something. Then again, Match Game got the critics all in a lather and I was left flat. So I'm probably the wrong one. Go see it.

buddy
06-05-2011, 11:34 PM
yeah, i'm still occasionally entertained by his movies like, Small Time Crooks, Sweet and Lowdown, etc. i'm definitely still going to see it.

SoulDischarge
06-06-2011, 12:01 AM
Hobo With A Shotgun tried entirely way too hard. I'll give it minor points for a few creative scenes, but mostly I was rolling my eyes throughout at their attempts to shock.

M Sparks
06-06-2011, 12:34 AM
I watched Zero Effect last night. It's a really good underrated little film.

I love this film. I try to talk it up to people, and no one seems interested, they just think it's a typical Ben Stiller movie.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-06-2011, 09:03 AM
Zero Effect is awesome. Bill Pullman was so great in it. Also, it came out at a time when Ben Stiller movies were anything but typical.

BlackSwan
06-06-2011, 10:09 AM
Agreed... I remember really liking Zero Effect when it came out. I still remember some of the Pullman quotes, especially this one...

"A few words here about following people. People know they're being followed when they turn around and see someone following them. They can't tell they're being followed if you get there first."

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-06-2011, 10:26 AM
Huh, I didn't realize that Bad Teacher was directed by Jake Kasdan, director of Zero Effect (as well as several eps of Freaks & Geeks, Undeclared, Walk Hard, and the The TV Set). that makes me want to watch it more.

TallGuyCM
06-06-2011, 11:31 AM
Bad Teacher looks like the worst movie to come out in years.

Waiting on Tree of Life reviews from Rob and Jared...

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-06-2011, 11:33 AM
I've not actually seen a trailer for BT, only have been seeing the billboards

M Sparks
06-06-2011, 11:58 AM
Bad Teacher looks like the worst movie to come out in years.

I don't really have any interest in it (though I tend to enjoy almost anything with Jason Siegel), but worst in years? That's the most ridiculous hyperbole I've heard since the 1400s.

schoolofruckus
06-06-2011, 12:25 PM
I thought the red band trailer was surprisingly funny - more than Horrible Bosses or 30 Seconds Or Less or any of the other comedies coming out soon. I'd watch it at home.

Also very anxious to hear Tree of Life reactions...

bobert
06-06-2011, 01:28 PM
Also very anxious to hear Tree of Life reactions...

I saw it twice this weekend and I'm convinced of its brilliance. It feels like a gift - the film that Malick has been building towards his whole career. I don't feel like I'm exaggerating when I say that it's the most visually stunning piece of cinema I've ever laid eyes on - almost overwhelmingly beautiful at times. Emmanuel Lubezki has set the bar for what's possible with a camera lens.

I thought the cast was excellent. I had my doubts about a star of Pitt's caliber fitting seamlessly into the film, but he really disappeared into his character. Some of his finest work to date. I'd never seen Jessica Chastain in anything before, but thought she was incredible. Both her and Pitt gave performances that were complex enough for their characters to coexist both as individuals and the archetypes they represented. Sean Penn made the most of his sliver of screen time.

But the real stars of the film were the children, particularly the two older brothers (Hunter McCracken and Laramie Eppler.) Pretty extraordinary performances for a couple of first-timers. I was kind of annoyed that my girlfriend didn't have the same love for the movie that I did, but she made a good point: this is a boys' film. Some of the scenes of childhood were so alive in their authenticity it seemed as though you were witnessing nothing less than pure human memory. I've never had a film so completely capture what it felt like to be a young boy on the cusp of adulthood.

I've read several negative reviews for the film that I don't necessarily disagree with. I'm just glad my reaction was different. I never got to see 2001: A Space Odyssey in the theaters, and that's about the only film I can think of that matches The Tree of Life in scope and ambition. It seems like a movie like this comes around maybe once in a generation, and I for one feel nothing but gratitude to Mr. Malick for sharing it with the world.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-06-2011, 01:50 PM
I think I need to start associating with a different crowd. These were some of the reactions when I suggested Tree of Life this weekend to several friends.

"Looks like a Netflix one."
"Oh God no! I heard there's, like, a 15 minute scene of just space. No talking."
"Is that the one about the bridesmaids?" (!!!!!!!!!!!)

Guess this will be a solo venture. Did someone mention it was playing on the Dome? I guess that's over now as it looks like Hangover II is playing there now. Lame.

J~$$$$
06-06-2011, 02:52 PM
awesome.


PSA of the Day: When an angry (ex-)customer phoned Austin’s Alamo Drafthouse Theater to complain about the establishment’s no-texting policy (for the record, she was warned twice before being kicked out), they did what any amazing movie house would do: They turned her rambling rant into a “Don’t Talk or Text” PSA which they intend to play before all R-rated movies.

1L3eeC2lJZs#at=76

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-06-2011, 03:01 PM
I'm waiting for the girlfriend to get over to Tennessee so I can bathe in this movie.

schoolofruckus
06-06-2011, 03:42 PM
I think I need to start associating with a different crowd. These were some of the reactions when I suggested Tree of Life this weekend to several friends.

"Looks like a Netflix one."
"Oh God no! I heard there's, like, a 15 minute scene of just space. No talking."
"Is that the one about the bridesmaids?" (!!!!!!!!!!!)

Guess this will be a solo venture. Did someone mention it was playing on the Dome? I guess that's over now as it looks like Hangover II is playing there now. Lame.

Yes, you need to find a new group of people to see movies with. And yes, Tree of Life played the Dome, but it was only one showing last Sunday morning; otherwise, it's been Hangover for the past couple weeks.

schoolofruckus
06-06-2011, 04:25 PM
I saw it twice this weekend and I'm convinced of its brilliance. It feels like a gift - the film that Malick has been building towards his whole career. I don't feel like I'm exaggerating when I say that it's the most visually stunning piece of cinema I've ever laid eyes on - almost overwhelmingly beautiful at times. Emmanuel Lubezki has set the bar for what's possible with a camera lens.

I thought the cast was excellent. I had my doubts about a star of Pitt's caliber fitting seamlessly into the film, but he really disappeared into his character. Some of his finest work to date. I'd never seen Jessica Chastain in anything before, but thought she was incredible. Both her and Pitt gave performances that were complex enough for their characters to coexist both as individuals and the archetypes they represented. Sean Penn made the most of his sliver of screen time.

But the real stars of the film were the children, particularly the two older brothers (Hunter McCracken and Laramie Eppler.) Pretty extraordinary performances for a couple of first-timers. I was kind of annoyed that my girlfriend didn't have the same love for the movie that I did, but she made a good point: this is a boys' film. Some of the scenes of childhood were so alive in their authenticity it seemed as though you were witnessing nothing less than pure human memory. I've never had a film so completely capture what it felt like to be a young boy on the cusp of adulthood.

I've read several negative reviews for the film that I don't necessarily disagree with. I'm just glad my reaction was different. I never got to see 2001: A Space Odyssey in the theaters, and that's about the only film I can think of matches The Tree of Life in scope and ambition. It seems like a movie like this comes around maybe once in a generation, and I for one feel nothing but gratitude to Mr. Malick for sharing it with the world.

It definitely got better for me the second time around, and I agree 100% that it's Malick's masterpiece. I said initially that I didn't think I could argue with the negative reviews, but seeing how well it held up, I'm inclined to shy away from that. This is an unquestionably great film that poignantly evolves the conventions of narrative cinema.

I'm also anxious to see if this will finally get you fuckers to properly embrace The Fountain.

TallGuyCM
06-06-2011, 04:29 PM
I'm also anxious to see if this will finally get you fuckers to properly embrace The Fountain.

I think that might just be why I didn't quite like Tree as much as some of you did, elements of it reminded me very much of The Fountain and it was hard not to have a knee-jerk :rolleyes reaction.

bobert
06-06-2011, 05:21 PM
I'm also anxious to see if this will finally get you fuckers to properly embrace The Fountain.

That won't happen, but I wouldn't be surprised if Darren Aronofsky cries himself to sleep after seeing a superior filmmaker accomplish everything that he attempted with that film. :)

schoolofruckus
06-06-2011, 05:45 PM
Well, Malick is unquestionably a superior filmmaker - primarily because he doesn't have a Black Swan in him. But Aronofsky made his best film from a similar set of ambitions and the entire world turned on him. That can't help but hurt.

TallGuyCM
06-06-2011, 05:49 PM
The world might have turned on Malick as well if he looked like David Arquette.

wmgaretjax
06-06-2011, 06:14 PM
I feel like all three of Haneke's films I've seen (Time of the Wolf, Funny Games (US) and The White Ribbon, in descending order of preference) have some Great Movie in them. But his vision - always thematically and often visually - is absolutely repulsive, and I feel like his main objective is obfuscation for its own sake. There's some merit to his method (although I think a lot of people get on board simply because they feel bullied and confused), but I just can't have much affinity for an alleged artist who has this level of contempt for everyone on both sides of the screen.

So... I'm a bit perplexed about how there is any obfuscation in Funny Games... Or as to how it's a main objective in Time of the Wolf... It certainly is pervasive in The White Ribbon... but that is incredibly consistent with the thematic material... and essential to the internal logic of the film. Haneke is a genius. Definitely one of the greatest living filmmakers.

As to Tree of Life... It is undoubtedly a masterpiece. I'm a bit hesitant about the structure... I wonder whether or not it would have been more effective without resting in the memory in one massive chunk. I need to see it again. Probably next weekend.

That said... the comparison to The Fountain is appalling. That film is a clunky pot of schlock steeped in hollywood melodrama. Tree of Life is anything but...

roberto73
06-06-2011, 08:08 PM
Herzog's on Colbert tonight. Pretty funny, but I could listen to that guy talk for hours.

My Tree of Life review will have to wait until the weekend. Turns out I couldn't make it into Atlanta on Saturday. I did see Everything Must Go and The Beaver on Sunday, both of which had their moments. They're actually both pretty interesting in how they don't try too hard to make the protagonists particularly likable. Gibson's character, especially, is a turd throughout the movie, and there's only a hint of redemption at the end. Guy might be a twerp in real life, but I actually came away from the movie thinking more of him as an actor.

WhyTheLongFace
06-06-2011, 08:09 PM
Any suggestions to see at LA Film Festival?

KungFuJoe
06-06-2011, 09:19 PM
Any suggestions to see at LA Film Festival?

The Yellow Sea, Detective Dee & the Mystery of the Phantom Flame, Drive & Attack the Block. TRUST.

And of course The Seductions of Ingmar Bergman if you want to check Sparks performing a musical they put together live with Guy Maddin directing.

Another Earth, The Future & The Innkeepers should be good as well. I'm sure there are some other gems I'm missing out on too.

malcolmjamalawesome
06-06-2011, 09:24 PM
I love Hot Rod

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-06-2011, 10:44 PM
Attack The Block looks fucking horrible. I'm surprised to see so many people interested in it. i read the synopsis a few weeks ago and was all "oh that sounds cool!" and then saw the trailer and couldn't fucking believe it. Prove me wrong, I guess.

sonofhal
06-06-2011, 10:48 PM
It's a very good movie. Prove yourself wrong and go see it.

M Sparks
06-06-2011, 11:27 PM
It looked fun to me, but nothing special.

PotVsKtl
06-07-2011, 10:25 AM
I have no idea why the Chemical Brothers were involved, and Cate Blanchett was terribly miscast, but Hanna turned out to be a better than average thriller. I just realized it's the same girl from Atonement so I'll withhold my predictions of big things to come from the lead actress.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-07-2011, 10:28 AM
It's the same director as Atonement as well

PotVsKtl
06-07-2011, 10:30 AM
Oh dip.

PotVsKtl
06-07-2011, 10:31 AM
This almost makes me want to watch The Soloist.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-07-2011, 10:35 AM
Don't. Bad idea.

schoolofruckus
06-07-2011, 10:58 AM
So... I'm a bit perplexed about how there is any obfuscation in Funny Games... Or as to how it's a main objective in Time of the Wolf... It certainly is pervasive in The White Ribbon... but that is incredibly consistent with the thematic material... and essential to the internal logic of the film. Haneke is a genius. Definitely one of the greatest living filmmakers.

You're right about Funny Games - while I haven't seen it in a while, I remember its perspective being abundantly clear. But with Time of the Wolf...I'm going to offer up the last scene with the kid by the campfire - and specifically, the way it's resolved - as an example of something that made NO fucking sense to me. If that's not Haneke deliberately obscuring anything that would help me understand what it was supposed to convey, the alternatives are that Palm horrendously fucked up the subtitles, or I'm significantly more dim-witted than I've ever realized.

While his films frustrate me, I mostly find them boring. The only thing I find particularly memorable is the subsequent conversations that make me wonder what I'm missing.


As to Tree of Life... It is undoubtedly a masterpiece. I'm a bit hesitant about the structure... I wonder whether or not it would have been more effective without resting in the memory in one massive chunk. I need to see it again. Probably next weekend.

Very pleased to hear this.


That said... the comparison to The Fountain is appalling. That film is a clunky pot of schlock steeped in hollywood melodrama. Tree of Life is anything but...

There are plenty of comparisons to make between Aronofsky's film and Malick's. Beyond the fact that they both literally involve the concept of a tree of life, each film concerns a man trying to process the death of a loved one through contemplating his place in the history of Earth and the universe. The Fountain may connect these ruminations with a narrative contrivance, but that's still the same trajectory taken by Jackman's character. The clunkiness and schlockiness is something we'll never agree upon, but the melodramatic tag seems unfair for a film that's trying to explore the nature of death. The Tree of Life is wildly emotional in its own right; I don't see why The Fountain alone deserves this criticism simply for dealing more concretely with its heroine's passing. I suspect that a lot of your aversion to its execution is due to the bombastic Mansell/Kronos score, but doesn't Tree of Life do the same thing with its chosen opera pieces? I don't have a problem with this in either case - bombast is entirely appropriate when the film is attempting to push the edges of existence - but it seems that the only difference is that Malick didn't choose a composer that you already hate :).

schoolofruckus
06-07-2011, 11:05 AM
Attack The Block looks fucking horrible. I'm surprised to see so many people interested in it. i read the synopsis a few weeks ago and was all "oh that sounds cool!" and then saw the trailer and couldn't fucking believe it. Prove me wrong, I guess.

I'm not terrible impressed with what I've seen so far, but the enormous enthusiasm by so many people who have seen and written about it is enough for me to drop $13 and see it at LAFF.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-08-2011, 12:11 AM
I rewatched the Legend directors cut for probably the first time in 6 years tonight and fuck that's a an amazing movie, especially for an early work by a young director. I'm looking forward to listening to the commentary during a slow work day tomorrow

disgustipated
06-08-2011, 07:20 AM
figured you guys would enjoy this.

edit: uncensored maybe nsfw

1L3eeC2lJZs

schoolofruckus
06-08-2011, 07:32 AM
Luckily for you, suprefan rarely comes in here. But yeah, that was awesome. I need to make a hajj to the Drafthouse one of these years.

disgustipated
06-08-2011, 07:42 AM
shit. I have'nt been on here in a while. vineyards are keeping me busy.

sorry for the double post.

Miroir Noir
06-08-2011, 09:10 AM
Wait, you haven't seen Cache, Schoolio?

schoolofruckus
06-08-2011, 09:59 AM
I have not. I'm sure I'll try that one at some point. I tend to not give up easily on directors that are widely considered to be great - and who, as I credited to Haneke, have moments within the films that I find striking.

schoolofruckus
06-08-2011, 11:40 AM
Aurora, the new film from Cristi Puiu (The Death of Mr. Lazarescu), looks fucking incredible:
http://www.vimeo.com/24811231

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-08-2011, 04:11 PM
I listened to Ridley Scott's commentary on the Legend Director's Cut dvd today. As usual, Scott proves to be one of the best commentators out there. He always comes to the table extremely well prepared and has a ton of really neat information about every process of the production. I'm always happy about how technical he's willing to get.

I've been having a bit of a love affair with Ridley Scott the last couple of years and he's really become on of my all time favorite directors. There's still about 4 of his films I've yet to see. Even when working with scripts/projects that aren't the best, he's such a fucking craftsman that he really pours his guts into a movie.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-08-2011, 04:13 PM
Finally got a few ppl together for Tree of Life + dinner tomorrow. So damn excited to see it. Hopefully you guys don't consider this misuse of the thread. Arclight + dinner...

Off Vine, Kabuki, Fabiolus or Los Balcones de Peru? (No to Umami; done it far too often).

schoolofruckus
06-08-2011, 04:30 PM
As long as you're seeing Tree of Life, you can do whatever the fuck you want here.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-08-2011, 04:38 PM
Rage, I've never eaten at any of those places, but let me know where you go and how it was. I always just end up eating in the Arclight's restaurant

TallGuyCM
06-08-2011, 04:49 PM
As long as you're seeing Tree of Life, you can do whatever the fuck you want here.

QFT :)

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-08-2011, 06:34 PM
Saw Tree of Life this afternoon. There is not much to say at this point. Jared, care to watch it with me this weekend? I feel very overwhelmed with what I saw. I feel like it needs a notes section written by David Foster Wallace. Or an Ulyssean annotated bibliography. Needless to say, there is nothing I can compare it to, visually or structurally, and that just may be my lack of film knowledge. But that is also just genius of Malick to come up with. I can see how some would go with The Fountain for comparison but with respect to the filmmakers, each do something exponentially different, one going the spiritual/scifi route and the other something cosmic and natural. I don't know if any of this computes so I will watch again for a better post.

Jared, I can go Sunday or Monday evening if you'd like to join.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-08-2011, 07:12 PM
EverythingIsTerrible is doing a 5 day festival at Cinefamily over 4th of July weekend...that's a lot of ridiculous for $80. It's very tempting...
http://www.cinefamily.org/films/the-2nd-annual-everything-is-festival/#everything-is-festival-day-one

Miroir Noir
06-08-2011, 07:18 PM
Do any of you guys come up this way in January?

guedita
06-08-2011, 07:23 PM
I didn't even know that Haneke did Cache AND The White Ribbon until right now and I saw "pschaw" to all of you haters. The level of terse anxiety I was riddled with during both of those films is unmatched. I don't know, or at least I can't name, another filmmaker that evokes the very particular emotion I felt during each of those films

And obviously I am an idiot for not realizing it was the same dude both times (that's what she said).

PotVsKtl
06-08-2011, 08:27 PM
I can go Sunday or Monday evening if you'd like to join.

I am officially inviting myself.

wmgaretjax
06-08-2011, 08:38 PM
if i can go, it'll be sunday night. not sure what my schedule is gonna be like this weekend yet though...

daxton
06-08-2011, 08:42 PM
I wish it was playing near me.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-08-2011, 10:26 PM
Oh wait, isn't it a one-week-only screening thing in SF? If not let's make a night of it. Pot, you're always welcome.

suprefan
06-08-2011, 10:40 PM
Nice deal on movie tickets. $9 for 2 movie tickets valid at fandango.com movie theaters

https://livingsocial.com/deals/57725?ref=conf-jp&rpi=13274759

PotVsKtl
06-09-2011, 12:56 PM
I don't think it's entirely necessary for Park Chan-Wook to make two vampire films.

cutterbutter
06-09-2011, 01:48 PM
Went to an early screening of Super 8 last night. Stepping back into childhood for 2 hours. Wonderful modern day homage to early Spielberg films.

M Sparks
06-09-2011, 01:58 PM
EverythingIsTerrible is doing a 5 day festival at Cinefamily over 4th of July weekend...that's a lot of ridiculous for $80. It's very tempting...
http://www.cinefamily.org/films/the-2nd-annual-everything-is-festival/#everything-is-festival-day-one

Wow, Negativeland and Firesign Theatre!?!

TallGuyCM
06-09-2011, 05:00 PM
Jessica Chastain is on Jimmy Fallon tonight...it'll be interesting to hear what she has to say about working with Malick, etc.

schoolofruckus
06-09-2011, 05:04 PM
SPOILERZ: it's going to be a lot of gushing about how he changed the art of filmmaking forever.

cutterbutter
06-09-2011, 06:41 PM
The new Netflix "Watch Instantly" page is fucking awful. That is all.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-10-2011, 12:29 AM
Saw Tree of Life tonight. About 1/3 of the way through I started to think oh dear, the Emperor has no clothes. I mean those shots of the beginning of life in space and on earth were absolutely stunning to look at, but where was Malick going with this? Then I started worrying that I might be a philistine. But then, luckily, somewhere about half way through it clicked. It's simply one of the most magnificent experiences I've ever had at the cinema. I feel fully incapable of being able to encapsulate what the experience of watching this film was like for me. I agree with the poster who said that the film may appeal more to men. My group was 4 guys and 2 girls. I will say that the gentlemen were definitely more engaged by the film than the ladies were. It was an unrelenting almost exhausting experience and afterward we all wanted to go home, but instead we just stood outside the Arclight in a daze talking about the film for over an hour.

I was so struck by how Malick was able to make a film about such monumental themes so delicate, so... intimate. I'm an older brother and so many scenes between the older and middle brother shot straight to the heart with me. The tenderness between them, the knowing looks, the undeniable bond of brotherhood, the violence of youth... it all just triggered so many memories and emotions for me; for all of the guys in my group, actually. I wish I could watch this film with my brother. I mean, I just got home and I called my brother and left him a voicemail just to tell him that I love him because I rarely do that. I can't remember a film ever having that kind of effect on me.

****SPOILERS IN THIS PARAGRAPH****This film has so many small moments amongst all the stunning shots of space and early life. The way the older dinosaur puts its paw protectively on the head of the younger dinosaur, the way the middle brother looks up from his guitar and smiles at his dad when he realizes he's accompanying him on the piano from inside the house, the apology and the acceptance after the bb gun incident. How could you heart not break after that??

And those kids? My GOD, what naturals. This film is just perfectly cast. Just... go see it.

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 06:19 AM
Fuck yeah. But you should maybe put a spoiler warning or some camo on that last paragraph.

wmgaretjax
06-10-2011, 07:00 AM
yeah... the whole older/young thing in the first 1/3 of the film... i didn't see it as "protective" at all...

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 07:34 AM
Thanks Rage, your review is written in a way that works for me.

Too many reviews I've read from laypeople on this one have cranked up the Flowerey Prose Adjective Machine in a way that I always tend to find a bit suspicious. Whenever I come across that sort of writing I get the sense that the review is less about the piece being discussed and the writer's reaction than to it than it is about who they see themselves posing as through showing themselves being affected in a certain way. Feels false to me. But we all have our things, hang-ups, etc.

Anyhoo, still looking forward to this one at any rate, but your review helps in that it read more like a person that experienced a piece of art and less like a creative writing student trying to portray themselves a certain way. So thanks for that.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 07:39 AM
BTW, thats not a swipe at anyone in this thread. Im talking about other goofballs.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 08:18 AM
Phew! For all you worry warts out there, Embarcadero Center Cinemas is still playing The Tree of Life for another week.

So does 5:10 work for people? I get off at 4 and that would work perfectly for me on Sunday. Otherwise there is a 7 o'clock showing.

And OUCH HandBanana! I said I would write a better post after my second viewing!!! :sorry

Also, RATAoki, that was an excellent review and it sort of captured what I felt as well. I have an older sister and we would fight a lot but there was also a lot of forgiving (due to all the fighting) so that moment after the SPOILER BB to the finger, the movie really kind of sunk in for me.

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 09:00 AM
yeah... the whole older/young thing in the first 1/3 of the film... i didn't see it as "protective" at all...

True. I figured the bigger dinosaur was deciding whether or not to stomp the small one out, and thus having its own nature vs. grace struggle. But Aoki's alternate take is interesting.

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 09:07 AM
Thanks Rage, your review is written in a way that works for me.

Too many reviews I've read from laypeople on this one have cranked up the Flowerey Prose Adjective Machine in a way that I always tend to find a bit suspicious. Whenever I come across that sort of writing I get the sense that the review is less about the piece being discussed and the writer's reaction than to it than it is about who they see themselves posing as through showing themselves being affected in a certain way. Feels false to me. But we all have our things, hang-ups, etc.

Anyhoo, still looking forward to this one at any rate, but your review helps in that it read more like a person that experienced a piece of art and less like a creative writing student trying to portray themselves a certain way. So thanks for that.

Part of the reason for that hyperbolic language is because the film takes an intimate, personal perspective on some really gigantic, universe-level shit. I'm not talking strictly about the overtly cosmic material - it's also the emotions and the attempt to define one's own life in a way that makes sense with everything that has come before us. When you're engaging with and attempting to describe a film that tackles that kind of search (especially as well as this one did), extreme expression is the only way that feels right.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 09:10 AM
One more thing. When I went to see the film at the Embarcadero Center Cinema, it was early afternoonish on a Wednesday, so I knew the audience was going to consist of senior citizens. There are a few good and a few annoying things about watching movies with the elder folk: they are either really quiet or asleep thus very respectful of other moviegoers; they are talkative in a loud-whispery kind of way, and they like to move a lot. This may not be everyone else's experience but for someone who sees most of his movies during the early afternoon, it is prevalent. Anyway, as the movie was going through the life on earth and other planets sequences, three (count 'em, THREE) different groups of seniors got up and left. One group had seating arrangement problems for the first 15 minutes of the movie, shifting around and yelling into each other's ears, because I think they were hard of hearing, about how they were going to switch seats and how one wanted the aisle and the other wanted to be more in on the row. And then not 15 minutes had gone by and they decided the movie wasn't for them. Another group had a member who sighed really heavily then told his partner in an outside voice (unnecessary) that "this is ridiculous" and "I'm gonna see if we can get our money back and see that other movie, the Woody Allen one." I was stunned. I can understand that maybe a movie blows or doesn't vibe well with certain people but the movie had barely begun, we were maybe 30 minutes in, and they didn't even give it a chance. AND THEN the only other group in my age range whipped out their cell phones and started cell phoning, I don't know what they were doing on them but the glare and all was distracting. I was able to tune out a lot of it half way through, and by then the crowd was sparse and who were left were captivated, I'm guessing, because they were quiet and attentive.

wmgaretjax
06-10-2011, 09:15 AM
True. I figured

yeah. that's how I took it too.

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 09:20 AM
My experiences with seniors at movies has been generally awful - mostly because of the talk-back factor. I don't know if talking during a film was more widely-accepted at an earlier point in history - the way that many dipshits now consider texting during a film to be acceptable - but I feel like every time I see a person above 59 sitting near me, I have to prepare myself to tell them to shut up.

I waited months to see Silent Light - long-chronicled as one of my favorite recent movies - on a big screen, even after I'd already seen it on an import DVD. It finally played at LACMA for one weekend, and I swear, the theater was full of old people who felt the need to say aloud everything the film was suggesting. Like, the movie is about a Mennonite guy having an affair, and it's pretty obvious early on that everyone in the community (including his wife) is aware of it....yet at one point 90 minutes in, this old woman behind me exclaims "she knows!" (re: the wife). During the film's climax - when the wife returns to life at her own funeral after being kissed by the other woman - this same lady sitting beside me said "she's awake!" I wanted to burn the theater down.

wmgaretjax
06-10-2011, 09:22 AM
my screening for tree of life was fine despite all the old folk. that said, i heard some pretty funny conversations by other attendees while walking back to BART. "god... what a dick! just, like, give us an ending... y'know?!"

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 09:32 AM
Haaaa.....after both of my viewings, I was desperate to not hear other people speak. Granted, we went as a big group the first time, but even then, I wanted to just shut myself off from conversation.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-10-2011, 09:52 AM
My friend Clarke had a great story about seeing Moon with his wife...after the film ended this old couple starting leaving the woman goes, "GOT ANY OTHER BRIGHT IDEAS HERBERT?!?!?!" hahaha

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 10:25 AM
Haha, these are great. If Cara has a minute, she should tell you guys all about our experience seeing Revolutionary Road in Santa Barbara. The old folk there were down right chatty. It was just as obnoxious as a mid-twenties black chick at a slasher flick.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 10:35 AM
To be fair tho, Revolutionary Road was pretty bad.
Winslet and Shannon were both incredible though.
DiCaprio once again proved that he has one note in his repertoire and he only ever modulates it by squinting and smoking.

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 10:43 AM
Shannon was GREAT in that movie. I actually thought the movie as a whole was excellent except for the horrendously Spielberged ending.

Which, by definition, means I ultimately remember it badly.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 10:48 AM
Sam Mendes' critiques of suburbia (and this goes double for that fucking cartoon American Beauty) strike me as shallow and suggest that he's never actually spent any time in a suburb.

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 10:49 AM
Also, I disagree on Leo. I thought that movie contained maybe his best performance, and he's got several that are really strong. One review noted that his baby-faced, boyish looks were in some ways used against him in that film - an observation that's clearly stayed with me as much as anything in the actual film.

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 10:53 AM
See, I never bought Rev Road as a commentary on suburbia as much as on the crippling fear that drives a lot of people's lives into the ground. Maybe that's what you meant (there's obviously ample connection between the two), but I didn't feel that the forces in their lives were specific to the environment.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-10-2011, 11:16 AM
Fuck yeah. But you should maybe put a spoiler warning or some camo on that last paragraph.

Oh right you are. Just edited my op. Sorry about that. I think the lack of traditional linear plot made me totally forget that there could be spoilers for this type of film.




yeah... the whole older/young thing in the first 1/3 of the film... i didn't see it as "protective" at all...

Yeah, looking back on it now, you're right. Definitely not protective. But not entirely... oppressive either. Gosh, Malick's got complex emotional arcs for effin dinosaurs! Although I still think the dinosaur scenes were a tad goofy, I do like how they tied back to the lives of the family.




Thanks Rage, your review is written in a way that works for me.

Too many reviews I've read from laypeople on this one have cranked up the Flowerey Prose Adjective Machine in a way that I always tend to find a bit suspicious. Whenever I come across that sort of writing I get the sense that the review is less about the piece being discussed and the writer's reaction than to it than it is about who they see themselves posing as through showing themselves being affected in a certain way. Feels false to me. But we all have our things, hang-ups, etc.

Anyhoo, still looking forward to this one at any rate, but your review helps in that it read more like a person that experienced a piece of art and less like a creative writing student trying to portray themselves a certain way. So thanks for that.


'Welcome. Just to be clear, this was in no way intended to be a formal review. Rather it was just my raw reaction to the film last night. Just one dude's experience. There were plenty of people leaving the theatre grumbling about "bombast", "overly long Natural Geographic sequences" and "no plot" so who knows. I get the feeling that most people will either be utterly captivated or completely frustrated by this film.

I'm sure all of the film geeks (said lovingly) in here already know this, but I was very interested to see that Douglas Trumbull, who did visual effects for 2001: A Space Odyssey, worked on Tree of Life with Malick. For some reason, I don't see him on the imdb credits, though he appears to be credited in multiple articles.

I can't stop thinking about this film. Although this probably sounds silly, I'm worried that a second viewing might expose more of the flaws in the film and lesson the enormous impact it had on me.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 11:18 AM
DiCaprio is an outstanding actor when he wants and needs to be. I'm going to tell Scorsese that some dickshit on the internet thinks he's bad at casting leading men.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-10-2011, 11:22 AM
Not a DiCaprio fan here at all, but I thought he was excellent in The Aviator.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 11:28 AM
He's definitely one of the better portrayers of the mentally challenged.

http://fictionalreality43.files.wordpress.com/2010/04/778622fb687b2b94.jpg?w=400&h=300

Compared to this, for example.

http://www.cinemablend.com/images/news_img/9788/_9788.jpg

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 11:38 AM
I'll give you that but that was nearly 20 years ago and it's been the same performance in different clothes since then.
He can't emote, possibly due to the fact that he has never not been a famous good looking actor. So all his performances are incredibly surface and overt. It's a shame because I actually think he wants it and tries. You can see him trying. I just never feel anything from him other than "watch me! I'm acting as hard as I can!"

This is fine for a movie star. That's how being a star works. You in different clothes over and over. But I just don't buy it as performance or inhabiting a character.

When DeNiro was Scorcese's boy sure he was always DeNiro, but he had way more tools in his arsenal. You could forget you were watching him and follow say Jake Lamotta's story. DiCapro seems to try and substitute volume and facial expression for Character.

Just my opinion.

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 11:40 AM
He's great at playing a lot of things. He struggles with accents and unnatural-leaning material (I'm not thinking entire films as much as certain scenes or monologues that are scripted to be big "actor" moments), but so do many other great actors.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 11:48 AM
http://cdn.islandcrisis.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/leoaskid.jpg

http://www.hotflick.net/flicks/1995_The_Basketball_Diaries/995BLD_Leonardo_DiCaprio_001.jpg

http://d.yimg.com/b/util/anysize/360,http%3A%2F%2Fus.ent4.yimg.com%2Fmovies.yahoo.c om%2Fimages%2Fhv%2Fphoto%2Fmovie_pix%2Fmiramax_fil ms%2Fgangs_of_new_york%2Fleonardo_dicaprio%2Fgangs 3.jpg?v=2

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_ZVkb0M61jmc/TEtNhMbkmaI/AAAAAAAAA78/hNctZxRJxEw/s640/leonardo+dicaprio.jpg

Same performance, different clothes.

Still-ill
06-10-2011, 11:49 AM
Eh, we can't all be Robin Williams.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 11:50 AM
That should be an acronymized thing. Like "Damn dude, Ben Stiller was all SPDC on Duplex, thass wack!"

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 11:52 AM
Excepting the first one, which I covered in my post already, those are not really all that different of performances no.
Still Leo pretty much playing Leo in different clothes saying different words.

Still-ill
06-10-2011, 11:52 AM
or Garry Shandling.

Still-ill
06-10-2011, 11:53 AM
Excepting the first one, which I covered in my post already, those are not really all that different of performances no.
Still Leo pretty much playing Leo in different clothes saying different words.

playing different personas.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 11:54 AM
Excepting the first one, which I covered in my post already, those are not really all that different of performances no.
Still Leo pretty much playing Leo in different clothes saying different words.

Basketball Diaries is the same type of performance as Titanic and Aviator? Do you know what a performance is?

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 11:54 AM
Now take DeNiro in King of Comedy, Raging Bull, Cape Fear, and Goodfellas.
Shorter time span and wildly greater range.

I'm not saying Leo is terrible. But I don't agree that he's a great actor as much as a great star with limited range.

Still-ill
06-10-2011, 11:56 AM
You do have a point with DeNiro.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 11:56 AM
http://cynicritics.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/leo.jpeg

I hate it when retarded heroin addicts with OCD start bar fights.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 12:02 PM
And pot continues on trying to push a topic (Gilbert Grape) that I've already covered. With jpegs no less.
But then, youre a standard-issue contrarian message board insult twat laboring under the delusion that there isn't an absolutely identical one of you on every single message board everywhere. If it were still 2002 I might give some weight to your shit-flinging, but it would still be 3 years past expiration.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 12:04 PM
You understand that there's only one picture from Gilbert Grape, right? Let's count together on one finger.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-10-2011, 12:04 PM
I really, really enjoy Dicaprio is pretty much everything he's in, but you make a good point Jason. He's just charismatic and entertaining enough and in the films he's in are good enough that i don't care.

Like, i never hear people complaining that Woody Allen isn't a broad enough actor

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-10-2011, 12:05 PM
You understand that there's only one picture from Gilbert Grape, right? Let's count together on one finger.

to be fair, you did use the word "retarded" in the description of your last image, which is what he was referencing

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 12:05 PM
In other news, does 5:10 work for you guys, Jared and Ryan, on Sunday? There is a great bar/eatery called Elephant & Castle that a friend of mine works for that we can hip up since it's near the theater. Lots of beer on tap, some good appetizers as well.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 12:06 PM
to be fair, you did use the word "retarded" in the description of your last image, which is what he was referencing

To be fair, trying to call out a conglomeration of all of the multiple types of characters that an actor has portrayed over their career in such a way as to put in question the idea that they're one-note is not focusing on one of those chracters in particular, and a retort that consists of "but I already said Gilbert Grape was good" is fucking useless and doesn't advance the debate is any meaningful way.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 12:08 PM
In other news, does 5:10 work for you guys, Jared and Ryan, on Sunday? There is a great bar/eatery called Elephant & Castle that a friend of mine works for that we can hip up since it's near the theater. Lots of beer on tap, some good appetizers as well.

I'm good with that.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 12:10 PM
But jpegs and stale insults do advance the debate.
And what I was talking about was that yes those are different characters. Played with (again in my opinion) limited range.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 12:10 PM
How does a person playing a wide range of characters display that they have limited range? You can say he's just not a very good actor, at which point you'd be wrong. Right now you're just not making any sense.

amyzzz
06-10-2011, 12:11 PM
I agree with Gabe and Ryan. I could probably say that on just about any page of this thread. Leo has really grown as an actor, especially with The Aviator and The Departed.

Starraven
06-10-2011, 12:13 PM
ha.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 12:14 PM
The character is written. It's external to the performance. It exists whether played well or not.
If I played Jake LaMotta it would suck. But the character would still exist.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 12:15 PM
But the actor should inhabit that character. And create and flesh out character within it.
Not terribly hard to understand.

wmgaretjax
06-10-2011, 12:30 PM
I'm good with that.

i'll give a tentative yes... not entirely sure at this point.

KungFuJoe
06-10-2011, 01:29 PM
Damn Donnie Yen is on a role! You don't need subtitles to see how fantastic this looks. Let's hope the rest of the film lives up to these 8 minutes.

oHsLIpBoRqw&feature=player_embedded

This also raises my expectations for The Grandmasters.

Miroir Noir
06-10-2011, 02:06 PM
Trailer for Errol Morris' new doc Tabloid:

TWeQce0cZsE

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 02:28 PM
I'm pretty excited for that, even though I wasn't a fan of The Fog of War.

Miroir Noir
06-10-2011, 02:44 PM
I love Errol Morris, possibly my favorite contemporary American filmmaker, period. He spent the entirety of the Bush years wrapped up in political projects, so it will be refreshing to see him get back to eccentrics.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 03:21 PM
@TallGuyCM or anyone else for that matter.

I watched Syndrome and a Century the other night and loved the cinematography and for some weird reason found all the dialogue to not be boring at all, even though some of it seemed to be. Tropical Malady comes in the mail tomorrow. But my question is, does Weerasethakul always delve into the past life part of Thai life? Syndrome had a lot of scenes where the characters all talked about their possible past lives and probable reincarnated lives, and the title of his latest one is Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives... I really like his abstract style and want to know a little bit more about him since it is apparent that you are a big fan.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-11-2011, 09:30 AM
Saw Le Quattro Volte last night at the Lumiere... pretty good. Maybe it was just the way the movie was made but it had a sort of blur to the whole thing. I was sitting in the middle-middle of the theater and I find I have perfect vision but 90% of the movie had a slight blur to it. Aside from that, the fact that is it dialogueless made it appealing, and the four different "characters" each had moments of sheer grace. I'd recommend it to anyone who ISN'T tired when watching. It is a bit dull at times.

TallGuyCM
06-11-2011, 01:26 PM
@TallGuyCM or anyone else for that matter.

I watched Syndrome and a Century the other night and loved the cinematography and for some weird reason found all the dialogue to not be boring at all, even though some of it seemed to be. Tropical Malady comes in the mail tomorrow. But my question is, does Weerasethakul always delve into the past life part of Thai life? Syndrome had a lot of scenes where the characters all talked about their possible past lives and probable reincarnated lives, and the title of his latest one is Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives... I really like his abstract style and want to know a little bit more about him since it is apparent that you are a big fan.

If I recall correctly, Syndrome actually addresses the past life issue more than the other two, ironically enough. Even though Uncle Boonmee has that title, it's not as focused on in that film as you'd think. And Malady is indeed a very spiritual film, but doesn't necessarily focus on the past life thing excessively either.

But I could be way off. I watched all three of them in nearly a week's span and that was it, and that was over six months ago now.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-12-2011, 12:23 PM
X-Men: First Class really is as good as a big summer movie or superhero movie could ever be. I was prepared to like it and was optimistic based on all the good reviews, but man, it really is a fucking solid movie from beginning to end. the two leads being so good really helps it. I'll echo the statements that January Jones is just fucking awful, but she's not in it enough to really bother me. I would gladly welcome a First Class 2 to see this incarnation of the two sides in this early time period.

PotVsKtl
06-12-2011, 12:27 PM
You're like G-Men.

No, we're X-Men.

Hey movie, go fuck yourself.

buddy
06-12-2011, 04:22 PM
Saw Midnight in Paris tonight. Man, I really wanted to like this one. I'm one of those fools who follows Allen around hoping he'll have another great one in him. This film was just so forgettable. I will say that Owen Wilson was a surprisingly good stand-in for the Allen character and Marion Coitillard, as a mistress of Picasso, looked absolutely luminous every time she was on screen and it was amusing for a few minutes to see which literary or art great would show up next. There's Picasso arguing with Gertrude Stein! There's Hemingway getting soused and threatening to get into fights! I kept thinking of Purple Rose of Cairo throughout the whole thing; a film also obsessed with nostalgia and romanticism of past eras. But that film really was as charming and funny as it thought it was. Did anyone see You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger? Still haven't seen that one yet.

saw it today, and it enjoyed it for what it was. didn't really think it was trying to be charming or funny, but just simply a nostalgic trip for both Wilson's character, and the audience, as well. i can understand what Allen was going for in showing us how many times people are unsatisfied with the time or place in which we live, and that traveling to different time or place we'll never truly be satisfied, at least not for long. unless we make the change in lifestyle or thought process within ourselves. although, i could be over analyzing. definitely not classic, but enjoyable for what it was.

schoolofruckus
06-13-2011, 07:46 AM
I watched Bresson's Pickpocket on Saturday. I liked it a little more than Diary of a Country Priest, but there were still some elements that bothered me. Mainly the way the voiceover was used; despite Paul Schrader's claims otherwise on the DVD intro, I felt like it was almost always redundant and unnecessary. Still definitely worth seeing. I think I'll try Mouchette next.

I also watched Levy's Date Night later that evening. It was wholly excruciating, and that's coming from someone who has laughed at basically everyone involved at some point in the past.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-13-2011, 08:43 AM
Date Night? The one starring Fey and Carell? With a cameo by Wahlberg? Yeah, that one was kinda lame. I saw it for free at the Independent so I didn't really care if it sucked, but it was bad.

I watched Tropical Malady last night. I'm gonna have to say I did not care for it. It was sort of a mythical version of Predator with a love story. I thought that the combination of the genres (fantasy, thriller, romance) was not held together. And the fact that it went from normal life (going to the movies, falling in love, meeting a family, flirting... things of that nature) to a sort of storybook fairy tale that involved SPOILER talking primates, a shape-shifting shaman, and wall paintings illustrating what we have seen or will see. However, there were several things I enjoyed: the acting from Sakda Kaewbuadee and Banlop Lomnoi and how they turned this unlikely love story into something believable and true to life, the direction by Apichatpong Weerasethakul who still has a keen eye for human nature... in nature, AND the name drop of his 2011 film in the first half of the movie. I feel like there is a definite overarching thread that runs throughout his films and I'll only truly enjoy this thread after I have seen all his films.

Down Rodeo
06-13-2011, 09:27 AM
It really hurts me that I've been out of the country until now and haven't been able to 1) see Tree of Life or 2) join in the great dialogue about it here. That will all change once I'm back in CA next week though...

P.S. Gabe - watch Au Hasard Balthazar. You won't regret it.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-13-2011, 09:28 AM
So last night I couldn't sleep so I watched American Wedding on TBS. January Jones is in that movie as Cadence, the sister of the bandcamp girl. All I have to say is, even in a B-movie about getting laid and drunk and sabotaging the sex life of friends, she can't act worth shit. The whole time she was being hit on by Stifler and Finch and she couldn't even act her way out of the scene, it was like a car wreck every time she smiled off their advances. Maybe Mad Men was all she was made for.

schoolofruckus
06-13-2011, 12:35 PM
P.S. Gabe - watch Au Hasard Balthazar. You won't regret it.

Actually, that's a good call. Since my main issue with Diary and Pickpocket was the main character's narration, it would make sense to try one in which the main character doesn't speak. My next Netflix delivery will be this one and The Temptation of St. Tony, which I already saw and loved last October.

TallGuyCM
06-13-2011, 02:22 PM
Mouchette doesn't say a lot either fwiw.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-13-2011, 09:52 PM
I just purchased The Thin Red Line from the Criterion Collection on Blu-Ray and loved the short essay on Terrence Malick and the film itself titled "This Side of Paradise" in the liner notes. And as I was reading this I thought: Why doesn't Schoolio/Gabe start a new thread about Movie Purchases (similar to the CD/LP Purchases thread) where people discuss their movie collection (VHS, DVD, Blu-Ray) and other people talk about recently purchases movies and what owning one offers. I understand most of what they offer can be had through Netflix (commentaries, bonus features, and such) but after reading through that essay in the booklet, I know no one can get that through netflix, and so on. Just a thought. And since I'm currently in the mindset to begin a movie collection, I thought that a new thread would be the perfect place to argue and discuss which purchases are necessary/desired or which are just awful and should be avoided.

TallGuyCM
06-13-2011, 11:24 PM
In anticipation of (hopefully getting into) Drive on Friday, I watched Nicolas Winding Refn's Bronson tonight. Holy shit, what an absolutely fucking brilliant performance by Tom Hardy...it's really a shame that Refn isn't a more well-known filmmaker.

In my book, Hardy's depiction of Bronson was every bit the tour de force that much lauded (and similarly deranged) roles like Nicholson in Cuckoo and Hopkins in Silence were. And if Refn was more a prominent director in the public eye, I have a feeling that both he and Hardy would have been much more recognized for this film.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-13-2011, 11:42 PM
i absolutely adore Bronson and that adoration made me so much more disappointing in the fact that i didn't love Valhalla Rising. I still need to see the Pusher Trilogy though. I definitely want to see Drive

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-14-2011, 12:18 AM
Bronson is a great film. A truly magnificent biopic of Bronson and the craziness behind him and his career. I had no idea Refn directed this. Now I want to see all of his films.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-14-2011, 07:43 AM
I watched The Enforcer last night. I kept reading that it wasn't as good as the first 2 Dirty Harry movies, but really it's the same damn movie. And that is totally okay. I very much enjoy watching Harry Callahan scream at his boss, smash his car through building, beat the shit out of people, and chase thugs on roof tops while crazy jazz music blares in the background. What a fucking fun series of movies.

schoolofruckus
06-14-2011, 08:36 AM
Cinema Guild is becoming my new favorite indie distributor....not only did they release the beautiful Putty Hill earlier this year, but they also have the upcoming Aurora, The Turin Horse, and as of today, Nuri Bilge Ceylan's Once Upon a Time in Anatolia.

bobert
06-14-2011, 09:23 AM
Surprised by all of the love for Bronson. Interesting film in some aspects, but for the most part I thought that it tried way too hard.

schoolofruckus
06-14-2011, 09:35 AM
I agree with all the praise for Hardy - a legitimate high-voltage screen presence - but otherwise, I wasn't terribly impressed with it.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-14-2011, 09:43 AM
I guess to me, since it's basically Hardy on screen for the entire film and you spend a great deal of time inside of his head, his performance really IS the movie. It does meander around a bit, and I kind of wish they cut a bulk of his "origin" and had more of his real-life zany prison exploits in it, but all in all i really enjoyed it.

amyzzz
06-14-2011, 10:09 AM
I was so struck by how Malick was able to make a film about such monumental themes so delicate, so... intimate. I'm an older brother and so many scenes between the older and middle brother shot straight to the heart with me. The tenderness between them, the knowing looks, the undeniable bond of brotherhood, the violence of youth... it all just triggered so many memories and emotions for me; for all of the guys in my group, actually. I wish I could watch this film with my brother. I mean, I just got home and I called my brother and left him a voicemail just to tell him that I love him because I rarely do that. I can't remember a film ever having that kind of effect on me.

****SPOILERS IN THIS PARAGRAPH****This film has so many small moments amongst all the stunning shots of space and early life. The way the older dinosaur puts its paw protectively on the head of the younger dinosaur, the way the middle brother looks up from his guitar and smiles at his dad when he realizes he's accompanying him on the piano from inside the house, the apology and the acceptance after the bb gun incident. How could you heart not break after that??

And those kids? My GOD, what naturals. This film is just perfectly cast. Just... go see it.

MORE SPOILERS
Your review makes me want to see it again. I saw Tree of Life with mountmccabe on Sunday, and I agree that it was very intimate and breathtaking -- the family scenes and natural scenes had a very soothing rhythm that lulled me, which made the scenes with the boy gang torturing animals and the brothers shooting the bb gun more shocking and disturbing.

daxton
06-14-2011, 11:46 AM
Anyone seen Bunny and the Bull? I've been waiting to see it for almost a year now and just found it on Netflix instant. It's a British comedy about a neurotic young man suffering from agoraphopia who relives (without leaving his flat) a European road trip he took. I'm getting a lot of Amelie and The Science of Sleep vibes from it. But it's a bit more on the humorous side than those two.

0L9VlgJitmA

TallGuyCM
06-14-2011, 01:47 PM
I guess to me, since it's basically Hardy on screen for the entire film and you spend a great deal of time inside of his head, his performance really IS the movie.

Yes, exactly.

lunatic core
06-15-2011, 02:45 AM
NSFW
5PcAQbhnGNs

schoolofruckus
06-15-2011, 12:47 PM
I'm going to see F.W. Murnau's Sunrise tonight at Cinefamily, if anyone cares to join. There'll be a live score by Beck collaborators Brian LeBarton and Joey Waronker - pretty excited for this.

In other news, Criterion announced today that Carlos will finally be available in late September - fuck yeah. Also, apparently they've teased rather blatantly that Kieslowski's Three Colors trilogy will be added soon. I look forward to discovering all four of these films sometime soon. I need to catch up with Double Life of Veronique on Criterion BD as well.

Sebastian - I'll respond to your call for a DVD/BD purchases thread in a bit...

schoolofruckus
06-15-2011, 07:02 PM
I've been meaning to remind Los Angeles that the great City of Life and Death - an epic and compassionate story about the Rape of Nanking, or if you prefer, the Chinese Holocaust - opens at the Nuart on Friday. It was one of my best of 2009 picks after I saw it at AFI fest that year, and it's a riveting, thoroughly objective look at an event that I didn't know much about. You've got a week to find time for it.

bmack86
06-15-2011, 08:12 PM
Oh man, Sunrise is one of my all time favorite films. I can't wait to hear what you think.

schoolofruckus
06-15-2011, 10:12 PM
Gladly. Sunrise was fucking mind-blowing - an emotional mushroom cloud that has essentially redefined my perspectives on what silent films have to offer. The eerie electronic score by LeBarton and Waronker - a lot of Wendy Carlos-type shit - was hugely enjoyable; I think that I personally prefer these kinds of contemporarily-scored presentations as opposed to seeing a lot of the early 20th century films with their original scores, because those scores are often a big deterrent for me. But even if I had watched this with zero music, it would have bowled me over. It's an absolutely visionary film, but one which deals with some of the most direct - and directly affecting - emotions known to man. I was woefully underslept due to last night's Flaming Lips show, but I was riveted instantly and throughout.

Miroir Noir
06-15-2011, 10:20 PM
For me, those four Kieslowski international co-productions are the single best body of work put together by one filmmaker during the '90s, just narrowly ahead of Wong Kar-Wai's run from Days of Being Wild to Happy Together. Absolutely great filmmaking.

The real Criterion treat announced this month is that they've finally gotten around to the first two Chabrol films!

KungFuJoe
06-15-2011, 10:24 PM
The Attack the Block red band trailer helps to believe the hype.

EjK9TNj_FN0

lunatic core
06-16-2011, 07:41 AM
Watched The Bridge yesterday. It's a documentary about suicide hotspot the Golden Gate Bridge. Specifically the 24 that happened during 2004 when they were almost constantly filming the Bridge.

It's a pretty amazing film.

RedHotSgtPeppers
06-16-2011, 11:48 PM
Just saw Green Lantern.

It was fucking retarded. The special effects were horrible. The 100% CGI characters were made with computer technology comparitive to late-90's Veggie Tales. No joke. Shit story. Shit acting. It should have gone straight to DVD.

On the plus side, Tim Robbins' douchey character dies.

TallGuyCM
06-17-2011, 12:00 AM
Haha, I could have told you it'd turn out like that. Why didn't you just give one of us $12 and we could have kicked you in the balls for the same effect?

RedHotSgtPeppers
06-17-2011, 12:02 AM
I only went to spend some time with an old friend who is visiting home from West Point. I could have given two shits about seeing Green Lantern, but it was what he/the group wanted to do. So I went.

Honestly, I would have taken the kick to the balls instead of enduring that garbage.

TallGuyCM
06-17-2011, 12:04 AM
Let's just plan on doing that when you have the urge to see Transformers in a few weeks. ;)

RedHotSgtPeppers
06-17-2011, 12:10 AM
lol, sounds like a good plan. Got your steel-toed boots ready?

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-17-2011, 12:13 AM
I'm sorry, but I HAVE to see Green Lantern in the theater. It's a nerd thing.

On a completely different note, I've had Days Of Heaven sitting at my house for over a week and I'm dying to finally see it, but I haven't had a good time to be able to sit and fully appreciate it as I would like.

TallGuyCM
06-17-2011, 12:16 AM
I just watched it for the first time a few months ago, it's good to wait until the right time. And make sure the room's pitch black.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-17-2011, 12:22 AM
We're dog-sitting for my girlfriend's brother this weekend and he's got a 50"+ tv, so I'm hoping it will provide a good opportunity.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-17-2011, 12:22 AM
This sounds so oddly domesticated for me.

TallGuyCM
06-17-2011, 12:26 AM
Make sure you have the Criterion Bluray.

RedHotSgtPeppers
06-17-2011, 12:47 AM
I'm sorry, but I HAVE to see Green Lantern in the theater. It's a nerd thing.

Don't expect much.

schoolofruckus
06-17-2011, 10:48 AM
I watched Guy Maddin's My Winnipeg last night. It was a gloriously entertaining and ambiguously-dramatized portrait of Maddin's childhood and hometown, and it fits right in between my recent viewings of The Tree of Life and Voyage in Time.

Still-ill
06-17-2011, 11:27 AM
Just finished The Killing of a Chinese Bookie. Hot damn, that was fucking great. The first half didn't floor me, but the more important half did. The acting, the change of perspectives, the lighting, loved it. I need to watch A Woman Under the Influence now.

schoolofruckus
06-17-2011, 01:04 PM
Just finished The Killing of a Chinese Bookie. Hot damn, that was fucking great. The first half didn't floor me, but the more important half did. The acting, the change of perspectives, the lighting, loved it. I need to watch A Woman Under the Influence now.

Awesome. Was that your first time with Cassavetes?

bug on your lip
06-17-2011, 01:06 PM
I watched Guy Maddin's My Winnipeg last night. It was a gloriously entertaining and ambiguously-dramatized portrait of Maddin's childhood and hometown, and it fits right in between my recent viewings of The Tree of Life and Voyage in Time.


doooood..

love that movie...

it makes me so excited that Winnipeg has an NHL team again. It's like the movie got closure.

HandBanana
06-17-2011, 01:36 PM
Maddin is a hugely underrated talent.

Grandma
06-17-2011, 01:47 PM
The Green Lantern is up there with the last 3 minutes of Air Force One for the worst CGI ever used in a major motion picture. Its as if it was made on a sega saturn development kit...

5BBa51CHPtc

wmgaretjax
06-17-2011, 02:21 PM
Maddin is a hugely underrated talent.

i love maddin, but i don't think he's underrated at all. he's a total indie-darling. i'm fairly certain every maddin film i've seen in theaters (which, i believe, is all of them with the exception of dracula) has been with a sell out audience.

Still-ill
06-17-2011, 02:24 PM
Awesome. Was that your first time with Cassavetes?

Yep, I've been putting him off for a long time.

schoolofruckus
06-17-2011, 02:27 PM
doooood..

love that movie...

it makes me so excited that Winnipeg has an NHL team again. It's like the movie got closure.

I was thinking the same fucking thing!


i love maddin, but i don't think he's underrated at all. he's a total indie-darling. i'm fairly certain every maddin film i've seen in theaters (which, i believe, is all of them with the exception of dracula) has been with a sell out audience.

Yeah, I would say he's properly rated as a cinematic treasure. I've only seen Brand Upon the Brain! - on DVD, having fucked up the chance to see it live with Crispin narrating - so I think I'm going to work straight backwards to The Saddest Music in the World.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-17-2011, 02:51 PM
On a completely different note, I've had Days Of Heaven sitting at my house for over a week and I'm dying to finally see it, but I haven't had a good time to be able to sit and fully appreciate it as I would like.


I just watched it for the first time a few months ago, it's good to wait until the right time. And make sure the room's pitch black.

I watched it Wednesday night, the criterion blu-ray version on our 42" HDTV. It is good, and you can definitely see an early version of Malick's camera work in the river scenes. It's pretty lovely to see the plains of Texas in that light.

DRINKEY! DON'T READ! SPOILERS (SORT OF):

HOWEVER, the movie sort of felt like An Hour And A Half of Hell. The Blu-ray disc that Netflix sent was skipping every 5-10 minutes, the jaggedness in the storyline (typical Malick) really made it sort of a headache to keep up with, the nail-biting moments weren't nail-biting as much as lackluster, and the narration by Linda Manz was really, really cheesy and just annoying. I had a few beers in me so it may have distorted my judgment but I probably wouldn't watch this movie again. I still have a huge desire to check out Badlands but mostly 'cause of someone's recommendation on this thread.

SoulDischarge
06-17-2011, 05:19 PM
[Strong statement of approval for both My Winnipeg and Badlands]

The A.V. Club just did a New Cult Canon entry on Schizopolis, which is probably one of the top ten most entertaining and re-watchable films for me. Anyone who hasn't seen that and is a fan of anarchistic humor should do so post haste.

HandBanana
06-17-2011, 08:31 PM
Maybe my perspective on Maddin is skewed by me not living somewhere cool.

Watching this right now. A personal fave and also (IMHO) underrated.
It's very 1995 but the important stuff is pretty timeless and the concept is pretty great.


http://i.imgur.com/ecEAz.jpg

daxton
06-17-2011, 10:22 PM
^ I fucking love that movie. We briefly discussed it a while back in here, mostly due to Juliette Lewis hate (and love on my part).

iv3rdawG
06-17-2011, 10:46 PM
Drive was pretty amazing. Absolutely loved the soundtrack and the choice of music.

TallGuyCM
06-18-2011, 12:52 AM
Drive was pretty amazing. Absolutely loved the soundtrack and the choice of music.

I figured this would be the response that most people had and will continue to have. I absolutely hated it. It definitely had its moments, and at this moment in time I can't quite put into words just why I loathed it so, but I couldn't have been more disappointed with it. Especially after how much I was looking forward to it.

Ryan Gosling has gotten rave reviews for his performance, and while he was indeed very good, I wasn't overly impressed. His acting in Blue Valentine was far superior, and maybe he's just getting to that point where people praise him for anything he does, I dunno.

I did have good fortune today though, I randomly got a text from a friend asking if I wanted to hang out tonight and mentioned that I was going to try to get into the screening, completely forgetting that he works for the L.A. Times (the festival's biggest sponsor). He hooked Matt and I up with two Priority Admission passes so we were the first ones in, and got free food and alcohol in a VIP area ahead of time. So there was a silver lining at least.

schoolofruckus
06-18-2011, 08:50 PM
Wow...I'm wondering if it actually sucks or if it's Redland 2: Redland Harder.

TallGuyCM
06-18-2011, 11:15 PM
Like I said, I'll likely be in the minority of people who don't really like it. I'm sure you'll love it.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-19-2011, 12:10 PM
Wow...I'm wondering if it actually sucks or if it's Redland 2: Redland Harder.

Haha! This reminds of Rainn Wilson's twitter a month ago. Where he had people coming up with potential Nic Cage sequel titles. It was the highlight of the week, as far as twitter goes. My favorite ones are:

Gone in 60 Seconds 2: Gone in 30 Seconds
The Passion of The Christ 2: Revenge

TallGuyCM
06-19-2011, 01:57 PM
Last night I watched a random double feature of Weekend and Grizzly Man.

The former was probably the most pretentious thing I've ever seen before, and Godard's now 1 for 4 in my book. I'm not sure I care for him as a filmmaker at all at this point. I feel I have a pretty strong stomach for heavy-handed diatribe, but parts of Weekend were completely excessive. I think now I know how Gabe feels about Haneke, in that he dislikes him largely because he feels he has no respect for his audience. That's exactly how I felt about this. The traffic jam shot and the 360 scene with the piano player were pretty remarkable, though.

Grizzly Man was good, but I think it could have been a lot more compelling. And it seemed to make Treadwell out to be too much of a nut (which he surely was), when an appreciation for what he strived for and did might have been a better route to have explored.

malcolmjamalawesome
06-19-2011, 01:57 PM
I have a theory that upwards of 90% of the time Character A tells Character B, "Wait here. I want to show you something," Character A will shortly return with an item that once belonged to one of Character A's parents.

MissingPerson
06-19-2011, 02:00 PM
I think you might be on to something. Apply for a grant immediately.

obzen
06-19-2011, 02:31 PM
lulz, Jurassic Park 4... 3D.

Gribbz
06-19-2011, 02:35 PM
3Diculous.

malcolmjamalawesome
06-19-2011, 03:15 PM
I saw X Men: First Class today. I don't want to talk about it.

obzen
06-19-2011, 03:22 PM
They really fucked it all off with the first outing, from the inaccurate story line to Magneto's daft costume.



I'd like to see them get it right next time, perhaps with X-Men: The Age of Apocalypse.

PotVsKtl
06-19-2011, 03:22 PM
Grizzly Man was good, but I think it could have been a lot more compelling. And it seemed to make Treadwell out to be too much of a nut (which he surely was), when an appreciation for what he strived for and did might have been a better route to have explored.

You're going to want to look for another director if doting montages are your thing. What was he striving for, and how should it be appreciated? He get et by the bar, story told.

malcolmjamalawesome
06-19-2011, 03:24 PM
They really fucked it all off with the first outing, from the inaccurate story line to Magneto's daft costume.



I'd like to see them get it right next time, perhaps with X-Men: The Age of Apocalypse.

I'd still go see a Dark Phoenix Saga redux if someone capable was writing/directing it.

PotVsKtl
06-19-2011, 03:26 PM
For example, Mamet writes in “The Secret Knowledge” that “the Israelis would like to live in peace within their borders; the Arabs would like to kill them all.” Whatever one’s opinion of that conflict may be, this (twice-made) claim of his abolishes any need to analyze or even discuss it. It has a long way to go before it can even be called simplistic. By now, perhaps, you will not be surprised to know that Mamet regards global warming as a false alarm, and demands to be told “by what magical process” bumper stickers can “save whales, and free Tibet.” This again is not uncharacteristic of his pointlessly aggressive style: who on earth maintains that they can? If I were as prone to sloganizing as Mamet, I’d keep clear of bumper-sticker comparisons altogether.

Please proceed to director jail.

MissingPerson
06-19-2011, 03:37 PM
I get a kick out of Magneto O' Toole on all the ads.

"De real enemy is out dere!"

obzen
06-19-2011, 04:36 PM
Of course, X-Men: The Age of Apocalypse would have to be a sort of like LOTR; three installments each clocking in at over 3 hours.


It's the only way.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-19-2011, 04:41 PM
Age of Apocalypse was exceedingly dumb in most every way.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-19-2011, 04:49 PM
My friends and I couldn't make it into the sold out Cinespia screening of Heathers at Hollywood Forever last night so we did Bridesmaids instead. God, that was enjoyable. A light, completely forgettable piece of fluff for sure. But I can't remember the last time I literally LOL'd at the movies so much. Kind of nice to see a bunch of very funny women do their things without having to play the shrew. (Well, except for poor Rose Byrne)

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-19-2011, 10:14 PM
I watched it Wednesday night, the criterion blu-ray version on our 42" HDTV. It is good, and you can definitely see an early version of Malick's camera work in the river scenes. It's pretty lovely to see the plains of Texas in that light.

DRINKEY! DON'T READ! SPOILERS (SORT OF):

HOWEVER, the movie sort of felt like An Hour And A Half of Hell. The Blu-ray disc that Netflix sent was skipping every 5-10 minutes, the jaggedness in the storyline (typical Malick) really made it sort of a headache to keep up with, the nail-biting moments weren't nail-biting as much as lackluster, and the narration by Linda Manz was really, really cheesy and just annoying. I had a few beers in me so it may have distorted my judgment but I probably wouldn't watch this movie again. I still have a huge desire to check out Badlands but mostly 'cause of someone's recommendation on this thread.

Not really spoilery at all, but I did wait until after i saw the film to read it. Sucks about the skipping, that would certainly impair the experience.

I don't have a blu ray player, but I really enjoyed the movie all the same - it's gorgeous. I really enjoyed the entirety of immensely. I liked the narration because it came off as being really real, and I thin it really sells that we see the story unfold from the youngest character's perspective. I guess I wasn't really expecting "nail-biting moments"...for what could have been a melodrama, the story is told in a refreshingly subtle way.

Also, definitely see Badlands.

M Sparks
06-19-2011, 10:46 PM
The A.V. Club just did a New Cult Canon entry on Schizopolis, which is probably one of the top ten most entertaining and re-watchable films for me. Anyone who hasn't seen that and is a fan of anarchistic humor should do so post haste.

I have not seen this in a while. I thought it was fascinating, but "rewatchable" is not a term I would have used. Maybe I should revisit.

If we had a poll for strangest film by a "mainstream" director, this would have to rank pretty damn high. Great credit sequence.

HandBanana
06-20-2011, 11:55 AM
Saw the trailer for this before Tree of Life the other night and I am sold.
I'm a big Mike Mills fan and the early word is positive.

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buddy
06-20-2011, 12:02 PM
it's playing at the arclight currently

Miroir Noir
06-20-2011, 01:27 PM
I watched it Wednesday night, the criterion blu-ray version on our 42" HDTV. It is good, and you can definitely see an early version of Malick's camera work in the river scenes. It's pretty lovely to see the plains of Texas in that light.

DRINKEY! DON'T READ! SPOILERS (SORT OF):

HOWEVER, the movie sort of felt like An Hour And A Half of Hell. The Blu-ray disc that Netflix sent was skipping every 5-10 minutes, the jaggedness in the storyline (typical Malick) really made it sort of a headache to keep up with, the nail-biting moments weren't nail-biting as much as lackluster, and the narration by Linda Manz was really, really cheesy and just annoying. I had a few beers in me so it may have distorted my judgment but I probably wouldn't watch this movie again. I still have a huge desire to check out Badlands but mostly 'cause of someone's recommendation on this thread.

It was actually shot in Canada; Malick got so wrapped up in pre-production that they had to move north to find wheat fields that hadn't been harvested yet.

I've always found the voiceover in that film interesting. It certainly was not planned. If I recall correctly, Malick wanted to avoid using voiceover in Days of Heaven because he had used it so extensively in Badlands. However, as the editing process ground on, he discovered that he had edited so much of the narrative dialogue out that he needed to use voiceover in order for the plot to make sense. But not too much sense, right? It's interesting to me that Malick picked the child to do the narration: so much of that voiceover ends up being unreliable, or even inconsequential to the plot. It would have been easy to pick the Brooke Adams character to do the voiceover, after all, she survives and presumably has the most insight into the motivations of the other two main characters. But the Manz character turns out be the perfect character to comment obliquely on larger themes. I usually pick up something new from that voiceover on repeated viewings.

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 03:09 PM
I've seen three films each by Bergman and Bresson, and there are alarming parallels between my reactions to the films I chose to see. The first film I saw by each (The Seventh Seal and Diary of a Country Priest) severely disappointed, due to what I perceived as a repellent Christian perspective and grossly stagey qualities in the acting and writing. The second by each (The Virgin Spring and Pickpocket) were better in those regards, but still somewhat underwhelming. However, I recently broke through the ceiling with Bergman on Persona, and in turn, with Bresson this afternoon on Au Hasard Balthazar.

No less than a masterpiece, the film follows Balthazar, a donkey born into the somewhat-undefined care of two neighboring families over the course of a summer in the French countryside. But as the summer ends and the innocent romance between young Marie and Jacques draws to a close, Balthazar begins a long life of hardship, passed between an interconnected series of brutish owners who see him - and one another - only in terms of capacity to help them attain wealth and amusement. As you can surely imagine, it's one of the more devastating comments on human nature that has ever been put on screen.

TallGuyCM
06-20-2011, 03:42 PM
The first film I saw by each (The Seventh Seal and Diary of a Country Priest) severely disappointed, due to what I perceived as a repellent Christian perspective

I'm not sure I agree with The Seventh Seal being told from a Christian perspective. I noticed more than a few jabs at religion in it. Aside from turning the ideas of death and judgment (which many people in general seem to fear) into something almost comedic, there were a few not so devoutly Christian lines muttered by the characters in the film. The one that comes to mind is when Gunnar Bjornstrand's character says something along the lines of monkeys having very similar characteristics to humans, more or less addressing the concept of evolution.

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 03:50 PM
I'd have to see it again to argue that at length - and that just isn't going to happen absent special circumstances - but taking "jabs" at religion isn't mutually exclusive from embracing it or letting it dictate the film's viewpoint.

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 04:33 PM
In other news - Weekend is "pretentious"!? Is that just your new word for movies that are GREAT?

HandBanana
06-20-2011, 04:50 PM
If I ever get my shit together (Ill probably never get my shit together) and move to LA, I think I'll just end up living at the New Beverley all the time.

They're playin The Limey tonite. I love that flick. :(

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-20-2011, 04:52 PM
I wish our revival theaters weren't all stupid tiny and uncomfortable...but there sure are a lot of opportunities to see cool movies.

TallGuyCM
06-20-2011, 05:01 PM
In other news - Weekend is "pretentious"!? Is that just your new word for movies that are GREAT?

My new word? I haven't used it lately at all aside from describing Weekend.

Let's talk about this one for a bit. I know Jared and Patrick have also seen it and could provide some insight. But what exactly is it that gives this film any kind of merit? How is it not Godard at (from what I've seen so far) his most self-indulgent? For anyone that's seen it, what specifically did you get out of it?

suprefan
06-20-2011, 05:40 PM
an official trailer for Bellflower. FINALLY

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