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Thread: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

  1. #31

    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Beulah - Yoko (2003, Velocette Records)

    This album is what happens when a band that produces sunny indie pop with strings and horns hits darkness. The band knew it was going to break up before the record's release - hence the title, Yoko. The strings and horns aren't gone, but they're less prevalent, and the recordings are darker and more melancholic. It's too bad it ended here, because this was Beulah at their peak. Side note: Beulah did release one full length on the Elephant 6 label.

  2. #32
    Member IlliniQ's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by IceyHotshot View Post
    Stars of the Lid - ...And their Refinement of the Decline (Kranky, 2007)



    This album is certainly not overlooked in the ambient community - some might call it the crowning achievement of the genre - but it is, sadly, overlooked everywhere else. Hauntingly beautiful, gorgeously bright, and entrancing in the best way possible, ...And their Refinement of the Decline is a real triumph of ambient drone. It can be a bit long at 2 hours, but no one says you have to listen to it all in one setting.
    Fantastic choice, was just listening to this last week, and completely agree...possibly the most abstract album I've ever listened to but an absolute masterpiece all the same.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by FEELS View Post
    lists like this are what ruin these threads... at least write a couple sentences for each album. jeez
    I've tried twice, once before posting, once after...but this forum has the worst time-out features...lost my work both times. So you'll just have to live with the list.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Do what I do: type up in Word, copy, paste.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Silver Jews - American Water (1998)



    Easily one of the best albums of the 90's, yet no one ever really talks about it. Those that do, mention Silver Jews as more of a Steve Malkmus side project (he played and sang on a few of their songs). No way. This was all David Berman's band. One of the best songwriters and voices in indie rock ever imo.. Lo-fi, folky goodness. You'll feel 10x cooler after listening to this record.

    "All my favorite singers couldn't sing"

    "Behind the walls of medication i'm free"

    "When you know how I feel I feel better"

    So many quotables.
    Last edited by FEELS; 06-29-2013 at 01:27 AM.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    I made lists for the 70s, 80s, and 90s, and finished my write ups for the 70s albums. As a disclaimer, I'd like to say a lot of these are pretty well recognized by the alt-rock canon, but I went off the rule I set where the album couldn't be on the Rolling Stone Top 500 Albums list, because coming up with 50 albums from the 70s absolutely no one has heard of is a pretty tall order that I just can't fill. I'd still be willing to bet a lot of people one here who aren't Bryan or Chris or a few others haven't heard many of these and they should be mandatory listening, or at the very least a really good time. So consider this a list of albums any music geek should hear after they've already absorbed The Ramones, Fun House, Low, Paranoid, etc. And these all are albums I'm passionate enough about to actually write something meaningful to recommend them by.

    Not included either because I feel they're already Rolling Stone canon or I don't know/care enough: Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Wire, Devo, Bob Dylan, Sly & The Family Stone, Parliament/Funkadelic, Elton John, Miles Davis, Al Green, James Brown, Marvin Gaye, Steve Reich, Genesis, The Jam, Caetano Veloso, Os Mutantes, Fela Kuti, Television, Van Halen, Neil Young, Frank Zappa, Stevie Wonder, Lee Perry, Roxy Music, Lou Reed, Stooges/Iggy Pop, Patti Smith, Ramones, Sex Pistols, The Clash, The Specials, Mott The Hoople, Joni Mitchell, Leonard Cohen, Booker T, T. Rex, Pink Floyd, Judas Priest, Motorhead, Cheap Trick, Chic, Blondie, David Bowie, Alice Cooper, etcetcetc.


    Alphabetically:


    Adverts - Crossing The Red Sea With The Adverts (1977)
    Perhaps the finest straight up British punk album, each of its tracks is a perfectly realized pop song with a killer hook. Smart without being obscure, snotty without succumbing to self parody, this album has aged far better than many of its contemporaries. Lead off track "One Chord Wonders" wonderfully sums up the musical ethos of punk better than just about anything else out there.


    Amon Duul II - Tanz Der Lemming (1971)
    While much of krautrock seemed to de-emphasize the rock part while chasing their more esoteric experiments, Amon Duul II were never afraid to indulge in heavy rock guitar heroics. Which isn't to say there isn't plenty of weirdness and sound collage meanderings going on here. Merely that when they chose to rock, they did it harder than any of their contemporaries. Split into three extended multi-suite compositions and three shorter, instrumental guitar showcases, this can sometimes veer dangerously close to prog rock's indulgences, but the band always keeps enough diversity and musicality from avoiding those pitfalls. This is probably the ideal place for people who are really into early Pink Floyd to transition into a love of all things krautrock.


    Ash Ra Tempel - Ash Ra Tempel (1971)
    The godfather of stoned guitar jams, this album will probably ruin all other attempts at feedback laden psychedelic noodling for you with how perfectly it's realized. The A-side is the blast off that sends you into the furthest reachest of space, while the B-side is the come down that lets you drift off into eternity. One of a dozen essential guitar albums.


    Black Devil - Disco Club (1978)
    This ep is one of those delightful little obscurities that barely saw the light of day upon its original release until some entreprising individual (a certain Richard D. James) reissued it on his record label several decades later and fixed it as a lost classic. Pretty much coming off as a moodier (but still plenty goofy) version of Giorgio Moroder's From Here To Eternity, its six tracks create a continuous mix that delights at every turn. A timeless piece of electronic history that holds up even after thousands of listens.


    The Boys - The Boys (1977)
    Juvenile chant along punk anthems that were really just power pop with a mean streak. Despite all their bad boy posturing, though, they're clearly nice kids with a rock & roll fixation who love their mommas and know their way around a killer hook. Their first two albums contain hit after hit after hit. Great songs, front to back, and that's all you need.


    Cabaret Voltaire - Mix-Up (1979)
    How many albums sound so thoroughly alien as this? The dub production techniques, the hellishly distorted vocals, the tortured guitar, the zaps of forbidding synths, all can be comprehended on their own, but exactly how they all combine into something so otherworldly is a mystery. It's like a rogue signal caught by satellite whose sole purpose is to brainwash the public and turn them into terrified ticking time bombs. When Stephen Mallinder tells you "Enemies await us on every other street," you fucking believe him and head for the panic room. And what the hell did they do to the Seeds' "No Escape" to make it so goddamned sinister? This is what paranoia distilled to its absolute essence sounds like. Even on a sunny day it'll make you feel like the loneliest creature in the universe.


    John Cale - Fear (1974)
    Choosing just one Cale album from the 70s is no easy task as he covered more stylistic ground than just about everyone this side of Bowie, including his former Velvet Underground compatriot Lou Reed. Fear wins out, then, for its range and the quality of its songs. Some of the decades most gorgeous songs (the country tinged "Buffalo Ballet," the heart on sleeve ballad "You Know More Than I Know") share space with unhinged rockers ("Fear Is A Man's Best Friend," "Gun"), and each track is a pop gem. Although he's better known to a lot of people for his work with other artists, this is as good an example as any as to why his own catalog is the real treasure.


    Can - Future Days (1973)
    The previous two Can albums are rightly regarded as some of the most important and rewarding of all time, so it's easy to overlook this fairly low key outing, but it's the most inviting thing they ever released. Without sacrificing their trademark adventurousness, the band produced four tracks of pleasant soundscapes ideal for cruising along the beach, built on the back of their signature grooves and jazz inflected rhythms. A pure delight from front to back and a fine entry point for the neophyte.


    Captain Beefheart - Lick My Decals Off Baby (1970)
    Maybe this is sacrilege, but Trout Mask Replica is just a tad overrated in the catalog of Don Van Vliet. In any case, it goes on for far too long and not all of its experiments work. This album is every bit as baffling and distinctive, but it's a whole lot more enjoyable going down. The Captains deep blues growl still spouts out his absurd beat poetry over free form guitar rhythms that are constantly at conflict with themselves, but the songs are more well rounded and it clocks in at a far more manageable 38 minutes. If Trout Mask was a sprawling mess where Beefheart and the Magic Band threw anything and everything they could think of at the wall, this is the album where they sharpened their focus and only included what needed to be included. Besides, songs like the title track and "I Wanna Find A Woman That'll Hold My Big Toe" are some of the funnest and most bizarrely raunchy of his career. Music to seduce a Picasso painting by.


    Chrome - Half Machine Lip Moves (1979)
    Still forward thinking and alien sounding after all these years, this is junkyard rock descended from the Stooges as filtered through a hallucinogenic, paranoid sci-fi perspective. The first couple of listens make this seem like inpenetrable sonic stew, but once you break the surface, you realize it's one of the most restlessly imaginative albums of all time, the sound of flipping through interstellar radio broadcasts and landing on hit after hit.


    Cluster - Zuckerzeit (1974)
    Although they were every bit as good at creating expansive electronic space rock epics as Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream, Cluster's most enduring legacy is in the short form electronic pop that they first perfected on Zuckerzeit. While it's influence on an unbelievable range of electronic music to follow cannot be overstated, what really makes this a classic is how enjoyable it is to listen to decades later. Each track creates its own distinctive mood and melody out little more than some primitive synths and drum machines.


    D.A.F. - Ein Produkt Der (1979)
    Although they were still two years from recording their proto-EBM classic, the provocateurs of Deutsch Amerikanische Freundschaft proved they knew how to lay down a compelling industrial groove from the very beginning with their debut album. Over 22 short (usually less than a minute or two) instrumental, titleless tracks that flow like a continuous mix, D.A.F. strip post-punk funk down to it's fundamental basics and use it as a springboard for exploring factory floor atmospherics. Later albums would prove to be stronger and more influential, but this is the one that proved that industrial could welcome a little bump'n'grind into the mix and still remain every bit as uncompromising.


    The Damned - Damned Damned Damned (1977)
    Nevermind the Sex Pistols, the Damned released their album first, and it's twice as raucous and vicious as anything Sid and the boys churned out. Shades of the goth band they would evolve into are evident on tracks like "Feel The Pain," but very few classic punk albums are anywhere near as fun as this.


    The Dead Boys - Young, Loud & Snotty (1977)
    Living up to the title of their debut album, the Dead Boys did crude nihilism better than just about anyone (save their Cleveland punk contemporaries, the Pagans and the Electric Eels). It certainly helped that they swiped a couple of classic songs from Cheetah Chrome's previous band, Rocket From The Tombs, but Stiv Bators sold masochistic self abandon better than most of the art-punks in that band anyway. Juvenile, rudimentary, misogynistic, and totally tasteless, the Dead Boys nevertheless perfectly summed up the feeling of the whole world spitting on you and just not giving a fuck about it. Plus, "Sonic Reducer" is the punk anthem to end all punk anthems.


    Devo - Hardcore Vol. 1 (1990, recorded 1974-1977)
    Although Devo is fairly well-known thanks to a couple of new wave hits and their debut album is widely recognized as a classic, very few outside of extreme devotees (no pun intended) have heard this collection of early demos. If you thought flower pot hats and sado-masochistic anthems were odd, they're about as transgressive as football on Thanksgiving compared to this deeply strange set. Songs about space girls, buttered beauties, and being a potato are backed by radioactive industrial funk. Even sewer mutants think this shit is a little too strange. And yet, there's a perverse musicality to most of these songs. Take enough cough syrup, and they'll actually get stuck in your head. A fascinating prelude for one of America's most unusual musical success stories.


    Brian Eno - Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy) (1974)
    Widely considered the lesser of Eno's first three solo albums, it still stands as a masterwork of avant-pop and contains some of his most endearing songs ("Third Uncle," for example). Even its smaller songs overflow with creativity and invention.


    The Fall - Dragnet (1979)
    Even amongst dedicated Fall fans, this one is pretty unrecognized as the classic it is. This is the album that ultimately endeared me to the band and made me a life long fan, but like almost every record in their discography, its sound is a bit of anomaly. Probably the most minimal thing they've ever recorded, there's not much more to this album than repetitive bass, angular post-punk guitars, Native American tribal drums, and Mark E. Smith's unmistakeable speak-singing. Smith's obsessions with rockabilly and reggae are in full display in the record's shambling grooves, as is his fascination with pulp fiction, especially the Lovecraftian dirge "Spectre Vs. Rector." Opening track "Psykick Dancehall" theorizes that the band will continue to haunt the world after they're dead and gone through the vinyl grooves of their records, which is a fitting thesis statement for an album that sounds like its songs were discovered via some kind of British hillbilly seance.


    Faust - So Far (1972)
    As far as I'm concerned, Faust were the most exciting band of the 20th century, the one that was willing to go further and try more than any other band and somehow pull off every stunt it attempted with charm and good humor. Any of their first four albums could be here, but So Far is the one where their many sides are best represented: avant-pop, pastoral folk, psychedelic freak outs, industrial dirges, cartoonish toss offs, Zappa-esque wackiness, and Teutonic cosmic reveries. That one band should lay claim to so much restless creativity is almost unfair, but the real shame is how few people are familiar with them. No other band has made adventurous, avant-garde music more accessible and irresistible. If you listen to one album off this list, make it this one.


    Flower Travellin' Band - Satori (1971)
    Are there any deserts in Japan? If not, how do you explain the sun cracked, peyote fueled madness of the Flower Travellin' Band? This is the kind of music that takes acid fried psychedelia into visionquest territory. The vocals of Joe Yamanaka sound like they've been reverberated off the steep cliffs of canyon walls, while the guitars seem to be attempting to bring the sun crashing down to Earth. The Western world may be where psychedelia rose to prominence, but Japan is where it went to reach transcendence.


    Serge Gainsbourg - Historie De Melody Nelson (1971)
    Notoriously lecherous ye-ye singer/songwriter composes a mini-album about a middle aged man seducing a teenage girl and becomes an inexplicable classic. Even without that context, though, this is a remarkable album, an uncanny mix of sleazy minimalist rock, rigid funk, and symphonic pop, it's at once perverse and elegant, soaring and mournful. Pop rarely pulls off widescreen this convincingly, so it's even more impressive that Gainbsbourg was able to manage it so masterfully in less than a half hour.


    German Oak - German Oak (1972)
    Yes, I want you to listen to an album by a band called German Oak whose first track is called "Swastika Rising." Why? Because it's fucking great. Not quite krautrock, but not quite anything else, it's the kind of thing that could have only come out of Germany in the 70s. Supposedly, it was intended to provide a soundtrack to what German soldiers during WWII must have felt, but you can either take or leave that context. A completely instrumental album built upon some rather heavy subterranean grooves, there is a distinctly Teutonic element to this that's hard to ignore. There are times where it veers close to the psychedelic funk of George Clinton, although with no hint of soul. Other parts rely on more of an organ drone. The whole affair is pretty lo-fi, which gives it a hazy, distant atmosphere that adds to the strange appeal of the record. While not quite on par with the krautrock A-listers, this is still a fascinating, unique album for anyone who can't get enough of that kind of stuff.


    Harmonia - De Luxe (1975)
    This is one of my default come down albums for when I'm feeling like shit or freaked out or having a rough time and just need something soothing to get lost in. It works like a charm every time. A collaboration between Neu! and Cluster, it's a perfect melding of the two acts. Gorgeous analogue synth melodies backed by that insistent motorik beat and even some poppy vocals thrown in for good effect. The first two extended jams steal the show, but the second half of the album is still rich with interesting electronic vignettes that hew fairly closely to Cluster's pop albums. Perhaps the most delightful krautrock album.


    Hawkwind - Space Ritual (1973)
    I don't give a fuck what you say, this is the best space rock album of the 70's. Sure, it's way too fucking long and they get a little indulgent with the goofy theremin sounds from time to time, but this is 2 hours of acid fried riff after acid fried riff. And all the songs are good. Even the stupid filler tracks with self serious mystical ramblings work in context. Lemmy said he left the band because they were doing different drugs than him, but this album proves that the speed freaks and the acid heads can find common ground. Stoner metal was an inevitability after this album.


    Lard Free - I'm Around About Midnight (1975)
    To call this prog rock seems like a disservice; very little of that genre's self serious technical displays or forays into whimsy are present here. Instead, we have an electronic jazz rock hybrid that would be right at home soundtracking a particularly abstract horror film. The main objective of this album is to create immersive mood pieces, which it achieves stunningly. The first three tracks comprise one long, flowing composition that relies on drone, muted guiar wails, and sinister saxophone blurts to put the listener into an unsettled trance before winding down with a section of vibraphone reminiscent of Steve Reich. The slow build guitar and drums tension of "Pale Violence Under A Reverbere" anticipates a whole slew of post-punk and goth bands to come, while "Even Silence Stops When Trains Come" tops the album off with a coda of piano runs that split the difference between prettiness and chaos. If only all prog rock could be this effective.


    Magazine - Real Life (1978)
    One of the essential documents of what would become known as post-punk, Magazine's debut took the sneering nihilism of British punk and combined it with the icey grandeur of synth pop to create a hybrid that was more than the sum of its parts. While the synths and prodcution certainly sound very much of their time on some tracks, the songwriting, clever lyrics, and Howard Devoto's snarling delivery have helped this one endure over the decades. Every fucking song is incredible and distinct, and how many albums can you really say that about?


    Giorgio Moroder - From Here To Eternity (1977)
    Disco was always a singles game, but it can claim at least on classic album to its name in From Here To Eternity. Designed by Moroder as a continuous mix, this is giddy fluff at it's most euphoric and divine. Endlessly pulsing synth lines carry forward delirious pop confections until every pleasure center in your brain is raging and you can't wipe that stupid fucking grin off your face. It's all so gaudy and absurd and it's the only thing you want to hear for the rest of your life.


    The Mumps - Fatal Charm (1994, recorded late 70s)
    Although not released in the 70s, this compilation covers material recorded between '75 and '80 by the great overlooked camp-punk band the Mumps. Like many of their CBGB peers, the group fronted by the flamboyant Lance Loud used punk as merely a jumping off point to indulge in their own eccentricities. In the case of the Mumps, this meant showtune inspired glam rock that vaguely resembles a far grungier Elton John (although he'd probably kill for some of these hooks). Their fey theatricality is probably what prevented them from being as well regarded as the New York Dolls, but make no mistake, several of their songs are every bit as wry and vital as their more well known contemporaries.


    Neu! - Neu! 2 (1973)
    Really, everyone should have the first Neu! album in their collection no matter who they are, it is the very definition of the motorik beat which has had such a tremendous influence on all music that's come since, and even though that's not on the RS list, I decided to go with the second album for it being just slightly less recognized than the first album. Beginning with one of krautrock's finest grooves, the 11-minute "Fur Immer," Neu! 2 delivers a little more of the same and then tweaks its formula just enough, partly out of creative drive and partly out of necessity. Not having the money to complete their album, they decided to do some early "remixes" of certain tracks to fill out the running time, which mostly consisted of them slowing down and speeding up portions of tracks and other kinds of tape manipulation. While this almost sounds like it'd be a rip off, it actually makes for some fascinating results and shows how a little bit of creativity can turn a problem into a boon. This is what it sounds like when krautrock cannibalizes itself.


    Nico - Desertshore (1970)
    While the Velvet Underground might have plunged the depths of depravity with aplomb on their first two studio albums, they couldn't compare to their fashion model protege when it came to harrowing statements of isolation and existential horror. Produced by John Cale, it had much more of an overt avant-garde bent to it than anything VU released, with classical elements reigning over rock techniques. Nico's unusual voice is the perfect instrument to tell these stories of loneliness and lunacy. There are moments of tenderness strewn in throughout, but mostly the tone is one of stark emptiness. One of the most beautiful portryals of nihilism around.


    The Normal - TVOD/Warm Leatherette (1978)
    Although just a two song single, this release has had more lasting influence than many full lengths. Mute Records founder Daniel Miller picked up a synthesizer because it was easier to learn than a guitar and recorded two of the most seminal songs in electronic music. The single's dehumanized synth tones still sound alien and foreboding today, but the uncanny pop songs buried beneath are what have carried it for so long, inspiring countless covers, remixes, and references throughout pop music.


    Nurse With Wound - Chance Meeting On A Dissecting Table (1979)
    And so begins the career of one of the 20th century's most important and prolific avant garde musicians. Undoubtedly one of the most difficult albums on this list, this album consists of three (and on some reissues, four) extended noise pieces ranging from six minutes to a half hour. The first two feature some of the most mangled guitar improvisations you're likely to come across, while the final (and longest) track hints at where Stephen Stapleton's future lay in spare sound collages that use harsh noises, a sense of space, and disaffected vocal samples against one another to create the world's most effective haunted house mixtapes. Although it will appeal to only a very small section of music fans, it is an essential document in the evolution of noise and experimental music.


    Pere Ubu - Dub Housing (1979)
    Notoriously weird, surprisingly fun, absolutely perfect. Pere Ubu has always been on the far edges of rock's avant-garde, but this is the album where they pushed themselves further into uncharted territory than at any point before or since. Despite the whole record sounding completely possessed, it's a remarkably bouncy, energetic set of songs. It's easy to consider a song title like "Ubu Dance Party" as some kind of sly joke, but you gotta wonder if maybe this is just the way these guys make a fun garage rock album. Every empty space is filled with some odd sound, the constant post-modern chatter of industrial life. The title track sounds like a haunted jazz recital at an abandoned warehouse. "Caligari's Mirror" sounds like a haunted sea shanty that keeps getting interrupted by a Broadway musical. Closer "Codex" is just plain haunted, the delirious echo chamber of a man imprisoned forever by his own obsession. Startingly unique in every way, one of the landmark releases of the 20th century.


    The Pop Group - Y (1979)
    Amongst the messiest and most challenging albums of the post-punk era, the bitter irony of the group's name is apparent from the very start. Taking dub techniques and applying them in the most radical way possible to funk influenced rock songs that seemed to fall apart and recombine a couple of times every minute. Mark Stewart's impassioned, politically charged yelps echo into infinity; the ever present bass divides its time between exacting funk rhythms and jazzy solos divorced from the rest of the proceedings; guitar stabs that make Gang Of Four sound relaxed pop in and out at will; empty space often explodes into a cacophony of saxophone skronks and feedback. The unpredictable is the standard, which makes the album's most impressive feat the fact that so many of these songs manage to hang together as cohesive and (dare I say) catchy packages.


    The Raincoats - The Raincoats (1979)
    The debut album of the Raincoats is one of the purest joys in modern music, plain and simple. Somehow even more rudimentary than their contemporaries in the Slits, they manage to pull off a similar trick of creating something startling unique and celebratory out of the most amateur of abilities. The difference is that this album feels more personal, more lived in. It's also a bit more avant-garde, with that squealing violin that recalls John Cale on the Velvets first album. Their cover of the Kinks "Lola" is one of the sweetest and most magical things in existence, making the original obsolete with their definitive take. This is the kind of record you think of more as a close personal friend than a mere piece of recorded music, shabby and falling apart at the seams and all the more lovable for it.


    The Residents - Third Reich & Roll (1976)
    Even by the early 70s, there was backlash against the perpetual loop of contrived 60s pop hits being flogged like a dead horse across the radio, and with Third Reich & Roll, the mysterious Residents recorded the ultimate piss take in response to such aural crimes against humanity. Two extended sound collages that consisted of a couple dozen extraordinarily twisted covers of 60's rock hits, the band made the rather tongue in cheek comparison between radio programming and fascist programming. Although it's easy to write them off as a bunch of dudes making funny voices and calling it avant garde, it's remarkable how the band holds a funhouse mirror to pop culture standards and reveals both the hilarity and terror to be found buried underneath. Some of their interpretations are truly skin crawling endeavors and will probably change your perception of the originals forever. They would continue to explore their fascination with outsider pop on subsequent albums, but this is where their love/hate relationship with catchy tunes would first crystallize.


    Sand - Golem (1974)
    Yet another krautrock adjacent oddity that was more of an outlier than part of the canon, Sand nonetheless recorded one of the most distinctive albums of the 70s experimental rock scene, which is no small feat (as much of this list should contest). There is old world mysticism all tied up in this album to the point where you almost feel like you're eavesdropping on some ancient ritual you shouldn't be allowed to know about. Lead off track "Helicopter" begins with what very much sounds like the blades of its eponymous aircraft cutting through the wind before bringing in a hypnotic guitar strum and some unholy moans. And then this dude starts singing and it's one of the most startling, evocative "bad singer" voices you've ever heard. He loudly whispers what sounds like some kind of invocation, occasionally breaking out into a commanding wail. And even that can't prepare you for the unsettling haunted forest soundscapes of "Old Loggerhead." One track ("On The Corner") actually approaches something that resembles an actual rock song but even that is deeply strange to the core of its being. This is the kind of astonishing record that inexplicably taps directly into primordial fears (and occasionally joys) that date back centuries. A dark masterpiece.


    Klaus Schulze - Cyborg (1973)
    Schulze probably took the synthesizer to its most grandiose level, creating mind-melting space epics whose vistas surpassed in scale even the impressive depths of his contemporaries in Tangerine Dream. Tracks under 20 minutes in length are rare in his catalog. While all of his 70s work is excellent, Cyborg is perhaps his most haunting and impressive album. Its four extended compositions truly feel like exploring the outer limits of consciousness, the sound of your being becoming one with the universe, with all the wonder and horror implied by that.


    The Screamers - In A Better World (2001, recorded 1977-1979)
    Like the Mumps record, this is another more recent compilation of music from a great lost band active in the late 70s, only the Screamers were from LA and had a much more distinctive sound. The leaders of the overlooked synth punk scene, the Screamers replaced guitars with synths that often sounded like haunted house organs, but retained the aggressiveness of punk, as though they had never heard "Louie Louie" and just jammed out to "96 Tears" on repeat. Never recording an official album, this collection compiles mostly live recordings, which captures the band at their raw best. At two discs and almost 2 1/2 hours, it's definitely far too much, but highlights such as the immortal "122 Hours Of Fear," "Vertigo," "I Want To Hurt," and "Go Guy" make this essential listening.


    Siouxsie & The Banshees - The Scream (1978)
    The debut Banshees album is only the first of several moody masterpieces they would release as one of the most consistent bands of the post-punk era, but this one has the closest ties to what was happening in the rest of punk, which gives it a more highly charged atmosphere that would give way to more psychedelic flourishes on subsequent releases. That isn't to say it sounded like much else out there, though. Only one time tour mates Adam & The Ants could match them for dramatic tension. Every song packs a punch, tightly coiled attacks against mediocrity that made the most of their rhythm section before exploding into bursts of ecstatic frenzy as Siouxsie wailed and barked over top with one of the most commanding voices in punk. That they got even better from here is really kind of awe inspiring.


    Slits - Cut (1979)
    There is a story about the girls of the Slits being so clueless, musically, that they had to have their tourmates tune their instruments for them. And yet they recorded one of the most original and seminal albums of the late 70s, forever proving that enthusiasm and an unique vision outweighs technical prowess any day. Somehow, a couple of ramshackle reggae beats and the willingness to try just about anything to make a joyously rebellious racket added up to an endlessly surprising and grin inducing set of songs that would still sound revolutionary if they were released today. Score one for atypical girls everywhere.


    Sparks - Kimono My House (1974)
    Too clever by far to ever make it big in America, Sparks approached glam rock with a wry sense of humor and an operatic scope. The songs on this album positively soar. Infusing witty tales of sexual inadequacy and lovers scorned with all the drama and solemnity of a Broadway musical, the brothers Mael created an absolutely irresistable slice of bubblegum that sticks in your maw long after you've spat it out.


    Suicide Commandos - Make A Record (1978)
    One of the great "one and done" bands of the punk explosion, these Minneapolis punks were more concerned with hooks than rebellion, and it's the quality of the songs that makes this so listenable today. It's fairly telling that they included a Monkees cover on here. Covering 15 tracks in 35 minutes, there's not much time for anything but quick and to the point pop gems, and every song is a hit. There's nothing here offensive or inflammatory, making it the kind of classic punk album your little sister could have gotten behind circa '78.


    Talking Heads - Fear Of Music (1979)
    Pretty much everything Talking Heads did through the mid-80s is considered canon at this point, but this is the early album that often gets the shortest shrift. It's understandable as it's something of an uneven transitional album, but it's also the album where they got to experiment the most, sometimes to thrilling ends. They'd always been nervous but here they're downright paranoid. These are the kind of songs that are just off enough that you don't really think much of them on first exposure, but soon they burrow a little hole in the center of your brain and you keep going back to try to figure out what that weird little semi-hook was that you thought you might have caught and soon you've listened to the song 25 times in a row and still haven't unraveled its mystery. Even David Byrne's lyrics are at their most inscrutable as you can't tell how serious he is when he hollers on about how stupid animals are. At least half of the songs on here are classics that don't really sound like anything else in their catalog.


    Throbbing Gristle - Second Annual Report (1977)
    It's hard to imagine many people even conceiving of music this ugly and visceral existing before the release of this album. While there had been plenty of music that aimed and sometimes succeeded at being dark and frightening, nothing excited that pit of your stomach nausea as vividly as Throbbing Gristle in their early days. Even though they were one of the world's most confrontational bands, it's through understatement and suggestion that they are able to create such an unsettling atmosphere here. A queasy bassline that nibbles away at the back of your skull, a sickening burst of static here and there, the oddly contorted yelps of Genesis P-Orridge (few moments in music are as chilling as the pitched up screams of "knife" and "wife" in "Slug Bait"), a pregnant pause between alien sounds; these are the simple tools that Throbbing Gristle use to create their hellscapes. If Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil to play the guitar, I don't want to know who these guys sold their souls to in order to achieve such unnerving synth tones. And if that wasn't enough, they have the gall to tack on a sickly sweet love song at the end of the reissue.


    Johnny Thunders & The Heartbreakers - LAMF (1977)
    Part of what made punk so invigorating is that it gave a voice to the terminally fucked up. And they didn't come much more fucked up than former New York Dolls guitarist Johnny Thunders. The great songs speak for themselves, but it's that tragic self defeatism that leads you to sing along to catchy songs about heroin addiction and being born to lose that provides the real catharsis. Because some times you're just a piece of shit and the only thing to do is get fucked up and sing at the top of your lungs.


    Tubeway Army - Replicas (1979)
    Before releasing the landmark synth-pop album The Pleasure Principle and spawning his biggest hit in the process, Gary Numan was the leader of a band called Tubeway Army who hadn't quite given up on guitars while still embracing the futurism of electronic instruments. Replicas marked the transition from glam punk to alien pop sensation, but as titles such as "Are 'Friends' Electric?" and "I Nearly Married A Human" make clear, Numan's approach was already fully formed. The aforementioned "Are 'Friends Electric?" and "Down In The Park" still have yet to be topped in the world of chilly synth pop, directly influencing everyone from Marilyn Manson to Plastikman. The peak of synthetic dystopian pop.


    Various Artists - No New York (1978)
    By now, everyone knows that that epochal first wave of punk bands mostly just played sped up Chuck Berry riffs and sang with a nasal whine. Despite the "fuck you" attitude, the music itself was fairly traditional, and now, decades down the line, kind of quaint. Not so with the No Wave movement out of NYC. Comprised of a small set of short lived groups, these artists took the confrontational amateur attitude of punk and applied it to every part of their sound, actively trying to destroy rock & roll in the process. Stumbling upon this nascent scene, Brian Eno decided to release a compilation of the best of these acts, eventually paring it down to four acts with four contributions apiece. They are as different from each other as they are from any band from outside the scene. The Contortions as led by James Chance turned James Brown's funk into an atonal skronk fest that celebrated self loathing as a virtue. Teenage Jesus & The Jerks took martial primtivism to it's logical extreme, using screeching guitars and screeching vocals as rhythm instruments as much as the bass and drums. Mars was the most inexplicable of the four, warbled vocals paired with detuned guitar gymnastics that often focused more on mood than songs. D.N.A. were perhaps the closest of the four to a conventional rock group, but their jagged blasts of guitar feedback, oddball sing/shouting and tense organ lines made sure they were plenty alien to anyone who thought Talking Heads were as weird as it got. Some of the most compelling avant garde rock ever recorded, it still sounds exciting today.


    Robert Wyatt - Rock Bottom (1974)
    Making his name with the jazzy prog-pop group the Soft Machine, Robert Wyatt embarked upon a lengthy solo career following that band's demise, ultimately recording this rather prescient album. Although there are still enough prog signifiers to mark this as a relic of the 70s, in many ways, it shares more in common with post-rock innovators of the late 80s and early 90s, particularly Talk Talk. Featuring jazzy song structures that twist and evolve in the service of their own inner logic, it's a complex, challenging album that also has just enough melody to keep it relatively accessible. Like many albums in this vein, atmosphere and mood often take a precedent, and it is by turn mournful, unnerving, and triumphant.


    X-Ray Spex - Germ Free Adolescents (1978)
    Who knew the most punk rock things in the world were a teenage girl with braces and saxophones? Yet, here we have what is probably the most joyful expression of punk rebellion in rock history. Poly Styrene's shrill vocals should be grating, but they perfectly suit the playful songs. Ditto Lora Logic's sax, which hearkens back to the party rock of the 50s and 60s. While classics like "I Am A Poseur" and "Oh Bondage, Up Yours!" are what the band's reputation are built upon, the real fun is found on the dreamy, tongue-in-cheek title track. The band has such a strong sense of purpose that even the lesser songs are pulled off with celebratory panache.


    XTC - Drums & Wires (1979)
    The very definition of "quirky new wave band," XTC on Drums & Wires fully live up to the expectations of that description and transcends it with songs that are as perfect as they are offbeat. Clocking in at 55 minutes over 15 diverse songs, it's almost a statistical anomaly that there's not a single second of filler on the album. There's a bouncy energy across this album that betrays some of its more serious and darker impulses (which finally reveal themselves in the explosive and harrowing closer, "Complicated Game"), which makes for an album that is as substantial as it is fun to listen to. The goofy quirks and subtle oddities may take a little getting used to, but the pay off is one of the fullest and catchiest album's from perhaps the world's most underrated pop band.
    Last edited by SoulDischarge; 06-29-2013 at 01:50 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Thanks for giving us the opportunity to not give a fuck again.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Well shit, that just obliterated my Silver Jews post... but awesome!! Can't wait to listen to a lot of these

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    And Patrick rocks it.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Third - Soft Machine
    So Far - Faust
    Brain Capers - Mott The Hoople
    12 Dreams Of Dr. Sardonicus - Spirit
    Rock 'n' Roll Animal - Lou Reed
    Lodger - David Bowie

    From The 60s
    Gris-Gris - Dr. John
    Moby Grape
    Love, Da Capo, Forever Changes - Love
    Steppenwolf The Second
    Mott The Hoople
    A Salty Dog - Procul Harum
    Ogden's Nut Gone Flakes - The Small Faces


    The reason I disagree with these is because the title says "overlooked." and of course they are from earlier time than the title. Some of these are indeed classics and got wore out on my turntable.....cr****
    Have Another Hit Of Colorado Sunshine

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    The bar has been set...wonderful write up...hope you have a blog cause you should be getting revenue generating ad-clicks for this level of effort.

    A couple comments in bold on some of your excellent choices.


    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post
    I made lists for the 70s, 80s, and 90s, and finished my write ups for the 70s albums. As a disclaimer, I'd like to say a lot of these are pretty well recognized by the alt-rock canon, but I went off the rule I set where the album couldn't be on the Rolling Stone Top 500 Albums list, because coming up with 50 albums from the 70s absolutely no one has heard of is a pretty tall order that I just can't fill. I'd still be willing to bet a lot of people one here who aren't Bryan or Chris or a few others haven't heard many of these and they should be mandatory listening, or at the very least a really good time. So consider this a list of albums any music geek should hear after they've already absorbed The Ramones, Fun House, Low, Paranoid, etc. And these all are albums I'm passionate enough about to actually write something meaningful to recommend them by.


    John Cale - Fear (1974)
    Choosing just one Cale album from the 70s is no easy task as he covered more stylistic ground than just about everyone this side of Bowie, including his former Velvet Underground compatriot Lou Reed. Fear wins out, then, for its range and the quality of its songs. Some of the decades most gorgeous songs (the country tinged "Buffalo Ballet," the heart on sleeve ballad "You Know More Than I Know") share space with unhinged rockers ("Fear Is A Man's Best Friend," "Gun"), and each track is a pop gem. Although he's better known to a lot of people for his work with other artists, this is as good an example as any as to why his own catalog is the real treasure.

    Love this, but I've always been partial to the goth-pastoral Paris 1919


    Captain Beefheart - Lick My Decals Off Baby (1970)
    Maybe this is sacrilege, but Trout Mask Replica is just a tad overrated in the catalog of Don Van Vliet. In any case, it goes on for far too long and not all of its experiments work. This album is every bit as baffling and distinctive, but it's a whole lot more enjoyable going down. The Captains deep blues growl still spouts out his absurd beat poetry over free form guitar rhythms that are constantly at conflict with themselves, but the songs are more well rounded and it clocks in at a far more manageable 38 minutes. If Trout Mask was a sprawling mess where Beefheart and the Magic Band threw anything and everything they could think of at the wall, this is the album where they sharpened their focus and only included what needed to be included. Besides, songs like the title track and "I Wanna Find A Woman That'll Hold My Big Toe" are some of the funnest and most bizarrely raunchy of his career. Music to seduce a Picasso painting by.

    Totally buy your reason for promoting this Beefheart, as a 180 degree counter, I've always promoted Clear Spot amongst his '70s albums, along with '67s Safe As Milk, as they are the two easiest entry points for the uninitiated.


    Brian Eno - Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy) (1974)
    Widely considered the lesser of Eno's first three solo albums, it still stands as a masterwork of avant-pop and contains some of his most endearing songs ("Third Uncle," for example). Even its smaller songs overflow with creativity and invention.

    Couldn't agree more with this choice, as an added insight, I often come to associate certain album's with one thing they do exceptionally well...After London Calling, Tiger Mountain Strategy may have the most exciting and adventurous collection of Verse 2 to Verse 3 bridges I've ever heard.


    Faust - So Far (1972)
    As far as I'm concerned, Faust were the most exciting band of the 20th century, the one that was willing to go further and try more than any other band and somehow pull off every stunt it attempted with charm and good humor. Any of their first four albums could be here, but So Far is the one where their many sides are best represented: avant-pop, pastoral folk, psychedelic freak outs, industrial dirges, cartoonish toss offs, Zappa-esque wackiness, and Teutonic cosmic reveries. That one band should lay claim to so much restless creativity is almost unfair, but the real shame is how few people are familiar with them. No other band has made adventurous, avant-garde music more accessible and irresistible. If you listen to one album off this list, make it this one.

    Coachella could do their part to alleviate this problem - a portion of the band remains active and is still touring...I just caught them 6 months ago and was one of the strangest, most experiential sets I've ever witnessed. Would love to see them on the 2014 lineup as long as it doesn't come down to an either or with Swans, who I feel absolutely have to be on the 2014 bill
    Last edited by IlliniQ; 06-29-2013 at 12:09 PM.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Some previous write-ups of albums i've done over the years, which probably fit this thread.



    Happy End - Kazemachi Roman (1971)
    A Japanese pop/rock/folk/country band who delievered a definite classic. Influenced by the Beatles, the Zombies, Crosby, Still, & Nash, and the classic pop of the late 60's, and early 70's.

    two songs from the album:




    Mickey Newbury - Heaven Help the Child (1973)

    Newbury could be considered laregly a Folk artist rather than a traditional Country artist, and was responsible for encouraging "Outlaw Country" musicians, such as Townes Van Zandt, and Kris Kristofferson in their own music. This is the last of his albums that has been known as his trilogy that began with It Looks Like Rain, and traveled his own path in terms of both lyrical and musicial style.

    Some songs:

    Live Version






    Townes Van Zandt - Live at the Old Quarter (1977) was a great songwriter on par, or at least close to, Hank Williams Sr., in my opinion. I think it's a great introduction for possible fans, and it's just a great album live or otherwise. He recorded it in a bar/music venue, yet the audience is completely captivated throughout the entire show as they are silenced as he performs, and subsequently show their appreciation after every song. Van Zandt lightens the mood at times with some jokes between songs, which help to break the serious mood which many of his songs may bring.

    Last edited by buddy; 06-29-2013 at 02:20 PM.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Patrick. buddy. You are both magnificent. Thank you.
    9/17 - Buzzcocks - Fonda (?)
    9/20 - Crosby, Stills & Nash - Santa Barbara Bowl
    9/21 - Caetano Veloso - Hollywood Bowl (?)
    9/26 - William Basinski - Pasadena Arts Council
    9/28 - Bob Mould - Roxy (?)


    Quote Originally Posted by getbetter View Post
    I finally made it through a listen of Sun Kil Moon - Benji and had put it on maybe 4 times til I could finally feel mentally like, "just fuck it just let this guy blabber on" while I'm doing paperwork .
    last.fm, if you care

    Twitter, if you dare

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    I'll post mine by year as I finish them up. My goal was to go with albums that people who focus mostly on indie and dance music would likely have ignored, either through obscurity or due to the perceived reputation that certain albums have within indie circles. I have some serious overlap with Patrick's list, which didn't surprise me. I, however, included some things from the Rolling Stone list because they are albums that I've never seen discussed on this board.

    Without further ado:

    1970
    Nina Simone – Black Gold



    At this point it’s more likely that people have heard Nina Simone thanks to Kanye West than to her legendary status as a soul singer, powerful interpreter of popular song or icon of black music. All due respect to Kanye, Simone’s huge voice and huge personality should be enough to sell her to a generation of listeners. This album, recorded live, contains a devastating take on Black Is the Color of My True Love’s Hair, one of her signature tunes. Throughout, she is conversational, lively and in great form, performing like a woman completely at ease. Possibly the best entry into her long, varied, and sadly underheard catalog.

    Fairport Convention – Full House



    Fairport Convention gets very little modern recognition, but in the late 60s and early 70s their blending of rock instrumentation with traditional British folk idioms inspired a whole different folk revival, and Sandy Denny, one of their singers, was the only person to guest on a Led Zeppelin album. When she left, one would expect that Fairport would suffer greatly, but instead Full House shows that the band was full of talented songwriters, interpreters and players. Sloth, a nine minute wonder, and Doctor of Physick show off the increasingly masterful guitar playing of Richard Thompson, who would go on to have a long and successful solo career. He is capable of great fingerpicking, subtle solos and great restraint, and his work turns this into an album well worth hearing, and a near equal of the twin peaks of Liege and Lief and Unhalfbricking

    Curtis Mayfield – Curtis



    The Impressions were a smooth soul act full of life and Superfly was Curtis Mayfield’s funky highlight, but his first solo album, Curtis, showed him seeking to throw off the restraints of his group and stretch out to great effect. The album works best as a whole, but the undeniable highlight is (Don’t Worry) If There’s A Hell Below, We’re All Gonna Go, a nearly-8 minute track that pushes it’s nearly despondent lyrics forward with an insistent groove and great craft. Most people only know Superfly, but this album is every bit as good.

    Kraftwerk – Kraftwerk



    Before they became the robots, Kraftwerk was a prototypical krautrock band. At this point Klaus Dinger, later of NEU!, played drums for the act and they were much more of a psychedelic groove band. While most of the tracks don’t reach the heights of either NEU! or Kraftwerk’s best releases, Ruckzuck, the opening song, rides a propulsive drum beat and guitar line to mesmerizing effect, and the flute that rides over the top just sells it. It sounds like James Bond music in the best of ways, and was an early sign that these German nuts were on to something.

    Emmit Rhodes – Emmit Rhodes



    Whenever I play this album for people, they ask which Paul McCartney album it is. Rhodes writes perfect Beatles-esque songs that are notable largely because they sound like work that the Beatles would have actually put out, rather than mere retreads of their sound. That Rhodes recorded the album in his garage (likely among the first albums to be recorded in such a manner) and that he played every instrument on the album just makes it more impressive. Somebody Made for You is a total gem of a song that should have been a hit, but every single track is worth discovering and full of pure joy.

    Amon Duul II – Yeti



    One of the early gems of the krautrock scene, Yeti finds Amon Duul II in particularly weird shape. Tanz Der Lemming is generally regarded as their high water mark, but Yeti shows that they were equally adept songwriters and improvisers: it’s a double album, with the first disc featuring composed tracks and the second live improvisations. That the improvised material is more engaging than the composed tracks is a compliment. They achieve a level of focus and playing across the disc that few psychedelic bands could muster.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    1971
    Booker T. & the MGs – Melting Pot



    The Stax/Volt house band gets seriously funky and absorbs some cues from African music. This album proved to be the swan song for the original MGs lineup, and it was a hell of a way to go out. The players have been together so long that the chemistry is just natural, and they play more loose and free than on any prior MGs album. One of their most entertaining and consistent releases, and a highlight of the Stax catalog.

    Jimi Hendrix – The Cry of Love



    As with a few other releases on my list, it’s arguable that any album released by Hendrix cannot be considered overlooked. However, the Cry of Love, the first posthumous Hendrix studio release, never receives nearly the same level of recognition as his work with the Experience. There’s no good reason for that, as the tracks on here are all killers, from Angel to Freedom. They may not have been finished, but they show Hendrix continuing to stretch his songwriting abilities and singing in a more comfortable and natural register. The album is a pure joy, even if it has been supplanted recently by New Rays of the Rising Sun, which attempts to create the fourth studio album that Hendrix intended.

    Yoko Ono – Fly



    Yes, Yoko Ono. This album marches alongside Can and Faust as one of the best rhythmic psychedelic albums of all time. Ono’s singing is always going to be an acquired taste, but the music on this album is nothing short of jaw-dropping. Mindtrain and Aimale could be mistaken for prime-era Can tracks and Don’t Worry Kyoko is one of the best songs that Eric Clapton ever latched himself onto. See why bands like Sonic Youth still revere Ono for her music.

    Merle Haggard – Hag



    Haggard is the face of Bakersfield outlaw country, and Hag is one of his all-time classics, released a few years after the success of Okie from Muskogee. He’s less raucous and rousing than much of his earlier work here, focusing on mid-tempo songs that ponder the state of the world and living as a country-man. Good country exists, and Haggard is one of the best.

    Paul and Linda McCartney – Ram



    Although its standing has been greatly elevated recently, for a long time Ram was viewed as Paul McCartney’s shitty album full of childish, half-written goof-offs. Never mind that Monkberry Moon Delight is a Man Man song 40 years early or that Hands Across the Water was a big hit, every single song on the album is a perfect example of McCartney’s way with melody and songcraft. When I first heard it at a ski area I thought I was hearing a Beatles album that had somehow eluded me, and once I found a copy of it I’ve listened to it constantly.

    Mahavishnu Orchestra – The Inner Mounting Flame



    Despite their reputation as prog wankers or jazz/rock crap, Mahavishnu’s first album is a really weird and wooly collection of intense, fast and technical rock music. John McLaughlin’s frantic guitar runs and the intense tempos were an early blueprint for thrash, speed and death metal, and the atonal, bizarre playing throughout the album points towards the louder aspects of post-punk and hardcore. Don’t put the fact that your creepy, pale jazz-nerd uncle loves this album against it: it rocks and is much weirder than you’d expect.

    Hawkwind – In Search of Space



    Hawkwind is so awesome, and mostly ignored by a majority of music fans. Hell, they’re touring the US for the first time in 20 years right now, and playing places like the House of Blues. Albums like In Search of Space should have turned them into cosmic rock icons on the level of Pink Floyd, or at least a beloved cult group with a following and influence as large as Can or NEU!. The first track, You Can’t Do That, is a 10+ minute rhythmic excursion into space, full of grooves and movement. The rest of the album is replete with shorter, energetic rock tracks. Killer band, and each of their first six albums is 100% worth hearing.

    Harry Nilsson – Nilsson Schmilsson



    John Lennon’s favorite singer and drinking buddy, Harry Nilsson had a great voice and was a consistently interesting artist. He only recorded one masterpiece, but this album is so full of great songs that it doesn’t matter if he never equaled or topped it. From the opening of Gotta Get Up to the final moments of I’ll Never Leave You, each song is a little world of craft and quirk. The song that most people know is probably Coconut, which is the rare novelty song that is also totally great. LCD Soundsystem would frequently cover Jump Into the Fire live, and Without You, a Sinatra classic, has fresh life breathed into it. I couldn’t imagine not having this album in my life.


    Roy Harper – Stormcock



    It’s mindblowing that this album doesn’t receive more recognition. Sure, it’s just a guy and his guitar for the most part, playing long, psychedelic folk tracks and singing some bizarre poetry. The level of playing and writing on here is so impressive. Harper is a truly masterful guitarist, blending the hard edge of Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd with more acoustic players of the day like Richard Thompson or Bert Jansch. The songs are great, and the guitar solo The Same Old Rock is the best Jimmy Page guitar playing you’ve never heard (he was credited as S. Flavius Mercurius.) A perennial favorite of musicians and perennially ignored by everyone else.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by FEELS View Post


    Roxy Music - Stranded (1973)

    Roxy Music are often overlooked when talking about great music of the 1970's. The best band to come out of the "Glam Rock" movement. When people do mention Roxy Music's 70's catalogue, they seem to only talk about the brilliance of For Your Pleasure, which is an amazing record, but this is the finer album i think. Every song is great. The album contains possibly my favorite Roxy song "Psalm".. which is an 8 minute long masterpiece. Apparently Bryan Ferry's first song he ever penned, which says a lot about his songwriting... A+
    I've never quite gotten the love for For Your Pleasure...It's funny to me that Brian Eno's least successful early career run was in the band he help formed. When it comes to Roxy Music, post-Eno is more often than not better than with-Eno. I'd rate Country Life, Siren and Avalon over For Your Pleasure as well.

    Either way, great pick.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    I'll post mine by year as I finish them up. My goal was to go with albums that people who focus mostly on indie and dance music would likely have ignored, either through obscurity or due to the perceived reputation that certain albums have within indie circles. I have some serious overlap with Patrick's list, which didn't surprise me. I, however, included some things from the Rolling Stone list because they are albums that I've never seen discussed on this board.

    Without further ado:

    1970
    Nina Simone – Black Gold



    Curtis Mayfield – Curtis


    Yes. I played both of these today.


    And yeah, Patrick, great write-up. I've been trying to listen to more current music but that list just obliterated my will to listen to anything recorded in the last 34 years.
    Last edited by greghead; 07-01-2013 at 12:28 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by nathanfairchild View Post
    Has Pitchfork revealed it's top 200 covers by Arcade Fire yet?

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Thanks all. Some good calls, as expected, Bryan, and some stuff I need to dig into (had trouble finding one album because it's Emitt, not Emmit, by the way) or revisit. Haven't heard any of the three Rey posted, so I'll have to give them a listen too.

    I love keeping up with music, but going through that list, it was shocking how many albums were really perfect albums in the sense that there just aren't any dud songs. I can't think of half as many albums made in the past ten years where every single song is great in some way or another. I'd love to hear some of your picks, Greg, as I'm sure there would be a lot of stuff that falls out of my area of expertise. Tom's too.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Some feedback from today's listening:

    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post

    Adverts - Crossing The Red Sea With The Adverts (1977)
    Perhaps the finest straight up British punk album, each of its tracks is a perfectly realized pop song with a killer hook. Smart without being obscure, snotty without succumbing to self parody, this album has aged far better than many of its contemporaries. Lead off track "One Chord Wonders" wonderfully sums up the musical ethos of punk better than just about anything else out there.
    Loved this. It had been sitting on my hard drive forever but I had never listened to it. Heck yeah.

    Quote Originally Posted by buddy View Post

    Happy End - Kazemachi Roman (1971)
    A Japanese pop/rock/folk/country band who delievered a definite classic. Influenced by the Beatles, the Zombies, Crosby, Still, & Nash, and the classic pop of the late 60's, and early 70's.
    This had me absolutely bouncing out of my chair with excitement. LOVE LOVE LOVED every bit of it. It was a real trip for me to listen to - I haven't listened to very much non-English music (Serge Gainsbourg, but it's so much about the music and attitude that the fact it's not in English hardly matters. And Boris, but Takeshi sings in such a way that often times I feel like I'm hearing English) and this was very foreign sounding. I'd love to read the translation of a lot of these lyrics. Haikara Hakuchi is just fantastic. This album absolutely made my day.
    9/17 - Buzzcocks - Fonda (?)
    9/20 - Crosby, Stills & Nash - Santa Barbara Bowl
    9/21 - Caetano Veloso - Hollywood Bowl (?)
    9/26 - William Basinski - Pasadena Arts Council
    9/28 - Bob Mould - Roxy (?)


    Quote Originally Posted by getbetter View Post
    I finally made it through a listen of Sun Kil Moon - Benji and had put it on maybe 4 times til I could finally feel mentally like, "just fuck it just let this guy blabber on" while I'm doing paperwork .
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    It's a start, but I've got a whole bunch more to tackle...


    1970's


    Parliament - Osmium (1970)
    Much closer to the muddy psychedelia of Funkadelic than the slick funk sounds of mid-'70s Parliament, Osmium contains early versions of numerous songs which were later re-recorded by the group.


    Bob Dylan - New Morning (1970)
    After Dylan freaked out the squares with the messy, underrated Self Portrait, he returned to form with the uncomplicated, lovely New Morning. The album has grown in stature in recent years, but it's still a nice surprise to people who think Dylan was still on sabbatical in 1970.


    The Rolling Stones - Black and Blue (1976)
    Black and Blue is a mess, essentially an eight-song documentary about the wildly disparate guitarists the Stones considered as a replacement for Mick Taylor before settling on Ron Wood. It's also great fun, with "Hot Stuff" and "Hey Negrita" mindless booty-shakers, and the shmaltzy "Fool to Cry" - with the era's ubiquitous electric piano - particularly enjoyable. Easy to dismiss, but also a mistake.


    Geraldo Pino Lets Have a Party/Afro Soco Soul Live (1970/early 70s)
    Hailing from Sierra Leone, soul singer Geraldo Pino was reportedly a serious influence on Fela Kuti. These two albums reflect Pino's masterful melding of African sounds with American funk and soul. Let's have a party, indeed.


    1980's


    3rd Bass - The Cactus Album (1989)
    Beastie Boys kicked open the door for white emcees, but even in the same year when Paul's Boutique blew people's minds, 3rd Bass were often looked at as the genuine article. Their debut album isn't exactly forgotten, but for anyone exploring hip-hop's past, songs like "Sons of 3rd Bass" and "The Gas Face" are a revelation.


    Arcadia - So Red the Rose (1985)
    When Duran Duran fractured into a pair of side projects, the Power Station won the commercial and chart battle with bombast. Simon Le Bon, Nick Rhodes and Roger Taylor took a decidedly more artful approach with an album of lush synthesizers, grand imagination and cameos by famous friends (David Gilmour, Grace Jones, Sting, etc...)


    Camper Van Beethoven - Key Lime Pie (1989)
    David Lowery followed Camper Van Beethoven's split with Cracker, which found commercial success in the age of "alternative radio." But Key Lime Pie is the real treat, a collection of wry Americana and desperation best exemplified by the cover of Status Quo's "Pictures of Matchstick Men" and the group's own "All Her Favorite Fruit" and "Sweethearts."


    The Clash - Sandinista! (1980)
    Following a brilliant double album (London Calling) with a sprawling triple album priced as a single disc (at least upon initial release) makes perfect sense with the Clash. Though I've always loved songs like "The Magnificent Seven," the Motown-tinged "Hitsville UK" and the moody "Broadway," I could never connect with Sandinista!, getting lost in the dub and other wild tangents. But it took Tim Burgess to explain it to me, equating the album - his favorite by the Clash - with a walk through London in the summertime, people sitting on stoops playing disparate music. Ever since, I've loved the record(s) and have no issue with playing it front to back.


    A Certain Ratio - The Graveyard and the Ballroom (1980)
    Kinetic funk, dour vocals and the occasional blast of a referee's whistle are all part of what made A Certain Ratio so unique. Even as early as their debut the Manchester group had its vision squarely on the dancefloor. Like Talking Heads on grimmer drugs.


    Jungle Brothers - Done By the Forces of Nature (1989)
    The best album by the most overlooked group in the Native Tongues crew, Done By the Forces of Nature is one of the great artifacts of the era, when samples were often about much more than ripping a beat or a recognizable riff. Features the Native Tongues anthem "Doin' Our Own Dang" on the second side, but it's the first side's perfect string of songs I go back to again and again.


    1990's


    Leaders of the New School T.I.M.E. (1993)
    Before Busta Rhymes broke off and became a solo star, he was a member of Leaders of the New School, a Long Island-based, Native Tongues-linked collective. Their first record, A Future Without a Past, was a goofy diversion, but there was nothing there which could have signaled what came next. T.I.M.E. failed to make much of a commercial impact, and its not difficult to understand why. Paranoid production and an almost complete rejection of the light themes of the debut led to the creation of an album which sounded like it came from the future.


    Blur - The Great Escape (1995)
    If it's possible for an album which reached #1 on the charts in an artist's country of origin, then this is a prime example. Though not as routinely dismissed as the group's underrated debut, Blur's The Great Escape still gets a bad rap as a second-rate BritPop kid brother to their 1994 opus Parklife. That dissatisfaction from within the group led to their excellently noisy eponymous follow-up, and the fans often rank The Great Escape fairly low in the canon. But the record is better than history says, not just because of its singles ("Country House" is ridiculous, but in a good way; "The Universal" remains as epic as it was upon first listen; "Charmless Man" is just great fun), but also odd album tracks like "He Thought of Cars," "Fade Away" and "Best Days."


    The Charlatans - Up to Our Hips (1994)
    The Charlatans' debut was a giddy chapter in the Madchester story, and their follow-up a thin approximation of a group looking to break those shackles. It was on their third album, Up to Our Hips, where they made good with a rhythm section stretching out and exploring their fascination with soul music and a generally dark theme which wouldn't be revealed until a few years later as more than just a stylistic departure.


    Spiritualized - Pure Phase (1995)
    Released between their celebrated debut (Lazer Guided Melodies) and their acknowledged artistic peak (Ladies and Gentlemen, We are Floating in Space), Spiritualized's Pure Phase sometimes gets lost in the shuffle. Amid the drone, though, is a perfect link between the first and third albums, and on songs like "Medication" and "Lay Back in the Sun" Jason Pierce's crew even find the time to mix in drugs with pop melodies, in an albeit hazy form.


    2000's


    Mink Lungs - The Better Button (2001)
    My exposure to Mink Lungs began when they opened for Luna at CBGB's on New Year's Eve several months before their debut album was released. They were eclectic indie from Brooklyn, so right up my alley. Following the show, I spoke to Tim and he sold me a vinyl single, which I promptly left in the apartment of my date that night. When the album was released, I was not disappointed. Years later, I met my fiancee, who it turned out was at that very show. She was there because her boyfriend was a member of Mink Lungs. Strange but true.


    Beachwood Sparks - Beachwood Sparks (2000)
    Beachwood Sparks have never gotten their due. While their sophomore effort Once We Were Trees builds upon the group's modern Cosmic American Music blueprint, the debut is the best place to begin.


    Mercury Rev - The Secret Migration (2005)
    Fans of Mercury Rev are often split as to whether they prefer the psychedelic early stuff with David Baker or the later majestic stuff when Jonathan Donahue and Grasshopper took the reins. I tend to lean toward the latter, but while I love the group's critical darling, Deserter's Songs, The Secret Migration is a favorite of mine that feels overlooked. Perhaps it's a bit dramatic or precious for some, but lushly complex songs like "Across Yer Ocean" and "Black Forest (Lorelei)" is where I connect with the band the most on an emotional level.
    Last edited by stuporfly; 07-02-2013 at 08:52 AM.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    New Morning and Black and Blue are a couple of my favorite albums from those artists.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by FEELS View Post
    Silver Jews - American Water (1998)



    Easily one of the best albums of the 90's, yet no one ever really talks about it. Those that do, mention Silver Jews as more of a Steve Malkmus side project (he played and sang on a few of their songs).

    So many quotables.
    The silver Jews, the mountain goats and cat power were like the gods of indie in '06 at least thats what it seemed like to me.
    This is very difficult for me because it seems like most of these albums are said band's magnum opus.
    I'd throw out Return to Cookie Mountain would that count?
    Last edited by Jordanp; 07-02-2013 at 05:28 PM.
    Certain songs they get so scratched into our souls

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Oh and Pinkerton - Weezer
    Far and away rivers' best writing and yet looked at as a failure. If only it would have deserved its due accolades. Maybe he wouldn't write shitty pop songs to appease the masses.
    Certain songs they get so scratched into our souls

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    I think you misunderstand the term overlooked.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Patrick, bmack, buddy, stuporfly - Please don't give up on this thread just because of the inactivity. I realize that putting a lot of effort into a thread like this can be like spending hours writing a great speech for a class, only to look up while you're giving it to see that the entire class has their heads buried in their cell phones. I've listened to quite a few of your recommended albums over the past two days, but haven't had a chance to properly give feedback just yet.
    9/17 - Buzzcocks - Fonda (?)
    9/20 - Crosby, Stills & Nash - Santa Barbara Bowl
    9/21 - Caetano Veloso - Hollywood Bowl (?)
    9/26 - William Basinski - Pasadena Arts Council
    9/28 - Bob Mould - Roxy (?)


    Quote Originally Posted by getbetter View Post
    I finally made it through a listen of Sun Kil Moon - Benji and had put it on maybe 4 times til I could finally feel mentally like, "just fuck it just let this guy blabber on" while I'm doing paperwork .
    last.fm, if you care

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    To be honest, I just forgot. I still have the rest of my 70s list all set up, I just need to do my writeups. I'll try to get some of that done today while I'm sitting around.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    You really seem to know your shit, SoulDischarge. I have been trying to recall this one-minor-underground-hit (maybe one album/one EP) band from the early 80s. All I remember is that it was a minimalist electronic sound with a female singer (in the vein of Book of Love). They could even have been from NYC. The song was called "Circumvent" or "Circumspect" and I've been trying to find a copy for two decades now. Any clue to what the fuck I'm talking about?
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by TallGuyCM View Post
    Patrick, bmack, buddy, stuporfly - Please don't give up on this thread just because of the inactivity.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    ^ lol

    I've got some albums picked out for this, but I just need to find the time/motivation to do the write-ups.
    Quote Originally Posted by roberto73 View Post
    I'd contribute to this discussion but I'm still busy reminiscing about the halcyon days of punk. You know, the mid-90s.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    I doubt I can hang with you guys for long but I've slowly been compiling a funk & soul-centric list. Gotta stick with what I know.


    EDIT: Patrick, I've been working through your list. Tons of great stuff. But for all the weird, abrasive shit contained in it, nothing I've listened to so far has been nearly as unsettling as The Third Reich & Roll. A weird, creepy record. I'm just barely beginning to wrap my head around what they did there.
    Last edited by greghead; 07-10-2013 at 02:02 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by nathanfairchild View Post
    Has Pitchfork revealed it's top 200 covers by Arcade Fire yet?

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    A little feedback:

    Silver Jews - I had heard bits and pieces of this record over the years, but had never sat down and put it on front to back. Definitely borrows from Pavement quite a bit, but adds enough musically to not seem obvious about it. And lyrically it was just astounding. Loved it overall.

    Cabaret Voltaire - Wonderfully weird. Reminded me a bit of Throbbing Gristle at times, and the vocals sounded like Mark E. Smith some too. Really liked it.

    The Boys - This was awesome. Straight-forward, no bullshit. I put it on when I was getting a bit tired on a drive and it was perfect.

    Merle Haggard - I listened to on the 99 between Bakersfield and Fresno. You know me, I'm not super into country, but these were some really sincere, well-written tunes. It was perfect on that drive, and aside from the few uptempo songs that got a bit too twangy I really loved it.

    Dead Boys - Ever since hearing Pearl Jam cover Sonic Reducer over a decade ago, I've always been meaning to listen to this band. This was the best album of this kind I've heard in a really long time, I loved every minute of it.

    The Damned - Really fucking loved this too. So much energy from beginning to end.
    9/17 - Buzzcocks - Fonda (?)
    9/20 - Crosby, Stills & Nash - Santa Barbara Bowl
    9/21 - Caetano Veloso - Hollywood Bowl (?)
    9/26 - William Basinski - Pasadena Arts Council
    9/28 - Bob Mould - Roxy (?)


    Quote Originally Posted by getbetter View Post
    I finally made it through a listen of Sun Kil Moon - Benji and had put it on maybe 4 times til I could finally feel mentally like, "just fuck it just let this guy blabber on" while I'm doing paperwork .
    last.fm, if you care

    Twitter, if you dare

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