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Thread: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by TallGuyCM View Post
    Oh. And with it being a '00s it obviously hasn't been mentioned in here yet, but I listened to this masterpiece for the first time today:



    Fuck me for not listening to this years ago. I've historically had a bit of a rough time embracing this band, but I'm completely on board now. Matt told me a few weeks ago that I'd *love* Let's Call It Love, and described the song a bit, piquing my interest to finally give this a spin. The entire rest of the album just slays, too. Sorry I didn't listen to you about this years ago, bmack.
    It's the best album from 00-09 by any band, any genre, period...I know some argue it got enough acclaim to be left off this thread, but fact of matter is any 10 best of the decade list that doesn't have this album on it just wasn't paying attention. When Pitchfork suggested Kid A was the last "album" album, I had to laugh...Kid A is a poor-man's The Woods when it comes to conceptual/thematic completeness. It did nothing to promote a new sound or style, but as a holistic artistic statement...no album can match the subtextual density of this work. I'll be adding more on it in my own first write up soon.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by TallGuyCM View Post

    For whatever reason, this board seems to be the only place that puts Tanz Der Lemming on a higher pedestal than Yeti. I'd have to listen to both several more times before deciding, but every other list I've ever seen has Yeti as the band's go-to record. *Insert The More You Know jpeg*
    I mean, I could understand preferring Tanz Der Lemming as it's a more concise and focused statement, but that's actually why I prefer Yeti. It's a shaggy beast of a record (heh.)
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by IlliniQ View Post
    It's the best album from 00-09 by any band, any genre, period...I know some argue it got enough acclaim to be left off this thread, but fact of matter is any 10 best of the decade list that doesn't have this album on it just wasn't paying attention. When Pitchfork suggested Kid A was the last "album" album, I had to laugh...Kid A is a poor-man's The Woods when it comes to conceptual/thematic completeness. It did nothing to promote a new sound or style, but as a holistic artistic statement...no album can match the subtextual density of this work. I'll be adding more on it in my own first write up soon.
    I'll not be including it in my 2000s list probably because I've talked about it so much here, but it is a fantastic album. That said, trying to compare Kid A and The Woods in terms of thematic development doesn't really seem to make sense to me. They were two VERY different approaches, and while The Woods is great and (I would argue) the definitive statement from a spectacular rock band, it wasn't the huge stylistic shift that Kid A was. Sure, they added quite a bit more of a "classic" rock sound, but they still retain their base of songwriting and just developed it further. I'd listen to The Woods over Kid A any day, but I don't think there's an easy comparison between the two.

    Subtextual density is such a ridiculous phrase. What do you mean there? Because if you mean the underlying developments, references and sounds the band works with, I'd argue that Leaves Turn Inside You by Unwound is more developed in that regard. I'd also argue it's the better album, although they're both great.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    I'll not be including it in my 2000s list probably because I've talked about it so much here, but it is a fantastic album. That said, trying to compare Kid A and The Woods in terms of thematic development doesn't really seem to make sense to me. They were two VERY different approaches, and while The Woods is great and (I would argue) the definitive statement from a spectacular rock band, it wasn't the huge stylistic shift that Kid A was. Sure, they added quite a bit more of a "classic" rock sound, but they still retain their base of songwriting and just developed it further. I'd listen to The Woods over Kid A any day, but I don't think there's an easy comparison between the two.

    Subtextual density is such a ridiculous phrase. What do you mean there? Because if you mean the underlying developments, references and sounds the band works with, I'd argue that Leaves Turn Inside You by Unwound is more developed in that regard. I'd also argue it's the better album, although they're both great.
    Not talking musical terms here...thinking more along the lines of literature, or painting, or film...in the same way artists in those mediums will make choices of shape, word, structure, color to enhance unspoken general themes.

    THE WOODS is overflowing with elements reinforcing each other such ways...be it the way the Album's CD/Cover Art and song order that flows lyrically from Naive Youthful Belief to Crippling Middle-Aged Uncertainty all reinforce the Album's central thematic preoccupation with growing old ("taking root") on stage,

    or the way individuals songs are paired to counterpoint each other, as in the case of Jumpers and Modern Girl, which present extreme individuation and conformity as equally isolating hells,

    or the way sound effects are chosen for more than just their sonic impact, as when Channel-2 VHS timecode, used in the 80s and 90s to timelock VHS Music Video dubs to the songs they were to be synced with, is used as a drone in the 3rd verse of Entertain, underscoring the band's ironic trouncing of other contemporary bands returning to past genres,

    or the way that incredible in-the-red mix is used not just to create the intentional "live feel" of the record, but also to act as basically a "negator" of specific lyrics, turning the earnestly deliver lyrics to the back half of Modern Girl into as brutal a listening experience, and hence as horrific an experience, as Jumpers, or "cancelling" out the band's later stated desire to "get off the roller coaster" and "get back on the Tilt-a-whirl,"

    or the way the songs lyrically jump back and forth from tales of dynamic movement to stories of stark stasis, of running vs fighting it out, highly reflective of the personal dynamics of the band at the time, when Corin Tucker - always the intellectual if not on-stage leader of the band - was contemplating leaving on an almost daily basis after the birth of her first child.

    Those are the kind of things I mean when talking about "subtextual density" And I felt The Woods did a better job of integrating and structuring all those elements into one coherent whole than any other album of the last decade. Every song on the album, while working on a more literal level, can be read as an exploration of the band's metamorphasis, from the Duck (fierce female Punk Pursists) of opener The Fox, full of pluck but naively unaware of what it's getting itself into, to the confused, bed-ridden woman in Night Light who no longer has any idea what to do next (but who just can't play punk music anymore, she's completely outgrown it)...all set to the most dynamic Psych-Rock the Aughts produced.
    Last edited by IlliniQ; 07-29-2013 at 07:50 PM.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    I don't think I would write up anything quite so involved, as I'm working on my 80s list, but I'd say that Unwound's last work can easily match for those criteria while also displaying a shocking level of development musically. The two bands (S-K and Unwound) were frequently viewed as twins within the punk community due to their being the two highest-profile acts on KRS. They both did their best work with their last albums, but for very different reasons. S-K fortified their sound, added some interesting twists and wrote their most consistent batch of songs. Unwound took their best batch of songs, seriously upped their technical skills, took years to develop the album as a whole, expanded their musical vocabulary and created a unique mystique that flowed through the album.

    Which I guess is all meant to say, give Leaves Turn Inside You a listen if you haven't. It's a near-perfect record and a completely stunning release.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    I don't think I would write up anything quite so involved, as I'm working on my 80s list, but I'd say that Unwound's last work can easily match for those criteria while also displaying a shocking level of development musically. The two bands (S-K and Unwound) were frequently viewed as twins within the punk community due to their being the two highest-profile acts on KRS. They both did their best work with their last albums, but for very different reasons. S-K fortified their sound, added some interesting twists and wrote their most consistent batch of songs. Unwound took their best batch of songs, seriously upped their technical skills, took years to develop the album as a whole, expanded their musical vocabulary and created a unique mystique that flowed through the album.

    Which I guess is all meant to say, give Leaves Turn Inside You a listen if you haven't. It's a near-perfect record and a completely stunning release.
    Added to my Spotify Must hear list just now...will definitely give a spin over next couple days. Thx.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    1975

    Lou Reed – Metal Machine Music

    Oh, Come on...Even Lou thinks this album sucks.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    If he dislikes it then why would he choose to perform it at multiple dates, authorize a reissue and state that he was satisfied with how it came out?

    And who gives a fuck how the artist feels about the release, if it's good? And Metal Machine Music is good, abstract noise before abstract noise was a thing.
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    Loveable Curmudgeon TallGuyCM's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Damn, IlliniQ. Post in here more often. That was a great read.
    4/27 - Ghost BC - Fonda (?)
    4/29 - Franz Ferdinand - Wiltern (?)
    4/30 - Mono - Troubadour (?)
    5/03 - Philip Glass - Royce Hall
    5/06 - Rodrigo y Gabriela - Orpheum (?)


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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    "Anyone that gets to side four is dumber than I am."

    And, I can only find one performance of the piece that actually involved Lou.

    As to why perform or re release it...who knows...have you heard Loutallica?
    Youth, you son of a bitch, where did you go?

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cheddar's Cousin View Post
    "Anyone that gets to side four is dumber than I am."

    And, I can only find one performance of the piece that actually involved Lou.

    As to why perform or re release it...who knows...have you heard Loutallica?
    He brought a trio to the UK and Europe to tour the album extensively.

    Are you familiar with LaMonte Young and the Theater of the Eternal Music? Because the album definitely sounds like it uses those works as a clear precedent (which makes sense considering John Cale and Angus MacLise were both members of the group as well as founding members of the Velvet Underground.)

    Here's an interview where Lou expresses his fondness for Metal Machine Music, describes what he was attempting to do with it, and generally is a hilariously curmudgeounly interview. But like I said, who gives a fuck when it's an entertaining album, and definitely a highly influential one.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    that article also has a link down in the lower right to the best article about Dr Who that I have ever read.
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    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    I've been so impressed by the efforts of others on this thread, wanted to make a contribution myself. So here goes.

    I don’t have the time to work through these lists decade by decade, so instead I’m going tackle it offering up one title per decade per post. As with Bmack, I’m not going to religiously adhere to the “can’t be on Rolling Stones Top 500” criteria, if it’s an older album that has dropped off the radar of most younger posters…i.e. Moby Grape, The Band, Gris Gris, Soft Machine Third, etc, I feel it should be mentioned in this thread at some point in time. Anyway, here’s the first block of titles that came to mind.





    Mott The Hoople (1969): Far better known for later, glammier, harder-rocking efforts like All The Young Dudes and my personal favorite, Mott, debut effort Mott The Hoople finds the band, having just added lead vocalist Ian Hunter, trying to concoct the perfect synthesis of Beggars Banquet and Blonde On Blonde, and to a surprising degree they succeed. Original compositions like Rock and Roll Queen and the epic Half Moon Bay are impressive, but it’s the three covers that open the record - a blazing instrumental take on The Kink’s You Really Got Me, a fine rendition of Doug Sahm’s At The Crossroads, and best of all, a moving version of Sonny Bono’s Laugh At Me - that really set the bar. Anyone with a taste for 60s organ-drenched Dylan done with a harder-rocking edge, should run, not walk, to pick up a vinyl copy of this mostly forgotten gem.



    Golden Filth - The Fugs (1970): The 1978 edition of The Rolling Stone record guide put it best - “only the 60s could have produced high quality pornographic rock.” Formed in the mid-60s by a trio of New York beat poets, The Fug’s set out to be the most offensive band in the world, but by the time this collection of live recordings of most of their best tracks was put together, they had also morphed into a very tight live act. This is far from their best album, and the one-time shocking, now very dated song intros full of references to Lesbian Dwarfs, Slurp Circles, Jello Orgies and petrified Zebra Puke can grate if not in the mood for an anthropological study of how some Hippies talked dirty to each other back in ’68, but given how much better the recording quality is here than on most of their classic original releases, this is the best place to start for those new to the band.



    Big Daddy - John Cougar Mellencamp (1989): An artist who’s work is flat out wolfsbane in the eyes of most hipsters, I’ve actually come to view Mellencamp as one of the most underrated artists in all of pop history. Though always mainstream, with a plain-spoken, backwoods lyrical style that has generated some of clumsiest lyrics known to mankind, the man knows how to rock a Keith Richards riff, is a fantastic live performer, and over the years has also evolved into a very courageous artist, willing to take on and challenge his audience in ways his far more celebrated peer Bruce Springsteen has never had the guts to do. This album, his second to incorporate the rich, Appalachian sound he initiated on The Lonesome Jubilee, is my personal favorite, finding Mellencamp at his most pointed, dark, and reflective, and includes the best song in his entire canon, the remarkable Jackie Brown, possibly the most profound, clear-eyed examinations of poverty in contemporary democratic society popular music has ever produced. I welcome challenges to this claim.





    Pop - U2 (1997): Another album reviled by many, and while far from the band’s best effort, I include it here as a demarcation of one of the saddest career turning points I can think of among contemporary bands. Coming on the heels of Achtung, Baby! and mini-release Zooropa, this is the most musically ambitious effort in U2’s catalog. Though no longer at the forefront of the zeitgeist as they were in the late 80s, Pop shows us a band refusing to be left behind. Techno, electronica, Hip-Hop break beats, 90s Alt-Rock…all these tropes, non-existent at the band’s early 80s inception, were daringly thrown into the traditional U2 mix, and the results, though inconsistent, produced far more winners than most seem willing to acknowledge. The title track, Do You Feel Loved, Last Night On Earth, Gone, Please, Miami, Wake Up Dead Man…these songs still sound great to me, sonically enormous like most of U2's best work . Unfortunately, the band’s audience, which by now was mostly a massive contingent of harried young Moms and Dads forever married to the earlier earnest hits like New Years Day, Pride and One, would have nothing to do with “out-there” experiments like Mofo, and the album bombed. And tragedy of tragedies, given the choice between their audience and continued musical growth, the band turned tail and chose their audience, following up Pop with the decent but safer than milk All That You Can’t Leave Behind. They haven’t taken another musical chance since.



    ‘Sno Angel like You - Howe Gelb (2006): My personal favorite album of 2006 is a one-of -a-kind charmer. Having accidentally stumbled upon Canadian gospel act Voices Of Praise at a music festival, Gelb was inspired to pare his spare, flat Lou-Reed-like monotone and dust-covered tunes with Voices Of Praises soaring harmonies, and the result is a miraculous pairing of opposites like no other. Turning the choir’s one collaborative condition that Gelb keep the music positive from a limitation into a strength, Gelb uses his world-weary voice and a combination of covers, recast Giant Sand tunes, and newly penned originals to convey an implied album-long conversion of tired cynic to happy adherent of good-Christian living fully at peace with his world. A fantastic head-phone listen, full of brilliant acoustic guitar lines and razor sharp Stratocaster stings, it contains some of the most joyous tracks in recent memory, and the last two minutes of final track Chore Of Enchantment, as our narrator breathes his last breathe, might be the most perfect close to an album I’ve heard in over a decade. If there’s one album in this first batch you check out, make it this.






    Hadestown - Anais Mitchell (2010): We all have a relatively unknown artist we hold dear to our hearts that for the life of us we can’t understand how the rest of the music listening world hasn’t jumped on board. For me it is without question Mitchell, who I feel has been the single finest folk artist working the last five years. This audacious album is actually a soundtrack to her stage play of the same name, a recasting of the Orpheus-Eurydice Myth in Depression-era America. Handling the role of Eurydice herself, and bringing in an all-star cast of indie talents to play the other parts - including mentor Ani DiFranco as Persephone, the Low Anthem’s Ben Knox Miller as Hermes, bottom-of-the-ocean bass Greg Brown as Hades, and Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon as Orpheus - Mitchell crafts a vibrant, eclectic, and at times, especially during the album’s powerhouse middle third, deeply moving waltz through the American music of the first 50 years. All contributors have stand-out moments - Brown’s That’s Why We Build The Wall, and Mitchell’s Flowers are both amazing - but it’s Vernon, his songs given a more British folk-feel to set his character’s purity apart, who wows the most, delivering some of his best vocal performances of his career.

    Every year I post an Anais Mitchell for next year thread in the Wish Lists category of this forum, to which most respond, who? Hopefully a few readers will be inspired to check this record out and join me in that chorus in upcoming years while she remains at the top of her game.
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    Last edited by IlliniQ; 07-30-2013 at 06:52 PM.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    In my eyes, Pop is the second best U2 album behind Achtung, Baby. In addition to being so much more boundary-pushing musically, I've always found it to be much more consistent than The Joshua Tree, whose side B really drags after the greatest hits of sorts that is its side A.
    4/27 - Ghost BC - Fonda (?)
    4/29 - Franz Ferdinand - Wiltern (?)
    4/30 - Mono - Troubadour (?)
    5/03 - Philip Glass - Royce Hall
    5/06 - Rodrigo y Gabriela - Orpheum (?)


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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by IlliniQ View Post

    ‘Son Angel like You - Howe Gelb (2006):
    I don't know this album but I wanted to lend a voice of support for Howe Gelb generally. I really don't understand why more serious music people ("hipsters") don't talk about his work more. I've seen Howe live a few times but the coolest was when I saw Giant Sand at FFF last year ... an hour of spiritual tranquility in a sea of punk rock chaos.

    Great writeup IlliniQ. I was just reading about Peter Stampfel the other day. Interesting choice for Mellencamp.. not my favorite of his but certainly in the top 3 or 4.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by TallGuyCM View Post
    In my eyes, Pop is the second best U2 album behind Achtung, Baby. In addition to being so much more boundary-pushing musically, I've always found it to be much more consistent than The Joshua Tree, whose side B really drags after the greatest hits of sorts that is its side A.
    I can meet you half way on Joshua Tree side two...Trip Through Your Wires, No Exit, and Mothers Of The Disappeared have never done it for me, but I've always liked Red Hill Mining Town and In God's Country, and One Tree Hill is just magic, as good as any track on Side One save for maybe Running To Stand Still.
    The Replacements - Bryan Ferry - Outkast - The Knife - Dum Dum Girls - Jon Spencer Blues Explosion - Broken Bells - Haim - Neko Case - Jagwar Ma - Goat - Waxahatchee

    Queens Of The Stone Age - Pet Shop Boys - Chvrches - Mogwai - Warpaint - Washed Out - Future Islands - Ty Seagall - Darkside - Foxygen

    Beck - Neutral Milk Hotel - Superchunk - Arcade Fire - Bombino - Daughter - Surfer Blood

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    "One Tree Hill" into "Exit" is one of my favorite things, ever.

    As for Pop, I love it and think it is underrated (mostly because people wanted to hate it in 1997 for a lot of reasons that had nothing to do with the music itself), but I wouldn't rate it in the first half of U2's discography.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    I really like Pop as well. Used to listen to that album all the time in the dorms freshman year.
    We're here to play some Mississippi Delta Blues. We're in a horrible depression, and I gotta admit - we're starting to like it.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Here's an interview where Lou expresses his fondness for Metal Machine Music, describes what he was attempting to do with it, and generally is a hilariously curmudgeounly interview. But like I said, who gives a fuck when it's an entertaining album, and definitely a highly influential one.
    Great interview. Thanks for that. I love Lou Reed, but I still maintain that MMM Sucks. It is unlistenable.

    I can agree with you though...who gives a fuck? If you like it, you like it.

    I am enjoying your write ups and opinions (many of them). You obviously love music.

    Maybe I'll come up with a few recommendations of my own.
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Part One

    King Crimson - Discipline (1981)



    The more "modern" leanings of King Crimson’s 1980s lineup, with Adrian Belew on guitar and lead vocals, Tony Levin playing the Chapman stick bass, and Yes’ former drummer Bill Bruford, was a stark departure from what the Fripp-led band released in it's first phase, changes which could easily have backfired spectacularly. The results on Discipline, however, led to one of the band’s best and most consistent albums, one which deserves to be mentioned in the same conversations as the more revered In the Court of King Crimson and Red. Over the album’s seven songs the band are able to effortlessly blend Fripp’s unique and distinctive approach to the guitar with Belew's bright, angular guitar lines (“Frame by Frame” and “Thela Hun Ginjeet”), craft immersive soundscapes (“The Sheltering Sky” and “Matte Kudasai”), and write the kind of paranoid (“Indiscipline”) and seemingly nonsensical (“Elephant Talk”) New/No-Wave tracks which wouldn't have been out of place on the first few Talking Heads albums. While the quartet would only record two further albums, Discipline serves an important touching point in the band's evolution in the 30+ years since the album's release.

    Scientist - Rids the World of the Evil Curse of the Vampires (1981)



    The only things you really need to know about this dub classic is that Scientist was King Tubby’s protégé, and that the album cover expertly captures the overall mood of the 10 versions Scientist recorded – dark, murky, and foreboding, but with its tongue planted firmly in its cheek. What makes this album so unique, however, is Scientist’s willingness and ability to add layer after layer of effects to his mixes, experiments which were pretty much unheard of at the time and would, in turn, lay the foundation for the evolution of dub in the 1980s.

    Wipers - Youth of America (1981)



    Bryan was right to recommend Wipers’ excellent first album Is This Real?, but for me the follow-up Youth of America is perhaps just a nose ahead of its predecessor due to the evolution of the band’s sound. Here Sage moves away from the short and more direct songs of the debut for more complex structures and a willingness to explore a groove as long as needed. This shift is most evident on the album's second half, especially on the titular, 10+ minute closer. An important album, and one which influenced countless underground rocks acts of the 1980s not only for its willingness to push the boundaries of a genre, but also in its DIY genesis (with Sage having a major say in the writing, recording, and engineering processes).

    Black Uhuru - Chill Out (1982)



    An important moment in the sound of roots reggae in the 1980s, Black Uhuru's Chill Out finds the vocal trio working with a very talented crew of musicians who were able to seamlessly synthesize the foundational sounds of the genre (upstroked guitar, fat basslines, in-the-pocket drumming) with new technologies like digital drums, keyboard and studio effects, and synthesizers (played by one Wally Badarou, someone I'll be talking about in a later write-up). Not only are the tracks themselves extremely well-written, the production is a marvel as well; in lesser hands Chill Out would be a cluttered and rudderless mess, but instead we have an album full of inventive flourishes which enhance the moods each track create.

  22. #232
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    I don't know that Uhuru album, and based on the other 3 I will like it.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

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    Loveable Curmudgeon TallGuyCM's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    serious music people ("hipsters")
    I can't tell if this is sarcasm or not. Hipsters are the complete opposite of serious music people...always hopping from one hyped up buzzy band or show to the next.
    4/27 - Ghost BC - Fonda (?)
    4/29 - Franz Ferdinand - Wiltern (?)
    4/30 - Mono - Troubadour (?)
    5/03 - Philip Glass - Royce Hall
    5/06 - Rodrigo y Gabriela - Orpheum (?)


    Quote Originally Posted by ThomThom View Post
    I want to get the members of Brand New and Chvrches in a line and have all of them executed in front of their fans.
    last.fm, if you care

    Twitter, if you dare

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    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    It was a wink.
    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

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    Coachella Junkie getbetter's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Wink harder Tom

    Simian Mobile Disco, Earth @ Pappy and Harriet's 04/26/15
    Austin Psych Fest @ Carson Creek Ranch 05/02-04/14
    The Decemberist @ Crystal Ballroom 05/30/14
    Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds @ The Warfield 07/07/14


    Last.fm
    Quote Originally Posted by psychic friend View Post
    thanks for whatever you did in mexico.



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    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    (TallGuy doesn't think he's a hipster)

    4/20: Godflesh, Cut Hands @ DNA Lounge
    4/21: The Men @ Rickshaw Stop
    4/26: Simian Mobile Disco, Earth @ Pappy and Harriet's
    5/2-5/4: Austin Psych Fest @ Carson Creek Ranch
    5/10: Joey Anderson @ TBA
    5/17: Kishi Bashi @ GAMH
    5/17: Move D b2b Optimo, Jackmaster, J.Phlip @ PW
    5/21: Baths @ The Independent
    5/30: The Decemberists @ The Crystal Ballroom
    6/27: Fuck Buttons @ The Independent
    6/28: Robyn & Royksopp @ Bill Graham

  27. #237
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    well he would look ridiculous in skinny jeans
    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Keep up the good work. Anyone who even knows who the Fugs are is ok by me. I saw them a couple of times and they were so ahead of their times. cr****
    Have Another Hit Of Colorado Sunshine

  29. #239
    old school nosurprises12's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    I don't know that Uhuru album, and based on the other 3 I will like it.
    Hope you do! I almost wrote about Red but thought Chill Out was the more interesting/varied of the two.

    Also, Scientist Meets the Space Invaders, his second 1981 release, is very much worth of a listen if you've already heard Rids....

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    Coachella Junkie SoulDischarge's Avatar
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    Default Re: 50 Must Hear Overlooked Albums per Decade 70s-00s.

    Here's #s 16-30 of the 80's. I'm starting to feel the limitations of my vocabulary here.


    Pussy Galore - Groovy Hate Fuck (1986)
    Although Dial "M" For Motherfucker has the better title, Groovy Hate Fuck was the album from John Spencer's nasty little lo-fi garage rock project with the better songs. Clocking in at a scant 23 minutes, this set influenced countless barely competent distorted scuzz rock bands to follow in the 90s, and did so with tasteless panache. Their mission statement seemed to be to piss off as wide a range of people as possible with the most politically incorrect lyrics they could think of while still having just enough pop sense to make the songs stick. Don't be surprised when you can't get a song called "You Look Like A Jew" out of your head for weeks.


    Nomeansno - Mama (1982)
    The debut album from Canada's prevailing art-punks is quite the odd beast, a bass-heavy jazz/punk/funk influenced work that nevertheless seems to defy all easy categorization. Even from the opening track, with its vertigious bass line, playful, jazzy piano runs, unsettling warbled chorus, and spare mid-song breakdown, it's clear Nomeansno are miles away from anything else happening in punk or post punk at the time. Although Mama finds the band at a point where they weren't fully formed, it also might be them at their most idiosyncratic and fascinating. So while not every song is a full on success, the strength of tracks like "My Roommate Is Turning Into A Monster" and "Mama's Little Boy," which balance creepiness and tongue-in-cheek humor perfectly, more than make up for the less inspired parts (which, honestly, are still pretty intriguing). That it's all topped with a hilariously chintzy lounge number is just a bonus. A fine entry way into one of the most unusual punk bands to rise out of the morass of the 80s.


    808 State - Newbuild (1988)
    The squelchy, endlessly undulating tone of the 303 was one of the biggest yet most specific revolutions in sound to come out of the 80s, yet the majority of important work to surface from acid house's initial boom in Chicago was restricted to great singles. Much like the blues several decades earlier, acid house found more resonance in the UK, where an explosion of acts took the basic feel of early jacking house singles (if not always the sound) to create defining album-length statements. 808 State's first album (and only featuring founding member A Guy Called Gerald) followed the actual template of squiggly 303 lines supported by unrelenting, primitive drum machines closer than just about anyone, creating a true classic of the genre. Despite some times seeming more like a great collection of singles than a cohesive album, there's still enough flow and diversity to maintain an engaging listen throughout. If for no other reason, this one is essential for including the truly timeless "Flow Coma," (supposedly Richard D. James' all time favorite track), which still sounds futuristic 25 years later and perhaps stands as the finest representation of true acid.


    Ultramagnetic MCs - Critical Beatdown (1988)
    Sure, it's the hipster's old school hip hop album of choice, featuring the debut of indie rap's favorite extraterrestrial, Kool Keith, Critical Beatdown slays all doubts to its credibility by living up to its title with no reservations. This album bangs as hard as anything else from the era with its fair share of James Brown grunts, rawer and funkier than some of its more well known contemporaries. Far more grounded than anything Dr. Octagon released, Kool Keith and Ced-Gee bring just enough offbeat style to keep things interesting without overwhelming their b-boy swagger. Not just a classic of the underground, but an essential old school abum on any level.


    Yello - Claro Que Si (1981)
    Yello are another one of those acts forever overshadowed by one novelty hit ("Oh Yeah") and eye-popping early videos for MTV, but, as is often the case, their discography is a lot richer and weirder than their mainstream status would let on. One of the most experimental synth pop acts to crop up during the early 80s, they could be every bit as goofy as their reputation framed them as, but they tempered it with darker edges and forward thinking electronic programming. With a stronger pop sense than their debut, Claro Que Si is the ideal meeting place between their avantgarde and commercial tendencies, often seeming like the halfway point between Cabaret Voltaire and Giorgio Moroder. Bookended by its most pop oriented tracks ("Daily Disco" and "Pinball Cha Cha"), the middle section can some times be bogged down with meandering experiments, but there's always enough creativity at hand to keep the more aimless sections intriguing. While even the purer Euro-pop of Stella is worth reappraisal, this is the ideal album to introduce Yello to modern audiences as more than just the creators of the world's weirdest jock jam.


    Severed Heads - Since The Accident (1983)
    Splitting the difference between challenging tape collage experiments and catchy electronic pop, this early effort from these Austrailian electronic explorers is quite the odd duck. That something this potentially alienating manages to be so catchy at times is a bit inexplicable. Still, tracks like "Gashing The Old Mae West" and "Epilespy '82" take somewhat harsh noise snippets and oddball vocal and sound effect samples and crafts them into compelling rhythm workouts. Other tracks are more straight forward industrial synth pop with a strong 20 Jazz Funk Greats era Throbbing Gristle influence ("Dead Eyes Opened," "Exploring The Secrets Of Treating Deaf Mutes"). Alternating between moments of beauty and noisy agitation, this stands as one of the more distinctive and hard to pin down electronic albums of the 80s.


    Adam & The Ants - Kings Of The Wild Frontier (1980)
    Honestly, I'm not exactly sure where Adam & The Ants critical cachet stands these days but in any case, most audiences are probably more familiar with Adam Ant's solo work than his earlier post punk classics. The band's second album has to be one of the most dramatic releases of new wave, full of tribal percussion, tense guitar squall, and savage chants. A lot of it sounds like Bo Diddley going native as filtered through the wide screen Spaghetti western soundtracks of Ennio Morricone. Most bands would kill to have a song as good as any of the several highlights that fill this album. They may have been far from the most challenging or forward thinking bands of the post-punk movement, but they wrote better songs and are a whole hell of a lot more fun to sing along to than many of their peers, which has to count for something. You might not like it now, but you will.


    Rudimentary Peni - Death Church (1983)
    It's easy to dismiss Rudimentary Peni without even hearing them on the virtue of their name and just about every readymade crust punk jacket featuring a patch of theirs, which is a shame because Death church is one of the best hardcore albums of the 80s, standing apart from a lot of the more generic bands in the British anarcho-punk scene. Far scuzzier, sludgier, and bleaker than their peers, Rudimentary Peni weren't afraid to slow down their songs or induldge in their own bizarre sensiblities to write songs like "When You Are A Martian Church." Tracks like "Rotten To The Core" and "The Cloud Song" are built on riffs grimey enough to bear a strong resemblance to a lot of stoner metal to follow (with all the associated sacreligious imagery and references to depression to boot). This doesn't mean the band can't do the short, fast and brutal approach, but they tended to put a nastier left of center spin to even their most hardcore songs. Lead singer Nick Blinko's distinctive raspy screeching is part of what sets them apart, but he's matched by the heavily distorted guitar and prominent bass lines that anchor every song. While they could have just coasted on their thick-as-sewage sound, by writing actual songs, Rudimentary Peni created one of the few true classics of British hardcore.


    Killdozer - Intellectuals Are The Shoeshine Boys Of The Ruling Elite/Snakeboy (1984)
    I suppose I'm cheating here just a bit by including a compilation of two successive albums, but they're both fairly short and compliment each other well, so fuck it. Killdozer were a Madison, WI noise rock band that humurously captured the darker side of small town America even better than their fellow Midwesterners in Big Black. Even sludgier than many in the 80s noise rock scene, and with a slight Americana influence (there's some rather insiduously plodding covers of "Run Through The Jungle" and "Cinnamon Girl" on here), Killdozer were at the center of the heartland's sleazy, violent id. Fortunately, the band's wicked sense of humor and Michael Gerald's goofy voice makes the whole thing easier to swallow. Thus, we have songs about serial killer Ed Gein being a "ladies man," bragging about being the "King Of Sex," and a particularly menacing sludgefest ("Going To The Beach") serving as the background for a straightforward account of a little kid's dream vacation with the family (Sample lyric: "We're going to the lake, mom made some chocolate cake."). A decade later, and this kind of this probably would have accidentally gotten swept up by a major label after the success of grunge and albums like Mellow Gold, which both bear the influence of these grimey little fuckers. As American as teenage pregnancy and meth labs, and a scumfuck classic.


    Scratch Acid - The Greatest Gift (1991, recorded 1984-1986)
    Again, I'm cheating slightly by including this anthology from the 90s, but it includes everything the band ever recorded on one disc with all the material dating from between '84 and '86. Before the Jesus Lizard and Rapeman, David Yow made his name as a geniunely unhinged frontman in this exceptionally fried noise rock band from Austin. Possibly the most deranged of their peers, with only fellow Texans the Butthole Surfers giving them a run for that title, Scratch Acid was hardcore punk as filtered through a serial killer's peyote fueled desert visionquest. Their songs play out as a battle of wills between Yow and the guitar as to who can scream louder and shriller, with the edge usually going to Yow. The material here occasionally makes a passing resemblance to a far nastier and aggressive take on Surfer Rosa at its most sun scorched. Like most noise rock of the era, the lyrical content approaches disgusting subject matter with tongue-in-cheek humor, with tales of cannibalism, arson, mutilation, drug abuse, and lurking desert menaces. There's also a hilariously faithful cover of a Jesus Christ Superstar number ("Damned For All Time"). While the later material moves slightly closer to more conventional hardcore, it's the earlier stuff that really leaves its mark, especially opener "Cannibal," one of fiercest, most deranged songs ever written and a true pinnacle of 80's noise rock.


    Minutemen - Buzz Or Howl Under The Influence Of Heat (1983)
    Double Nickels On The Dime is rightly celebrated as a high water mark in underground rock in the 80s, but as consistently good as it is, it can still be a bit exhausting at 44 songs. A much more concise yet every bit as essential introduction to the band's unique approach to post-hardcore, this EP fits in eight songs in less than 16 minutes and features some of the best songs of their career. Although there's a few fun but ultimately pointless throwaways (with great titles like "Dreams Are Free, Motherfucker!"), the good stuff is fucking great, especially the concluding trio of songs. The jittery funk/punk hybrid with obtuse lyrics that they built their name on is in full effect here, but the songs are more defined and memorable than anything they had written beforehand. "I Felt Like A Gringo" is as terse as anything Talking Heads wrote, only without the coked up paranoia, while "The Product" almost sounds like a punk sea shanty with D. Boon mumbling incoherently for most of the song before hollering on about capitalism. Clocking at over three minutes, "Little Man With A Gun In His Hand" almost feels like a mini-epic, as spry and addictive as any other SoCal pop punk band, only with hardcore's aggressive bite. No other band made combining hardcore, post-punk, funk, jazz, and pop seem so effortless and fun, and this is the first glimpse of the band writing songs as good as their ambitions.


    Coil - Scatology (1984)
    This is another band/album I've gone on about ad nauseam around these parts and probably shouldn't go too in depth about here. Coil covered more stylistic ground and pushed music to the furthest reaches of creative accomplishment as just about anyone, and their debut is a fine introduction to their peculiar world. Even from the very first track, it's clear that Coil are on a completely different path from what everyone else in the industrial world was doing. There is a medieval mysticism and cinematic scope to early Coil that sets this album's harsh rhythms, gloomy offbeat synth pop, and avantgarde soundscapes apart from other artists exploring dark textures throughout the 80s. From the very beginning, Coil worked with a sonic palette that was entirely their own, and Scatology was the first of many statements of greatness to come out of their unique approach to organized noise.


    Butthole Surfers - Locust Abortion Technician (1987)
    Before getting swept up in the alternative rock sweepstakes of the 90s with a catchy yet ultimately bland hit, the Butthole Surfers had over a decade of seriously fucked up material behind them. And this is their fucked up masterpiece. During the 80's, the Surfers made music that was a genre in itself, punk, classic rock, and psychedelia as processed through a meat grinder, defined by a multitude of disorienting distortion effects and Paul Leary's acid damaged guitar licks. In fact, the whole album comes off like the sonic equivalent of every bad trip you've seen in movies and tv shows for the past several decades. Thus we get piss take semi-covers of Black Sabbath classics ("Sweat Loaf"), the same song played at different speeds ("Graveyard" and "Graveyard"), disturbing half-speed trudges through the blues ("Pittsburgh To Lebanon"), juvenile yet bizzare Indian pop deconstructions ("Kuntz"), and exercises in gleefully annoying weirdness ("U.S.S.A.", "The O-Men"). They save the best for last, though, with one of Leary's most fried jams laid over samples of a sexual abuse victim (later found out to be a compulsive liar) calling into a talk radio show and, eventually, a chorus of cow moos. Just about everything they released during the 80's is an underground classic, but this brief (33 minutes) album is where they distilled their essence down to its very core. Still one of the absolute strangest trips of modern popular music.


    Colin Newman - A-Z (1980)
    Some times referred to as the fourth initial run Wire album, this debut solo album from that band's lead singer often does seem like the logical progression of their sound from 154, but it also strikes out ground of its own that was quite different from anything Wire recorded before or since. For the most part, A-Z is more avant-pop than post-punk, although certain songs bear a definite resemblance to the dark, emotionally charged textures utilized by many bands of the day. In fact, this album's greatest claim to fame is the moody classic "Alone," which was featured in Silence Of The Lambs as covered by This Mortal Coil. It's a fairly diverse set of songs, split about evenly between gloomy pop songs and slightly more inaccessible compositions. Fortunately, just about everything works, and works together in fact, making for a very satisfying listen front to back. Anyone who is a harcore Wire fan has probably already heard this, but anyone else that has an interest in somewhat challenging, somewhat moody post punk needs to hear this. Plus, it spawned this immortal video:



    Manuel Gottsching - E2-E4 (1984)
    This pioneering work by the former leader of Ash Ra Tempel is every bit as important to the evolution of electronic music as Trans Europe Express or Cybotron's Clear. It has been re-imagined by techno luminaries such as Carl Craig and Basic Channel, and was referenced by LCD Soundsystem with the cover of their 45:33 release, but its influence is apparent in any work that has used subtle variation within a framework of repetition to achieve a higher state of consciousness. One prolonged suite built on a single repetitive beat over the course of an hour, it sucks the listener in almost immediately and doesn't let up until the cheesy guitar solo disrupts the flow about half way through. In the recent Fact Magazine list of top albums of the 80s, Emptyset writes that this album is much more satisfying if you just play the first half twice, and I have to agree. Still, distracting as the guitar is, it doesn't take away from the hypnotic impact this record has had. Even after decades of it's innovations having been absorbed into the sonic vocabulary of contemporary music, it's still an engrossing, surprising listen, far more deserving of the "trance" classification than anything released by Paul Oakenfold.
    Last edited by SoulDischarge; 07-31-2013 at 12:48 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Thanks for giving us the opportunity to not give a fuck again.

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