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Thread: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

  1. #31
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Tom, I agree with what Josh said. Her other two aren't very appealing, but on that album she really wrote some decent songs.
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  2. #32
    sarcastic fuckoff GeezrRckr's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Wow, Monks last album was in 1981 (they only made 3 records). Going to DL that later for sure. Very cool. I'm always amazed at your library-like mind around music, Bryan.

    I'll drop in my pick(s) sometime over the weekend. In work mode and am having a hard time thinking of one. Oh wait...a couple just came to mind. I'll be back. Good idea, man.

  3. #33
    Member FEELS's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Another grateful person for the Townes rec.. I remember listening to High, Low, & In Between a while ago and it was forgettable for me. Though I was very young and stuff. However, after giving a majority of this live album a listen I'm definitely hooked on this guy. Prolly gonna order the vinyl tommorow.

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  4. #34
    old school buddy's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Glad people are giving it a listen, also if you can get you hands on the documentary Be Here to Love Me: A Film About Townes Van Zandt it's a great look into Van Zandt's life and work.

  5. #35
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Bon Iver - Bon Iver, Bon Iver (2011, Jagjaguwar)



    So sure, you listened to Bon Iver, Bon Iver last year and you thought it was beautiful, or you thought it was incredibly boring, or you didn't care either way because Kanye wasn't on the track. But hey, did you listen to it again, and again, and again? I'm blown away at how the pretentious lyrics somehow seem to blossom upon repeated scrutiny, especially in how Justin seems to emphasize certain obscure words and phrases in ways that really support their weight. I'm convinced this whole album is a love song to a first girlfriend or a specific night. It really is of a piece, unlike so many albums today that hearken back to the early 60s model of song-collections. The ambience and build throughout the album is mesmerizing, and the album really could only end with Beth/Rest. Who cares about the Grammys and the Bushmills ads and Kanye and all the hype: Bon Iver put out a hell of an album, and it sounds fucking great tonight.

    Grade: A
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

  6. #36
    Coachella Junkie greghead's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by GeezrRckr View Post
    Wow, Monks last album was in 1981 (they only made 3 records). Going to DL that later for sure. Very cool. I'm always amazed at your library-like mind around music, Bryan.

    I'll drop in my pick(s) sometime over the weekend. In work mode and am having a hard time thinking of one. Oh wait...a couple just came to mind. I'll be back. Good idea, man.
    No, are you serious? You've never listened to the Monks, Drew? Man, they're right up your alley.


    "The Quintet" - Jazz at Massey Hall



    Take 5 legendary bop musicians, ship them up to Canada for a bit for a show, and this is what you get. Undoubtedly one of the greatest live jazz records ever. It's so damn good. You'd be hard-pressed to find five better instrumentalists of the bop era, however, listening to this record is a bit like watching the NBA All Star game: they haven't spent enough time playing together as a team to totally mesh the whole way through. This concert, actually, is closer to a pick-up game by five all stars and the results are exceptional. But they shouldn't have been, it was 1953 and Bird was waist-deep in diggin his own grave with booze & heroin, Bud Powell was on lease from a mental institution, and Dizz wanted virtually nothing to do with Parker (this was their last recorded meeting, Bird even jibes Dizz by calling his his "worthy constituent." Ouch). Shit, Bird was playing one of the infamous white plastic altos because he had pawned his horn for smack before leaving New York. And we're not done yet, the whole thing was recorded on a backstage amateur tape recorder by Mingus (who later when back and overdubbed his bass parts) and was never intended to see the light of day. None of this matters, the music absolutely cooks. Standouts include "Salt Peanuts;" Parker is really kicking here, with Dizz yelling encouragement in the background, and the rhythm section has an electric, punching pulse. Dizzy plays at a blistering pace: his bravado and virtuosity evident with every note, and there's a prototypical powerhouse solo by Roach. In fact, Roach is the most consistently brilliant and acrobatic player on the record, deftly tossing fireworks with controlled abandon. "Wee" is another brilliant track, an uptempo blues number that kicks off the second side and contains some of Parker's best playing on the record. The rhythm section burns but steps back and lets Dizz & Bird do their bop heartbeat thing and the result is astounding. Bud Powell was a genius piano player, unfortunately his playing on the record isn't as sharp as the others, though his solos reach staggering expressive heights on both "Wee" and "Hot House," and he delivers an excellently fluid-yet-choppy solo on the opening track, "Perdido."

    Curious listeners should definitely pick up the Complete Jazz at Massey Hall import, which includes all 14 tracks from this show, in order, without all of Mingus' overdubs. It also features some really nice trio work as Dizz and Bird kept leaving the stage for various amounts of time (unfortunate, but it's nice to hear the rhythm section stretch out).

    Sound is a bit fuzzy due to the amateur recorder and the players are no longer playing with the fiery inspiration of the early bop era. However, these are five absolutely tremendous musicians playing beautiful music with and for each other.

    Grade: A-
    Last edited by greghead; 02-18-2012 at 03:52 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by nathanfairchild View Post
    I'm still waiting for Jack White to finally admit that he invented the guitar.

  7. #37
    old school buddy's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    Listen to Tom on this one. Elvis & the Attractions at their peak.

  8. #38
    Coachella Junkie sonofhal's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    I'm just going to chip in with what, for me, is the best album made this century.

    The Meadowlands by The Wrens.

    I cannot think of another album that comes close to matching the near perfect flow of intensity and melody as discovered on this album. The quality and deepness of the lyrics just add an icing that improves the best cake you've ever tasted. As with all the best albums (For Emma, Hospice etc), it takes the darkest parts of life and turns them into something eerily beautiful. Similarly, it also needs to be listened to as an album - not as a one off youtube clip (but one is there for the more ADD amongst you) or on shuffle. The tracks are in that order for a reason. The Meadowlands turned up 7 years after their previous album and next Sept it will be 10 years since this one was released. I hope they make more music and hit the road again, but they owe the world nothing. They've already contributed more than enough.

    A+ distinction with a free Bowie handjob.

    Just fucking buy it already.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listi...condition=used

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    well, for all intensive porpoises it is, will sell out within seconds tomorrow.
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  9. #39
    Member icedKeg's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    nevermind
    Last edited by icedKeg; 02-18-2012 at 08:19 PM.
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  10. #40
    sarcastic fuckoff GeezrRckr's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    One of my favorite bands of all-time, and one which I feel is/was vastly under appreciated, is Morphine. The album by them I would like you to check out is Cure for Pain (1993).



    There are many things I love about Morphine, but my overriding passion for them is due to Mark Sandman's genius. Sandman was their lead singer/bassist/songwriter. His bass was modified to use just two strings (most of the time) which he customized with other cool things (pick-ups, tuning and some other stuff) and he played it like a slide guitar. He had a very unique and rich sound and playing style which ended up having a huge influence on another great bassist that I adore - Les Claypool (who has paid homage to Mark Sandman, both, on record and during his live shows with covers and his unique banter about the man). Sadly, Sandman died at the age of 44(?) suffering from a fatal heart attack while performing on stage. I never saw them perform, which is one of the biggest musical regrets I have in life.

    Cure for Pain is a great starting point for people interested in checking out Morphine because it shows off all of the band's/Sandman's flavors - dark, deep, tragic lyrics layered on top of music that is minimalist, moody and performed by amazing musicians - Sandman on bass (and other instruments...can't remember all of them), Dana Colley (baritone/tenor/double sax) and Billy Conway (drums - well, he was the drummer from this album on and the one who helped take the band to new heights, imo). They called their brand of music "low rock." It's really masculine and best listened to alone late at night by yourself. I don't know why, but just trust me on this. Here's some highlights to whet your whistle:

    Check out this bass line



    Taste of what they were like live (drumming is tits)



    This song just kills me...and mandolin



    ps - Greg...dude, there are so damn many bands/album that I've never heard of. For as much as I think I know about music, there are people on this site that remind me every day that I really don't know shit. Monks being a classic example. Cheers.
    Last edited by GeezrRckr; 02-18-2012 at 03:35 PM. Reason: Better "Buena" vid posted

  11. #41
    Member zircona1's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums



    The Screaming Blue Messiahs were a UK band during the 1980's whose music blended rock, r&b, rockabilly, and punk. Gun-Shy is their first full-length album and it is incredible. Their songs often have a political edge to them, sometimes it's blunt (one song is called 'Smash the Market Place') and other times it's subtle. Album also contains a cover of Hank Williams' "You're Gonna Change". Recommended if you're a fan of "big music" bands from the '80s (U2, Simple Minds, Big Country, etc). Here's the promo video for "Twin Cadillac Valentine":

    We're here to play some Mississippi Delta Blues. We're in a horrible depression, and I gotta admit - we're starting to like it.

  12. #42
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Nicely done zircona. I should get this album.

    Quibble: (or maybe sidebar): You left out The Waterboys in your list of 80s 'big music' bands. yeah I know they hardly made a dent in the states but still, they mean more to me personally that the three you listed combined. (Yes, including U2). I guess I should shut up and review A Pagan Place here or something.
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  13. #43
    old school zenidogx's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums



    Night Falls Over Kortedala - Jens Lekman

    The quintessential Swedish indie pop album. Jens Lekman composes some really good music. The opener, "And I Remember Every Kiss" is a grandiose, orchestral arrangement that segues into a disco number, "Sipping On The Sweet Nectar." It's my favorite one-two punch to start off an album. He also lays down some funky guitar on "Kanske Ar Jag I Dig (Maybe I'm In Love With You)," and the closer, "Friday Night At The Drive-In Bingo," is a great throwback to the early days of rock 'n' roll. What really shines, though, is Lekman's songwriting. His lyrics are catchy and funny, and he can tell some fascinating stories. On "A Postcard To Nina" he recounts a true story, in which he travels to Berlin to pretend to be his lesbian friend's boyfriend in front of her Catholic father - and hilarity ensues! Albeit, Lekman's cutesiness (especially in "Your Arms Around Me") may be a bit much, he maintains that Jonathan Richman-like sincerity that's quite endearing. Like the best twee music, this album is a fun way to celebrate melancholy.
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  14. #44
    Member zircona1's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    Quibble: (or maybe sidebar): You left out The Waterboys in your list of 80s 'big music' bands. yeah I know they hardly made a dent in the states but still, they mean more to me personally that the three you listed combined. (Yes, including U2). I guess I should shut up and review A Pagan Place here or something.
    I know of The Waterboys but I only have 1 song of theirs - haven't listened to any of their albums.
    We're here to play some Mississippi Delta Blues. We're in a horrible depression, and I gotta admit - we're starting to like it.

  15. #45
    Member zircona1's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by zenidogx View Post


    Night Falls Over Kortedala - Jens Lekman

    The quintessential Swedish indie pop album. Jens Lekman composes some really good music. The opener, "And I Remember Every Kiss" is a grandiose, orchestral arrangement that segues into a disco number, "Sipping On The Sweet Nectar." It's my favorite one-two punch to start off an album. He also lays down some funky guitar on "Kanske Ar Jag I Dig (Maybe I'm In Love With You)," and the closer, "Friday Night At The Drive-In Bingo," is a great throwback to the early days of rock 'n' roll. What really shines, though, is Lekman's songwriting. His lyrics are catchy and funny, and he can tell some fascinating stories. On "A Postcard To Nina" he recounts a true story, in which he travels to Berlin to pretend to be his lesbian friend's boyfriend in front of her Catholic father - and hilarity ensues! Albeit, Lekman's cutesiness (especially in "Your Arms Around Me") may be a bit much, he maintains that Jonathan Richman-like sincerity that's quite endearing. Like the best twee music, this album is a fun way to celebrate melancholy.
    Nice write up! I'll second the love for this album, Jens is great. Also, Oh You're So Silent Jens is a fantastic collection of his singles that's worth getting.
    We're here to play some Mississippi Delta Blues. We're in a horrible depression, and I gotta admit - we're starting to like it.

  16. #46

    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by GeezrRckr View Post
    One of my favorite bands of all-time, and one which I feel is/was vastly under appreciated, is Morphine. The album by them I would like you to check out is Cure for Pain (1993)....
    Wow. That takes me back - haven't thought about this album in a while. You're right - an absolute classic that unfortunately folks have lost track of. I listened to this for about 3 months straight my sophomore year in college. Great call.

  17. #47
    Coachella Junkie SoulDischarge's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums



    Seefeel - Quique

    Of the many, many, many great acts to release world changing records on Warp in the 90s, Seefeel are probably one of the most overlooked these days. And that's a damn shame, because they were just as stunning and inventive as anyone on that label. Quique (released before their move to Warp) is probably their high water mark, the point where their electronic dubbed out shoegaze was at its most refined before turning into a creepy, even dubbier dark ambient group along the lines of Main. The most convenient short hand for their sound around this era is My Bloody Valentine meets IDM, evident from the very first track, "Climactic Phase #3", which is as immersive and disorienting as anything on Loveless. Endlessly looping light as air synth lines flitter and swirl around one another as a steady motorik bassline keeps things chugging along. There are untold depths here in which to get lost. Other tracks veer closer to conventional IDM, with "Industrious" sounding like a cast-away from one of the Selected Ambient Works, with its combination of primitive machinery aping beats and washes of ambient texture. The band's trademark song, "Plainsong," treats Sarah Peacock's indecipherable sweet as syrup intonations as just another element to be endlessly repeated amongst the billowing patterns of electronic haze. The approach here is of minimalism in the vein of early Steve Reich, opening up hidden chasms of sound between simple, repeated phrases, but the texture is pure dream pop, soft and haunting and fragile and gorgeous. Seefeel led the way to many strands of electronic and rock hybrids, with traces of everything from Boards of Canada to Ulrich Schnauss and The Field in its DNA. Even after its innovations have been fully absorbed and integrated by contemporary artists, Quique still feels special, both a relic of its era and independent of time and space.

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  18. #48

    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums



    This one is for you, Bmack, if you haven't heard 'em already. Bomb the Music Industry! is one of my favorite bands ever. All of the albums play like they were put through a big, fun machine that turned a 5 year olds crayon doodles into crazy fun, manic pop punk songs. It's like everything the Aquabats tried to do when they introduced synths into their band, but done 1000 times better.

    To Supre:
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    Isn't there some awful hardcore band you should be listening to?

  19. #49
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    oooo, intriguing.
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    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

  20. #50

    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    oooo, intriguing.
    They've got a lot of albums out. Vacation is the most recent, and the more mature. Goodbye Cool World is my favorite though.
    To Supre:
    Quote Originally Posted by TallGuyCM View Post
    Isn't there some awful hardcore band you should be listening to?

  21. #51
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    So this could go in the 2012 thread technically, I guess, but I'm keeping it here.

    Milk Music - Live at WFMU 2011

    Milk Music is my favorite new band floating around out there. They did a tape of a live set up in Seattle. The sound is every bit as beefy and distorted as on the EP that they put out last year. There are five really well written and loud grungy rock tracks with good solos, good drumming and shouted vocals. If you like SST music, you'll love this, and if you like good music you'll probably love it too. The EP is better, but hot damn the live recording is pretty great.

    And if this makes them sound like they've got a throwback sound, well, they kind of do. But, if you make 'em like they used to, and you do it well, I can't complain.
    Last edited by bmack86; 02-24-2012 at 02:14 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

  22. #52
    Coachella Junkie greghead's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post


    Seefeel - Quique
    Yes yes yes. Love this album


    Quote Originally Posted by ZachTheEskimo View Post


    This one is for you, Bmack, if you haven't heard 'em already. Bomb the Music Industry! is one of my favorite bands ever. All of the albums play like they were put through a big, fun machine that turned a 5 year olds crayon doodles into crazy fun, manic pop punk songs. It's like everything the Aquabats tried to do when they introduced synths into their band, but done 1000 times better.

    This was really, really fun to listen to.
    Quote Originally Posted by nathanfairchild View Post
    I'm still waiting for Jack White to finally admit that he invented the guitar.

  23. #53
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    WFMU.. Seattle...
    confused.
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  24. #54
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Is that wrong? I just know they're from Olympia, so maybe I assumed. Ass out of you and me?
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

  25. #55
    old school ods..'s Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post


    Seefeel - Quique
    why don't i know this.. i'm so dumb. thanks for the rec, excited to listen. sounds right up my alley

  26. #56
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    I'm a Neil Young nut. I've been listening to him every day for the past two years and I've yet to really tire of his material from any era (he did some great stuff in the 80s-check out . That said, the man had a run from 1969-1979 that, for my money, is unparalleled in popular music. Song like Cinnamon Girl, Heart of Gold, Time Fades Away, Ohio and so many others make him a legend in their own right. However, if I were ever asked to point someone to a Neil Young album, I'd never hesitate. It'd be Rust Never Sleeps every. Single. Time.

    Basically, if you wanted to simplify Neil Young's career into a duality, it'd be the fight between acoustic singer-songwriter stuff and his hard, loud, feedback filled Crazy Horse material. This album is the perfect example of everything he does. It starts (and ends) with an iconic lament of punk rock, Hey Hey My My. The acoustic version is so dour and dark, and also one of the only points where you can really appreciate how masterful the recording really is: it begins with audience cheers, letting you know that, despite the fact that it was comprised solely of new songs, this was in fact a live recording. After Hey Hey My My comes Thrasher, a spectacular ballad-like run through a surreal memory of CSNY's touring days, and why Neil had to get away. The lyrics are so all over the place and free-form that you would be hard pressed to get the meaning out of it, but the imagery is so captivating. Pocahontas is an incredible surreal bounce of a song, with background chants and Neil, Marlon Brando and Pocahontas sitting around a fire. It's incredible and the lyrics are spellbinding, describing an indian massacre and jumping through time at ease. Ride My Llama is another surreal jaunt, and Sail Away is a fun country duet, there to remind you that Neil's got Twang.

    And then side two, the electric side, kicked off with the biggest bang Neil ever wrote. Powderfinger is the story of a kid during the civil war who sees an enemy ship coming down the river. He writes the song like a novel, with all these great little details giving you a full picture of the kid and his struggle in this insane situation. There is no chorus, no big development in the structure, just a great song beat out of intertwining guitars, a laid back rhythm and some incredible playing. Neil Young has written many great songs, but this is his best. Welfare Mothers is a blast, a dirty jam with a driving riff, and Sedan Delivery shows that punk had worked its way into Neil's ear, full of fast tempos and brash delivery. My My Hey Hey closes it out, the fuzz-filled dark twin of the opener. You can readily hear the influence on grunge, on post-punk, basically on all subsequent guitar music. The tone is from hell, they play with abandon, and it's fantastic. Neil Young capped the most amazing decade in popular music with, inexplicably, a half-acoustic/half-electric live album that remains the best thing in his storied career.

    Grade: A+
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

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    Coachella Junkie Drinkey McDrinkerstein's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Is that wrong? I just know they're from Olympia, so maybe I assumed. Ass out of you and me?
    Radio stations on the west coast start with a K, on the east coast they start with a W. WFMU is in NJ.
    last.fm
    6/15/14 Failure - Glasshouse // 7/9/14 Cloud Nothings/Metz - Roxy
    7/16/14 Planes Mistaken For Stars - Echo // 8/23-24/14 FYF Fest - Expo Park //8/25/14 Nine Inch Nails - Hollywood Bowl // 9/12-14/14 Riotfest - Humboldt Park, Chicago, IL
    9/18/14 Neutral Milk Hotel - Hollywood Bowl

  28. #58
    Coachella Junkie cutterbutter's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by Drinkey McDrinkerstein View Post
    Radio stations on the west coast start with a K, on the east coast they start with a W. WFMU is in NJ.
    TIL

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    Coachella Junkie Drinkey McDrinkerstein's Avatar
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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    More accurately I'm sure if has to do with the sides of the Mississippi river or some such such shit.
    last.fm
    6/15/14 Failure - Glasshouse // 7/9/14 Cloud Nothings/Metz - Roxy
    7/16/14 Planes Mistaken For Stars - Echo // 8/23-24/14 FYF Fest - Expo Park //8/25/14 Nine Inch Nails - Hollywood Bowl // 9/12-14/14 Riotfest - Humboldt Park, Chicago, IL
    9/18/14 Neutral Milk Hotel - Hollywood Bowl

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    Default Re: We should tell each other why to listen to albums

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    So this could go in the 2012 thread technically, I guess, but I'm keeping it here.

    Milk Music - Live at WFMU 2011

    Milk Music is my favorite new band floating around out there. They did a tape of a live set up in Seattle. The sound is every bit as beefy and distorted as on the EP that they put out last year. There are five really well written and loud grungy rock tracks with good solos, good drumming and shouted vocals. If you like SST music, you'll love this, and if you like good music you'll probably love it too. The EP is better, but hot damn the live recording is pretty great.

    And if this makes them sound like they've got a throwback sound, well, they kind of do. But, if you make 'em like they used to, and you do it well, I can't complain.
    Fuck yes.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Yea I think a lot of men think they are bad ass, but a 12 year old with a AK can take me out I know ...... cr****

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