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Thread: Mexico: "El Thread"

  1. #31
    Member grenade's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Dos tacos bandejo
    R.I.P.
    T.F.O.T.
    F.C.P.S.I.T.S.G.E.P.G.E.P.G.E.P.

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  2. #32
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    fuck mexican food, i love me hamburgers

  3. #33
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by pozhiin View Post
    fuck mexican food, i love me hamburgers
    yet, you live in texas?

    cool story bro.
    2007:2009:2010:2011:2012[1]

    Quote Originally Posted by Undies View Post
    I considered asking my doctor for advice, but when I asked him if he had ever been to Coachella, and his answer was "What's a Coachella?"; Everything else he said was meaningless to me after that point.

  4. #34

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    i never clicked on this thread because i thought it was just a bunch of mexican boardies talking about getting together at coachella to be loud and whistle or some shit.
    then i realized... there are already several threads about fence jumping into coachella '11

  5. #35
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    mexican water + mexican coffee grounds = dietary supplement

    100% Caffeinated

  6. #36

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I used to work with a bunch of Mexicans at one point. Never use a restroom after a Mexican does a Number Two: They wipe their a-- then throw the used toilet paper on the floor beside the toilet or, if your lucky (sort of) in a nearby wastebasket. They do not flush their used toilet paper down the toilet! I was told, "It's a cultural thing, get used to it." I find it pathetically gross, not to mention unsanitary.
    "Some people just need a hi-five in the face."

  7. #37
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by RODGERRAMJET View Post
    I used to work with a bunch of Mexicans at one point. Never use a restroom after a Mexican does a Number Two: They wipe their a-- then throw the used toilet paper on the floor beside the toilet or, if your lucky (sort of) in a nearby wastebasket. They do not flush their used toilet paper down the toilet! I was told, "It's a cultural thing, get used to it." I find it pathetically gross, not to mention unsanitary.
    I find you to be relentlessly retarded and not just a prime candidate for the Ban Thread but also for an hero.

    Self-immolation. Look into it.
    Quote Originally Posted by **NaNcY** View Post
    Phoenix the band?

  8. #38
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    12 taxi drivers, fares killed in Mexican resort
    Sun Feb 20, 4:06 pm ET

    .ACAPULCO, Mexico – A spate of attacks on taxis in the Mexican resort city of Acapulco has left 12 taxi drivers or passengers dead, police said Sunday, just hours before the Mexican Open tennis tournament is scheduled to start.

    Acapulco has been the scene of bloody drug cartel turf wars, and taxi drivers have often been targeted for extortion or recruited by the gangs to act as lookouts or transport drugs.

    The organizers of the largest tennis tournament in Latin America said in a statement Sunday that the Mexican government has assured them that appropriate security measures have been taken for the event that starts Monday.

    Police in Guerrero state, where Acapulco is located, said that four suspects had been detained in relation with some of the attacks. The suspects had guns, a grenade and a machete that police say may have been used to decapitate some of the victims.

    The attacks began Friday, when five taxi drivers were found dead in or near their vehicles.

    The slaughter continued Saturday, when a driver was found bound and shot to death near his taxi, and two others were found dead of bullet wounds inside their vehicles. One of the drivers had been beheaded.

    Gunmen opened fire on yet another taxi, killing the driver and three passengers.

    On Sunday, the violence came closer to the city's tourist zone, where the tennis matches are held. Five cars were set afire and a man's body was found hacked to pieces outside an apartment building.

    Dozens of cars have been set ablaze in Acapulco in recent days, for reasons that are not entirely clear.

    Tournament organizers at the Association of Tennis Professionals, in a statement sent to The Associated Press, said the group had received assurances from all levels of the Mexican government.

    "Following an independent security assessment and discussions with tournament organizers, we are satisfied that responsible measures are being taken, and that the event has the full support of the authorities of Acapulco, the state of Guerrero, and the Mexican federal government," the statement said.

    Players have received e-mails from the ATP about the situation, cautioning them about going out and suggesting they stay near their hotel. It has also been suggested they arrive as late as possible and leave once eliminated.

    Tournament organizers have played down the security concerns, pointing out that the International Olympic Committee and President Jacques Rogge held their executive board meeting in the coastal resort in October.

    Argentine player David Nalbandian said Saturday that he was thinking about withdrawing since he already has a groin injury and could use the rest before Argentina's Davis Cup match against Romania March 4-6.

    "It's a great and enjoyable tournament to play," said Nalbandian, who was beaten on Saturday by Tommy Robredo in the quarterfinals of the Copa Claro in Buenos Aires.

    "But for right now it's a little more difficult because of the security situation. We (players) are a bit scared about this and we're trying to decide what to do."
    ...
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  9. #39
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Former Tijuana top cop takes on troubled Juarez
    By OLIVIA TORRES, Associated Press Olivia Torres, Associated Press
    Thu Mar 10, 4:40 pm ET

    .CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico – One of the most dangerous places in the world pinned its hopes Thursday on a former Tijuana police chief praised for a hardline approach to restoring calm in that border city and criticized for allegedly abusing suspected crooked cops in the process.

    Julian Leyzaola Perez was introduced as the new director of public security in Ciudad Juarez, across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas. His daunting task: to reduce crime in this city of 1.3 million, which registered more than 3,000 homicides last year amid the nation's soaring drug violence.

    "We are naming a person who has the capability, the experience and the track record to get results," Mayor Hector Murguia said as he introduced his new police chief. "The most important thing is for security to arrive in our homes."

    Many Mexican mayors and local police chiefs refuse to attack drug kingpins, saying it is the federal government's job to fight organized crime. Leyzaola, 50, broke with that pattern during his tenure as Tijuana's top cop from December 2008 to November 2010.

    The retired army lieutenant colonel forged an unusually close relationship with the military, sharing intelligence as they pursued the same targets. He slept at an army base in downtown Tijuana, sometimes after nights cruising the city to "hunt" for criminals, as he put it.

    Leyzaola declined Thursday to specify what plans he has for Ciudad Juarez, saying he didn't want to tip his hand to the enemy.

    "Tijuana is one thing and Ciudad Juarez is another," he said. "I come here to work with what there is."

    In Tijuana, Leyzaola worked to overhaul what was considered one of the most corrupt police forces in the country. While other cities have tapped police chiefs with military backgrounds, Leyzaola went further, replacing field commanders with retired military officers who had no policing experience.

    "These are not people with a lot of experience at police work," he told a group of police officers last September. "Their job is different. Their job is to counter organized crime."

    Dozens of Tijuana's 2,000-plus police officers were charged with corruption and hundreds were purged under Leyzaola. When he suspected officers were working with drug traffickers but couldn't prove it, he assigned them to stand idly under palm trees outside police headquarters to humiliate them into leaving.

    Leyzaola's star power rose as daytime shootouts and other high-profile displays of violence subsided and residents felt safe again to go out at night, winning him plaudits from local business leaders and even President Felipe Calderon. His salty, occasionally profane descriptions of crime bosses endeared him to reporters.

    "We call them fat and disgusting; paunchy, malformed, slimy cockroaches; scoundrels," he said in September. "It had a very specific goal: to hit them directly in the social consciousness. ... We began ridiculing them."

    Dozens of officers were assassinated during Leyzaola's tenure as their killers demanded the chief resign. Leyzaola himself survived several plots.

    Leyzaola was dogged by allegations that he inflicted or condoned torture. Several police officers who were charged in early 2009 with helping drug traffickers said Leyzaola or other officers dropped them off at a military base where they were beaten, nearly asphyxiated or forced to endure electric shocks to their genitals.

    The Baja California state human rights ombudsman said that in August 2009, Leyzaola and other officers tortured five people suspected of killing police.

    Leyzaola denied the allegations and called them part of a campaign to smear him.

    He lost his job in November after voters elected a new political party to City Hall. Mayor Carlos Bustamante of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, under pressure from political allies to break with the previous administration, tapped Leyzaola's top deputy, Gustavo Huerta.
    ...
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  10. #40
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Mexican drug cartels move into Central America
    By KATHERINE CORCORAN, Associated Press Katherine Corcoran, Associated Press
    Sun Mar 13, 2:27 pm ET

    .SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador – On a steamy, late-summer day near the Salvadoran coast, more than 100 police working an intelligence tip scoured a near-vacant cattle ranch the size of 42 Manhattan blocks.

    Using probes and backhoes, they unearthed two plastic storage drums packed with U.S. dollars. It took three days to count the $20s, $50s and $100s — which added up to more than $10 million. A third barrel was excavated a week later from beneath a patio in an upscale San Salvador suburb, for a total of $14.5 million.

    Though questions remain, the stash may be Mexican drug cartel money. One of the two Guatemalan ranch owners allegedly had ties to the leader of a Guatemalan branch of Mexico's Gulf Cartel, who is serving a 31-year sentence for drug trafficking in the U.S.

    Mexican drug cartels now operate virtually uninhibited in their Central American backyard. U.S.-supported crackdowns in Mexico and Colombia have only pushed traffickers into a region where corruption is rampant, borders lack even minimal immigration control and local gangs provide a ready-made infrastructure for organized crime.

    "The cartels are clear on the possibilities for using El Salvador as a place to launder money or to transport it south to pay for their drugs," National Police deputy director Howard Cotto told The Associated Press in an interview.

    When President Barack Obama visits El Salvador later this month as part of a swing through Latin America, he will hit the region at its hottest point since the civil wars in the 1980s. Cocaine seizures in Central America tripled from 2003 to 2008, according to the U.N. World Drug Report. The murder rate in Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, already the highest in the world, is climbing in part from a rise in local drug dealing, authorities say.

    While the U.S. and Mexico focus on gunrunning on their shared border, arms trafficking thrives in Guatemala, a country that doesn't manufacture a single firearm. There is even evidence that guns are brought from the U.S. into Guatemala and then smuggled into Mexico, in an example of reverse trafficking from south to north, one U.S. government official said.

    "We have no firm numbers," said the official, who could not be named for security reasons. "What we know is that it's occurring and it doesn't seem to be random."

    Salvadoran President Mauricio Funes, who maintains close ties with the U.S. despite being the country's first leftist leader, says he will focus the Obama visit on poverty. El Salvador has seen little change in the poverty and violence that fueled its 13-year civil war until 1992, and the rural states and outskirts of the capital that served as guerrilla battlegrounds are now the domain of deadly gangs.

    The White House says the president, scheduled to be in El Salvador March 22 and 23, will talk about "regional and bilateral economic, clean energy, and citizen security cooperation initiatives."

    But other Central American countries say security is issue No. 1 and are baffled at White House plans for only a bilateral meeting.

    "For those of us who have worked for decades in regional cooperation, we feel let down," said former Guatemalan Vice President Eduardo Stein, noting that the White House may not have wanted to wade into regional problems, such as a border dispute between Costa Rica and Nicaragua. "It looks like they are trying to protect the president from local infighting. But it feels like a cop out."

    Central America has always been a transit corridor for drugs coming from Colombia to the United States and a hideout for Mexican capos. A key suspect later convicted in the 1985 killing of DEA agent Enrique "Kiki" Camarena in Mexico was arrested in Costa Rica. The head of the Sinaloa Cartel, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was nabbed near the border between Mexico and Guatemala in 1993.

    "There have long been connections between five to six families here and the Gulf cartel and Sinaloa cartel," said U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala Stephen McFarland. "Most groups had dealings here with one or the other or both ... generally the drug-trafficking organizations more or less left each other alone."

    But the flood of drugs and money have intensified, first with security crackdowns in the U.S. after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and later with Mexico's assault on organized crime beginning in 2006. Authorities mark the worst crime waves with the arrival of the Zetas cartel in Central America in 2008, about the same time Mexican cartels started to pay their collaborators on the ground in drugs instead of cash — creating a boom in local drug sales and violent street crime.

    McFarland said the Zetas, formed from defectors of Mexico's elite forces as the enforcement arm of the Gulf Cartel, were invited to Guatemala by local cartels to provide protection, but soon after began taking over the territory for themselves.

    Today, any cartel that wants to do business in Guatemala has to pay an extortion fee to the Zetas, according to Leonel Ruiz, federal prosecutor for narcotics activity, whose caseload has gone up 50 percent in the last five years.

    The Guatemalan government recently ended a two-month siege in the mountainous northern state of Alta Verapaz near the Mexican border, a prime corridor for smuggling drugs from Honduras to Mexico, where Zetas roamed the streets with assault rifles and armored vehicles and even controlled when people could leave their homes. But few people think a siege in one state did much -- Ruiz says the Zetas control four other states and as much as half of Guatemala's territory.

    Now, the vast majority of suspicious transports by sea end up in Guatemala, while an overwhelming number of suspicious flights land in Honduras, according to intelligence information shown to the AP. Honduran authorities have found an average of 20 abandoned airplanes a year along the Atlantic coast in the last three years and suspect that fishermen help offload drugs from ships at sea to avoid potential detection in ports.

    Honduran authorities were alarmed last week to find a cocaine-processing laboratory in the remote northeastern mountains. Evidence ties the lab, capable of producing 440 to 880 pounds (200 to 400 kilograms) a week, to the Sinaloa Cartel.

    Government corruption and porous borders make it difficult for authorities to fight back. Across the region, countless public officials, including police chiefs and drug czars, have been prosecuted or made to resign. An arms trafficking study by the International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala cited dozens of uncontrolled vehicle crossings along Guatemala's borders with four countries, including 44 along the 600-mile (963-kilometer) border with Mexico.

    The northern triangle already struggles with networks of street gangs that pushed murder rates to between 50 and 60 people per 100,000 in 2008, compared to 11.6 in Mexico and five in the U.S., according to the U.N. World Drug Report.

    The gangs still mostly stick to petty crime and extortion, especially in Guatemala. But they have become increasingly involved in local drugs sales. And in El Salvador, Cotto said, authorities have reports that the Mexican cartels are eyeing the Mara Salvatruchas for an alliance that could overwhelm the small country.

    "We would be in a very difficult situation crime-wise, because they would have more money and bigger arms than they do at the moment," said Gen. David Munguia Payes, Salvadoran defense minister, who says he also has documented cases of Zetas trying to recruit Salvadoran military and police.

    Even in Costa Rica and Panama, countries with much lower crime rates, murders and cocaine seizures have skyrocketed, including cases of execution-style killings in Panama that authorities say are directly related to drug trafficking.

    The U.S. and international groups have worked with Central America to build regional programs for fingerprinting, wiretapping and police training, among others. A U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime program to inspect containers coming into Guatemala ports is set to begin this month. And the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is now establishing arms-tracking operations in the region.

    After complaints that Central America was an afterthought, receiving only $165 million for the now $1.8 billion Merida Initiative to fight drugs in Mexico, Congress last year created a separate Central America Regional Security Initiative with a total of $248 million to date.

    The region says it's not enough.

    The Central American Integration System, an organization representing seven countries, says it would take close to $1 billion to pay for a viable security plan and plans a donors conference in June to raise the money.

    But the stunning case of the narco-barrels shows how deep the transnational drug ties already run.

    The two barrels were dug up in early September about five yards (meters) apart on a 72-acre (29-hectare) ranch in the town of Penitente Abajo, about 40 miles (62 kilometers) from the capital of San Salvador.

    One of the ranch's owners, Guatemalan Bilbardy Obdulio Ortega Vasquez, was already in custody after he and two women were picked up in the San Salvador airport in August, heading to Panama with $36,900 in undeclared cash. Authorities say Ortega Vasquez is the alleged accountant of jailed drug kingpin Jorge Mario Paredes Cordova, a.k.a. "El Gordo," who ran an arm of the Gulf Cartel in Guatemala before he was captured in Honduras and sentenced in New York last year to 31 years for conspiracy to import and distribute cocaine.

    A third narco-barrel found a week later under a patio had more than $4 million in $100 bills. Cotto says the barrels are clearly related to the same operation, packed in the same manner with money distributed in the same quantities. But they still don't know who is behind it.

    "We don't know for sure that there aren't more barrels," Cotto said. "They say everyone is now excavating their patios."
    ...
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  11. #41
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Honduras: Mexican cartel may be behind cocaine lab
    Fri Mar 11, 8:38 pm ET

    TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras – A security official in Honduras says a cocaine processing lab found in a remote mountain area may have been run by Mexico's powerful Sinaloa cartel.

    Security Minister Oscar Alvarez says evidence suggests Sinaloa installed and ran the lab, though he did not elaborate.

    The lab was discovered Wednesday in a mountainous area in northeastern Honduras reachable only on foot or in all-terrain vehicles.

    Alvarez said Friday the lab could produce 200 to 400 kilos (440-880 pounds)of cocaine a week. He says it was the first lab of its kind found in Honduras and called the discovery alarming.

    Mexican cartels are fighting a military crackdown at home and have been increasingly encroaching in volatile Central American countries.

    Mexican media sets drug war coverage guidelines
    By MARK STEVENSON, Associated Press Mark Stevenson, Associated Press
    Thu Mar 24, 5:34 pm ET

    MEXICO CITY – Most of Mexico's largest news media outlets agreed to a set of drug-war reporting guidelines Thursday, promising not to glorify drug traffickers, publish cartel propaganda messages or reveal information that could endanger police operations.

    The voluntary, self-policed guidelines are the first of their kind in Mexico, where more than 35,000 people, including at least 22 journalists, have been killed in drug-related violence since the government stepped up its offensive against cartels in late 2006.

    "We in the news media should condemn and reject the violence arising from organized crime," the agreement said. It also vowed to "ignore and reject any information coming from criminal groups with the purpose of propaganda."

    Mexican drug cartels frequently leave messages or banners next to the bodies of their victims, often with misspelled, obscene threats to authorities or rival gangs, and some media outlets in Mexico already have a policy of not reporting those messages.

    But some of the messages have proven newsworthy.

    In July 2010, the director of a prison in northern Mexico was charged with allowing inmates allied with the Sinaloa cartel to make forays out of the prison to murder their rivals. Prison officials allegedly even lent the inmates guns and vehicles.

    The Zetas gang, a rival of the Sinaloa cartel, first drew attention to the scandal by kidnapping a local police officer and forcing him to describe the scheme on a video posted to a website that specializes in drug underworld information.

    While supporters of the accord denied the government had been involved in drawing up the guidelines, President Felipe Calderon's office praised the accord as "a clear example of the responsible way in which the participating media outlets treat criminal organizations and the violence they create."

    The accord was signed by officials of Mexico's two dominant TV networks, a number of large radio station chains and several of Mexico's most influential newspaper groups. But some organizations declined to sign on to the list of self-imposed rules, including prominent newspapers such as Reforma and La Jornada.

    Reforma issued a statement saying that it "has had its own mechanisms for editorial policy."

    Benoit Hervieu, the head of the Americas desk for Paris-based Reporters Without Borders, said his group had been invited to sign, but declined because of concerns about some articles, especially one that reads "When the government takes action within the limits of the law, it should be made clear that the violence is caused by the criminal groups."

    "I do not totally agree with that," Hervieu said. "When there are raids, even when they are within the limits of the law, there can still be abuses, even against the news media." Police and soldiers have sometimes shoved, beaten or threatened reporters covering raids.

    Another clause says journalists "should avoid (using) the language and terminology used by criminals," and pledges "as news media, we should not publish information that places at risk the viability of actions and raids against organized crime, or place at risk the lives of those who fight it, or their families."

    In 2009, assailants gunned down the mother, aunt and siblings of a marine who died during a raid that that killed Arturo Beltran Leyva, the leader of one of Mexico's most powerful cartels. The federal government had released the marine's name, something it no longer does.

    Carlos Lauria, senior coordinator of the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists, said none of the clauses seem to attack freedom of expression, and said that if some organizations object to some of the guidelines, "if it generates a debate, it seems to me that would be positive."

    "We couldn't have a worse situation than the one we have today," Lauria said, referring to the threats, violence and attacks by drug gangs that have led some newspapers in northern Mexico to stop publishing articles on drug gang turf battles.

    The accord aims to defend journalists' safety, suggesting possible measures such as omitting bylines on some stories. It also defends the media's right to criticize government anti-crime actions, and questions the police practice of displaying newly arrested suspects, often surrounded by their alleged weapons, before reporters and cameras.

    "The authorities sometimes try to show how well they are doing in the fight against organized crime by parading suspects before the media in conditions that violate the presumption of innocence," it said. "We as media should always publish this type of information based on the assumption they are innocent until proven guilty."

    News anchor Joaquin Lopez Doriga of the Televisa network denied that the rules amount to self-censorship.

    "The organized crime gangs very clearly want to use some of us as their spokesmen," Lopez Doriga said, adding that he had never broadcast a drug cartel message.

    Milenio television news director Ciro Gomez Leyva said he would still broadcast drug cartel banners "when those messages are newsworthy. News will continue to be news."
    .. ... .
    Whiskey Sour

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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  12. #42
    Member Dustin da DnB Soulja's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    One time I went to Mexico with my 2 actor buddies, and he helped this small village from this tyrant named ... well his name translated to something like Handsome One or some shit. Basically we got into this massive gun fight and one guy even had a Mexican stand off with this crazy German guy. Man... that was a trip.
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  13. #43
    old school Cheddar's Cousin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Wow...he really does think he's funny.
    Youth, you son of a bitch, where did you go?

    Quote Originally Posted by Emma Ocean View Post
    so I assume you've never been cunt punched at a festival? Well lucky you!

  14. #44
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Tijuana Border Shooting: 2 Americans Killed At San Ysidro Border Crossing
    04/ 4/11 11:36 PM ET

    TIJUANA, Mexico — Two men who prosecutors tentatively identified as U.S. citizens were shot to death in their vehicle early Monday as they waited at a Tijuana-area border crossing to enter the United States.

    Prosecutors in Baja California state quoted witnesses as saying a gunman approached the line of vehicles waiting at the San Ysidro border crossing and fired into the men's pickup truck, hitting the victims in the head, arms and body.

    The state Attorney General's Office initially said the men were U.S. citizens aged 25 and 28.

    Attorney General Rommel Moreno later said their nationality was still unclear.

    "We are looking at where they came from, their nationality, if they are dual Mexican-American (citizens). We do not have that information yet," Moreno said.

    The U.S. consulate in Tijuana did not immediately return phone calls seeking confirmation of the men's nationality. There was no immediate information on their hometowns.

    Investigators said they found 9-mm shell casings at the scene. That ammunition is used in weapons favored by drug cartel gunmen in Mexico.

    The shooting occurred before dawn Monday. The men's pickup had California plates. Both victims were dead by the time authorities arrived.
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  15. #45
    Coachella Junkie fikus222's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheScenestar View Post
    Is that girl still mayor of Juarez?
    If you're talking about the Criminology student who became the Chief of Police of a city near the border, than no. This past month, she fled to the US seeking asylum.
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    If you are interested: A Coachella feature made by the mexican magazine Reporte Indigo

    http://bit.ly/h8HZzK (en español)

    Includes interviews with 10 artists from the 2011 fest including Robyn, The National, Paul Van Dyk, Axwell, Los Bunkers etc

  17. #47
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Mass kidnappings new cash cow for Mexico drug gangs
    By Lorena Segura and Mica Rosenberg Lorena Segura And Mica Rosenberg
    Mon Apr 11, 8:02 am ET

    LA PATRONA, Mexico (Reuters) – Mexican drug gangs branching out into new criminal activity are earning a steady stream of cash from the mass kidnapping of migrants, making the already arduous journey to the United States even more lethal.

    The trek across Mexico has long been dangerous for the hundreds of thousands of undocumented migrants, mostly Central Americans, who try their luck each year, risking robbery, death from fast-moving freight trains or dehydration in the desert.

    But in the past couple of years, the feared Zetas cartel has raised the stakes for migrants and created another security headache for President Felipe Calderon's government, which has spent millions of dollars embroiled in a brutal drug war.

    "I was kidnapped for three days," said 21-year-old Wilson from Honduras waiting in the shade to jump the next speeding train in La Patrona in the Gulf state of Veracruz, one of the most dangerous points on the more than 1,800 mile journey from southern Mexico to the U.S. border.

    Known as "the beast," the massive cargo train is mounted by hundreds of illegal migrants every day who perilously cling to the sides and roof on the ride north, then risk capture by gangs who know they are unlikely to go to the police for help.

    "It was dark, they pulled us off the train with automatic weapons and locked us in small rooms. They beat us and asked for the numbers of relatives (in the U.S.). Otherwise they said you had to work for (the gang) or they kill you," Wilson said.

    Last August, 72 mostly Central American migrants were lined up and executed on an isolated ranch in the northern state of Tamaulipas, the main battleground between the Zetas and their erstwhile employers, the Gulf cartel.

    One of the massacre's two survivors said the Zetas killed the group for refusing to join their ranks. Abducted migrants are often forced to transport drugs across the U.S. border.

    Mexican police dug up 72 more bodies in mass graves last week in the same area but investigators are still determining if they are foreigners.

    At least 11,333 migrants were kidnapped in Mexico between April and September last year, many in large groups, a study by the National Human Rights Commission showed. In 9 percent of cases, corrupt police or immigration officials were involved.

    The Zetas are named time and again in the Commission's testimonies, which detail brutal beatings and multiple rapes.

    A group of women volunteers in La Patrona who give donated food to migrants on the trains told of women who take birth control shots before leaving to avoid pregnancy if raped.

    "There are victims who say they were held for over a month and they saw between 15 and 20 kidnapped migrants coming in and out of the safe house every day," said Fernando Batista, a Commission official. "It's a tragic business."

    Tragic but lucrative, according to the Commission database, which showed extortion fees over the six months totaled more than a half million dollars -- ranging from $200 to $85,000 in more than 100 cases. The unreported figure may be much higher.

    EVERYONE KNOWS WHO THEY ARE

    Originally a group of army deserters, the Zetas have morphed into a broad crime syndicate after splitting from the Gulf cartel, and are now fighting Mexico's other major drugs gangs for control of smuggling routes to the United States.

    They make money not just from drug trafficking but oil theft, extortion and now kidnapping of migrants in bulk.

    The gang's branching out into new criminal enterprises may be an unintended consequence of Calderon's four year-old army crackdown on cartels, which has fractured old criminal alliances and made drug smuggling more difficult.

    The Zetas' ability to round up dozens of people and kill them en masse has tarnished Mexico's image as it competes for foreign investment with other emerging markets.

    Salvador Beltran del Rio, the head of Mexico's National Migration Institute, told a United Nations committee this month the main threat to migrants is organized crime.

    But while the U.N. committee praised some measures Mexico has taken to protect the 150,000 to 400,000 migrants that pass through the country each year, they still had major concerns about the "alarming" number of abductions.

    "The committee was further concerned by reports that ... these human rights violations were carried out with the complicity or acquiescence and/or connivance of federal, state and municipal officials," the U.N. committee said.

    Mexico's shortfalls safeguarding migrants in its territory complicates the government's push for better protection for Mexican nationals living and working in the United States.

    Mexicans account for more than half the estimated 10.8 million illegal immigrants residing in the United States, and Central Americans make up about 10 percent.

    Now that the U.S. economy is emerging from recession the flow of migrants looking for jobs is expected to increase again after a dip, despite the growing dangers along the route.

    Migration from poor countries like El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala is far from slowing, the governments say, giving a constant source of revenue to the gangs.

    Stepping off a U.S. deportation flight back to Honduras, German Escalante said he would head back as soon as he could.

    "I don't have a job here and even if I did, they pay you nothing. It's not enough to live," the 24-year-old said in Tegucigalpa where the minimum wage is around $7 a day.

    "I have family up there and they are going to pay a smuggler," he said. "Last time I went, there were armed men on both sides of the border who said they were Zetas. Everyone knows who they are."

    The women in La Patrona, who have been helping migrants for years, say job-seekers will continue risking their lives.

    "They tell us, 'if I don't die on the way I'll die of hunger back home,'" 25-year-old volunteer Lourdes Romero said.

    (Additional reporting by Miguel Angel Gutierrez in Mexico City, Mike McDonald in Guatemala City, Nelson Renteria in San Salvador and Gustavo Palencia in Tegucigalpa; Editing by Laura MacInnis)
    ...
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  18. #48
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    11 bodies found in Mexico pits, total now 121

    – Wed May 4, 10:42 pm ET

    MEXICO CITY – Investigators in the northern Mexico state of Durango said they found the remains of 10 men and one woman in mass graves in the state capital Wednesday, bringing the total of bodies recovered there to 121.

    The Durango state prosecutors' office said in a statement that the remains were uncovered by military personnel who have been excavating at about four sites in the city, which is also known as Durango.

    The search has been under way for about a month at pits where drug gangs are believed to have buried victims.

    The Durango graves are the second such discovery in a month. A total of 183 bodies have been unearthed in 40 pits in the northeastern border state of Tamaulipas.

    Mass graves have become an increasingly common discovery in Mexico, with drug cartels using the sites to dispose of enemies and other victims amid increased fighting among rival gangs. More than 34,600 people have died in drug-related violence since President Felipe Calderon deployed thousands of federal security forces four years ago to fight traffickers.

    Authorities in Durango state say the discovery of mass graves there has not brought out many relatives of missing people, perhaps because families are too frightened to come forward.

    As Mexicans braced for demonstrations scheduled for the weekend to protest ongoing violence associated with the anti-drug offensive, Calderon issued an impassioned appeal in a televised speech Wednesday for Mexicans to stick with fight, though he acknowledged it will take time.

    "Backing off from the fight is not an option," Calderon said. "If we retreat, we are going to allow gangs of criminals to roam the streets of Mexico, attacking people with no one to stop them."

    Calderon criticized "those who, with good intentions or bad, are trying to stop the government from acting." He said "nobody likes violence," but warned that peace "is not a goal that will be achieved with false solutions."

    He said Mexico needed to reform its police forces and judicial system to be able to fight the drug cartels.

    "These are changes that will take time in order to be carried out, but it is worth the effort, because it is the only solid and lasting basis for the future."

    Also Wednesday in the Pacific coast state of Guerrero, state police said a man's dismembered body was found in four plastic bags at a shopping mall in the state capital, Chilpancingo.

    Police found a handwritten message of the kind frequently left by drug cartels; in keeping with policy, the contents of the message were not revealed.
    ...
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  19. #49
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Mexico's Calderon berates U.S. after casino attack
    By Miguel Angel Gutierrez | Reuters – 4 hrs agotweet46Share5EmailPrint


    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - President Felipe Calderon declared three days of mourning on Friday and demanded a crackdown on drugs in the United States after armed men torched a casino in northern Mexico, killing at least 52 people.

    Under intense pressure as violence soars, Calderon said he would send more federal security forces to the city of Monterrey, where gunmen set fire to an upmarket casino on Thursday in one of the worst attacks of Mexico's drugs war.

    Lashing out at corrupt officials in Mexico and "insatiable" U.S. demand for drugs for fomenting the violence, Calderon urged Congress to stamp out drug consumption and stop illegal trafficking of weapons across the border into Mexico.

    "We're neighbors, we're allies, we're friends, but you are also responsible," a somber and angry Calderon said to the United States in a speech after meeting his security advisers.

    Pledging to step up the fight on organized crime, Calderon said Mexico was under attack from "true terrorists", and told all Mexicans to come forward and denounce those responsible.

    "They aren't and cannot be the ones in charge of our streets, our cities and our future," he said, shortly before departing to Monterrey to take stock of the situation.

    President Barack Obama called the attack "barbaric" and said his government stood shoulder to shoulder with Mexico in the battle against the gangs.

    "We share with Mexico responsibility for meeting this challenge and we are committed to continuing our unprecedented cooperation in confronting these criminal organizations," Obama said in a statement issued by the White House.

    Washington provides money and resources to Mexico in the drugs war, but joint cooperation has been damaged by mistrust, a botched U.S. plan to track down weapons smugglers and the killing by suspected hitmen of a U.S. customs agent in Mexico this year.

    Calderon first ordered a crackdown against the cartels when he took office in late 2006 and several senior traffickers have been arrested. However, turf wars between rival cartels have killed about 42,000 people, battering Mexico's reputation.

    The president insists his campaign has weakened the cartels but critics say it simply brought a surge in violence and has done little or nothing to slow the flow of cocaine, marijuana and other drugs into the United States.

    The carnage has hurt support for Calderon's conservative National Action Party (PAN), which already faces an uphill battle to retain the presidency in elections next July.

    BITTER BLOW

    The casino attack is particularly bitter for Calderon because the victims were mainly well-to-do civilians with no link to the conflict, in an area that has traditionally been a electoral stronghold for the business-friendly PAN.

    Monterrey, which lies about 230 km (140 miles) from the Texas border, is a relatively wealthy city of about 4 million people and is home to some of Mexico's biggest companies. It was for many years seen as a model of economic development but it has been ravaged by the drugs war over the past two years.

    The president was unrepentant on Friday and sought to pin blame for the violence on corrupt judges and politicians in "certain parts" of the country. It appeared to be an attack on the main opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), which controls the majority of Mexico's states.

    With a big lead in opinion polls, the PRI is on track to oust the PAN from power next year and analysts expect the ruling party to intensify efforts to discredit its bitter rival as the presidential vote nears.

    Survivors from Thursday afternoon's attack said armed men burst into the Casino Royale and threatened gamblers before dousing gasoline on the carpets and setting it on fire.

    "My wife came here for a celebration," a weeping man told Milenio TV. "She was having dinner with her friends."

    Media reports said the majority of the dead were women.

    Security camera footage showed four vehicles pulling up outside the front of the casino and waiting while the assailants went into the gambling hall.

    Within three minutes, black smoke was billowing from the front doors and people could be seen fleeing in panic.

    (Additional reporting by Dave Graham, Victor Hugo Valdivia and Michael O'Boyle in Mexico and Laura MacInnis in the United States; Editing by Kieran Murray)
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  20. #50
    Member Premium Roast's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    can't even go down there anymore unless you got protection. And ain't talkin about rubbers. If they don't recognize your car and you, then you likely gonna get jacked.
    100% Caffeinated

  21. #51
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Mexican drug cartels recruiting Texas children
    By Jim Forsyth | Reuters – 6 hrs ago...

    SAN ANTONIO (Reuters) - Texas law enforcement officials say several Mexican drug cartels are luring youngsters as young as 11 to work in their smuggling operations.

    Steven McCraw, director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, told Reuters the drug gangs have a chilling name for the young Texans lured into their operations.

    "They call them 'the expendables,'" he said.

    McCraw said his investigators have evidence six Mexican drug gangs -- including the violent Zetas -- have "command and control centers" in Texas actively recruiting children for their operations, attracting them with what appears to be "easy money" for doing simple tasks.

    "Cartels would pay kids $50 just for them to move a vehicle from one position to another position, which allows the cartel to keep it under surveillance to see if law enforcement has it under surveillance," he said.

    "Of course, once you're hooked up with them, there's consequences."

    McCraw said 25 minors have been arrested in one Texas border county alone in the past year for running drugs, acting as lookouts, or doing other work for organized Mexican drug gangs. The cartels are now fanning out, he said, and have operations in all major Texas cities.

    This month, "we made an arrest of a 12-year-old boy who was in a stolen pickup truck with 800 pounds of marijuana," he said. "So they do recruit our kids."

    McCraw says the state of Texas is joining a program initiated by U.S. Customs and Border Protection called "Operation Detour," in which law enforcement officers meet with children and their parents in schools and at community centers to warn them about the dangers of what appears to be the easy money the Mexican drug gangs offer.

    Law enforcement officers say children are less likely to be suspects than adults, are easily manipulated by relatively small sums of money, and face less severe penalties than adults if arrested.

    Last month, Texas officials released a report indicating Mexico-based drug gangs are intent on creating a "sanitary zone" on the U.S. side of the Rio Grande, and are "intimidating landowners" in south Texas into allowing them to use their property as "permanent bases" for drug smuggling activity.
    ...
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  22. #52
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    'El Narco': The Trade Driving Mexico's Drug War
    by NPR Staff

    October 25, 2011

    Over the last five years, the Mexican drug war has claimed the lives of an estimated 40,000 civilians and drug traffickers. British journalist Ioan Grillo describes it as "a bloodbath that has shocked the world."

    In his new book, El Narco, Grillo takes a close look at the Mexican drug trade, starting with the term el narco, which has come to represent the vast, often faceless criminal network of drug smugglers who cast a murderous shadow over the entire country.

    "People struggle to really understand what this force is," Grillo tells NPR's Ari Shapiro. "You talk about el narco being behind 30 bodies on the street and el narco threatening politicians, but who really are these people and what really are they?"

    He says when he first arrived in Mexico in 2001, traffickers used gangbangers to carry out their assassinations — but not anymore.

    "Now they have fully fledged militias with AK-47s, [rocket-propelled grenades]," Grillo says, "and they have become something very fearsome and very dangerous within Mexico."

    'El Narco' As Boss

    Over the years, el narco has also become deeply embedded in Mexican society. In some communities, the local cartel serves as the biggest business and the biggest employer. According to Grillo, the violent Zetas cartel has even been known to post want ads.

    "The Zetas put up adverts on the street on blankets with a phone number saying 'Why are you going to work on a bus? Join us. We'll get you a good salary. If you're an ex-military guy, we'll give you a job,'" Grillo says.

    And just as the wealthy might finance culture, so do the cartels. Though, according to Grillo, traffickers' contributions are often more about getting their own name out there.

    "One way to do that is to pay somebody to write something about them," he says. "Now if you go to places where there is a big history of drug trafficking, like Sinaloa state, and you talk to these musicians you will find that any one of them will have a price they charge to write a song, to compose a ballad about somebody."

    A cartel's patronage can go a long way. Grillo says some Sinaloan communities call drug traffickers los valientes, Spanish for the brave.

    Still, not every story of cartel patronage ends well. In his book, Grillo recounts hearing the story of the musician one low-level trafficker had commissioned to write a particularly catchy song about him. Grillo writes,

    Soon everyone played it on his car stereo. "The crime bosses were like, 'Bring me the guy from that song. I want him to do the job for me.' So he rose through the ranks because of the song." "So what happened to him now?" I asked. "Oh, they killed him. He got too big. It was because of the song really."

    The Business Side Of Trafficking

    At the root of the current violence in Mexico is a lucrative drug trade that offers traffickers $50 for every dollar they invest.

    "You can buy a kilo brick of cocaine in Colombia for $2,000. When you sell it at a gram level in the U.S., you can turn that into some $100,000," Grillo says. "That area of buying the cocaine from Colombia and selling it to Americans is the area dominated by Mexican cartels."

    And those cartels have grown the trade to incredible proportions. In his book, Grillo describes a visit a Mexican military base that was used to store drugs that had been confiscated from the cartels.

    As we step inside, a cocktail of mystic toxic smells greets us. To the left, towers of cling-wrapped marijuana loom above our heads. To the right are huge sacks of cut-up ganja plants and enough seeds to give birth to a forest of psychedelic weed. Walking forward, we stumble into a pile of giant, blue metal saucepans ... The white sludge of raw methamphetamine fills the pan like a foul stew of ice and sour milk. In a corner, we catch sight of a much older Sinaloan product, black-tar heroin, which looks like jet-black Play-Doh, oozing out of yellow cans.
    While no one knows the exact numbers, Grillo says the trade in such products is estimated to be worth tens of billions of dollars.

    'An Escape' In Ciudad Juarez

    There's no question that Mexican society has been traumatized by the violence of the last five years; but, through it all, some have found a way to cope.

    Grillo says that in Ciudad Juarez — a town he describes as "the most murderous city on the planet" — people have started going to the opera.

    "People are saying, 'Well this opera is an amazing chance for us to forget about this drug violence,'" Grillo says.

    "'While you hear the music, it won't make anything better or improve your life; but at least for those minutes of hearing the music you can find an escape and imagine things getting better.'"
    ...
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  23. #53
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I find it fascinating how things get more attention (here and in the media) when it's miles away versus right next door.

  24. #54
    VigoTheCarpathian
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I've been following this war: it's a real horror show. I'm not Latino but I believe in Mexico; there's a lot of talent down there: Mexico is going to happen one day. In the mean time this is as disturbing as it is entertaining(if you're the sadistic type):http://www.blogdelnarco.me/

    The translate button is on the top left corner.

  25. #55
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Omg, those pictures on page 3 are horrible.

    Why do I feel like this is being ignored? Am I ignorant?

  26. #56
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I think it's been getting more and more attention, actually. It's not going to frequent the news unless the drug violence spills over into the U.S. in a bloody, gruesome display... but you can find information on it. I remember last year that the NYTimes website had a special report on Juarez that appeared on its front page for a while. It was basically a round-up of the drug violence there... You also have Breaking Bad touching on the Juarez drug violence, and the cartels themselves. That's just entertainment, but it does depict an accurate picture (although, they talk about El Paso being dangerous, which isn't the case at all)... And also, in a year or so, my book about Juarez drug violence will come out and it will sell like a billion copies. After that, nobody will shut up about it.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  27. #57
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"


  28. #58
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I just want to have something to do...

  29. #59
    VigoTheCarpathian
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    This is called a narco song. How do I say song in Spanish I forget?

  30. #60
    VigoTheCarpathian
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Salma. Mexico must be saved.

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