Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 61 to 90 of 116

Thread: Mexico: "El Thread"

  1. #61
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Tukee
    Posts
    95

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by VigoTheCarpathian View Post
    This is called a narco song. How do I say song in Spanish I forget?
    cancion.

  2. #62
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Rustin' in Tustin
    Posts
    21,367

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Alchemy, when real life drama gets more play in a tv series than in the news, that means nobody cares. This breaks my heart.

  3. #63

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Welcome Mexico thread! I wondered why u were in the Coachella section. <3
    Quote Originally Posted by bug on your lip View Post
    you ever get this uneasy feeling that everyone of us on this board is actually in Hell?

  4. #64
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    9,113

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by algunz View Post
    Alchemy, when real life drama gets more play in a tv series than in the news, that means nobody cares. This breaks my heart.
    Don't feel heartbroken, my dear Gunz. There is so much violence in the world, and misery, that could be on the news. But even if it is more important than, say, Kim Kardashian's wedding, the news isn't really the right venue for the scale of drug violence in Mexico. As crazy as that may sound... You couldn't just report on it or list what has happened. Breaking Bad is focused on a bunch of stuff, rather than just Mexico's drug violence, but I think it's a more promising thing than a news round-up, or even a news special. I think what Americans need, in terms of Mexican drug violence, are things like tv shows and movies that explore this, because it makes a bigger impact on the end. Not so much that Americans are tv crazy, but that narratives would do more justice. With American concerns, the news is usually enough... but for foreign things, even as close as Mexico, I think you need to build sympathy and empathy with Americans first... and stories seem to be the best way to do that.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  5. #65
    I'dDoItAllAgain
    Guest

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemy View Post
    You also have Breaking Bad touching on the Juarez drug violence, and the cartels themselves. That's just entertainment, but it does depict an accurate picture (although, they talk about El Paso being dangerous, which isn't the case at all)...
    So you think the portrayal of danger and violence in El Paso was exaggerated but the one of Juarez is somehow completely accurate?

    There's always been drug-related violence, not only here in México, but in the US too. While it's true that we've seen more violent episodes recently, this is only in certain cities and periods.

    Some people make it seem like we encounter a shooting in every corner when going out, when in fact, we go about our lives quite normally.

  6. #66
    Cult Leader koryp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In my own little world
    Posts
    3,279

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    The internetz is real, yo!

    MEXICO CITY — Mexico's Zetas drug cartel appears to be launching what might be one of the first violent campaigns by an organized crime group to silence commentary on the Internet.

    The cartel has already attacked rivals, journalists and other perceived enemies. Now, the target is an online chat room, Nuevo Laredo en Vivo, that lets users comment on the activities of the Zetas and others in the city on the border with Texas.

    Already, three apparent site users have been slain, and another man's decapitated body was found Wednesday with what residents said was a banner suggesting he was killed for posting on the site.
    Chat room users said they couldn't immediately confirm the victim's identity, because people post under aliases.

    Despite such precautions, the Zetas could be tracking users from clues they leave online, experts warned.

    A female chat room user was found decapitated in September with a similar message as the one found Wednesday and at the exact same spot, with a message signed with the letter "Z," which refers to the Zetas.

    "I don't know of anything like this having happened anywhere else in the world," said Jorge Chabat, an expert in safety and drug trafficking at the Center for Research and Teaching in Economics in Mexico. "It is certainly new and worrisome. ... It is a frontal confrontation against the public; it is not just a confrontation with the government anymore."

    Matt Harrigan, chief executive of the San Diego, Calif.-based security firm Critical Assets, said it would be relatively easy, with the money the Zetas have from running drugs, to track down website users.

    "If you're a Mexican cartel with hundreds of millions of dollars, there certainly are security experts in Mexico or former hackers, or whoever they are, that I'm certain they're for hire," he said.
    Wow, 12 step meetings at Coachella, who knew? SOBERCHELLA.COM

    I'm a reasonable man, get off my case....

  7. #67
    I'dDoItAllAgain
    Guest

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    More often than not, the victims are opposing cartel members.

    The messages are just to scare people off.

  8. #68
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    12,272

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    In Nuevo Laredo, 23 corpses found on grisly day in Mexican drug-cartel war
    By William Booth, Published: May 4
    MEXICO CITY — In a bold public display of the gang violence sweeping across northern Mexico, residents in the border city of Nuevo Laredo awoke at dawn Friday to find nine corpses of men and women hanging from a bridge at a busy intersection just a 10-minute drive from Texas.

    A few hours later, authorities discovered 14 headless bodies wrapped in plastic bags, stuffed into a sport-utility vehicle in front of a Mexican customs agency. The 14 heads were later placed in plastic-foam coolers and left by armed men on a crosswalk beside the city hall, according to the attorney general in Tamaulipas state.

    Residents accustomed to violence in Nuevo Laredo erupted in fear and disgust on social media networks. One tweet read: “We have no law in Nuevo Laredo. Welcome to the Jungle!” A car bomb exploded in front of a police station last month, followed by a gun battle between Mexican soldiers and gangsters.

    A Web site devoted to news about narco-violence published photographs of the nine victims — five men and four women — swinging from the bridge, the corpses bloody and bearing marks of torture. Some had their pants pulled down to their ankles.

    There was a banner hung beside the bodies on the bridge, and its profanity-laden message boasted that “in this way I am finishing you all off.” It also said that one victim “cried like a woman giving birth.”

    It was unknown who left the bodies hanging from the bridge or whether the 14 decapitated corpses found later were a response. Local police and state security officials reported no motives or arrests.

    “It appears there is a really awful fight going on for the control of Nuevo Laredo,” said Raul Benitez Manaut, a drug policy scholar.

    The city is an important gateway for smuggling drugs and people north to the United States, and for shipping bulk cash and weapons south to Mexico. Nuevo Laredo is a battleground between the Gulf Cartel and its former enforcers, the Zetas.
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  9. #69
    Member ialvarado2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    LA
    Posts
    926

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Who watch the presidential debate?

    OutKast-TheKnife-Replacements-theGlitchMob-JagwarMa-Shlohmo-MSMR-AntiFlag-CaravanPalace-GabbaGabbaHeys-EllieGoulding-NekoC-AFI-Bonobo-theCult-Bastille

    QOTSA-Lorde-PetShopBoys-MGMT-EmpireOfTheSun-CageTheElephant-Chvrches-CapitalCities-Temples-Naked&Famous-Mogwai-HolyGhost-WhiteLies-theInternet-LauraMvula-

    ArcadeFire-Beck-NMH-Disclosure-LanaDelRey-Motörhead-LittleDragon-ToyDolls-1975-Krewella-Fishbone-TromboneShorty-ArtDept-Bombino-BadManners-SurferBlood-BoNingen-JRoddy-FactoyFloor

  10. #70

  11. #71
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    12,272

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Drug Cartel Barbecues U.S.-Owned Potato Chip Company

    By RANDY KREIDER | ABC News –

    8 hrs agoEmailShare17PrintRelated ContentDrug Cartel Barbecues U.S.-Owned …

    Mexican authorities arrested four alleged members of the Knights Templar drug cartel after a series of firebomb attacks on a potato-chip company owned by the U.S. food company PepsiCo, the first attack on an American multinational firm in Mexico's ongoing drug war.

    Five warehouses and parking lots owned by the popular Sabritas brand were attacked over the weekend in the states of Michoacan and Guanajato. Witnesses said masked men had thrown firebombs and incinerated warehouses and dozens of delivery trucks. No one was injured in the bombings, according to authorities.

    The attorney general of Guanajato, Carlos Zamarippa Aguirre, alleged that the men arrested had confessed that the motive of the attacks was extortion. Aguirre said the suspects gave false names but were identified by fingerprints and at least one, the alleged cell leader, was already wanted on charges of kidnapping.

    Emails that circulated in Michoacan, however, suggested the attacks may have been revenge attacks by members of the Knights Templar who believe that Mexican authorities use the snack-food trucks to spy on the cartel. The company has nearly 15,000 delivery trucks in Mexico, many featuring a smiley face and the slogan, "You can't eat just one." Cheetos, Fritos, Ruffles and Doritos as well as Sabritas potato chips are sold under the Sabritas name in Mexico.

    Pepsico released a statement Sunday that emphasized the company's trucks are used only for company business. "We repeat that in accordance with our code of conduct, all of our operations are carried out in the current regulatory framework and our vehicles and facilities are used exclusively to carry our products to our customers and clients," said the statement.

    The company also said that it was already taking steps to "restore operations" and that the safety of employees is always its highest priority.

    The Knights Templar drug cartel is a relatively small and new entrant in Mexico's drug war, and is active in the Pacific coast states of Michoacan and Guanajato. Formed two years ago as an offshoot of Christian-tinged La Familia Michoacana cartel, the "Caballeros Templarios" model themselves on the original Knights Templar, a Christian military order established in Europe 900 years ago and active in the Crusades.

    The original Knights Templar, known for white tunics with large red crosses, fought to protect Christian pilgrims to Jerusalem and to recover the mythic Holy Grail, from which the disciples of Jesus supposedly drank during the Last Supper.

    During initiation ceremonies, recruits to the drug cartel wear helmets similar to those worn by medieval knights and common in Mexican Easter ceremonies. Cartel members swear blood oaths and are issued Templar rulebooks. The cartel issued a very public call for a ceasefire during Pope Benedict's visit to Mexico in March.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  12. #72
    Coachella Junkie Mugwog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    6,666

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Well at least that cartel has a cool theme going

  13. #73
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    12,272

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    (Reuters) - In February 2008, Mexican authorities told the CEO of HSBC Holdings Plc's Mexico unit that a local drug lord referred to the bank as the "place to launder money," U.S. prosecutors said on Tuesday, as they announced a record $1.92 billion settlement with the British bank.

    Lax money laundering controls at HSBC allowed two cartels - one each in Mexico and Colombia - to move $881 million in drug proceeds through the bank over the second half of the last decade, according to prosecutors and federal court documents.

    So rampant was the practice, prosecutors said, that on some days drug traffickers deposited hundreds of thousands of dollars at HSBC Mexico accounts. To speed things along, the criminals even designed "specially shaped boxes" that fit the size of teller windows at HSBC branches, according to the documents.

    Prosecutors said a multi-year, multi-agency probe into such transactions revealed how HSBC had degenerated into the "preferred financial institution" for drug traffickers and money launderers. And on Tuesday, that culminated in a far-reaching deferred prosecution agreement with HSBC.

    An HSBC spokesman declined to discuss specific transactions or clients. But as part of the agreement, the bank acknowledged major lapses in compliance and ignoring red flags. It also acknowledged enabling clients to avoid U.S. sanctions that prohibit dealings with countries such as Iran, Libya, Sudan, Myanmar and Cuba.

    The bank agreed to take steps to fix problems, forfeit $1.256 billion, and retain a compliance monitor. It also agreed to pay $665 million in civil penalties to resolve regulatory actions by the U.S. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, the Federal Reserve, the Treasury Department and others.

    "We accept responsibility for our past mistakes. We have said we are profoundly sorry for them, and we do so again. The HSBC of today is a fundamentally different organization from the one that made those mistakes," HSBC Chief Executive Stuart Gulliver said.

    The settlement, the largest penalty ever paid by a bank, had been expected.

    In November, the bank told investors its penalty could exceed $1.5 billion. And many of the details of the bank's lapses that allowed shadowy money to sluice through HSBC were contained in a U.S. Senate investigative report in July.

    HSBC shares closed up 0.6 percent in London on Tuesday, and its Hong Kong-listed shares were up about 0.25 percent by late morning on Wednesday.

    MONEY LAUNDERING AND WASHING MACHINES

    Top U.S. law-enforcement officials, standing sternly at a news conference in Brooklyn, New York, gave new details on Tuesday of how the bank was used. They pointed to flow charts decorated with green dollar bills showing how cartels used HSBC accounts to move money through Mexico, Colombia and elsewhere.

    In one type of money-laundering transaction, the documents show how millions of dollars of drug money flowed through HSBC as Colombian drug cartels used the so-called Black Market Peso Exchange to convert U.S. dollars to Colombian pesos.

    In a multi-step laundering process, middlemen - referred to as peso brokers - used U.S. dollars from drug cartels to buy consumer goods such as washing machines and then exported them to Colombia, where they were sold, according to the documents and a source familiar with the situation. Part of the sale proceeds, now in Colombian pesos, was then given back to the drug cartels, the documents show.

    Other transactions involved Mexican drug cartels, prosecutors said.

    After the February 2008 meeting with Mexican authorities, HSBC conducted an internal inquiry that found a small number of Mexican clients accounted for a large percentage of the U.S. dollars moving through HSBC, according to the documents, which include a "statement of facts" that HSBC has agreed to.

    A significant sum ultimately was traced to the city of Culiacan in the rugged Mexican state of Sinaloa, home to one of Mexico's powerful drug gangs that is directed by the country's most-wanted man, Joaquin "Shorty" Guzman, the documents show. In 2001, Guzman escaped from a maximum security prison in a laundry cart.

    HSBC closed the suspected accounts, but the bank kept accepting dollar deposits in Sinaloa. Between 2006 and 2008, HSBC's Mexican unit moved $1.1 billion from Sinaloa to the bank's U.S. branches, according to the documents.

    Drug cartels earn an estimated $60 billion a year from trafficking in the United States, according to the United Nations. Half of that money is routed back to Mexico to pay off politicians, fund private arsenals and fuel violence that killed more than 60,000 people over the past six years.

    Loretta Lynch, the U.S. Attorney in Brooklyn, said that compliance at HSBC was "woefully inadequate."

    HSBC's compliance employees were vastly outnumbered, according to prosecutors. Less than a handful of bank employees, for example, were charged with reviewing 13,000 to 15,000 suspicious alerts generated monthly, they said.

    FIXING PROBLEMS

    Prosecutors agreed to a deferred prosecution deal, which means that HSBC avoids being criminally charged. They also decided against charging any individuals.

    Lanny Breuer, chief of the Justice Department's criminal division, defended the move, saying, "HSBC is paying a heavy price for its conduct."

    Later, he said that while HSBC permitted itself to be an essential element in money laundering, it was not the mastermind. "They are not the Sinaloa cartel," he said.

    HSBC said it had increased spending on anti-money laundering systems by about nine times between 2009 and 2011, exited business relationships and clawed back bonuses for senior executives. As evidence of its determination to change, it cited the hiring last January of Stuart Levey, a former top U.S. Treasury Department official, as chief legal officer.

    Under the five-year agreement with the Justice Department, HSBC has agreed to have an independent monitor evaluate its progress in improving its compliance.

    It also said that as part of the overhaul of its controls, it has launched a global review of its "Know Your Customer" files, which will cost an estimated $700 million over five years. The files are designed to ensure that banks do not unwittingly act as conduits for criminal funds.

    There is already some evidence that the crackdown on HSBC has slowed the flow of illegal cash.

    In 2009, HSBC began exiting a business that moves bulk cash through the global financial system and a year later, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency ordered the bank to improve its compliance.

    Since then, the repatriation of U.S. dollars from Mexico has fallen to less than $5 billion in 2011 compared with $12 billion in 2008, according to Donald Semesky, a former Drug Enforcement Administration official who provided the data last month at an anti-money laundering conference in Washington.

    (Additional reporting by Aruna Viswanatha in Washington, Jessica Dye in New York, Brett Wolf and Steve Slater in London and Lawrence White and Michael Flaherty in Hong Kong; Editing by Eddie Evans, Paritosh Bansal and Ken Wills)
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  14. #74
    Coachella Junkie GuyInTucson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,080

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Then, there is this...

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...icle-1.1218358

    An ex-Marine who survived dangerous patrols in Iraq and Afghanistan is now “chained to a bed” in a notorious Mexican prison after a road trip to Costa Rica went terribly wrong, his friends and family say.

    A chorus of supporters are calling on the Mexican government to release Jon Hammar, 27, who was jailed in August for carrying an antique shotgun that he believed could be legally registered in Mexico.

    Hammar, of Palmetto Bay, Fla., was headed to Costa Rica for a surfing trip to try and recover from post-traumatic stress after four years of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    “The only time Hammar is not losing his mind is when he’s on the water,” fellow Marine veteran Ian McDonough, who was arrested with Hammar during the August incident but later released by Mexican authorities, told McClatchy newspapers.

    Hammar and McDonough had stocked up a used Winnebago with surfboards and camping supplies and had just crossed the border from Brownsville, Texas into Matamoros, Mexico, where they were detained.

    Hammar had registered the shotgun, a Sear & Roebuck model that once belonged to his great-grandfather, with U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials on the U.S. side of the border.

    After being told by U.S. agents the shotgun posed no problem and could be reigstered in Mexico, Hammar and McDonough crossed the border, tried to declare the weapon, and found themselves separated and behind bars.

    "The crux of it is the length of the barrel," his mother, Olivia Hammar, 46, told Reuters. "There's an old law on the books that says it can't be under 25 inches...It's a 2-foot barrel...It's strictly a technicality."

    “It’s a glorified BB gun,” she said.

    McDonough, who has Argentine residency in addition to his U.S. citizenship, was freed a few days after the Aug. 13 arrest and walked back to Brownsville.

    But the nightmare was just beginning for Hammar, who on Aug. 20 was charged with carrying a deadly weapon and placed in a prison known as CEDES in Matamoros, a notorious facility heavily populated, and run, by Mexico’s dangerous drug cartels.

    His parents have even received late night phone calls saying he would be killed if they failed to make thousands of dollars in payments into a Western Union account.

    “He was housed in a wing controlled by the drug cartel,” said Eddie Varon-Levy, a Mexican lawyer hired by the family. He told Reuters the charges in Mexico appear to be an effort to “make an example out of the gringo."

    The Embassy of Mexico in Washington D.C. did not immediately respond to a request from the Daily News about Hammar's case or why he wasn't turned back at the border.

    After receiving the death and extortion threats, Hammar’s family made frantic calls to U.S. diplomats who were able to get the former Marine temporarily placed in solitary confinement.

    In addition to fearing for his physical safety, friends and family are concerned that the extreme stress of the situation is taking its toll mentally.

    "He's getting more and more hopeless," said Olivia Hammar.

    Hammar, who spent four years in some of the most dangerous parts of Afghanistan and Iraq, had been honorably discharged and sought treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. He had witnessed the death of a fellow Marine who was killed by a sniper's bullet in Falluja, Iraq, friends said.

    Describing Hammar as a gentle and dependable man, fellow Marines were shocked to hear of his latest plight.

    “It’s heartbreaking. This is a guy who I served with in numerous combat situations, and he was one of the best we had,” veteran Marine Sgt. James Garcia told McClatchy.

    With few answers and their son facing up to 12 years in prison on the gun charge, his family is now calling on U.S. lawmakers to intervene with the Mexican authorities on their son’s behalf.

    Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., the chairwoman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and the Hammars’ local representative, called the case “outrageous.”

    “His family has described a very disturbing situation that includes their son being chained to a bed in a very small cell and receiving calls from fellow inmates threatening his life if they did not send them money,” Ros-Lehtinen said.

    “The family wants their son back home, and I will do my best to help them,” she said.

    There's also a "We the People" petition that has gained more than 8,000 signatures in just a few days.
    U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla. took to the Senate floor Tuesday to urge the Mexican government to release Hammar immediately.

    “The Mexican authorities, if it is against the law to take a gun in, even though he had already declared it at U.S. customs, the Mexican authorities could have … sent him back into the United States and told him, ‘Don’t bring your great-grandfather’s shotgun into Mexico,’” Nelson said.

    “They have put a United States Marine, who has honorably served his country, in a Mexican jail since last August. Now, enough is enough,” he said.
    10/8 - Little Dragon @ Marquee (Tempe, AZ)
    10/11 - Carolina Chocolate Drops @ Rialto Theater (Tucson, AZ)
    11/10 - The Black Keys @ US Airways Center (Phoenix, AZ)
    4/10/15 - 4/12/15 - Coachella

  15. #75
    Cult Leader koryp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In my own little world
    Posts
    3,279

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    So this was a thing this morning. Video was up on FB for 8 or so hours, and has now moved to the further bowels of the Interwebs. It's probably one of the top 10 most gruesome things I've ever seen. Story is it's a cartel beheading for some bullshit transgression. I'm really not wanting to go back to Mexico anytime soon, and that's kind of sad. I used to have loads of fun down there.

    Oh and obviously NOT SAFE FOR LIFE/WORK/SCHOOL/SANITY/ETC
    Last edited by koryp; 04-26-2013 at 06:41 AM.
    Wow, 12 step meetings at Coachella, who knew? SOBERCHELLA.COM

    I'm a reasonable man, get off my case....

  16. #76

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I have heard some reliable, nasty stories the last few years. Husbands and sons watching their wife/mother being raped on the side of the road by uniformed gunmen, twenty or so mexicans gangbanging a fiance from Oregon, stolen SUVs and all clothing, etc. Go down there if you into that kind of thing and not just for the seeded hot sauce.
    The pilgrimage is not perfected save by copulation with the camel.

  17. #77
    Coachella Junkie locachica73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    13,731

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    My roommate talks about retiring and moving to Mexico. I keep telling him that it's a horrible idea, but he is convinced he could just get a crappy car and live a low profile. I just don't see it being a good idea. I wouldn't even visit if I were offered a free vacation.
    Quote Originally Posted by SlowMotionApocalypse View Post
    I have snuck in weapons before
    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    A butt plug is not a weapon.

  18. #78
    Cult Leader koryp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In my own little world
    Posts
    3,279

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    It sucks really. There were so many great places to just disappear for a few weeks. You could find trouble, but most often, it was easy to be left alone once you got an hour or so from the border. Seems like that kind of flippancy today would just get you on a cell phone video as proof of life.
    Wow, 12 step meetings at Coachella, who knew? SOBERCHELLA.COM

    I'm a reasonable man, get off my case....

  19. #79
    old school ThatGirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    4,142

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    My parents lived in Los Cabos for several years after my dad semi-retired. They ended up coming back to Canada because visiting there and living there are very different. The living costs, pollution, safety problems, politics, water, and hurricanes did them in.
    Quote Originally Posted by M Sparks View Post
    It's all riding on this. You've got big dreams to ride to the top of the Flash Mob world. Well internet fame costs. And right now is when you start paying for it...in sweat.
    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    hey. get your own colonoscopy thread, bitch.

  20. #80
    Banned marooko's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    In your mouth!
    Posts
    19,687

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by koryp View Post
    It sucks really. There were so many great places to just disappear for a few weeks.

    There still are, even more actually. Maybe even forever.

  21. #81
    Member footixy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    The "NO"
    Posts
    1,823

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I go to mehico often...never ran into cartel shit..then again know where to go and watch your ass

    It helps to have family that serve as guides there as well =p
    Last edited by footixy; 04-26-2013 at 07:25 AM.
    Papi Piratón!

  22. #82
    Cult Leader koryp's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    In my own little world
    Posts
    3,279

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by marooko View Post
    There still are, even more actually. Maybe even forever.
    See, that's the part I'm a little uneasy with. I don't mind taking the long route back to life and all that, but I'd like +200 odds on the likelihood of being alive.
    Wow, 12 step meetings at Coachella, who knew? SOBERCHELLA.COM

    I'm a reasonable man, get off my case....

  23. #83

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    anyone know if K38s is within walking distance of Las Rocas hotel? I hear it's safe down there now.
    The pilgrimage is not perfected save by copulation with the camel.

  24. #84
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Rustin' in Tustin
    Posts
    21,367

  25. #85
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    12,272

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Mexico Seeks to Ramp Up Tourism By Rebranding Drug War


    Posted by Bill Conroy - May 19, 2013 at 9:51 pm


    Hospitality Industry, War on Drugs Can Be Complimentary Businesses

    The Mexican government under recently empowered President Enrique Peña Nieto has gone to great lengths to promote the nation as a rising economic contender while downplaying the disastrous war on drugs — which, to date, has led to more than 125,000 homicides in Mexico since the bloodshed began to escalated in late 2006.

    From the vantage point of the Mexican citizens, this public relations campaign must appear a sham, since much of the nation still lives below the poverty line and the carnage in the war on drugs is ongoing.

    However, for public officials, lenders and private developers benefiting from the tourism market, the scheme makes economic sense and promises to keep Mexico’s beach-front hotel communities filled with fun-loving US tourists.

    But those US tourists might want to have a second look at the stakes for them. Numbers released recently by the US Department of State show that it is actually more likely that a US citizen will meet an untimely death as a result of tourist-related activity in Mexico than due to its drug war — though both contributed to nearly 1,200 US citizen deaths in Mexico between 2007-2012.

    PR Spin

    The Riviera Nayarit is a nearly 200-mile-long strip of coastal tourist paradise that stretches from Playa Novilleros to Nuevo Vallarta in the Mexican state of Nayarit — located south of the states of Sinaloa, Durango and Zacatecas and north of the state of Jalisco on Mexico’s West Coast.

    Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in Riviera Nayarit since 2007 to make it a premier tourist destination. Part of that effort includes marketing and public relations.

    Toward that end, the Riviera Nayarit Convention and Visitors Bureau along with the Bahia de Banderas Hotel and Motel Association have retained US-based M. Silver Associates Inc., part of the Ruder Finn Group, to promote Riviera Nayarit — in the US and Canada in particular.

    M. Silver filed its marketing plan for the Mexican resort mecca in March 2013 with the Department of Justice per the requirements of the Foreign Agents Registration Act.

    “The five year anniversary of Riviera Nayarit, 2012, brought significant opportunities to the destination — Tianguis, several major television shows and the second Extravaganza Nautica,” M. Silver Associates states in the introduction to its marketing plan for Riviera Nayarit. “All of this was needed to bring Riviera Nayarit further into the forefront as a premier destination.

    “2013 marks new opportunities for Riviera Nayarit — the U.S. State Department warning for travel to Mexico has been removed for Riviera Nayarit and other Mexican destinations and the economy is improving. The Mexican market grew in the last few years, the Canadian market remained fairly steady and the U.S. market is ready to come back to Mexico.

    “Riviera Nayarit has a strong marketing plan that focuses on its key attributes and knows what audiences will be attracted to each one. M. Silver's public relations endeavors for 2013 and beyond will focus on each of those pillars with specific strategies and tactics.”

    And so, it seems the time is right to strike, particularly since the Mexican and US media are cooperating with the effort to rebrand Mexico as drug-war lite — a campaign that calls for downplaying the drug war and trumpeting the nation’s economic resurgence in areas such as tourism.

    And it should be noted that tourism projects have long been a favorite investment target for organized crime groups, because they offer great shelter for money-laundering operations.

    An article published back in 1995 by the Transnational Organized Crime Journal makes the following observation:


    Tourism projects have always been a prime venue for money laundering investment by Mexican drug traffickers. Felix Gallardo invested in Hermosillo and Puerto Vallarta, as did Chapo Guzman in Southern Nayarit and Banderas Bay in Nuevo Vallarta. In time, we may discover that Juan Garcia Abrego has investments in Punta Diamante, as he does in Monterrey and Matamoros, and that the Cancun-Tulum project is another example of money laundering ********* between narco-power and elites in Mexico. [Emphasis added.]

    Given Peña Nieto’s strategy of downplaying the drug-war bloodshed while magnifying Mexico’s so-called economic “recovery,” with tourism being promoted as one of the economic engines of that comeback, it is worth noting that the major commercial media in both the US and Mexico seem eager to trumpet Mexico’s fiscal success with only surface-level analysis. In fact, much of the commercial media has been firmly planted on the Peña Nieto PR bandwagon since he took office.

    And why not? If more money — clean or dirty, it matters not — is pumped into tourism, then that creates a larger pool of advertising dollars for media outlets to suck up.

    A recent report from the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin describes that media landscape:


    A report from the Media Agreement Observatory has revealed that Mexican media has notably reduced its coverage of organized crime since the inauguration of Enrique Peña Nieto as president in December.


    Words like "murder, organized crime and narcotrafficking" appeared much less frequently (50%) in Mexico City's media between December [2012] and February [2013] compared to the previous three months. On TV, the word "murder" appeared 70% less frequently, and "narcotrafficking" appeared 44% less frequently, reported the Campaign for Liberty of Expression.

    And that same effort to influence media in the US to spread the good gospel of Mexico is underway as well.

    Last July, Narco News reported that then President-elect Peña Nieto had hired Washington, DC-based public relations firm Chlopak, Leonard, Schechter & Associates to help him spread positive propaganda about his new administration and its plans for Mexico. CLSA is the same US image-building firm that was retained in the fall of 2009 by Honduran usurpers led by then “de facto” President Roberto Micheletti in the wake of their successful coup d'état in that Central American country.

    As of December of 2012, CLSA was still working for Pena Nieto, according to a filing the firm made that month under the Foreign Agents Registration Act. CLSA’s next filing under FARA is due by June of this year.

    A close reading of that FARA filing shows a list of all the contacts made from July to November 2012 by CLSA on behalf of Peña Nieto as part of the PR firm’s mission to solicit positive press from influential US media outlets. All of the majors for setting the news agenda in the US show up on the list of media outlets and think tanks contacted by CLSA on behalf of Pena Nieto, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, ABC, CBS, MSNBC, The Atlantic, Time, the Brookings Institution and the Wilson Center, among others.

    Between the Lines

    But there are a few facts that do not surface in the ongoing PR blitz aimed at clouding out the drug-war realities and promoting economic fiction for the benefit of industries such as tourism, finance and real-estate development.

    One, the carnage in the drug war in Mexico is continuing, with homicides actually higher in each of the first four months of Peña Nieto’s presidential term than they were in 10 of the 11 preceding months.



    The other hidden fact deals with the deaths of US citizens in Mexico from 2007-2012 — the period during which the drug war was escalated under former Mexican President Felipe Calderón. The truth is that US citizens living in or traveling to Mexico during this six-year period were relatively insulated, though not immune, from the drug-war carnage afflicting Mexican citizens — some 120,000 of whom were murdered during the six-year period.

    An analysis of US State Department figures included in the following report, “Death of US Citizens Abroad by Non-Natural Causes,” shows that from 2007-2012, a total of 468 US citizens were the victims of homicides — a number certainly related to the drug war. As might be expected, those homicides spiked in 2010 and 2011 (to 112 and 113, respectively) coinciding with a sharp increase in murders of Mexican citizens during that two-year period — the bloodiest under Calderón’s war on drugs.

    But the total number of homicides of US citizens in Mexico dropped to 71 in 2012 — also mimicking a slight decline in Mexican-citizen homicides that year.

    However, even as homicides declined, another death marker for US citizens in Mexico shot up in 2012, to 112 — a measure of the number of US citizens in Mexico who died due to vehicle accidents or drowning.

    In fact, from 2007-2012, a total of 688 US citizens lost their lives in Mexico due to vehicle accidents or drowning, according to the State Department figures. Arguably, those are the types of deaths most associated with tourism-related activities.

    The fact that US deaths in Mexico due to vehicle accidents and drowning eclipse the number of homicides by 220 over the period 2007-2012 should tell us that if Mexican President Peña Nieto and his private-sector backers are successful in downplaying the drug war and equally successful in attracting more US tourists to Mexico, then we are likely to see far more US citizens die in Mexico going forward.

    That’s because there will be all that many more opportunities for vehicle accidents and drowning incidents if more US tourists find their way to Mexico to party. Likewise, by downplaying the drug war, and its ongoing bloodshed, we can also expect its root causes to go unaddressed and consequently see an increase in the number of both Mexican and US citizens who will pay the ultimate price for that official denial.

    But it seems that is a price the captains of free enterprise and their political allies are willing to accept, because tourists attracted by government-backed propaganda and the money generated by the prohibition-fueled drug war both play an important role in keeping the resort towns booming. And that, after all, is the bottom line.
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  26. #86
    Lurker Bella Elena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    [QUOTE=lehorne;2746243]anyone know if K38s is within walking distance of Las Rocas hotel? I hear it's safe down there now.[/[/B]

    My in laws have a home close to there so we go often. I am going this weekend actually. I think Rosarito and Ensenada are much safer lately and in general are safer than TJ. The hotel's address is also K38 so I assume it is pretty close. It will just depend on how the road and beach access are there. I will see if I can check it out when we are in the neighborhood tomorrow!

  27. #87

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    wasup with the new people?
    The pilgrimage is not perfected save by copulation with the camel.

  28. #88

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    [QUOTE=Bella Elena;2754642]
    Quote Originally Posted by lehorne View Post
    anyone know if K38s is within walking distance of Las Rocas hotel? I hear it's safe down there now.[/[/B]

    My in laws have a home close to there so we go often. I am going this weekend actually. I think Rosarito and Ensenada are much safer lately and in general are safer than TJ. The hotel's address is also K38 so I assume it is pretty close. It will just depend on how the road and beach access are there. I will see if I can check it out when we are in the neighborhood tomorrow!
    I'm from Ensenada and have lived there for almost 20 years and go there often for vacations to visit family and friends. The place could not be any more peaceful, I love it there. There are lots of retirees from various countries buying beach houses over there. Of all the border States, Baja California is the most peaceful it seems. TJ and Rosarito may have reputations for being dodgy but Ensenada is often an overlooked place where you can disappear for a while.

    I think the problem with violence in other border towns is that it has been marketed as something that happens every day and to random people all across the country, which is complete nonsense. I'm not denying that brutal and horrible things have happened, but those atrocities happen to people who are in some way involved with the cartels. I'm not even going to address the deaths that relate to car accidents or drowning as the article mentions because those happen all around the world.

  29. #89
    Lurker Bella Elena's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Mr. Trent I totally agree with you. I am here right now, just had a great day in Ensenada. My favorite taqueria is closed for remodeling though

    I agree that most Americans think the streets are running with blood. I am sure it has been horrible in some areas of the county. But like any country it has its sketchy cities and places you have to be careful in or avoid all together. I had the best vacation of my life in Mexico City and Oaxaca last year and will be doing it again this year. We never felt unsafe at any point. Everything is 1/4 the price of going to Europe with great food and art and super nice people. My in-laws (gringos) have lived in Mexico for 6 years and have never had anything negative or violent happen. I just hope that with the new president the situation improves all over the country so the violence ends and the tourists return. The locals certainly need the income

  30. #90

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Resort area gang rapez are always sketchy
    Quote Originally Posted by BROKENDOLL View Post
    I hope y'all are happy with yourselves for comparing Hannah's smirk to a blow fish's asshole.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 56
    Last Post: 04-22-2014, 08:29 PM
  2. OFFICIAL "LET'S COMPLAIN ABOUT REPEAT THREADS" THREAD THREAD
    By Dr. Lufs-al-ot in forum Line Up/Artists
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-26-2010, 06:12 PM
  3. Replies: 41
    Last Post: 01-09-2010, 10:23 PM
  4. The"official" unofficial "Did you see...?" thread
    By Vic Viper in forum Line Up/Artists
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 05-02-2008, 02:18 AM
  5. Ratio of "new" vs "old" and "exclusive" vs "mainstream"
    By Madigon in forum Line Up/Artists
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 02-15-2008, 04:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •