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Thread: Mexico: "El Thread"

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    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Mexico: "El Thread"

    Time to dedicate one area on the board to post/discuss issues about the country right next door to us.

    MONTERREY, Mexico (Reuters) - Mexican marines killed drug baron Ezequiel "Tony Tormenta" Cardenas in a ferocious gunfight at the U.S. border on Friday, a fleeting victory for President Felipe Calderon that is unlikely to quell raging violence.

    Around 150 marines backed by helicopters and soldiers fought running battles with members of the powerful Gulf cartel for hours in Matamoros, across from Brownsville, Texas, terrifying residents and briefly shutting border bridges.

    Dodging grenades and coming under heavy fire from gunmen hidden in houses and shooting from trucks, the marines moved in on Cardenas, one of Mexico's most-wanted traffickers, and killed him on Friday afternoon, the navy said.

    "He died in a shootout with us," a navy spokesman said.

    Three marines and four gunmen were killed, the navy said. A reporter was killed after being caught in crossfire, local media reported.

    Cardenas, 48, was the brother of former Gulf cartel leader Osiel Cardenas, who was extradited to Texas in 2007. He had a $5 million (3 million pounds) bounty on his head in the United States and ran the powerful gang with his partner, Jorge Eduardo Costilla, known as El Coss, who is still at large.

    Praised in drug ballads, Cardenas won his nickname of "Tony Tormenta" (Tony Storm) for beheading and torturing rivals.

    RISK OF MORE VIOLENCE

    The Gulf cartel, which dominates trafficking from northeastern Mexico into Central America and has cells across the United States, is pitted against its former armed wing, the Zetas, in an unrelenting turf war.

    That violence has spread into Mexico's richest city of Monterrey near the Texas border, in a escalation of the drug war that worries foreign investors with factories in the area.

    More than 31,000 people have been killed across Mexico since December 2006, when Calderon took office and launched his army-led crackdown. The government is under increasing pressure to contain the burgeoning death toll across the country.

    Drug gangs blocked roads and set fire to gas stations in the colonial city of Morelia in western Mexico on Friday evening after soldiers captured a local drug gang leader, state news agency Notimex said.

    Calderon's national security chief Alejandro Poire lauded Cardenas' killing as a major success in weakening the cartels that generate up to $40 billion a year in narcotics sales in the United States.

    "Today, we are taking a significant step in dismantling the criminal gangs that do so much damage to our country's population," Poire told reporters.

    But drug trade specialists warned the violence will continue as long as Mexico fails to reform the corrupt judicial, police and prison services that help feed the cycle of killings.

    "This is unfortunately going to fuel the spiralling violence because rivals will try to take advantage of the Gulf cartel's weakened state," said Pedro de la Cruz, a security analyst at Mexico's National Autonomous University.

    Calderon has pledged reform but has failed to get initiatives through a divided Congress, focussing mainly on army-led operations that have led to the capture or killing of several top drug lords since late last year.

    But the Zetas, blamed for some of the worst atrocities in the drug war including the murders of 72 migrants in August, appear to be relatively unscathed by the crackdown and their top operators are still at large.

    (Additional reporting by Armando Tovar in Mexico City; Editing by Eric Walsh and John O'Callaghan)
    Mexico drug war worsened by organized crime's tight grip on politics
    Buzz up! ..By Sara Miller Llana Sara Miller Llana – Fri Nov 5, 3:02 pm ET
    Mexico City – The unrelenting drug violence here has cast a pall over Mexico, with the brutality turning many numb to its menace. In one week alone in late October, three mass killings took place, including a massacre of 14 at a birthday party in Ciudad Juárez, a shooting spree inside a Tijuana drug rehab center that killed 13, and an attack in a carwash in Nayarit that took 15 lives.

    Mexican President Felipe Calderón has made the restoration of security the centerpiece of his presidency. That has meant 50,000 troops and federal officials dispatched to take on drug criminals, but violence continues unabated, with more than 28,000 killed in drug-related violence since he took office in December 2006.

    The causes of the mayhem are manifold. But many experts, law enforcement officials, and ordinary Mexicans say that profound change cannot be accomplished until the government begins loosening organized crime's grip on officials and institutions at all levels.

    IN PICTURES: Mexico's drug war

    "Organized crime has not just penetrated police bodies but [also] government spaces at all levels.… It is one of the biggest problems complicating the fight against drug trafficking," says Alberto Aziz Nassif, a specialist in democracy and civil society at the Center for Research and Higher Education in Social Anthropology in Mexico City. "There are no clear boundaries. The boundaries have been erased by corruption and impunity."

    In the past few weeks, Mexico has been captivated by an ongoing political drama that symbolizes the challenges the government faces in rooting out corruption.

    In 2009, then-Congressman-elect Julio César Godoy Toscano went missing for 15 months after the federal attorney general's office charged him with having connections to La Familia, one of Mexico's most feared drug-running gangs.

    Mr. Godoy, who is from the violent state of Michoacán and is the governor's half-brother, eventually showed up at Mexico's Congress of the Union in Mexico City in September. Armed with a court injunction that said he could take office provided he was not arrested first, he managed to elude police outside Congress and get sworn in – thereby receiving immunity for the duration of his three-year term.

    A deepening dramaIf the story ended there, it would be political drama enough. But days later, a top drug trafficker from La Familia was heard on a leaked audiotape pledging support for a man alleged to be Godoy. And now the political class is scrambling to determine whether enough evidence exists to remove Godoy's immunity, or fuero.

    But whether Godoy turns out to be innocent or guilty, the events surrounding his arrest raise many troubling questions about how deeply entrenched drug gangs are within Mexico's political establishment.

    Many experts say President Calderón's drug war is failing because organized crime has co-opted the political system, either by victimizing candidates and politicians – killing them, in many instances – or by paying them off.

    Calderón has said no public official will be spared, but several factors complicate the government's ability to capture those suspected of moonlighting for criminal networks, including a lack of investigative expertise, a distrust of government motivations, and lack of political will.

    For John Ackerman, a legal expert at the National Autonomous University of Mexico, the main problem is the inability of Mexico to serve justice. For example, Godoy was charged in July 2009 as part of a roundup that had begun that spring in Michoacán. Mayors and state officials were accused of working with La Familia, but almost all of those cases fell apart due to a lack of direct material evidence.

    Critics say that too often, authorities rely on confessions made under duress to build cases. According to various nonprofit organizations, 75 percent of crimes go unreported in Mexico, and of those that are reported, only a small fraction result in prosecutions.

    "The big problem is not public security," says Mr. Ackerman, but the effective issuance of justice, including putting cases together in the advanced stages of a criminal investigation. "This is the real center of the problem," he says.

    The Michoacán arrests, and others throughout the country, are held up as proof of Calderón's commitment to holding all public officials accountable. Although most of the suspects hailed from the opposition, including Godoy, some came from the ruling party. "Calderón was sincere about it; he wanted to nail them," says George Grayson, author of "Mexico: Narco-Violence and a Failed State?"

    But many others claim the arrests were political – a common concern in Mexico that complicates efforts to investigate politicians suspected of misbehavior.

    A problem rooted in politicsThe problem goes back to the 71 years of one-party rule by the Revolutionary Institutional Party (PRI), says Aldo Muñoz, a political scientist at Mexico State's Autonomous University. One of the reasons the fuero exists is to shield sitting legislators from judicial harassment by opposition parties. It can be taken away only with a majority vote by legislators – the situation in which Godoy finds himself.

    "As we do not trust the attorney general's office, we assume that the government is going after its political rivals," Mr. Muñoz says.

    Perhaps the biggest obstacle to cleaning up the system, say political analysts, is a lack of political will, sometimes because politicians are involved and often because they are turning a blind eye.

    "The political elite in Mexico are not willing to take the hard medicine that Italy and Colombia took," says Edgardo Buscaglia, a leading organized crime expert at Mexico's Autonomous Institute of Technology, referring to the pain politicians elsewhere have endured to root out organized crime. "You have to bring down a huge economic and political system."

    Organized crime 'managing the state'Indeed, corruption in Mexican politics is nothing new, but it has grown unwieldy. Under the PRI, pacts were made that allowed the state to manage organized crime. Now organized crime is, in essence, managing the state, competing for control over various facets of society, says Mr. Buscaglia.

    After being sworn in earlier this fall, Godoy held a press conference to deny charges against him: "I am not a criminal," he told reporters.

    No matter how it plays out, it is one more powerful blow to the integrity of Mexican institutions. "Innocent or guilty, that is not the point," says Buscaglia. "One way or another [the Godoy case] shows the system collapsing from corruption from within."
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

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    old school Mr. Fuzz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    "ain't no thang but a chicken wang"

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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Not to split hairs, shouldn't this be in the non-Coachella "Misc. Lounge," rather than in the Coachella "Misc. Babble" section? Aside from Indio's proximity to the border, it's pretty much un-related to the festival.
    Quote Originally Posted by malcolmjamalawesome View Post
    I'd rather see my own gruesome rape and subsequent beheading than see Rammstein.

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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Is that girl still mayor of Juarez?
    http://www.thescenestar.com

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomThom View Post
    Don't ever include Thrice in a fucking Sigur Ros thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by sonofhal View Post
    Maybe more people would give a shit if he died two weekends in a row.

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    Member digitaldragon03's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I broke my hand 2 months ago. I paid $3000 for the emergency room bill where the doctor basically said "Yep, its broken. Heres a splint, and a referral to a hand surgeon" I visit the surgeon and he tells me it would be another $6000-$8000 for the surgery.

    I said fuck this, and went to Mexico City. $2000 later my hand was fixed with some pins through the bones. When it came time for the pins to come out, I didnt want to fly all the way to Mexico City for that surgeon to take them out. So i started making calls to doctors here to see if they would take them out. 5 different doctors told me they couldnt do anything because they didnt do the work. I went to Ensenada, the doctor took the pins out in 15 seconds with his hands, I gave him a $100 bill and now my hand is fine.

    Thanks Mexico.

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    Gunmen in Mexico's drug war getting younger
    By COLLEEN LONG, Associated Press Colleen Long, Associated Press – Sat Nov 13, 12:09 am ET
    MEXICO CITY – Mexican police on Friday detained a minor accused of working as a gunman for a drug cartel after shocking videos and photos surfaced online of fresh-faced boys mugging for the camera with guns and corpses.
    One video, briefly posted on YouTube, showed a youth, apparently in his teens, confessing to working for a branch of the Beltran Leyva cartel. While the authenticity of the video could not be determined, cartels in Mexico frequently post such interrogation videos to expose their rivals' crimes.
    The youth tells an unseen questioner that his gang was paid $3,000 per killing.
    "When we don't find the rivals, we kill innocent people, maybe a construction worker or a taxi driver," the youth is heard saying.
    Pedro Luis Benitez, the attorney general of central Morelos state, told a local radio station Friday that police had detained a minor who allegedly worked as a gunman for a drug cartel and were looking for another. He did not say whether the minor who was detained or the one being sought had appeared online.
    While Benitez did not give the age of the suspects, he implied they were young enough to be playing with toy guns.
    "It is easy for them (criminals) to give them a firearm, making it appear as it if were a plastic weapon and that it is a game, when in fact it is not," Benitez said.
    Local media reported police were seeking a 12-year-old killer nicknamed "El Ponchis," but there was no confirmation of that from prosecutors.
    President Felipe Calderon, who launched the offensive against cartels in 2006, acknowledged several months ago that "in the most violent areas of the country, there is an unending recruitment of young people without hope, without opportunities."
    Suspects under 18 are prosecuted in a separate legal system for youthful offenders for most crime in Mexico. But there are growing calls for both that and the nation's overcrowded adult prison system to be revamped.
    Mexico has more than doubled the number of people in federal prisons in the last two years as part of the country's crackdown on drug cartels, the country's top cop said Friday. While the federal prison system had about 4,500 inmates in 2008, there are now 11,000.
    "Where more disorder exists, there will be more violence," said Public Safety Secretary Genaro Garcia Luna. "The penitentiaries can be places where not only do people complete their punishments, but where future delinquent conduct is prevented."
    He cited one prison in particular, Islas Marias, which has seen its inmate population quadruple since 2006. Located off the coast of Sinaloa state, the prison now houses 3,946 inmates, up from 915.
    "We are trying to abate the deficit of space and modernize our prison system," he said.
    In the case of Islas Marias, the government expanded so it can now house more than 5,000 inmates, but more needs to be done, especially as cartel violence continues, Garcia Luna said.
    In recent years the government has detained thousands of suspected drug traffickers. In addition to the eight federal prisons, the country has 92 state and 333 municipal jails. The most dangerous nonfederal criminals are housed in the federal prisons.
    More than 28,000 Mexicans have been killed since late 2006 in drug-related violence, and 2010 is on track to be the bloodiest so far.
    In Acapulco on Friday, three men were shot to death in separate incidents, including one found dead on Costera Miguel Aleman, the main boulevard of the tourist zone. In all three cases, police in the Guerrero state had no motive for the killings or suspects.
    In Morelia, the state capital of Michoacan, two billboards put up by the federal Attorney General's Office offering rewards for information about members of La Familia cartel were found torched.
    The burning came a day after a letter surfaced purportedly signed by "La Familia Michoacana." It claimed the cartel wants to protect Michoacan and its residents and says the group will disband if federal police promise to act honestly and fight to the death to defend the state. There was no way to know whether the letter was legitimate.
    Federal officials say the cartel is responsible for the state's bloodshed — including the deaths of 18 officers last year. Last week, in response to the arrest of two alleged cartel members, the gang set trucks on fire to block entries to Morelia and sprayed a shopping mall with automatic-weapons fire, according to the state attorney general's office.
    Meanwhile, the Mexican government plans to auction luxury jewelry and cars, planes and helicopters seized from drug traffickers and use the money to help pay for its campaign against organized crime.
    The items to be auctioned next Thursday and Friday include a Rolex watch made of 18-karat white gold and encrusted with 60 white diamonds and a gold ring with a 12.25-carat diamond that will start bidding at $114,000.
    ___
    Associated Press writers Olga R. Rodriguez, Mark Stevenson and E. Eduardo Castillo in Mexico City, Sergio Flores in Acapulco and Gustavo Ruiz in Morelia contributed to this report.
    (This version CORRECTS to 18-karat gold instead of 18-carat.)
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  7. #7
    Milkshake suprefan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I like tacos.

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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by digitaldragon03 View Post
    I broke my hand 2 months ago. I paid $3000 for the emergency room bill where the doctor basically said "Yep, its broken. Heres a splint, and a referral to a hand surgeon" I visit the surgeon and he tells me it would be another $6000-$8000 for the surgery.

    I said fuck this, and went to Mexico City. $2000 later my hand was fixed with some pins through the bones. When it came time for the pins to come out, I didnt want to fly all the way to Mexico City for that surgeon to take them out. So i started making calls to doctors here to see if they would take them out. 5 different doctors told me they couldnt do anything because they didnt do the work. I went to Ensenada, the doctor took the pins out in 15 seconds with his hands, I gave him a $100 bill and now my hand is fine.

    Thanks Mexico.
    great story

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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by digitaldragon03 View Post
    I broke my hand 2 months ago. I paid $3000 for the emergency room bill where the doctor basically said "Yep, its broken. Heres a splint, and a referral to a hand surgeon" I visit the surgeon and he tells me it would be another $6000-$8000 for the surgery.

    I said fuck this, and went to Mexico City. $2000 later my hand was fixed with some pins through the bones. When it came time for the pins to come out, I didnt want to fly all the way to Mexico City for that surgeon to take them out. So i started making calls to doctors here to see if they would take them out. 5 different doctors told me they couldnt do anything because they didnt do the work. I went to Ensenada, the doctor took the pins out in 15 seconds with his hands, I gave him a $100 bill and now my hand is fine.

    Thanks Mexico.
    Our family physician wrote the book available in the following link. All doctors were interviewed by Dr. Page or others involved in the research of the book. So many facilities in Mexico that are as good or better than the US.
    Viva Mexico!!
    http://www.medtogo.com/mexico-health...vel-guide.html

  10. #10
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Mexico begins extradition of drug lord to U.S.

    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) – Mexico began the process of extraditing Edgar "La Barbie" Valdez, believed to be one of the country's top drug bosses, to the United States on Saturday, the federal prosecutor's office said in a statement.

    Valdez, a Texan who is accused of leading a breakaway wing of the Beltran Leyva cartel in a violent struggle for control of smuggling routes, is the highest-ranking suspected drug kingpin captured alive since Mexico's drug war broke out in 2006.

    Since his arrest in late August, Valdez has been held in a federal detention center while Mexican officials interrogated him and debated whether he should stand trial in Mexico or be turned over to the United States.

    U.S. authorities placed a $2 million bounty on the head of Valdez, dubbed "La Barbie" for his blond hair and blue eyes, and indicted him in Louisiana, where is his accused of masterminding the smuggling of metric tones of cocaine into the United States.

    More than 31,000 people have been killed in the fighting between rival drug gangs and security forces since President Felipe Calderon launched his army-led crackdown on the drug trade after taking office in late 2006.

    Mexico has enjoyed successes such as the arrest of Valdez and the killing of several top drug gang leaders this year, most recently Ezequiel "Tony Tormenta" Cardenas, the head of the Gulf cartel, but the spiraling violence is unnerving some investors and Washington, which fears the fighting could spill over the border.
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

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    Triple Whore TheScenestar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by digitaldragon03 View Post
    I broke my hand 2 months ago. I paid $3000 for the emergency room bill where the doctor basically said "Yep, its broken. Heres a splint, and a referral to a hand surgeon" I visit the surgeon and he tells me it would be another $6000-$8000 for the surgery.

    I said fuck this, and went to Mexico City. $2000 later my hand was fixed with some pins through the bones. When it came time for the pins to come out, I didnt want to fly all the way to Mexico City for that surgeon to take them out. So i started making calls to doctors here to see if they would take them out. 5 different doctors told me they couldnt do anything because they didnt do the work. I went to Ensenada, the doctor took the pins out in 15 seconds with his hands, I gave him a $100 bill and now my hand is fine.

    Thanks Mexico.
    and I bet you had some awesome food both times you went. WIN all over!
    http://www.thescenestar.com

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomThom View Post
    Don't ever include Thrice in a fucking Sigur Ros thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by sonofhal View Post
    Maybe more people would give a shit if he died two weekends in a row.

  12. #12
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Thanks for reminding me to post this article.

    November 6, 2010
    Chasing Pirates: Inside Microsoft’s War Room
    By ASHLEE VANCE
    AS the sun rose over the mountains circling Los Reyes, a town in the Mexican state of Michoacán, one morning in March 2009, a caravan of more than 300 heavily armed law enforcement agents set out on a raid.

    All but the lead vehicle turned off their headlights to evade lookouts, called “falcons,” who work for La Familia Michoacana, the brutal Mexican cartel that controls the drug trade. This time, the police weren’t hunting for a secret stash of drugs, guns or money. Instead, they looked to crack down on La Familia’s growing counterfeit software ring.

    The police reached the house undetected, barreled in and found rooms crammed with about 50 machines used to copy CDs and make counterfeit versions of software like Microsoft Office and Xbox video games. They arrested three men on the spot, who were later released while the authorities investigate the case. “The entire operation was very complicated and risky,” says a person close to the investigation, who demanded anonymity out of fear for his life.

    The raid added to a body of evidence confirming La Familia’s expansion into counterfeit software as a low-risk, high-profit complement to drugs, bribery and kidnapping. The group even stamps the disks it produces with “FMM,” which stands for Familia Morelia Michoacana, right alongside the original brand of various software makers.

    The cartel distributes the software through thousands of kiosks, markets and stores in the region and demands that sales workers meet weekly quotas, this person says, describing the operation as a “form of extortion” on locals.

    The arrival of organized criminal syndicates to the software piracy scene has escalated worries at companies like Microsoft, Symantec and Adobe. Groups in China, South America and Eastern Europe appear to have supply chains and sales networks rivaling those of legitimate businesses, says David Finn, Microsoft’s anti-piracy chief. Sometimes they sell exact copies of products, but often peddle tainted software that opens the door to other electronic crime.

    “As long as intellectual property is the lifeblood of this company, we have to go protect it,” Mr. Finn says.

    Microsoft has adopted a hard-line stance against counterfeiting. It has set up a sophisticated anti-piracy operation that dwarfs those of other software makers; the staff includes dozens of former government intelligence agents from the United States, Europe and Asia, who use a host of “CSI”-like forensic technology tools for finding and convicting criminals.

    But the hunt for pirates carries with it a cost to Microsoft’s reputation.

    The company’s profit from Windows and Office remains the envy of the technology industry, and critics contend that Microsoft simply charges too much for them. In countries like India, where Microsoft encourages local police officers to conduct raids, the company can come off as a bully willing to go after its own business partners if they occasionally peddle counterfeit software to people who struggle to afford the real thing.

    “It is better for the Indian government to focus on educating its children rather than making sure royalties go back to Microsoft,” says Eben Moglen, a law professor at Columbia Law School and a leading advocate of free software.

    Mr. Finn argues that Microsoft has no choice but to be aggressive in its fight, saying its immense network of resellers and partners can’t make a living in areas flush with counterfeit software. He says consumers and businesses are being coaxed into buying counterfeit products that either don’t work or do serious harm by clearing the way for various types of electronic fraud.

    And, crucially, the counterfeit software cuts into Microsoft’s potential profit. A software industry trade group estimated the value of unlicensed software for all companies at $51.4 billion last year.

    The most vociferous critics of Microsoft and the overall proprietary software industry describe the anti-piracy crusade as a sophisticated dog-and-pony show. They say the software makers tolerate a certain level of piracy because they would rather have people use their products — even if counterfeit — than pick up lower-cost alternatives. At the same time, the critics say, the software companies conduct periodic raids to remind customers and partners that playing by the rules makes sense.

    “It has always been in Microsoft’s interests for software to be available at two different prices — expensive for the people that can afford it and inexpensive for those that can’t,” Mr. Moglen says. “At the end of the day, if you’re a monopolist, you have to tolerate a large number of copies you don’t get paid for just to keep everyone hooked.”

    Microsoft has demonstrated a rare ability to elicit the cooperation of law enforcement officials to go after software counterfeiters and to secure convictions — not only in India and Mexico, but also in China, Brazil, Colombia, Belize and Russia. Countries like Malaysia, Chile and Peru have set up intellectual-property protection squads that rely on Microsoft’s training and expertise to deal with software cases.

    As Mr. Moglen sees it, these efforts underscore a certain level of desperation on the part of American companies and the economy of ideas on which they have come to rely. “This is the postindustrial United States,” he says. “We will make other governments around the world go around enforcing rights primarily held by Americans. This is a very important part of American thinking around how the country will make its living in the 21st century.”

    MICROSOFT’S pursuit of software counterfeiters begins in Dublin, at one of the company’s 10 crime labs.

    Donal Keating, a physicist who leads Microsoft’s forensics work, has turned the lab into an anti-piracy playpen full of microscopes and other equipment used to analyze software disks. Flat-screen monitors show data about counterfeit sales, and evidence bags almost overflow with nearly flawless Windows and Office fakes. Mr. Keating serves as the CD manufacturing whiz on what amounts to Microsoft’s version of the A-Team, clad in business-casual attire.

    The undercover operative of this group is Peter Anaman, a lawyer who was born in Ghana and educated in England; he taught hand-to-hand combat to soldiers during a stint in the French army and then taught himself how to write software. Mr. Anaman has applied his software skills and training to explore a shift in piracy from groups that make CDs to those that offer downloads online.

    Through three online personas — two female and one male — Mr. Anaman chats with and sometimes befriends hackers in Russia and Eastern Europe who use stolen credit card numbers to set up hundreds of Web sites and offer products from Microsoft, Adobe and Symantec. “It is part of gathering human intelligence and tracking relationships,” Mr. Anaman says.

    Through an artificial intelligence system, Microsoft scans the Web for suspicious, popular links and then sends takedown requests to Web service providers, providing evidence of questionable activity. “The Web sites look professional,” he says. “And some of them even offer customer support through call centers in India.”

    The counterfeiters, however, have automated systems that replace links that Microsoft deep-sixes. So the company has turned up the dial on its link-removal machine.

    “We used to remove 10,000 links a month,” Mr. Anaman says. “Now, we’re removing 800,000 links a month.”

    He describes the groups behind these sites as “part of the dark Web,” saying they have links to huge spam, virus and fraud networks. Microsoft’s tests of software on some popular sites have shown that 35 percent of the counterfeit software contained harmful code.

    Anthony Delaney, who started at Microsoft 25 years ago — driving a forklift to move boxes of its products for shipment — has worked his way up to become its piracy data guru.

    On one of the flat screens, Mr. Delaney brings up a world map that lets users zoom into a city just as they would if hunting for directions online. But instead of highlighting landmarks and popular stores, the map illuminates Microsoft’s retail partners. Hover a mouse over a shop in San Francisco, for example, and you can see how much software it sells, how often Office is sold in tandem with Windows, the failure rate for authentication codes and how many cease-and-desist letters have gone to suspicious sellers in the area.

    According to the map, the area within a 50-mile radius of New York City accounted for more than 200 “actions” last year, including 165 cease-and-desist warning letters to companies suspected of selling pirated software.

    “We can see that only 5 percent of your sales have Office attached to Windows,” Mr. Delaney says. “If that’s below the average for the area, we may go have a chat or conduct a test purchase.”

    This rather eclectic bunch is joined by about 75 other people, including former agents of the I.R.S., F.B.I., Secret Service and Interpol, and former prosecutors — all of whom work under Mr. Finn.

    A former assistant United States attorney in New York, Mr. Finn directs this squad from a Paris office. He says Microsoft spends “north of $10 million” a year on its intelligence-gathering operations and an estimated $200 million on developing anti-piracy technology.

    Mr. Finn talks at length about Microsoft’s need to refine the industry’s equivalent of fingerprinting, DNA testing and ballistics through CD and download forensics that can prove a software fake came from a particular factory or person. And his eyes widen as he thinks about advancing this technology to the point that Microsoft can emphasize the piracy issue directly to customers.

    “Imagine the day when a consumer finds a link that says, ‘Click here if you would like a forensic examination of your disk,’ ” Mr. Finn says. “You put the disk in, the computer reads it and suddenly you see a map of everywhere that counterfeit has been seen all over the world. If people see it in a graphic and visual way, I think they are more likely to help.”

    THE software thieves monitored by Microsoft come in various shapes and sizes.

    College students, grandmothers and others have been found selling cheap, copied versions of software like Windows, Office, Adobe’s Photoshop and Symantec’s security software on eBay and other shopping Web sites.

    And people unwilling to pay for discounted software, meanwhile, can find free versions of popular products online that offer downloads to all manner of copyrighted material.

    Microsoft’s investigators, however, spend much of their time examining how large-scale counterfeiters produce copies at factories and then distribute their wares around the globe.

    The biggest counterfeit software bust in history occurred in July 2007 in southern China. The Public Security Bureau there and the F.B.I. found a warehouse where workers assembled disks, authentication materials and manuals and prepared them for shipping. All told, investigators found $2 billion worth of counterfeit Microsoft software, including 19 versions of products in 11 languages. Software produced by this syndicate turned up in 36 countries on six continents.

    As one means of trying to tell the genuine article from a fake, Microsoft embeds about an inch of a special type of thread in each “certificate of authenticity” sticker found on boxes of software and computers. The investigators spotted dozens of spools of counterfeit thread — 81 miles worth — at the Chinese warehouse.

    Microsoft has found that operations of this scale tend to include all the trappings of legitimate businesses. Workers spend years building up contacts at software resellers around the globe, offering them discounted versions of software. Then they take the orders and send them off via shipping services, Mr. Keating says.

    Many Microsoft products make users enter an activation code to register the software and have it work properly. The syndicates trade in stolen versions of these codes as well, and sometimes set up their own online authentication systems to give people the feeling they have a legitimate product. Groups in Russia and Eastern Europe, with various cybercrime operations in play, now use money gained from credit card fraud schemes to buy activation codes.

    About a decade ago, only a few companies had the expertise or the $10 million needed to buy machines that could press CDs and DVDs. Today, someone can spend about $100,000 to buy second-hand pressing gear, says Patrick Corbett, the managing director at a CD plant owned by Arvato Digital Services, which produces Microsoft’s retail software in Europe.

    “Just five years ago, there were five sites in China that supplied the whole country,” Mr. Corbett says. “Now these machines are commonplace.”

    A prized object in the factory is the stamper, the master copy of a software product that takes great precision to produce. From a single stamper, Arvato can make tens of thousands of copies on large, rapid-fire presses.

    Crucially for Mr. Keating, each press leaves distinct identifying markers on the disks. He spends much of his time running CDs through a glowing, briefcase-size machine — and needs about six minutes to scan a disk and find patterns. Then he compares those markings against a database he has built of CD pressing machines worldwide.

    This system allows Microsoft to follow the spread of CDs from factories like the ones in China. The company conducts test purchases of software — online and in stores — and receives copies from some of the 300,000 people who have complained about running into counterfeits over the last four years.

    Microsoft keeps tight controls over its partners that produce CDs. But counterfeiters get around these measures by stealing stampers and presses, presenting factories with fake paperwork from Microsoft or printing in a factory when it isn’t doing official business — a practice known in the industry as producing “cabbage.”

    To make life harder for the counterfeiters, Microsoft plants messages in the security thread that goes into the authenticity stickers, plays tricks with lettering on its boxes and embosses a holographic film into a layer of lacquer on the CDs.

    To the untrained eye, the counterfeit software in Microsoft’s labs appears to be exact replicas, right down to the boxes. Chinese counterfeiters mimic the built-in hologram simply by placing a holographic sticker across the entire surface of a CD; then they use other machines to erase some of the unique identifiers found at microscopic levels.

    Such tactics have pushed Microsoft to create a new type of digital fingerprinting technology that scans a disk’s software code for special defects. The same techniques allow Microsoft to find malicious code that may have been injected in its products.

    THE grand question surrounding Microsoft’s anti-piracy razzle-dazzle is whether it’s worth the cost.

    The piracy problems tend to run highest in regions where there is less money to pay for Microsoft’s products. Backers of free software like the Linux operating system take aim at these areas, and Microsoft also faces growing competition from Google, which gives away its Office rival to consumers and sells a business version at prices far below what Microsoft typically receives.

    “We love Microsoft’s heavy-handedness,” says Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization. “We want 100 percent of the people using Windows to pay for it, because in those places where you have a lot of pirated use of Windows, we don’t have any cost advantage.”

    Microsoft’s critics portray its behavior as reactionary, saying the company is trying to protect old business models as new devices and services arrive.

    “If people are going to steal something, we sure as hell want them to steal our stuff,” says Michael Simon, the chief executive of LogMeIn, a company whose software is used in smartphones and tablets. “When you have a saturated market like Microsoft and have no growth in these devices, then it might be different.”

    The anti-piracy tactics employed by Microsoft rub many people in the software industry the wrong way as well.

    The Business Software Alliance, which is financed in part by Microsoft and conducts audits and investigations on its behalf, spends about $50 million a year going after counterfeiters and offers rewards to people who report the use of pirated software in their companies. The alliance also finances the oft-cited annual study performed by the research firm IDC that comes up with a dollar amount tied to piracy losses.

    Robert J. Scott, a lawyer at Scott & Scott in Dallas, contends like many others that the alliance’s figure is too high and that the group draws imprecise conclusions about the purchases that people would have made if they weren’t pirating software.

    “I don’t put much stock in those reports,” says Mr. Scott, who advises businesses being audited by the alliance and other software companies.

    The alliance defends its numbers, and Mr. Finn at Microsoft says the group’s figures are accurate. He plays down the central accusation that Microsoft would face less of a piracy threat if it just lowered prices. “We have seen no connection between piracy rates and price,” he says, citing the company’s own pricing experiments. “I think it’s a canard.”

    Meanwhile, Microsoft-sponsored raids and customer audits sometimes have a public relations fallout.

    Two years ago in India, Microsoft hired Anup Kumar, a 10-year veteran of the Central Bureau of Investigation, in part to teach the company how to push software piracy cases through the local bureaucracy. When raids followed, many local software sellers chided the government in the local press, saying it bowed to Microsoft’s will.

    And, last month, Microsoft altered its policies in Russia after a spate of incidents in which local security services seized computers of advocacy groups and opposition newspapers, using the pursuit of stolen software as justification. Microsoft said it would provide a blanket software license for advocacy groups and media outlets, and offer legal aid to such groups caught up in software inquiries.

    The protection of intellectual property has become a high-stakes political game where countries that do Microsoft’s bidding expect some kind of return on their effort, according to Joseph Menn, author of “Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords Who Are Bringing Down the Internet.”

    “It’s part of the geopolitical process,” he said, “and Microsoft has a level of clout that a lot of other folks don’t in Washington and in other countries.”

    Mr. Finn argues that Microsoft’s anti-piracy efforts and training of law enforcement are a benefit to countries that want to build out their tech sectors and show they value intellectual property.

    “Intellectual property is a critical engine of economic growth,” Mr. Finn says. “That’s not just for large companies, but also for small businesses and entire countries. We work with governments that are realizing this is in their best interests.”


    Miguel Helft contributed reporting.
    Whiskey Sour

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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  13. #13
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    hey meester, do you want to fuck my seester for a dollar?
    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

  14. #14
    Member digitaldragon03's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by TheScenestar View Post
    and I bet you had some awesome food both times you went. WIN all over!
    Oh god yes. The food to dollar value over there is ridiculous too.

  15. #15
    old school Cheddar's Cousin's Avatar
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    Youth, you son of a bitch, where did you go?

    Quote Originally Posted by Emma Ocean View Post
    so I assume you've never been cunt punched at a festival? Well lucky you!

  16. #16
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    ...
    Mexican state will try boy accused of beheadings
    By OSWALD ALONSO, Associated Press Oswald Alonso, Associated Press
    3 mins ago

    .CUERNAVACA, Mexico – A 14-year-old boy accused of participating in four beheadings for a Mexican drug cartel will be tried under a state juvenile law that carries a maximum of three years in prison if convicted, a judge said Sunday.
    The juvenile court judge in the state of Morelos made the ruling after a daylong hearing on whether the federal government should handle the case because of the gravity of the allegations against the boy, known as "El Ponchis."
    The judge said that Mexican law allows him to preside over cases involving minors facing federal charges and that the teenager will face charges of murder, organized crime and other allegations in the state of Morelos.
    After the hearing, the boy was escorted from the courthouse by 15 state police officers. Dozens more state and federal police were stationed inside and outside the court building.
    Authorities said they arrested El Ponchis on Thursday at an airport south of Mexico City with a 19-year-old sister. Mexican officials allege the boy was working for the Cartel of the South Pacific, a branch of the splintered Beltran Leyva gang. The sister has said they were headed for Tijuana, where they planned to cross the border and seek refuge with their stepmother in San Diego.
    Many youths have been used by drug cartels, but the story of El Ponchis may be the most shocking. A YouTube video that emerged a month ago sparked talk of a child hit man — said by some to be as young as 12.
    "I participated in four executions, but I did it drugged and under threat that if I didn't, they would kill me," the boy said when he was handed over to the federal prosecutor Friday.
    Authorities identified the curly haired suspect only by his first name, Edgar.
    Morelos Gov. Marco Adame Castillo has said the boy was born in San Diego, California, and Mexican officials were researching whether he has dual nationality. A U.S. Embassy official, who spoke on condition of anonymity due to embassy policy, said earlier that American officials had not confirmed his citizenship.
    As of Sunday his citizenship status was still unclear as was the possibility of the teenager being sent to the United States.
    Despite apparently being born in the United States, he grew up in a poor, urban neighborhood packed with businesses near the city of Cuernavaca, where the people who knew him said everyone called him El Ponchis since he was 4, although no one knew why.
    On Saturday, a car with a speaker on its roof drove around the neighborhood narrating how the boy had been captured. The neighbors, who did not want to be quoted by name because of safety fears, remembered him as a quiet boy and said they think the allegations against him are false.
    The boy's capture, and subsequent presentation to the press, angered a Mexican children's advocacy group that said Sunday the teen's privacy and due process rights were violated. The group, the Children's Rights Network said Mexican officials should not have allowed journalists to question the boy after his arrest.
    It's common practice in Mexico for authorities to parade adult and young suspects in significant cases before the news media.
    The teen's next court date has not been set.
    Whiskey Sour

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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  17. #17
    Triple Whore TheScenestar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by fatbastard View Post
    ...
    Crazy! Interesting read.
    http://www.thescenestar.com

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomThom View Post
    Don't ever include Thrice in a fucking Sigur Ros thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by sonofhal View Post
    Maybe more people would give a shit if he died two weekends in a row.

  18. #18
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Border Patrol agent killed in southern Arizona
    By AMANDA LEE MYERS, Associated Press Amanda Lee Myers, Associated Press Thu Dec 16, 4:17 am ET
    TUCSON, Ariz. – A shootout between border patrol agents and bandits near Arizona's troubled boundary with Mexico has left one American agent dead and a suspect wounded, a union leader says.

    The clash Tuesday night came after agents spotted suspected bandits known for targeting illegal immigrants along a violent smuggling corridor in the Arizona desert, National Border Patrol Council President T.J. Bonner said.

    Brian A. Terry, 40, was waiting with three other agents in a remote area north of the border city of Nogales late Tuesday when the gun battle erupted, Bonner said. Terry died in the shooting, but no other agents were injured.

    Border Patrol spokesman Eric Cantu and FBI spokeswoman Brenda Lee Nath declined to confirm Bonner's account but said that authorities have four suspects in custody and are searching for a fifth. The Border Patrol declined to reveal the country of origin of the suspects.

    The shooting followed months of heated political rhetoric on the immigration issue in Arizona as lawmakers passed a sweeping crackdown on illegal immigrants. Politicians pushing for immigration reform cite violence episodes like the Border Patrol shooting as proof that the state and federal governments need to better secure the border.

    "It is a stark reminder of the very real dangers our men and women on the front lines confront everyday as they protect our communities and the American people," said Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano. She plans to be in Arizona on Thursday and Friday to meet with Border Patrol agents in Nogales and Tucson.

    The shooting occurred in the Border Patrol's Tucson sector, the busiest gateway for illegal immigrants into the United States. Half of the marijuana seizures along the 1,969-mile southern border are made in the sector, which covers 262 miles of the boundary.

    Terry was part of an elite squad similar to a police SWAT team that was sent to a remote area north of Nogales known for border banditry, drug smuggling and violence, said Border Patrol Agent Brandon Judd, president of the local agents' union.

    Terry and the other agents came across a group of five people. There was no sign that they were hauling drugs, but two were carrying rifles, said Judd, who didn't know what prompted the firefight.

    Bonner, whose group represents 17,000 agents, said the fatal shooting shows that the border is still dangerous.

    "This is a sign that the politicians and bureaucrats are overly optimistic in their assessment that the borders are more secure now than at any point in our history. It showed just the opposite," Bonner said.

    Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, who has railed against border violence and signed Arizona's new illegal-immigration law earlier this year, struck a similar tone.

    "Although we needed no reminder of the ever-increasing dangers along our southern border, this tragedy serves as stark notice that the threats facing all who serve in protecting our state and nation are real and are increasing on a daily basis," Brewer said.

    Terry, a native of the Detroit area, served in the Marines and as a police officer in the Michigan cities of Ecorse and Lincoln Park before joining the Border Patrol in 2007. He wasn't married and didn't have any children. He is survived by his mother, father, a brother and two sisters.

    Terry's older sister, Michelle Terry-Balogh, told The Associated Press from Flat Rock, Mich., that her brother loved his job. "It was his life," she said. "He said it was very dangerous, but he loved what he did and wanted to make a difference."
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Calle Revolucion= good time with high risks of fights, arrests and STD's for a decent low price

    god, i miss TJ
    I would never want to belong to any club that would have someone like me for a member...

  20. #20
    Triple Whore TheScenestar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    When are you quoting something about Caifanes Fat Bastard?
    http://www.thescenestar.com

    Quote Originally Posted by ThomThom View Post
    Don't ever include Thrice in a fucking Sigur Ros thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by sonofhal View Post
    Maybe more people would give a shit if he died two weekends in a row.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    bitter bitter ass hat
    I would never want to belong to any club that would have someone like me for a member...

  22. #22
    Member le cab's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Quote Originally Posted by suprefan View Post
    I like tacos.
    burritos: the mexican lasagna
    2007:2009:2010:2011:2012[1]

    Quote Originally Posted by Undies View Post
    I considered asking my doctor for advice, but when I asked him if he had ever been to Coachella, and his answer was "What's a Coachella?"; Everything else he said was meaningless to me after that point.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    penny tacos
    I would never want to belong to any club that would have someone like me for a member...

  24. #24
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Severed head hung from bridge in Tijuana, Mexico
    Tue Jan 4, 12:52 am ET
    TIJUANA, Mexico – The severed head of a young man was found hanging from a bridge in the Mexican border city of Tijuana on Monday.

    The Baja California state attorney general's office said the head belonged to a man between 25 and 30 years old.

    It had several bullet wounds and was hung using a metallic ring and a nylon rope. A threatening message was found nearby on the bridge.

    Hours earlier, a woman between 30 and 35 years old was found shot to death in another Tijuana neighborhood, also with a threatening message left nearby.

    Authorities have blamed recent cartel-style violence in Tijuana on feuding between rivals and loyalists of Teodoro "El Teo" Garcia Simental, an alleged drug lord arrested last January.

    Farther east along Mexico's border with the United States, Mexican soldiers on Monday found an unfinished tunnel under a house in the city of Nogales, across from Nogales, Arizona.

    The army's 45th Military Zone command said the tunnel was dug about 5 feet (1.5 meters) beneath the surface and stretched almost 100 feet (30 meters), apparently just far enough to reach U.S. territory.

    The command said in a statement the tunnel ended abruptly and had probably been intended to move drugs across the border.

    The mouth of the tunnel was found in one of the rooms of the house in Mexico, which appeared abandoned. There were no arrests nor were any drugs found at the scene.

    Nogales is located in northern Sonora state, and on Monday unidentified gunmen shot to death the state's interim prison director, Erasto Ortiz Valencia, outside his home.

    State prosecutors' spokesman Jose Larrinaga said Ortiz Valencia died of three bullet wounds. He had been in office only 10 days when he died; his predecessor was fired after he was linked to the escape of a murder suspect.

    The assistant police chief of the city of Empalme, near the coastal city of Guaymas, was also shot to death Monday by a gunmen who fired an assault rifle from an SUV.

    In the Pacific coast state of Guerrero, police reported Monday that two boys ages 14 and 17 were shot to death in the remote mountain town of Alcozahuca, near the Oaxaca state line.

    The assailants fled after killing the boys with assault rifles late Sunday. While there was no immediate evidence the killings were drug-related, Mexican cartels have been recruiting youths as young as 14.

    Also in Guerrero, police in the resort of Acapulco reported Monday they had found the bound bodies of four young men dumped on a main boulevard.

    The men had been killed with guns and knives and were found blindfolded and their hands or feet tied. Handwritten messages of the kind frequently left by drug cartels were found near the bodies, but Guerrero state police, in keeping with policy, did not release the contents of those messages.
    . . .
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
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    1 cherry
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  25. #25
    Daft Punky Junkie BROKENDOLL's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    The lady I've been caring for the past few months needed me because her housekeeper of 15 years just up and disappeared without notice. I'd met the girl several times and became concerned because she didn't come off as someone that irresponsible. After about 6 months, she returned recently and said the reason she had to leave was because her family down in Mexico had a brother who was missing for 3 months, and that her mother was getting ransom notices. The first thing I asked her was about her brother's involvement with drugs and her answer was yes, but he was just a small time dealer... I think of small time dealers as the ones most likely to get busted and most likely to spill more info to save their own asses. Which, when you think about it, is probably a worse idea that just going to jail, as far as Mexico is concerned.

    I did happen to ask if she knew about the young female college student who volunteered to be sheriff, and she said she had recently been killed as well...If it's true, that's a bummer. Anyone know any facts on this?
    Its like the Infinite Monkey Theorem, if you put X amount of monkeys in a room with a typewriter and ask them to give you Shakespeare 99% of them will fling their shit at you while the other 1% will masturbate in the corner.

  26. #26
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"


    27 deaths, including 14 decapitated, rock Acapulco

    By SERGIO FLORES, Associated Press Sergio Flores, Associated Press
    Sun Jan 9, 7:05 am ET

    .ACAPULCO, Mexico – The image of this beach mecca has taken a new hit from Mexico's drug violence, with 27 people killed in less than a day, including 14 men whose bodies were found with their heads chopped off at a shopping center.

    Acapulco has seen fierce turf wars between drug gangs, and the bloodshed is scaring some vacationers away even though little of the violence happens in tourist areas.

    The decapitation slayings and most of the other killings that occurred in a stretch of just a few hours from Friday night into Saturday also occurred in non-tourism areas. But two police officers were shot to death on a major bayside avenue in front of visitors and locals.

    The 14 headless bodies, and a 15th intact corpse, were found by police on a street outside a shopping center accompanied by written warnings from a drug cartel, authorities said.

    Handwritten signs left with the bodies were signed by "El Chapo's People," a reference to the Sinaloa cartel, which is headed by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, said Fernando Monreal Leyva, director of investigative police for Guerrero state, where Acapulco is located.

    The narco-messages indicated the Sinaloa cartel killed the 15 men for trying to intrude on the gang's turf and extort residents.

    Mexico's drug cartels have increasingly taken to beheading their victims in a grisly show of force, but Saturday's discovery was the largest single group of decapitation victims found in recent years.

    In 2008, a group of 12 decapitated bodies were piled outside the Yucatan state capital of Merida. The same year, nine headless men were discovered in the Guerrero state capital of Chilpancingo.

    Also killed Saturday in Acapulco were the two police officers; six people who were shot dead and stuffed in a taxi, their hands and feet bound; and four others elsewhere in the city. Two police officers were wounded when armed men attacked a police post in the city's Emiliano Zapata district.

    "We are coordinating with federal forces and local police to reinforce security in Acapulco and investigating to try to establish the motive and perpetrators of these incidents," Monreal said.

    The wave of violence in one of Mexico's biggest resorts was condemned by the federal government.

    "Reprehensible acts of violence such as these underscore the need to fight with determination against organized crime," a statement from the Interior Ministry said.

    At least 30,196 people have died in drug-related violence since President Felipe Calderon launched an offensive against cartels in late 2006.

    Also Saturday, authorities said a small-town mayor was found dead in northern Mexico.

    Saul Vara Rivera, mayor of the municipality of Zaragoza, was reported missing by family members Wednesday, Coahuila state prosecutors said in a statement. His bullet-ridden body was discovered Friday in neighboring Nuevo Leon state.

    There were no immediate arrests.

    At least a dozen mayors were killed nationwide last year in acts of intimidation attributed to drug gangs.
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

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    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  27. #27
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    Smugglers with "medieval catapult" nabbed at border
    Thu Jan 27, 11:56 am ET
    PHOENIX (Reuters) – In a brazen attempt reminiscent of a medieval siege, Mexican smugglers tried to use a hefty catapult to hurl drugs north over the U.S. Border, authorities said..

    The Mexican military seized 45 pounds of marijuana, a sports utility vehicle and a metal-framed catapult just south of the Arizona border near the small town of Naco last Friday, following a tip-off from the U.S. Border Patrol.

    Surveillance video taken by National Guard troops deployed to support the Border Patrol caught a group of men apparently attempting to pull down a metal beam and load or test the catapult, which was powered by powerful elastic and mounted on a trailer close to the metal border fence.

    "It looks like a medieval catapult that was used back in the day," Tucson sector Border Patrol spokesman David Jimarez told Reuters.

    Arizona straddles a furiously trafficked corridor for human and drug smugglers from Mexico.

    The U.S. Border Patrol seize hundreds of tons of marijuana and other drugs each year, smuggled over or under the line using a variety of means, including trucks, clandestine tunnels, horseback and even micro-light aircraft -- although the catapult was new, Jimarez said.

    "I have not seen anything like that in my time before as a Border Patrol agent ... although we are trained to handle any kind of a threat that comes over that border," he added.

    (Reporting by Tim Gaynor, editing by Peter Bohan)
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  28. #28
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    17 killed in Mexico drug violence
    Sun Feb 6, 11:02 pm ET
    CIUDAD JUAREZ, Mexico (AFP) – At least 17 people were killed in drug-related violence in northern Mexico this weekend, nine of them in restive Ciudad Juarez, the state attorney general's office said.

    In Mexico's crime capital Ciudad Juarez, which is just across the border from El Paso in the southern US state of Texas, gunmen opened fire on Saturday and killed three young students at a used car dealership.

    A teenager, a woman and a 40-year-old man died in a second attack by unidentified gunmen elsewhere in Juarez, a statement from the Chihuahua state attorney general's office said.

    A third triple homicide at a garage left a 13-year-old boy among the dead. Another three people were killed in separate shooting incidents in Ciudad Juarez, which has a population of 1.3 million and saw 2,900 murders last year.

    Five men were also killed overnight in other parts of Chihuahua state, the official statement said.

    Meanwhile, in the northern state of Nuevo Leon, the mutilated bodies of five men were found Sunday dumped on the side of a road. They were found in the town of Los Ramones.

    The day before, authorities recovered the dismembered body of Francisco Martinez Ramirez, the chief of guards at a Monterrey prison who was dragged out of his house by armed men Friday. His body was found in a car in Monterrey, Mexico's third largest city.

    Northern Mexico has suffered in the bloody war between feuding drug cartels that has left over 34,200 people dead since December 2006, when President Felipe Calderon launched a nationwide crackdown that has failed to stem the tide of violence.

    Separately, Mexican soldiers have shot dead 13 suspected gang members in the northeastern state of Tamaulipas, including six gunmen who were killed in a town near the US border, military officials said.

    Three other suspected gang members were arrested during patrols over the past week.

    Tamaulipas has seen an escalation of violence recently between the rival Gulf and Zetas cartels as they vie for control of the lucrative trafficking routes to the United States.
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    i thought this thread was going to be about Caifanes
    Quote Originally Posted by elChurro View Post
    Perry lives beneath the polo grounds. A ritual must be performed for his awakening but only after a band/dj/performance art cancellation.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mammoth85 View Post
    Perhaps an appropriate conversation starter would have been: "pardon me sir, would you mind taking your finger out of your girlfriends asshole? We're trying to enjoy LCD Soundsystem."

  30. #30
    Member davrone's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mexico: "El Thread"

    I'm a bad Mexican. I haven't been in forever...
    2008, 2009, 2011, 2012-2, 2013-1...

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