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Thread: All that Jazz

  1. #151
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Marian McPartland, Jazz Pianist and NPR Radio Staple, Dies at 95

    By PETER KEEPNEWS


    Marian McPartland, the genteel Englishwoman who became a fixture of the American jazz scene as a pianist and, later in life, hosted the internationally syndicated and immensely popular public radio show “Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz,” died on Tuesday at her home in Port Washington, N.Y. She was 95.

    Her death was announced by NPR.

    Ms. McPartland was a gifted musician but an unlikely candidate for jazz stardom. She recalled in a 1998 interview for National Public Radio that shortly after she arrived in the United States in 1946, the influential jazz critic Leonard Feather, who himself was born in England and who began his career as a pianist, said, “Oh, she’ll never make it: she’s English, white and a woman.”

    Mr. Feather, she added, “always used to tell me it was a joke, but I don’t think he meant it as a joke.”

    The odds against any woman finding success as a jazz musician in the late 1940s and early ’50s were formidable, but Ms. McPartland overcame them with grace. Listeners were charmed by her Old World stage presence and captivated by her elegant, harmonically lush improvisations, which reflected both her classical training and her fascination with modern jazz.

    By 1958 she was well enough known to be included in Art Kane’s famous Esquire magazine group photograph of jazz musicians, the subject of Jean Bach’s 1994 documentary, “A Great Day in Harlem.” One of the few women in the picture, she stood next to her friend and fellow pianist Mary Lou Williams.

    Ms. McPartland’s contributions to jazz were not limited to her piano playing. An enthusiastic and articulate spokeswoman for the music, she lectured at schools and colleges and wrote for Down Beat, Melody Maker and other publications. (A collection of her essays, “All in Good Time,” was published in 1987 and reissued in 2003.) Most notably, for more than 30 years her “Piano Jazz” was one of the most popular jazz shows ever on the radio.

    The show, produced by South Carolina’s public radio network, made its debut on NPR in 1978. The format was simple: an informal interview interspersed with extemporaneous duets.

    “I didn’t have any idea I’d be good at something like this,” Ms. McPartland told The Associated Press in 2000. “I certainly never thought people would know me because of my voice.” But she proved a natural.

    As its title suggests, “Marian McPartland’s Piano Jazz” was originally a show about piano players. But the guest list came to include vocalists, among them Mel Tormé, Tony Bennett and even Willie Nelson and Elvis Costello, as well as trumpeters, saxophonists and other instrumentalists.

    Jazz pianists remained the focus, however, and over the years Ms. McPartland played host to some of the most famous, from the ragtime pioneer Eubie Blake to the uncompromising avant-gardist Cecil Taylor. She gamely played duets with all of them, even Mr. Taylor, whose aggressively dissonant approach was far removed from Ms. McPartland’s refined melodicism.

    “I just did the kind of thing he does,” she said. “Or else I went in the opposite direction, and that sounded fairly interesting too.”

    “Piano Jazz” was heard on more than 200 radio stations all over the world. It received a Peabody Award in 1983.

    Ms. McPartland recorded her last show in September 2010, although she did not officially step down as host until November 2011; “Piano Jazz” has continued with reruns and guest hosts.

    Marian McPartland was born Margaret Marian Turner in Windsor, England, on March 20, 1918. She began picking out melodies on the family piano when she was 3, and at 17 she entered the Guildhall School of Music in London.

    In 1938, over her parents’ strong objections, she left school to go on tour with a four-piano vaudeville act. “My mother said, ‘Oh, you’ll come to no good, you’ll marry a musician and live in an attic,’ ” she recalled in 1998. “Of course, that did happen.”

    While on a U.S.O. tour in 1944 she met the American jazz cornetist Jimmy McPartland in Belgium; they married in early 1946, and she moved with him to Chicago later that year.

    Ms. McPartland worked for a while in her husband’s group, but he was a tradition-loving Dixieland musician and she was more interested in the harmonically sophisticated new sounds coming from New York City, where the McPartlands moved in 1949.

    Encouraged by her husband, she formed a trio and found work at the Embers, an East Side nightclub, in 1950. Two years later she began what was supposed to be a brief engagement at the Hickory House, one of the last surviving jazz rooms on the city’s once-thriving 52nd Street nightclub row. That booking turned into an eight-year residency.

    The McPartlands’ marriage ended after two decades, but they remained close friends and continued to work together occasionally. The divorce, she was fond of saying, did not take. She helped care for him when he had lung cancer, and they remarried shortly before he died in 1991.

    Her survivors include two grandchildren.

    Ms. McPartland recorded for Savoy, Capitol and other labels in the 1950s and ’60s, but in 1969, disenchanted with the business, she formed her own record company, Halcyon. “It was quite a job,” she told one interviewer. “I used to actually go to a record store like Sam Goody and tell them, ‘I need that money you owe me.’ ”

    Halcyon released 18 albums in 10 years and had a roster that included her fellow pianists Teddy Wilson and Earl Hines as well as Ms. McPartland herself, but her career as an executive ended when she signed with Concord Jazz in 1979. She remained a Concord artist until she stopped recording, just a few years before her death.

    The bare-bones accompaniment of bass and drums was always Ms. McPartland’s preferred format, but she also appeared in concert with symphony orchestras, and in 1996 she recorded an album of her own compositions, “Silent Pool,” on which she was accompanied by a string orchestra.

    That album provided a rare showcase for an underappreciated aspect of her talent: although she told The New York Times in 1998 that she “never had all that much faith in myself as a composer,” she was a prolific songwriter whose work was recorded by Peggy Lee, Mr. Bennett, Sarah Vaughan and others. She performed her symphonic work “A Portrait of Rachel Carson” with the University of South Carolina Symphony Orchestra in 2007.

    In her last years Ms. McPartland received numerous honors. She was named a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master in 2000, given a lifetime achievement Grammy Award in 2004, inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame in 2007 and named a member of the Order of the British Empire in 2010.

    And she continued playing almost to the end. Reviewing her appearance at Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola in Manhattan the night before her 90th birthday in 2008, Nate Chinen wrote in The Times, “Ms. McPartland still has her pellucid touch and her careful yet comfortable style.”

    Unlike some jazz musicians of her generation, Ms. McPartland never became set in her ways; her playing grew denser and more complex with time, and even late in life she was experimenting with new harmonic ideas. “I’ve become a bit more — reckless, maybe,” she said in 1998. “I’m getting to the point where I can smash down a chord and not know what it’s going to be, and make it work.”
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  2. #152
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Cedar Walton, Pianist and Composer, Dies at 79

    By WILLIAM YARDLEY


    Cedar Walton, a pianist who distinguished himself as both an accompanist and a soloist, and who wrote some of the most enduring compositions in modern jazz while a member of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers in the early 1960s, died on Monday at his home in Brooklyn. He was 79.

    His death followed a brief illness, his manager, Jean-Pierre Leduc, said.

    Mr. Walton sat in with Charlie Parker, spent a year accompanying the singer Abbey Lincoln, and recorded with both John Coltrane and, much later, the saxophonist Joshua Redman. He led a series of successful small groups, including a trio and a quartet that both featured his longtime collaborator, the drummer Billy Higgins. Yet he probably remained best known for his early work with one of the most influential incarnations of the Jazz Messengers, the group that the drummer Art Blakey ran as a kind of postgraduate performance academy for rising jazz stars.

    Mr. Walton joined the Jazz Messengers in 1961, on the same day as the trumpeter Freddie Hubbard. (Among the other members of the group at the time, was the tenor saxophonist Wayne Shorter.) It was here that Mr. Walton established himself as a composer; over the years he would write a number of pieces that became jazz standards, including “Mosaic,” “Bolivia,” “Mode for Joe” and “Ugetsu,” also known as “Fantasy in D.”

    Mr. Walton said his time with the Jazz Messengers helped him greatly as an accompanist, a role he often said he preferred to that of leader. Asked in a 2010 interview — conducted in conjunction with his being named a Jazz Master by the National Endowment for the Arts — what was most important about providing accompaniment in an ensemble that thrives on improvisation, he said, “Total listening.”

    Cedar Anthony Walton Jr. was born on Jan. 17, 1934, in Dallas. His mother, Ruth, played and sang popular songs at home. He was not initially interested in reading music, but he showed an early inclination to compose.

    “Are you making up songs again?” his mother would call out.

    He studied music composition at the University of Denver but later switched to music education. Instead of graduating he left in 1955 for New York, where he soon joined the local jazz scene.

    Mr. Walton’s survivors include his wife, Martha Sammaciccia; three children from an earlier marriage, Carl, Rodney and Cedra; and a daughter from another relationship, Naisha.

    In April 1959, after serving in the Army, Mr. Walton was sought out by John Coltrane to play on a rehearsal recording for what would become one of his landmark albums “Giant Steps.” Mr. Walton played on the technically daunting title song but declined to take a solo. He soon realized that had been a mistake.

    “The song was too hard for me,” he said in a 2011 interview with JazzWax, Marc Myers’s Web site. “But you just didn’t do that. I was young.”

    When the album was recorded, Mr. Walton was out of town and Tommy Flanagan played piano. Years later, the sessions with Mr. Walton were released as alternate tracks. By then, he had long since established himself as a forceful and elegant soloist. His years with Mr. Blakey helped.

    “He had sort of a bombastic style, but he would leave little openings for you,” Mr. Walton said in the 2010 interview. “So you developed your radar when to get in. If you didn’t get in then, you wouldn’t be heard.”
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  3. #153
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Everything still boring and unlistenable in here? Good to know.
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  4. #154
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Chico Hamilton, Drummer, Bandleader and Exponent of Cool Jazz, Dies at 92

    By PETER KEEPNEWS


    Chico Hamilton, a drummer and bandleader who helped put California on the modern-jazz map in the 1950s and remained active into the 21st century, died on Monday in Manhattan. He was 92.

    His death was announced by April Thibeault, his publicist.

    Never among the flashiest or most muscular of jazz drummers, Mr. Hamilton had a subtle and melodic approach that made him ideally suited for the understated style that came to be known as cool jazz, of which his hometown, Los Angeles, was the epicenter.

    He was a charter member of the baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan’s quartet, which helped lay the groundwork for the cool movement. His own quintet, which he formed shortly after leaving the Mulligan group, came to be regarded as the quintessence of cool. With its quiet intensity, its intricate arrangements and its uniquely pastel instrumentation of flute, guitar, cello, bass and drums — the flutist, Buddy Collette, also played alto saxophone — the Chico Hamilton Quintet became one of the most popular groups in jazz. (The cellist in that group, Fred Katz, died in September.)

    The group was a mainstay of the nightclub and jazz festival circuit and even appeared in movies. It was prominently featured in the 1957 film “Sweet Smell of Success,” with Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis. (One character in that movie, a guitarist played by Martin Milner, was a member of the Hamilton group on screen, miming to the playing of the quintet’s real guitarist, John Pisano.) And it was seen in “Jazz on a Summer’s Day,” Bert Stern’s acclaimed documentary about the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival.

    Cool jazz had fallen out of favor by the mid-1960s, but by then Mr. Hamilton had already altered the sound and style of his quintet, replacing the cellist with a trombonist and adopting a bluesier, more aggressive approach.

    In 1966, after more personnel changes and more shifts in audience tastes, Mr. Hamilton, no longer on top of the jazz world but increasingly interested in composing — he wrote the music for Roman Polanski’s 1965 film, “Repulsion” — disbanded the quintet and formed a company that provided music for television shows and commercials.

    But he continued to perform and record occasionally, and by the mid-1970s he was back on the road as a bandleader full time. He was never again as big a star as he had been in the 1950s, but he remained active, and his music became increasingly difficult to categorize, incorporating elements of free jazz, jazz-rock fusion and other styles.

    He was born Foreststorn Hamilton in Los Angeles on Sept. 21, 1921. His father, Jesse, worked at the University Club of Southern California, and his mother, Pearl Lee Gonzales Cooley Hamilton, was a school dietitian.

    Asked by Marc Myers of the website JazzWax how he got the name Chico, he said he wasn’t sure but thought he acquired it as a teenager because “I was always a small dude.”

    While still in high school he immersed himself in the local jazz scene, and by 1940 he was touring with Lionel Hampton’s big band. After serving in the Army during World War II, he worked briefly with the bands of Jimmy Mundy, Charlie Barnet and Count Basie before becoming the house drummer at the Los Angeles nightclub Billy Berg’s in 1946.

    From 1948 to 1955 he toured Europe in the summers as a member of Lena Horne’s backup band, while playing the rest of the year in Los Angeles. His softly propulsive playing was an essential element in the popularity of Mulligan’s 1952 quartet, which also included Chet Baker on trumpet but, unusually, did not have a pianist. The group helped set the template for what came to be known as West Coast jazz, smoother and more cerebral than its East Coast counterpart.

    The high profile he achieved with Mulligan emboldened him to try his luck as a bandleader, something fairly unusual for a drummer in the 1950s. His success was almost instantaneous.

    He went on to record prolifically for a variety of labels, including Pacific Jazz, Impulse, Columbia and Soul Note. Among the honors he received were a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Masters Award in 2004 and a Kennedy Center Living Jazz Legend Award in 2007.

    Although slowed by age, Mr. Hamilton continued to perform and record beyond his 90th birthday. He released an album, “Revelation,” in 2011 on the Joyous Shout label, and had recently completed another one, “Inquiring Minds,” scheduled for release in 2014. Until late last year he was appearing at the Manhattan nightclub Drom with Euphoria, the group he had led since 1989.

    Mr. Hamilton is survived by a brother, Don; a daughter, Denise Hamilton; a granddaughter; and two great-granddaughters. His brother the actor Bernie Hamilton, and his wife, Helen Hamilton, both died in 2008.

    Mr. Hamilton was highly regarded not just for his drumming, but also as a talent scout. Musicians who passed through his group before achieving stardom on their own include the bassist Ron Carter, the saxophonists Eric Dolphy and Charles Lloyd and the guitarists Jim Hall, Gabor Szabo and Larry Coryell. In a 1992 interview with National Public Radio, the saxophonist Eric Person, a longtime sideman, praised Mr. Hamilton for teaching “how to work on the bandstand, how you dress onstage, how you carry yourself in public.”

    Mr. Hamilton taught those lessons as a bandleader and, for more than two decades, as a faculty member at the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music in New York. Teaching young musicians, he told The Providence Journal in Rhode Island in 2006, was “not difficult if they realize how fortunate they are.”

    “But,” he added, “if they’re on an ego trip, that’s their problem.”
    ...
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  5. #155
    Loveable Curmudgeon TallGuyCM's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Seeking something new to listen to, I just Googled "underrated jazz record" and this was #1 on a list that was the first result. And it's completely fantastic.

    8/31 - Sleep - Troubadour (?)
    9/05 - The Rentals - Fonda (?)
    9/11 - Swans - Roxy
    9/13 - Owen Pallett - El Rey (?)
    9/17 - Buzzcocks - Fonda (?)


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  6. #156
    Coachella Junkie SoulDischarge's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Jazz catalogs are complicated. I could use some recommendations on a couple of albums from each of these artists. I'd like say a single disc intro, something fairly easy to digest in one sitting to get familiar with the artists, and then maybe a few other essentials or necessary box type sets for each of these. Basically, what any standard music collection really ought to have without going full on collector mode. I have a few releases by some of these artists, but they're either too lengthy to act as a casual introduction or seem like an odd jumping in point. Thanks in advance!

    Duke Ellington
    Ella Fitzgerald
    Louis Armstrong
    Count Basie
    Jelly Roll Morton
    Django Reinhardt
    Billie Holiday
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  7. #157
    Member icedKeg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post
    Duke Ellington
    Ella Fitzgerald
    Louis Armstrong
    Count Basie
    Jelly Roll Morton
    Django Reinhardt
    Billie Holiday
    I have almost all of these artists in my collection, but they're all Greatest Hits and Best Ofs, which I don't think you're looking for. They are, however, essential Best Ofs and Greatest Hits in my opinion because they act as an easy starting point and contain some of the must-have songs. (Because obviously there are several Greatest Hits and Best Of albums for each of these artists) Let me know if you want those.

    I would like to recommend the Ray Charles & Count Basie album Ray Sings, Basie Swings. (2006)
    From wiki:
    Ray Sings, Basie Swings is a posthumously created album that mixes previously unreleased Ray Charles vocal performances, recorded at live concerts in the mid-1970s, together with newly recorded instrumental tracks by the contemporary Count Basie Orchestra.
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  8. #158
    Coachella Junkie SoulDischarge's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Compilations are fine, I know albums weren't really a big thing during the peak of a lot of those artists, it's just a matter of it being the right best of. So sure, recommend away.
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  9. #159
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Louis Armstrong - His Hot Fives and Sevens. You can find various compilations, from ones that have every song from this era, to single-disc best-ofs, but this is where to start with Armstrong. Bands made of either five or seven players ripping through some of the best music ever recorded with tons of energy and swagger. He might have sold more with the Orchestra and then later his vocal pop records, but those recordings are some of the best things.

    Ella Fitzgerald - Sings the _________ Song Book. She did a number of these and they are all excellent, but I'd say go with the Cole Porter one as your intro.

    Another recommendation for a great compilation that I own and listen to a ton: The Complete Benny Goodman, Vol. 5: 1937-1938. These tracks scorch.
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  10. #160
    Member icedKeg's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Duke Ellington & John Coltrane (1963)


    Billie Holiday's Greatest Hits (1967)


    The Best of Django Reinhardt [1936-1948 period]


    20 Best of Louis Armstrong


    More Greatest Hits (RCA)



    In my research over the years of gathering some of the essential (beginner) compilation albums for these artists, I feel that the above are some of the best to start with.

    I'd also throw these out there cause if you like the other stuff you'll like this:
    Ultimate Dizzy Gillespie


    Glenn Miller
    Golden Greats: The Encore Collection



    That's all I got for now. I'm very much a novice when it comes to jazz but I am definitely interested and love to listen to it. I thank Woody Allen movies for introducing me to most of this stuff.

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  11. #161
    Coachella Junkie SoulDischarge's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Many thanks, guys! That's very helpful. I do have a Louis Armstrong release of Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings, but it's almost 100 songs long. Is there a single disc you'd recommend, Bryan?
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  12. #162
    old school RageAgainstTheAoki's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Speaking of Duke Ellington, if you are a fan of the Duke's innovative big band sound and you find yourself in NY, I heartily recommend getting tickets for After Midnight on Broadway. The show is a loose recreation of a typical night at The Cotton Club with a special emphasis on Duke Ellington's orchestrations. It's not some Disney-fied/Wicked'esque lame Broadway version of jazz. It is the real deal. There is no plot. The show is simply a revue of 25+ numbers that Duke Ellington and his orchestra made famous at the Cotton Club during the Harlem renaissance. For those who don't know, the Cotton Club was this legendary venue at which all the greats played -- Duke, Cab Calloway, Fats Waller, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan, Ethel Waters, Lena Horne.

    In the tradition of the Cotton Club's regular celebrity guest night, this show also has a rotating "special guest star". The guest star I saw was Fantasia and I believe she's still playing. Yes, that Fantasia--the American Idol gal. I was skeptical, too, but was shocked at how perfect the woman is for the material. She absolutely owns four classic songs from the era including Harold Arlen's "Stormy Weather", a song I thought I'd heard far too many times. But, somehow, Fantasia makes this classic torch song feel new and urgently raw, while staying authentic to the period. It's a perfect melding of artist and material.

    With her on stage are 20+ African American singers, ballet, jazz and tap dancers--insanely gifted, every last one of them. The show's also beautifully lit and features a simple, but elegantly designed set and really beautiful costumes by fashion designer Isabel Toledo. But the real star of the show is the 16 piece big band on stage. It's not some regular pit band for a musical. Wynton Marsalis, probably the best living jazz trumpeter and the music director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, picked each musician himself. These musicians are beyond talented--they're true virtuosos--and play this music with palpable joy and abandon. At one moment in the show, all the dancers/singers go off stage and the band's platform glides all the way downs to the very lip of the stage--just inches from the audience--and then they let loose with a blazing rendition of a Duke Ellington instrumental number. It is absolutely thrilling. I honestly don't think it's possible that there is a better big band playing anywhere else in the country at this time. I probably sound like some shill for the show, but I just connected with this stuff on a cellular level. If you're a fan of Duke and the music of the jazz/Harlem Renaissance era, this is pretty much a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The 2 min clip below gives you a nice feel for the show. Discounts were readily available when I was in NY last month.

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  13. #163
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post
    Many thanks, guys! That's very helpful. I do have a Louis Armstrong release of Hot Five and Hot Seven recordings, but it's almost 100 songs long. Is there a single disc you'd recommend, Bryan?
    I have a huge compilation on vinyl with most of that stuff. Here's the tracklisting of my favorite, most-listened to disc from it:

    Wild Man Blues
    A2 Potato Head Blues
    A3 Keyhole Blues
    A4 Ory's Creole Trombone
    A5 Gully Low Blues
    A6 Muskrat Ramble
    A7 Basin Street Blues
    A8 Cornet Shop Suey
    B1 West End Blues
    B2 Struttin' With Some Barbecue
    B3 S.O.L. Blues
    B4 Twelfth Street Rag
    B5 Melancholy Blues
    B6 Savoy Blues
    B7 Willie The Weeper
    B8 Skid-Dat-De-Dat
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  14. #164
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    I found The Modern Jazz Quartet's Third Stream Music in a dollar bin recently and picked it up because I used to love one of their records when I was first listening to jazz. The first half is a cool collection of more moving and contemporary tracks, but on the B-Side they really get out with a string septet. The two blend very well, creating an improvised collaboration between a string group and a jazz group. I'd never heard it before, but the album is excellent and if you can find a way to hear it you should.
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  15. #165
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Blue Note

    Two years ago, we decided to begin remastering the jewels of the Blue Note catalog in hi-def resolutions of 96k and 192k. In order to develop a guiding artistic philosophy for this delicate endeavor, we donned our lab coats, ran dozens of sonic experiments and carefully referenced every generation of our reissues. Ultimately, we decided that our goal would be to protect the original intentions of the artists, producers and engineers who made these records and that, in the case of pre-digital-era albums, these intentions were best represented by the sound and feel of their first-edition vinyl releases. Working with a team of dedicated and groovy engineers, we found a sound that both captured the feel of the original records while maintaining the depth and transparency of the master tapes... the new remasters are really cool!

    While these new versions will become available in Digital Hi Def, CD and the Mastered for iTunes formats, the allure of vinyl records is WAY too potent to ignore. This year, Blue Note - along with our friends at Universal Music Enterprises - is launching a major 75th Anniversary Vinyl Initiative that is dedicated to the proposition that our catalog should be readily available at a low cost - featuring high quality pressings and authentic reproductions of Blue Note's iconic packaging. Beginning in March 2014, we'll start rolling out five remastered vinyl reissues every month. Although this program begins in celebration of Blue Note's 75th Anniversary, our catalog runs so deep that we will faithfully be reissuing five albums a month for many years to come!

    —Don Was, President, Blue Note Records


    Blue Note Records 75th Anniversary Vinyl Initiative

    Available March 25, 2014
    Art Blakey Free For All
    Wayne Shorter Speak No Evil
    John Coltrane Blue Train
    Eric Dolphy Out To Lunch
    Larry Young Unity

    Available April 22, 2014
    Ornette Coleman At The "Golden Circle" Stockholm, Vol. 1
    Herbie Hancock Maiden Voyage
    Sonny Rollins A Night At The Village Vanguard
    Cannonball Adderley Somethin' Else
    Dexter Gordon Our Man In Paris

    Available May 27, 2014
    Horace Silver Song For My Father
    McCoy Tyner The Real McCoy
    Grant Green Idle Moments
    Hank Mobley Soul Station
    Madlib Shades Of Blue

    Available June 24, 2014
    Dexter Gordon Go
    Lee Morgan Cornbread
    Bobby Hutcherson Total Eclipse
    Jimmy Smith Back At The Chicken Shack
    Medeski Martin & Wood Combustication

    Available July 29, 2014
    Kenny Burrell Midnight Blue
    Donald Byrd Black Byrd
    Joe Henderson Mode For Joe
    Cassandra Wilson Traveling Miles
    Kenny Dorham Afro-Cuban

    Available August 26, 2014
    Lou Donaldson Lush Life
    Bud Powell The Amazing Bud Powell, Vol. 1
    Wayne Shorter Juju
    Herbie Hancock Speak Like A Child
    Terence Blanchard Flow

    Available September 30, 2014
    Kenny Drew Undercurrent
    Sonny Clark Cool Struttin'
    Stanley Turrentine That's Where It's At
    Freddie Hubbard Ready For Freddie
    Brian Blade Fellowship Perceptual

    Available October 28, 2014
    Horace Silver Horace Silver and The Jazz Messengers
    The Three Sounds Out Of This World
    Dianne Reeves I Remember
    Hank Mobley No Room For Squares
    Thelonious Monk Genius Of Modern Music, Vol. 1

    Available November 25, 2014
    Curtis Fuller The Opener
    Joe Lovano Quartets: Live At The Village Vanguard
    Lee Morgan The Sidewinder
    Ornette Coleman New York Is Now
    Clifford Brown Memorial Album

    Available December 30, 2014
    Andrew Hill Black Fire
    Jackie McLean Let Freedom Ring
    Anthony Williams Spring
    Grant Green Street Of Dreams
    Bobby McFerrin Spontaneous Inventions

    Available January 27, 2015
    Herbie Hancock Empyrean Isles
    Wayne Shorter Adam's Apple
    Art Blakey Mosaic
    Jason Moran Soundtrack To Human Motion
    Cecil Taylor Unit Structures

    Available February 24, 2015
    Don Cherry Complete Communion
    Elvin Jones The Ultimate
    Robert Glasper Double Booked
    Thelonious Monk Genius Of Modern Music, Vol. 2
    Sonny Rollins Newk's Time

    Available March 24, 2015
    Wayne Shorter Night Dreamer
    Freddie Hubbard Blue Spirits
    Kurt Elling Flirting With Twilight
    Grachan Moncur III Evolution
    Sonny Rollins Vol. 1

    Available April 28, 2015
    Herbie Hancock The Prisoner
    Horace Silver Cape Verdean Blues
    McCoy Tyner Time For Tyner
    Joe Henderson The State of the Tenor - Live at the Village Vanguard, Vol. 1
    Cecil Taylor Conquistador!

    Available May 26, 2015
    Lee Morgan Search For The New Land
    Medeski Martin & Wood End Of The World Party
    Art Blakey A Night A Birdland, Vol. 1
    Bobby Hutcherson Components
    Grant Green I Want To Hold Your Hand

    Available June 30, 2015
    Donald Byrd A New Perspective
    Cassandra Wilson New Moon Daughter
    Hank Mobley The Turnaround
    Bud Powell The Scene Changes: The Amazing Bud Powell, Vol. 5
    Dexter Gordon One Flight Up

    Available July 28, 2015
    Miles Davis Vol. 1
    Tina Brooks True Blue
    Andrew Hill Point Of Departure
    Joe Henderson Page One
    Jackie McLean Capuchin Swing

    Available August 25, 2015
    Donald Byrd At The Half Note Café, Vol. 1
    Art Blakey A Night A Birdland, Vol. 2
    Freddie Hubbard Breaking Point!
    Sonny Clark Leapin' and Lopin'
    Stefon Harris Black Action Figure

    Available September 29, 2015
    Horace Silver Blowin' The Blues Away
    Miles Davis Vol. 2
    McCoy Tyner Expansions
    Art Blakey Moanin'
    John Scofield Time On My Hands

    Available October 27, 2015
    Jimmy Smith Midnight Special
    Sonny Rollins Vol. 2
    Hank Mobley Workout
    Bobby Hutcherson Happenings
    Joe Lovano Rush Hour

    **Release Dates Are Subject To Change**

    © 2014 Blue Note Records
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  16. #166
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    US jazz singer and Twin Peaks star Jimmy Scott dies, aged 88

    Singer's haunting contralto voice won him acclaim over the course of more than seven decades

    Ben Quinn and agencies


    theguardian.com, Friday 13 June 2014 18.43 EDT


    Jimmy Scott, the US jazz singer whose haunting contralto voice won him acclaim over the course of more than seven decades, has died at the age of 88.

    Scott's wife, Jeanie, said her husband died in his sleep at his Las Vegas home on Thursday. He had battled health problems stemming from a genetic hormone deficiency and had been under the care of a home nurse. Jeanie Scott said her husband stopped touring two years ago but continued recording. He's expected to be buried in Cleveland.

    The vocalist, whose first major hit was Everybody's Somebody's Fool in 1949 alongside the Lionel Hampton Band, gathered new generations of fans during the 1960s and in the 1990s when he toured with Lou Reed and sang on the track, Sycamore Trees, for the series finale of Twin Peaks.

    Born into a family of 10 in Cleveland, Ohio, on 17 July 1925, Scott sang in a church choir as a child. His signature high voice came from Kallmann's syndrome, which kept him from experiencing puberty and stunted his growth. He stood just under five feet as an adultand his voice did not change.

    Although that trait ultimately helped Scott stand out as a singer, he also suffered from congestive heart failure and had a lifestyle that included heavy drinking and smoking.

    Despite his youthful sound, Scott brought heavy emotion to his delivery, often dramatically drawing out lyrics and singing far behind the beat. The technique won praise from Billie Holiday, Nancy Wilson and Madonna, who after seeing him perform in 1994 told the New York Times that Scott was the only singer who ever made her cry.

    "Jimmy had soul way back when people weren't using the word," Ray Charles once said in a PBS documentary on the history of jazz.

    The album Falling in Love Is Wonderful came out in the 1960s and is widely considered to be his masterpiece, although he largely disappeared from view until his 1990s career revival. His 1992 album All the Way sold only 49,000 copies in the United States but earned him cult-like popularity in Europe and Asia, particularly Japan, where he often sold out performances.

    A record label dispute prevented Scott from making an album in the 1950s produced by Ray Charles. Scott's previous record company, Savoy Records, said it had an exclusive, lifetime contract with him, and the company blocked Scott's efforts to release new records for nearly 20 years.

    Savoy Records dropped the matter in the 1970s. By that time, Scott had returned to Cleveland, where he worked as a hotel clerk and nursing home aide.

    Scott performed at Dwight Eisenhower's and Bill Clinton's presidential inaugurations and was inducted into the R&B Music Hall of Fame in 2013.

    His wife Jeanie said on Friday: "He was an Earth angel. He was different from any person I ever met. He was kind, humble. Everyone he met he made them feel special. He had a hard life, but he didn't hold any resentment."

    Describing Scott to the Observer in 2010, the Amercian singer-songwriter Sufjan Stevens said : "He sang in this lilting, odd, almost grandmotherly voice, but it was also so youthful. It was like he was extremely old and extremely young simultaneously.

    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  17. #167
    Loveable Curmudgeon TallGuyCM's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Damn. I'm not familiar with him outside of Twin Peaks, but RIP.
    8/31 - Sleep - Troubadour (?)
    9/05 - The Rentals - Fonda (?)
    9/11 - Swans - Roxy
    9/13 - Owen Pallett - El Rey (?)
    9/17 - Buzzcocks - Fonda (?)


    Quote Originally Posted by getbetter View Post
    I finally made it through a listen of Sun Kil Moon - Benji and had put it on maybe 4 times til I could finally feel mentally like, "just fuck it just let this guy blabber on" while I'm doing paperwork .
    last.fm, if you care

    Twitter, if you dare

  18. #168
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Horace Silver, 85, Master of Earthy Jazz, Is Dead
    By PETER KEEPNEWSJUNE 18, 2014
    Horace Silver, a pianist, composer and bandleader who was one of the most popular and influential jazz musicians of the 1950s and ’60s, died on Wednesday at his home in New Rochelle, N.Y. He was 85.

    His death was announced by Blue Note Records, the company for which he recorded from 1952 to 1979.

    After a high-profile apprenticeship with some of the biggest names in jazz, Mr. Silver began leading his own group in the mid-1950s and quickly became a big name himself, celebrated for his clever compositions and his infectious, bluesy playing. At a time when the refined, quiet and, to some, bloodless style known as cool jazz was all the rage, he was hailed as a leader of the back-to-basics movement that came to be called hard bop.

    Hard bop and cool jazz shared a pedigree: They were both variations on bebop, the challenging, harmonically intricate music that changed the face of jazz in the 1940s. But hard bop was simpler and more rhythmically driven, with more emphasis on jazz’s blues and gospel roots. The jazz press tended to portray the adherents of cool jazz (most of them West Coast-based and white) and hard bop (most of them East Coast-based and black) as warring factions. But Mr. Silver made an unlikely warrior.

    His albums included “Song for My Father,” which featured his father on the cover. Credit Blue Note Records
    “I personally do not believe in politics, hatred or anger in my musical composition,” he wrote in the liner notes to his album “Serenade to a Soul Sister” in 1968. “Musical composition should bring happiness and joy to people and make them forget their troubles.”

    And Mr. Silver’s music was never as one-dimensional as it was sometimes portrayed as being. In an interview early in his career he said he was aiming for “that old-time gutbucket barroom feeling with just a taste of the backbeat.” That approach was reflected in the titles he gave to songs, like “Sister Sadie,” “Filthy McNasty” and “The Preacher,” all of which became jazz standards. But his output also included gently melodic numbers like “Peace” and “Melancholy Mood” and Latin-inflected tunes like “Señor Blues.” “Song for My Father,” probably his best-known composition, blended elements of bossa nova and the Afro-Portuguese music of the Cape Verde islands, where his father was born.

    His piano playing, like his compositions, was not that easily characterized. Deftly improvising ingenious figures with his right hand while punching out rumbling bass lines with his left, he managed to evoke boogie-woogie pianists like Meade Lux Lewis and beboppers like Bud Powell simultaneously. Unlike many bebop pianists, however, Mr. Silver emphasized melodic simplicity over harmonic complexity; his improvisations, while sophisticated, were never so intricate as to be inaccessible.

    Horace Ward Martin Tavares Silver was born on Sept. 2, 1928, in Norwalk, Conn. His father, who was born John Silva but changed the family name to the more American-sounding Silver after immigrating to the United States, worked in a rubber factory. His mother, Gertrude, was a maid and sang in a church choir.

    Although he studied piano as a child, Mr. Silver began his professional career as a saxophonist. But he had returned to the piano, and was becoming well known as a jazz pianist in Connecticut, by the time the saxophonist Stan Getz — soon to be celebrated as one of the leading lights of the cool school — heard and hired him in 1950.

    “I had the house rhythm section at a club called the Sundown in Hartford,” Mr. Silver told The New York Times in 1981. “Stan Getz came up and played with us. He said he was going to call us, but we didn’t take him seriously. But a couple of weeks later he called and said he wanted the whole trio to join him.”

    Mr. Silver worked briefly with Getz before moving to New York in 1951. He was soon in demand as an accompanist, working with leading jazz musicians like the saxophonists Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young. In 1953, Mr. Silver and the drummer Art Blakey formed a cooperative group, the Jazz Messengers, whose aggressive style helped define hard bop and whose lineup of trumpet, tenor saxophone, piano, bass and drums became the standard hard-bop instrumentation.

    After two and a half years, during which Mr. Silver began his long and prolific association with Blue Note, he left the Jazz Messengers, which carried on with Blakey as the sole leader, and formed his own quintet. It became a showcase for his compositions.

    Another album by Mr. Silver is “Further Explorations by the Horace Silver Quintet.” Credit Blue Note Records
    Those compositions, beginning with “The Preacher” in 1955 — which his producer, Alfred Lion of Blue Note, had tried to discourage him from recording because he considered it too simplistic — captured the ears of a wide audience. Many were released as singles and garnered significant jukebox play. By the early ’60s Mr. Silver’s quintet was one of the most popular nightclub and concert attractions in jazz, and an inspiration for countless other bandleaders.

    Like Blakey, Miles Davis (with whom he recorded) and a few others, Mr. Silver was known for discovering and nurturing young talent, including the saxophonists Hank Mobley, Joe Henderson and Michael Brecker; the trumpeters Art Farmer, Woody Shaw, Tom Harrell and Dave Douglas; and the drummers Louis Hayes and Billy Cobham. His longest-lived ensemble, which lasted about five years in the late 1950s and early ’60s, featured Blue Mitchell on trumpet and Junior Cook on tenor saxophone.

    As interest in jazz declined in the ’70s, Mr. Silver disbanded his quintet and began concentrating on writing lyrics as well as music, notably on a three-album series called “The United States of Mind,” his first album to feature vocalists extensively. He later resumed touring, but only for a few months each year, essentially assembling a new group each time he went on the road.

    “I’m shooting for longevity,” he explained. “The road is hard on your body. I’m trying to get it all over with in four months and then recoup.” He said he also wanted to spend more time with his son, Gregory, who survives him.

    In 1981, Mr. Silver formed his own label, Silveto. His recordings for that label featured vocalists and were largely devoted to what he called “self-help holistic metaphysical music” — life lessons in song with titles like “Reaching Our Goals in Life” and “Don’t Dwell on Your Problems” that left critics for the most part unimpressed.

    Jon Pareles of The Times wrote in 1986 that Mr. Silver’s “naïvely mystical lyrics” made his new compositions sound like “near-miss pop songs.” On later albums for Columbia, Impulse and Verve, Mr. Silver returned to a primarily instrumental approach.
    Mr. Silver was named a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master in 1995 and received a President’s Merit Award from the Recording Academy in 2005.

    Many of his tunes became staples of the jazz repertoire — a development, he said, that surprised him. “When I wrote them,” he said in a 2003 interview for the website All About Jazz, “I would say to myself that I hope these at least withstand the test of time. I hope they don’t sound old in 10 years or something.”

    Rather than sounding dated, his compositions continued to be widely performed and recorded well into the 21st century. And while he acknowledged that “occasionally I hear an interpretation of one of my tunes that I say that they sure messed that one up,” he admitted, “For the most part I enjoy all of it.”
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  19. #169
    old school RageAgainstTheAoki's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    When I was in the UK last year, I saw the great jazz vocalist Cleo Laine, age 85, performing in concert. Though she was clearly showing signs of her age (having to stay seated during the entire concert) I was amazed at how well preserved her voice was - gorgeous high notes, a husky rich lower range and an innate sense of musicality and rhythm. I think her late husband, jazz composer, arranger, band-leader and saxophonist was a bit underrated. He was hardly a revolutionary, but his really smooth, effortlessly cool sound could be so good:


  20. #170
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: All that Jazz

    Charlie Haden, Influential Jazz Bassist, Is Dead at 76

    JULY 11, 2014

    Charlie Haden, one of the most influential bassists in the history of jazz, died on Friday in Los Angeles. He was 76.

    His death was confirmed by Ruth Cameron, his wife of 30 years. For the last several years he had been struggling with the degenerative effects of post-polio syndrome, related to the polio he contracted in his youth.

    Mr. Haden had a deep, grounded way with the bass and a warm, softly resonant tone. His approach to harmony was deeply intuitive and sometimes deceivingly simple, always with a firm relationship to a piece’s chordal root. Along with his calm, unbudging rhythmic aplomb, this served him well in settings ranging from the ragged and intrepid to the satiny and refined. His own acclaimed bands, like the Liberation Music Orchestra and Quartet West, handily covered that stylistic expanse.

    His jazz career crossed seven decades, with barely a moment of obscurity. He was in his early 20s in 1959, when, as a member of the Ornette Coleman Quartet, he helped set off a seismic disruption in jazz. Mr. Coleman, an alto saxophonist, had been developing a brazen, polytonal approach to improvisation — it would come to be known as free jazz — and in his band, which had no chordal instrument, Mr. Haden served as anchor and pivot. Mr. Coleman’s clarion cry, often entangled with that of the trumpeter Don Cherry, grabbed much of the attention, but Mr. Haden’s playing was just as crucial, for its feeling of unerring rightness in the face of an apparent ruckus.

    In addition to Mr. Coleman, with whom he continued to play intermittently in the 1960s and ’70s (and later, in the occasional reunion), Mr. Haden worked with many principal figures of an emerging jazz avant-garde. For a decade starting in 1967, he was a member of a celebrated quartet led by the pianist Keith Jarrett, with Dewey Redman on saxophone and Paul Motian on drums.

    The Liberation Music Orchestra, which released its debut album in 1969, was Mr. Haden’s large ensemble, and an expression of his left-leaning political ideals. The band, featuring compositions and arrangements by the pianist Carla Bley, mingled avant-garde wildness with the earnest immediacy of Latin American folk songs. Mr. Haden released each of the band’s four studio albums during Republican administrations; the most recent, in 2005, was “Not in Our Name,” a response to the war in Iraq.

    Mr. Haden, who liked to say he was driven by concern for “the struggle of the poor people,” hardly restricted his opinions to the Liberation Music Orchestra. While playing a festival with Mr. Coleman in Lisbon, in 1971, he dedicated his “Song for Ché” to the black liberation movements of Mozambique and Angola, and was promptly jailed.

    Charles Edward Haden was born in Shenandoah, Iowa, on Aug. 6, 1937, into a brood of musicians called the Haden Family. Prominent on the Midwestern country circuit in the ’30s and ’40s, the Haden Family had a radio show, on which Mr. Haden made frequent appearances as a yodeling toddler known as Cowboy Charlie.

    His own children are also accomplished musicians: His son, Josh Haden, is a singer-songwriter, and his triplet daughters, Petra, Rachel and Tanya Haden, have worked as the Haden Triplets. (In 2008 Mr. Haden released an album, “Rambling Boy,” credited to the Haden Family, featuring his children and a slew of guests in a rootsy style.) Mr. Haden is survived by his children, and by Ms. Cameron; by his brother, Carl Haden Jr., and his sister, Mary Davison; and by three grandchildren.

    For a while after taking up the bass, Mr. Haden played only country music, notably as the house bassist on “Ozark Jubilee,” a network television variety show broadcast from Springfield, Mo. He stopped singing at 15 when he contracted bulbar polio, which affected nerves in his face and throat, threatening his ability even to speak.

    One night in Omaha he saw a Jazz at the Philharmonic concert that featured the saxophonist Charlie Parker, a trailblazing hero of bebop. “It was country music all the way for me until I heard Bird in 1951,” he said in an interview in 2008. He moved to Los Angeles, where he connected with the pianists Hampton Hawes and Paul Bley and the saxophonist Art Pepper before falling in with Mr. Coleman.

    “People ask me how could I go from country to jazz,” Mr. Haden said. “It’s been a natural convergence for me.” His sensitive ear for pitch, sharply honed throughout a childhood of vocal harmonizing, perfectly suited the needs of Mr. Coleman’s music. “Lonely Woman,” their best-known piece of music together, essentially features a bass melody flowing beneath the plaintive main theme. And in “Ramblin’,” another early Coleman classic, Mr. Haden finishes a bass solo with a quotation of the Southern fiddle tune “Old Joe Clark.”

    For all his affinities with the avant-garde, Mr. Haden was a lifelong proponent of melody, and he pursued that interest with often impeccable results. Quartet West, a longtime band with the tenor saxophonist Ernie Watts, the pianist Alan Broadbent and the drummer Larence Marable, applied a burnished touch to an old-Hollywood repertoire; its sound was lush, romantic and unabashedly tinted with nostalgia.

    Mr. Haden also recorded albums with strings, including “American Dreams” (2002), and albums of duets with sensitive partners, notably the pianists Hank Jones and Kenny Barron and the guitarist Pat Metheny. The duo album he made with Mr. Metheny, “Beyond the Missouri Sky,” won Mr. Haden his first Grammy Award in 1997. His two others were for albums of reimagined Latin American standards, “Nocturne” and “Land of the Sun.” Both featured the Cuban pianist Gonzalo Rubalcaba.

    Mr. Haden, who founded the CalArts Jazz program in 1982 and taught generations of musicians there, was recognized as a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master in 2012. He received a lifetime achievement honor at last year’s Grammy Awards, though his health prevented him from attending the ceremony.

    His most recent release is “Last Dance,” recorded with Mr. Jarrett in 2007 and released last month. At least one posthumous album has already been scheduled: a concert recording made in 1990 with the guitarist Jim Hall, who died last year.

    At the heart of Mr. Haden’s artistic pursuits, even those that drew inspiration from sources far afield, was a conviction in a uniquely American expression. “The beauty of it is that this music is from the earth of the country,” he said. “The old hillbilly music, along with gospel and spirituals and blues and jazz.”
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

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