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Thread: Articles 2.0

  1. #541
    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    Default Re: Articles 2.0

    I'm always intrigued by personal insights/accounts/anecdotes regarding criminals, so this was an enjoyable read on someone who spent time with Lee Harvey Oswald. http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/10/ma...1&ref=magazine

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  2. #542
    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miroir Noir View Post
    As gut-wrenching, shocking, and horrible as anything you're likely to read this year: Reuters' investigative series on America's underground market for adopted children.
    Related: http://www.slate.com/articles/double..._it_could.html

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  3. #543
    Coachella Junkie faxman75's Avatar
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    Default Re: Articles 2.0

    Kid gets arrested at 16, judge sets bail at $10K. Three years later he is released with all charges dropped.

    http://abclocal.go.com/wabc/story?id=9317078

    NEW YORK (WABC) -- 20-year-old Kalief Browder may be physically free, but mentally he is still trapped behind bars on Rikers, where every day was a battle to survive.


    "It's very hard when you are dealing with dudes that are big and have weapons and shanks and there are gangs," says Browder, "you know if you don't give your phone call up, or you don't give them what they want you know they are going to jump you. And it's very scary."

    In May of 2010, Browder was a 16-year-old tenth grader, walking home on Arthur Avenue in the Bronx after a party. "This guy comes out of nowhere and says I robbed him. And the next thing I know they are putting cuffs on me. I don't know this dude. And I do over three years for something I didn't do."

    Browder's family couldn't make the $10,000 bail on the robbery charges, and he had a legal aid attorney. Browder is now represented by a civil rights law firm.

    "Someone who did not know Kalief Browder, and simply told the police officer, 'Officer I was robbed two weeks ago and that kid did it', that's where it ended. That was the identification," said Browder's attorney, Paul Prestia. Browder said that at the time, the stress was overwhelming, and at some point he tried to commit suicide.

    "I mean like every time I go to court, I think I'm, going home, and I go to court, and absolutely nothing happens," adds Browder, "I was feeling so much pain, and it was all balling in my head, and I just had to grab my head and I can't take it."

    He missed his sister's wedding, the birth of his nephew, and so many family events. In January, Browder says he was offered a plea deal after 33 Months in jail, which he refused.

    "The judge was trying to give me time served, and she is telling me if I am not taking it and I lose at trial I can get 15 years," notes Browder.

    Browder went back to jail, and in June, he was freed with no explanation.

    "They just dismissed the case and they think it's all right. No apology, no nothing," he says, "they just say 'case dismissed, don't worry about nothing'. What do you mean, don't worry about nothing? You just took 3 years of my life."

    Browder is now trying to make up for those three years of high school that he lost by taking courses to get his GED. "I didn't get to go to prom or graduation. Nothing," Browder says, "those are the main years. They are the main years. And I am never going to get those years back. Never. Never."

    Browder is trying to move forward. He expects to get his GED by the end of the year, and is desperately trying to find a job.

  4. #544
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    76,000 pounds of ribs burn in truck fire, smell 'wonderful'

    By Jenn Harris

    3:10 PM PST, January 27, 2014


    If the thought of wasting food makes you cringe, you may want to look away. 76,000 pounds of beef ribs headed to Los Angeles went up in flames Saturday when the truck containing them caught fire.

    And according to firefighters at the scene, it smelled "wonderful."

    The truck had been headed from Flagstaff, Ariz., to Wilmington. The fire started on the 40 Freeway in San Bernardino County after one of the back wheels of the trailer caught fire, reported the Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. The freeway had to be shut down for two hours.

    The fire had a "wonderful BBQ beef rib odor to it," read a report.

    There were no injures, but when firefighters arrived on the scene, they were too late to save the ribs. The trailer containing the ribs was already on fire, and disconnected from the truck.

    The cause of the fire is under investigation.

    Online outlets were having fun with the rib tragedy: "Nooooooooooo. One hour of high heat?! They probably burned. Did anyone even try to turn them?"

    If only there were a truck with barbecue sauce standing by ...
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  5. #545
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Taco truck employee accused of striking co-worker in head with hammer in Pasadena


    A taco truck worker is accused of assault with a deadly weapon for striking a fellow employee in the head with a hammer during an argument late Friday, police said.

    Raul Villareal, 27, of Los Angeles was jailed in connection with the alleged attack, which took place at about 10:05 p.m. at a taco truck parked at Fair Oaks Avenue and Bellevue Drive, Pasadena police Lt. Jason Clawson said.

    “Two employees of a taco truck got into an argument during their shift that resulted in a fight,” Clawson said. “(Villareal) pulled out a hammer and struck the other employee in the head.”


    The victim suffered what was considered a minor injury, the lieutenant said.

    Villareal was still at the scene when police arrived and taken into custody without a struggle, he added.

    According to county booking records, Villareal was being held in lieu of $30,000 bail at the Pasadena Police Department’s jail pending his initial court appearance.
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  6. #546
    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    Ta-Nehisi Coates: "Four years ago, I opposed reparations. Here's the story of how my thinking has evolved since then." http://www.theatlantic.com/features/...ations/361631/

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  7. #547
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    April 15, 2014

    The Rise of the Independents: Upstart SoCal Music Fests

    Evan Senn

    While some of the world's most popular musicians will be gracing the stage of the increasingly popular Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival very soon, the extreme growth of the festival and others like it in recent years has inspired the local music and art scenes in Los Angeles to step up and offer alternative options for underground music and art aficionados. The ever-growing popularity of festivals like Coachella, Lollapalooza, Bonaroo and South By South West has gotten out of hand for a lot of music lovers, who really just want a ton of great music in one location. The crowds, the costs, the mainstream and possibly unimaginative lineups -- it can be too much to bare, even for your favorite mainstream band. Since the resurgence of self-publishing, independent labels and D.I.Y. style music distribution, with the downward spiral of corporate record labels, there are a handful of smaller festivals that have been growing in the wake of the giant corporate festivals, and in turn, beginning to do what fests like Coachella couldn't. These fests connect with the local music community in Southern California, and the larger scene of what is being created and appreciated in new music right now. Festivals like FYF Fest, Burgerama, Desert Daze and Brokechella are offering alternative events for more independent and cutting-edge music lovers and Angelenos can't get enough of them.

    These independent festivals offer creative and talented rosters of independent, alternative and brand new musicians for all types of aficionados. FYF Fest, one of the longest running independent fests in L.A. has been showcasing emerging talent and some of the best alternative acts since 2004. Burgerama is another annual festival that brings alternative acts and up-and-coming indie stars to the limelight. Hosted by the Orange County independent label Burger Records, located in Fullerton, this itty-bitty storefront record label produces some of the most well known and popular independent acts around. Acts like Summer Twins, Cosmonauts, Shannon and the Clams, Thee Oh Sees, Cherry Glazerr, Bombon and many more -- and keeps it classy with its additional throwback cassette and vinyl releases of new music. This year, Burger Records held its third-annual showcase festival at the Observatory OC. More than 50 bands in the extended Burger family performed at this year's jam-packed event. The ever popular psych-happy White Fang and strangely seductive NOBUNNY packed the house alongside special guests like dark and ominous Sleep and indie hip-hop nerd Kool Keith. Burgerama also had the increasingly popular Black Lips, the Growlers, the Coathangers, Bleached and Mac DeMarco. Burgerama may not have made it to the billboard's top festivals to attend list, but any hipster within a 200-mile radius of OC knew what was going down with this quirky and impressive showcase.

    Desert Daze is another independent festival that has gotten some extreme love in the past few years, bringing new music to the ears of the strange and creative types of Southern California. This year, KCRW has teamed up with Moon Block Party -- the insane and dedicated producers of Desert Daze, who take over Pomona once a year to put on a smaller version in the arts district of Pomona (helping to raise money for the School for the Arts) -- to put together a stellar line up of underground and avant-garde tunes. Taking place every year, out in the kaleidoscopic Sunset Ranch Oasis in Mecca, Desert Daze has a Burning-Man-esque aura imbedded in its existence, drawing hundreds of hobo-looking scenesters, with artwork and style that rivals the 1960s psychedelic art movement. This festival brings a younger target audience to the desert, more well versed in experimental, alternative and new underground music. A completely artist-designed, artist-driven fest, Desert Daze was created by members of two major independent bands, Phil Pirrone from JJUUJJUU and Julie Edwards of Deap Vally, these dedicated professionals floored major music corporations in 2012 when Desert Daze became one of the world's longest consecutive day music festivals with over 120 acts on two stages at a roadhouse in the desert for eleven straight days and nights. In 2013, the Daze expanded with campgrounds and grew their numbers even more.

    Phil Pirrone, the founder of the festival, says that it's their attention to detail that really set them apart. "Having traveled a lot and played a lot of festivals, we noticed that fesitvals in Europe pay a lot of attention to detail, in a way that American festivals don't;" Pirrne says, "and we are trying to bring some of that attention to detail to our festivals."
    Crystal Antlers, Dengue Fever, Akron Family, Warpaint, Chelsea Wolfe and Fool's Gold have all played Desert Daze in the past. This year, Blonde Redhead and The Raveonettes grace the sun-soaked stages, along with DIIV, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Liars, Vincent Gallo, Autolux and more.

    A good festical can change a person's like and Pirrone admits that it is important to keep the festival positive and invigorating for attendees. "A festival can be a very important thing on a cellular level and if its done right it can be energizing," Pirrone says. "That's the meaning of a festival, for people to come and be entertained with joy and energy, and for people to leave feeling joyful and full of energy."

    Brokechella may be one of the most surprising come ups in SoCal alternative fests, but is clearly giving the urban-dwelling, can't-leave-L.A.-ers another reason never to leave the city limits. In true L.A. fashion, Brokechella is all about the local. With four stages of music set up at downtown L.A.'s Airliner, all local submission-based or recruited, Brokechella gives the up-and-comers a chance to play alongside some bigger names in underground music. Brokechella also values the many different styles of underground music, along with experimental and installation-based art and comedy. Having grown from an accidental scheduling conflict with Coachella, the organizers, including Executive Producer Negin Singh, embraced the anti-Coachella attitude and staycation style and were met with overwhelming response of support and love from local Angelenos. Singh says they are in full support of Coachella, and hope that some of the bands they feature at Brokechella will get more attention from playing at their fest. Though Brokechella is adamant about not having "headliners," they are very loyal and excited to have bands return to the Brokechella stages year after year. Yoya is one of the returning groups that have played Brokechella every year since it's inception in 2011. Executive Producer Negin Singh is looking forward to having Yoya come back again. "They're so awesome, because they have grown with us. In the same way that we've doubled in popularity, so have they. They've even released a new album every year since then . . . we love how much they hustle to get their stuff done. So I'm excited to showcase them again."

    Alongside 50+ musical performances, Brokechella is dedicate to the other arts, performative, comedy and visual -- they are also a huge proponent of making the festival deaf accessible. CARTEL Collaborative Arts LA host dozens of events throughout the year, with art and music, but Brokechella is really their main platform now. Artist Anna Schumacher is one of many fascinating artist participating in Brokechella this year, helping to create visual artwork to engage the deaf festival-goers in a creative way.

    Keeping the ticket cost low is important to Brokechella, and regardless of how popular the fest seems to get, that's something that they refuse to change. "To get something out there that is a good idea but not a profitable one, is so hard, but I think it's so important, Singh says. "Sometimes you have to do something that doesn't make a lot of money but is awesome and it invigorates the community, and you're going to do it, and it feeds you in a different way. We're not doing it because it's easy."
    ...
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  8. #548
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    This is freaking BIZARRE:

    https://shine.yahoo.com/parenting/ma...183300307.html

    A Man Finds His Lost Mom Living in an Amazon TribeBy Newser


    • David Good reuniting with his mother, Yarima.(Newser) - Imagine reconnecting with your long-lost mother-in a tribe that has no written language, electricity, or medicine. Or word for "love." That's what David Good experienced when he found his mother, Yarima, in the Yanomami tribe in Venezuela, the New York Post reports. He had long claimed she died in a car crash, because the truth embarrassed him-that his father, Kenneth, an anthropology student, had married Yarima in 1978 after a series of expeditions to the tribe; she was likely no more than 12-the tribe also has no numbers. Kenneth's travels back and forth to the US left her vulnerable (she was brutally gang-raped by 20 to 30 men during one of his absences), so he got her medical care and moved her to New Jersey in 1986 to give birth to David and live a typical American life.
      Their unusual marriage drew media attention and sparked a bidding war between major Hollywood players, but a movie was never made and the romance wouldn't last: Yarima said that in New Jersey, she missed close human relations, the BBC reports. So she moved back home, leaving David feeling abandoned and ashamed. (Especially horrifying was seeing her photo on a class field trip at the Museum of Natural History, in a tribal exhibit: "I just froze," he says. "...I ran to a dark corner and hid for 10 minutes.") He turned to alcohol as a teenager and kept his feelings hidden. But as an adult, he visited Yarima's tribe in 2011-she wept when they met again-and visited again last year, eating grubs and living as the Yanomami do. And he wants to keep going. "It's not like there's closure," he says. "We're at the beginning of our story, in so many ways." (Click to read about another big reunion.)




    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Because fucking millenials that's what

  9. #549
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Cook accused of licking cheese on sandwiches and serving them to corrections employees

    Published: May 30, 2014 at 1:24 PM

    Evan Bleier


    ALBUQUERQUE, May 30 (UPI) --ALBUQUERQUE, May 30 (UPI) --A New Mexico cook who is accused of serving tainted cheese sandwiches to state corrections employees on the sly might end up with something a little worse than double-secret probation.
    While working at the South Valley New Mexico Women's Recovery Academy in Albuquerque, Yolanda Arguello allegedly licked pieces of cheese, put them on sandwiches, and served them to probation and parole officers.

    During one such occasion, she allegedly told an officer "she'd make him or her a special grilled cheese sandwich" before licking the cheese, KOAT reported. Arguello reportedly said that "she'd show them who was special and better than others."

    Another witness told investigators that the 59-year-old also once sucked on an ice cube, put it in a cup, and gave it to someone. She also would allegedly dump ice cubes on the floor and then serve them in pitchers of iced tea.

    Arguello has been charged with three counts of battery on a peace officer.


    ...
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  10. #550
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    This is weird. How many women are storing still born dead babies? This is the second news report in the last couple months.

    http://news.yahoo.com/finnish-police...111709401.html

    HELSINKI (AP) — Finnish police have arrested a 35-year-old woman on suspicion of manslaughter after finding five dead babies in an apartment building, authorities said Wednesday.
    Officers found the bodies in "badly smelly packages" Tuesday in a basement cupboard of an apartment building in the western city of Oulu after they were alerted to the scene by emergency services.
    "A woman arrived there as officers had begun their investigation, saying she had put the packages into the cupboard," Det. Supt. Seppo Leinonen told the AP. "She said she'd given birth to the stillborn babies between five and 10 years ago at home."
    Leinonen said the woman couldn't give a clear motive for keeping and storing what he said appeared to be fetuses for so long.
    He declined to identify her except to say that she was a local Finnish woman, married with children, who had moved into an apartment in the building in Oulu, about 800 kilometers (500 miles) north of Helsinki, a few months earlier. He said no other family members were suspected of being involved.
    Leinonen said police are treating the case as suspected manslaughter. He declined to give more details, saying the forensic examination is expected to take months.
    The case bore some similarities to an investigation in the U.S. In April, police in Utah arrested a 39-year-old woman after discovering the bodies of seven dead newborn babies inside the garage of her former home. The tiny bodies had been wrapped up and packed in individual boxes. Authorities say Megan Huntsman told police that from 1996 to 2006, she strangled or suffocated six of the babies after giving birth to them at her home in the city of Pleasant Grove. Investigators believe a seventh baby was stillborn. Huntsman hasn't yet entered a plea to the six murder charges she faces.

  11. #551
    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    Why do you read yahoo articles

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  12. #552
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    Because that is what I can access at work when I am bored.

    I welcome other suggestions of what to read at work.
    Last edited by amyzzz; 06-05-2014 at 07:37 AM.

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    Articlez .0
    Quote Originally Posted by dj12inches View Post
    What makes me qualified? I've watched EVERY fucking episode of American Idol, and every single episode of The Voice...Forget that I won departmental music awards when I was in the 8th grade choir.

  14. #554
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    PLEASE DIRECT ME TO BETTER WEBSITES. PLEASE.

  15. #555
    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    msn.com

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    Coachella Junkie Miroir Noir's Avatar
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    aol.com
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    To you guys I say Wat?????????? Off to ?????? ....... cr****
    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    It's hard to argue with that.

  17. #557
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    Sigh

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  19. #559
    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    8/30: Peaking Lights @ The Chapel
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  20. #560
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    Thanks, Cara.

  21. #561
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    I should say Thanks, Cara, I'm now reading stories about plagues of crazy ants in Texas and swarms of stinging jellyfish in our oceans and I'm terrified. I mean, at least I'm just in Arizona , and we don't have those...yet.

  22. #562
    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    The jellyfish article is motherfucking TERRIFYING. I totally want to read Stung! after that article.

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  23. #563
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    The end of the roadie: how the backstage boys grew up

    They used to match their bands for debauchery, now they have degrees and drink tea – the billion-dollar live-music business is staffed by techs who would never throw a TV out the window

    Caroline Sullivan


    The Guardian, Thursday 12 June 2014 08.41 EDT


    Before the live-music industry became a billion-dollar behemoth, being on the road was, for many bands, a wild west of sex, drugs and even some rock'n'roll. Hedonism was rife, and it wasn't just the musicians who pillaged. Their road crews were right there with them, benefiting from a macho atmosphere where the expectation was that after they had unloaded the gear they would match their employers in debauchery.

    Some roadies became famous in their own right. Led Zeppelin's tour manager, for one: there's a Richard Cole Appreciation Society on Facebook, glorifying the man who was, according to the unofficial band biography Hammer of the Gods, "responsible for much of the mayhem" around the group. Then there was a metal roadie called Jef Hickey, who carved out such a reputation that half an episode of Vice.com's 2011 documentary series, On the Road, is devoted to him. Rock musicians speak of him in awed tones: "One time we were on a plane, and he went up to this stewardess and asked her if she had any drugs," claimed former Queens of the Stone Age bassist Nick Oliveri – and that was only the most printable of Hickey's antics.

    Roadie annals are full of such stories, many of them involving unpleasant treatment of female fans. But that era has long passed, and with it the idea of roadies as folk legends. They have since osmosed into "techs" – low-key professionals who often have degrees and treat the job as a job. "Bad behaviour isn't acceptable any more, to be drunk and carrying on," says Chris McDonnell, the Charlatans' sound engineer. "A lot more is expected of you. People think it's crazy backstage, and it's girls and drugs, but it's not. It's people working and having a cup of tea."

    With the biggest acts generating mammoth box-office receipts (last year's top tour, Bon Jovi, grossed $205m), unprofessional behaviour is likely to result in the sack. "You have to pay for hotel damage now. I've certainly thought of throwing the TV out the hotel window, but I couldn't afford it, and would get fired," McDonnell, 23, says. And the musicians are more responsible; on the phone before a show in Germany, Max Helyer of You Me at Six, Britain's biggest pop-metal band, says bluntly: "[The crew] are here to do a job, and we don't get destroyed out of our faces, because that would let down people who've paid money to see us."

    But if techs have become more abstemious and less visible, it's brought them closer together. Being the backbone of the live-music business generates a particularly intense camaraderie. Roadies socialise – there's an annual convention; they have dedicated websites and they speak their own lingo ("shitters", for example, means "money" – supposedly invented by shoegaze band Lush's crew on a European tour in the 90s, when they were vexed by having to deal with multiple pre-euro foreign currencies).

    But, despite the new clean-living techs, there are hints that things still go on that they can't talk about. Facebook tech pages tend to be closed to public view, and the biggest online tech site, Crewspace, accepts members by recommendation only. Crewspace's homepage assures its 16,000 members it's "a community where you don't get bothered by fans, etc", while its motto – "What goes on tour …" – hints at "colourful" discussions on its forums.

    "I can't tell you the stories while my mum's still alive," says Crewspace member Roger Nowell, semi-jokingly. "[Touring is] a world of its own, but people won't write about what goes on, if they want to keep working." Which, of course, they do: for most, the job is a way of life, offering travel, a good income and the kudos of being part of an artist's inner circle. Nowell has been Paul Weller's guitar tech since 1999 – "I'm stage right, where he can see me, in eye contact" – and before that looked after "drums, bass and Liam's tambourines" for Oasis. But, like most of the techs I speak to, he makes a distinction between Then and Now.

    Live music was once so unregulated, he says, that roadies coming home from 1970s American tours "would stuff dollars into [speaker] cabinets so they didn't have to declare them". Now, techs are tax-registered sole traders whose jobs have been transformed by technology. "It's not just stringing guitars now. It's all about programming and knowing how to …" He mimes tapping at a computer keyboard. Moreover, the younger techs are more health conscious – "They go running and swimming," Nowell says bemusedly – and some are even women.
    Rog Nowell, Paul Weller's guitar tech. Rog Nowell, Paul Weller's guitar tech. Photograph: Graeme Robertson
    Women are still massively under-represented, though: London-based sound engineer Anna Dahlin says that female techs are seen as a novelty. "It's not unusual to turn up at a venue with a band and get the question: 'Where's your sound guy?' And I wouldn't even want to start counting the amount of times I've got on to a stage and got the question: 'Are you the singer?' "

    "It's not that the industry doesn't want females in it," counters Jon Bond, who's just spent seven months with Rudimental. "It's quite a scary job to go into, because it's dominated by males. The chat can be like a building site." With his BTec in music technology, he's typical of younger roadies, who get their foot in the door not by being mates with a band but by being able to run complex sound and lighting systems from day one. Bond is quick to add that the "chat" is just chat; crews know that "there's so much money in [touring], we have to take it seriously". And fans are off-limits: "The age of the people going to gigs seems to have got a lot younger, from 15 upwards, so bands don't want to be seen hanging around with those people."

    Who do they want to hang around with? Each other, it seems. "It's not just a job – you're living very intensely together," says the Vaccines' tour manager, Nigel Brown, which explains why about 80 UK-based roadies, from newbies like McDonnell to veterans like Nowell, attend an annual invitation-only gathering. This year's was in January, in a bar in central London; within an hour of the doors opening, it was standing room only. One thing you could see from being there was that roadies don't necessarily look like roadies: for every denim-clad old-schooler, there was a clean-cut character who could have been a teacher. And they don't talk like roadies: there was little building-site chat, but quite a bit of bromantic bonhomie – and plenty of concern about the future. "There are so many bands on tour that you'd think there'd be more work, but in truth, it's much more streamlined now," said Nowell. He adds with a sigh that sums up the state of the music business: "It's expensive to tour."

    • This article was amended 13 June 2014: Jon Bond was originally incorrectly identified as Jon Brien.
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
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    1 cherry
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    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  24. #564
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Rite of the Sitting Dead: Funeral Poses Mimic Life

    By CAMPBELL ROBERTSON and FRANCES ROBLESJUNE 21, 2014




    At the family’s request, a funeral home in New Orleans posed the body of Miriam Burbank for her service this month. Credit Percy McRay, via Reuters

    NEW ORLEANS — All last week, people were calling Louis Charbonnet to find out how they might avoid lying down at their funerals. Funeral directors have called; so have people with their own requests, such as the woman who wanted to be seen for the last time standing over her cooking pot.

    The calls started coming in to the Charbonnet-Labat Funeral Home during its June 12 viewing for Miriam Burbank, who died at 53 and spent her service sitting at a table amid miniature New Orleans Saints helmets, with a can of Busch beer at one hand and a menthol cigarette between her fingers, just as she had spent a good number of her living days.

    Word of the arrangement began to spread, hundreds showed up, the news spread online, and now here was Mr. Charbonnet getting a call from a funeral director in Australia.

    Ms. Burbank’s service was the second of its kind that Mr. Charbonnet had arranged, and the third in New Orleans in two years. But there have been others elsewhere, most notably in San Juan, P.R. Viewings there in recent years have included a paramedic displayed behind the wheel of his ambulance and, in 2011, a man dressed for his wake like Che Guevara, cigar in hand and seated Indian style.

    The body of Christopher Rivera, a boxer who was shot to death, was propped up in a fake boxing ring for his wake in January in San Juan, P.R. Credit Ricardo Arduengo/Associated Press

    “I never said it was the first,” said Mr. Charbonnet, who mentioned the 1984 funeral of Willie Stokes Jr., a Chicago gambler known as the Wimp, who sat through his funeral services behind the wheel of a coffin made to look like a Cadillac Seville.

    New Orleans, which has long boasted of its ability to put the “fun” in funeral, seems like the place where this kind of thing would catch on, and Mr. Charbonnet boasts that his 132-year-old funeral home is well known for its funeral parades.

    “Couple weeks ago we even had a mariachi band in here,” he said, while checking text messages from people he referred to almost gleefully as his “haters” — apparently other funeral directors. They were criticizing such viewings as improper or even sacrilegious, a concern Mr. Charbonnet admitted was shared by his wife. But he said that he had gotten the O.K. from a local priest and that, besides, he was honoring family wishes.

    The phenomenon first appeared in Puerto Rico in 2008, four years before the first such funeral in New Orleans, with a 24-year-old murder victim whose viewing took place in his family’s living room, the body tethered against a wall. Angel Luis Pantojas’s funeral — called “muerto parao,” dead man standing — became an instant sensation.

    Another murder victim, on a motorcycle, followed, along with the paramedic and the man dressed like Guevara. This year, a boxer’s body was arranged standing in a ring, and an elderly woman was propped up in her rocking chair.

    The same funeral director, of the Marín Funeral Home in San Juan, arranged all of these.

    “It’s been a real boom in Puerto Rico,” said Elsie Rodríguez, vice president of the funeral home. “People have requested every type of funeral that could possibly come to mind. We have only done six so far, because the people who have requested the funerals have not died yet.”

    Ms. Rodríguez said the idea had come from Mr. Pantojas himself. His family has said that ever since he attended his father’s funeral at age 6, Mr. Pantojas had told relatives that he wanted to be viewed on his feet.

    “This is not a fun or funny event; the family is going through a lot of pain,” Ms. Rodríguez said. With these kinds of arrangements, “the family literally suffers less, because they see their loved one in a way that would have made them happy — they see them in a way in which they still look alive.”

    At first, some in Puerto Rico were against the services — which start around $1,700 — an opposition that Ms. Rodríguez attributed to “professional jealousy.” The Puerto Rico Legislature held hearings in which the Department of Health and other funeral directors weighed in.

    “I thought it would propagate competitions for the most exotic funeral,” said Jorge Lugo, president of the Puerto Rico Funeral Home Association. “These people — not all of them, but some of these people who had these funerals — belonged to the underworld and had a life of fast money. It seemed to me that with these kinds of people doing this, there could be negative consequences.”

    As it happened, Mr. Lugo said, the only other time a funeral home tried something unusual — the wake of a dog — it was a fiasco, as the dog had not been embalmed. A law passed in 2012 officially made the wakes with posed cadavers legal, “as long as the position is not immoral,” Mr. Lugo said.

    Dolores Lamboy touched a hand of her mother, Georgina Chervony, whose body was posed in a rocking chair for her funeral in San Juan in May. Credit Ricardo Arduengo/Associated Press
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
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    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

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    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Ken Roberts dies at 73; promoter transformed KROQ-FM into a powerhouse

    ELAINE WOO

    Ken Roberts, a concert promoter who rescued a debt-ridden Pasadena rock music station and oversaw its rebirth as powerhouse KROQ-FM (106.7), which helped acts like Prince and Culture Club gain mainstream attention, died May 22 in New York City. He was 73.

    Roberts had been ailing since a heart attack in February, said his former wife Harriette Craig, who announced his death last week.

    Under his ownership in the 1970s and '80s, KROQ went from being a much-maligned renegade to one of the most influential modern rock stations in the country, with deejays like Richard Blade, Freddy Snakeskin and Jed the Fish championing alternative music in the widely emulated "ROQ of the 80s" format.

    Among the many then-unknown bands the station featured were Duran Duran, the Clash, U2, R.E.M., the Go-Go's, Devo, the Police, the Pretenders, Billy Idol, Oingo Boingo and the Eurythmics, all of whom owed some of their success to a middle-aged concert promoter from Hoboken, N.J., who wanted people to hear new music.

    "I don't think he quite understood the music… but he wanted to be cutting edge," Blade said this week. "Ken really believed in the freedom of radio. What Ken allowed people on air to do shaped the musical taste of Southern California and exploded across the country."

    Born in Hoboken on Feb. 28, 1941, Kenneth John Roberts was entrepreneurial as a child, delivering newspapers and hiring other boys to wash neighbors' cars. He attended Seton Hall University in New Jersey and helped pay his way working as a page at NBC. His connections there helped him arrange a concert on campus featuring singer Jack Jones. He booked Della Reese next.

    After graduating in 1963, he started a business coordinating college concerts featuring some of the era's most popular performers, including Harry Belafonte, Sammy Davis Jr., Andy Williams, Johnny Mathis, the Supremes and the Temptations. By the early 1970s his company was representing Frankie Valli and Sly and the Family Stone.

    One of the engagements he booked for Sly Stone's band was for a KROQ-sponsored show at the Los Angeles Coliseum. When KROQ couldn't cover the costs, Roberts agreed to pay for the concert in exchange for a small ownership stake in the struggling station.

    He did not realize what he had gotten himself into until he attended a meeting in 1974 with the other owners — a motley group that included a doctor, a couple of dairymen, a Sacramento lobbyist, a secretary and several other small investors. Roberts, with his background in concert booking, turned out to be the most experienced as far as radio was concerned. By the end of the meeting he was elected president.

    He soon learned that KROQ's finances were in shambles after a year of programming without commercials, a gimmick intended to build audience. He took the station off the air for two years while he dug it out of $7 million of debt.

    The station resumed broadcasting in 1976 but its troubles were far from over. The Federal Communications Commission had ordered the station to surrender its license, which made it vulnerable to rivals trying to take it over. Roberts paid them to drop their bids and bought out his partners until he was sole owner.

    In 1979 he hired Rick Carroll as program director. Carroll, who died in 1989, was widely credited with refining KROQ's new-music signature, but Roberts kept him on track.

    Snakeskin, who joined KROQ in 1980 and now handles the vintage KROQ playlist on the station's digital channel, recalled that Carroll had proposed a weekend of Beatles music to draw in more listeners but "Ken set him straight. Ken said, 'You're not doing no Beatles weekend on my station.' He could see this new kind of music was catching on."

    KROQ's ratings soared in the 1980s, leading the FCC to award the license to Roberts in 1985. A year later he sold the station to Infinity Broadcasting for a record $45 million. KROQ, at 106.7 FM, is now owned by CBS.

    Divorced in 1981, Roberts had no children.

    In 1991 he returned to the radio business with his purchase of stations in Santa Monica and Newport Beach that shared the frequency 103.1. With Snakeskin as program director, a techno-rock format was simulcast on both outlets as MARS-FM. But it failed to find an audience and after a year switched to smooth jazz.

    A risk taker who made and lost fortunes, Roberts had to give up his 112-acre Mandeville Canyon ranch in 2012 after defaulting on a loan from a Connecticut hedge fund. Once listed for $45 million, it was sold at auction for $12 million.

    His turnaround of KROQ remained his most notable success.

    "We were this tiny little station in Pasadena with a crappy signal playing music the other stations wouldn't touch with a barge pole," Blade said. "We all came together under Ken Roberts."
    ...
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  26. #566

    Default Re: Articles 2.0

    http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/...iel-chong-dea/

    Chong was a 24-year-old engineering student when he was caught up in the drug sweep by a DEA task force two years ago.

    On the morning of April 21, 2012, Chong was detained with six other suspects and transported to the DEA field office, where agents determined that he was not involved in the ecstasy ring that was under investigation.

    A self-confessed pot smoker, Chong told investigators he had gone to the University City apartment that Friday night to celebrate April 20 — an important day for marijuana users — and spent the night.

    After being interviewed at the DEA field office Saturday, agents told Chong he would be released without charges and driven home soon.

    But agents forgot about him and Chong spent the next four and half days inside the five-by-10-foot cell without food, water or a toilet. He said his screams for help went unanswered.

    Chong was discovered near death on Wednesday afternoon. Agents called 911 and he was rushed to a hospital. Chong spent four days in the hospital for multiple conditions but has since recovered.
    In a harrowing news conference days after his release from Scripps Memorial Hospital, Chong said he smashed his glasses and swallowed the broken shards in an unsuccessful suicide attempt.

    He told a room packed with television news cameras that he was so delirious from hallucinations and dehydration that he tried to scratch “Sorry mom” into his arm with the broken glass as a goodbye message.
    Can't really wrap my head around this...

    The Inspector General’s summary said three case agents — one DEA employee and two task force officers — were responsible for making sure Chong was properly processed but failed in that responsibility.

    “Their failure to ensure that Chong was released from custody after deciding that he would not be charged resulted in Chong’s unjustified incarceration from April 21 to April 25, and his need for significant medical treatment,” the summary states.

    The review also cited a DEA supervisor for placing two of the agents involved in Chong’s detention in charge of the investigation into what happened.

  27. #567
    Coachella Junkie chairmenmeow47's Avatar
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    Default Re: Articles 2.0

    i find this both fascinating and infuriating

    http://www.thenation.com/article/180...million-rapes#

    How Did the FBI Miss Over 1 Million Rapes?
    Systematic undercounting of sexual assaults in the US disguises a hidden rape crisis.


    Soraya Chemaly June 27, 2014

    Earlier this month, a 911 dispatcher in Ohio was recorded telling a 20-year-old woman who had just been raped to “quit crying.” After she provided a description of her assailant, the caller went on to say, “They’re not going to be able to find him with the information that you’ve given.” This incident had its viral moment, sparking outrage at the dispatcher’s lack of empathy. But it also speaks to the larger issue of how we are counting rapes in the United States. Sixty-nine percent of police departments surveyed in 2012 said that dispatchers like this one, often with little training, are authorized to do the initial coding of sexual assault crimes.

    That’s important, because miscoding of such crimes is masking the high incidence of rape in the United States. We don’t have an overestimation of rape; we have a gross underestimation. A thorough analysis of federal data published earlier this year by Corey Rayburn Yung, associate professor at the University of Kansas School of Law, concludes that between 1995 and 2012, police departments across the country systematically undercounted and underreported sexual assaults.

    Yung used murder rates—the statistic with the most reliable measure of accuracy and one that is historically highly correlated with the incidence of rape—as a baseline for his analysis. After nearly two years of work, he estimates conservatively that between 796,213 and 1,145,309 sexual assault cases never made it into national FBI counts during the studied period.

    That’s more than 1 million rapes.

    The estimates are conservative for two reasons. First, in order to consistently analyze the data over time, Yung looked only at cases defined by the FBI’s pre-2012 definition of rape (one established in 1927): “carnal knowledge of a female forcibly and against her will.” This definition did not include anal or oral rape, cases involving drugging or alcohol, or the rape of boys and men. The Federal Criminal Code was recently broadened to include these categories. Second, the FBI and crime experts estimate that anywhere from 60 percent to 80 percent of rapes are never reported to the police.

    Yung’s analysis, which focused on cities with populations of more than 100,000, found that 22 percent of the 210 studied police departments demonstrated “substantial statistical irregularities in their rape data.”

    “It’s probably true that in all cities there is undercounting,” explains Yung. “However, forty-six outlier cities appear to be undercounting on a consistent, high level, which makes sense because you have to show [improved crime statistics] results year over year, and you get into a trap where you have to improve upon already low numbers.” Even worse, the number of jurisdictions that appear to be undercounting has increased by 61 percent during the period studied.

    How are police departments undercounting sexual assault?

    One of the primary ways is that officers discount victim testimony, categorizing complaints as “unfounded” or reclassifying allegations of rape as “noncriminal” minor offenses. In 2013, a 196-page report by Human Rights Watch documented widespread, systemic failures in the Washington, DC, police department’s handling and downgrading of sexual assault cases. Last month, an externally run audit of the New Orleans police department found that 46 percent of forcible rapes were misclassified. The New Orleans study indicted the department for having submitted rape statistics that were 43 percent lower than those from twenty-four comparable cities. And in Baltimore, reported rapes showed a suspicious 80 percent decline between 1995 and 2010, compared with a 7 percent national reduction. Yung also reveals that officers sometimes simply fail to write up reports after rape victims are interviewed.

    Second, police departments have been found to destroy records and ignore or mishandle evidence, which leads not only to undercounting but dismissal of cases. Many of the jurisdictions showing consistent undercounting are also, unsurprisingly, those with rape kit backlogs (there are more than 400,000 untested kits in the United States). Many cities and states don’t even keep accurate track of the number of rape exams or of kits languishing, expired or in storerooms—but when they do, the numbers improve. The arrest rate for sex assault in New York City went from 40 percent to 70 percent after the city successfully processed an estimated 17,000 kits in the early 2000s. However, it is only in the past year, after embarrassing and critical news coverage, that most departments have begun to process backlogs. After being publicly shamed for having abandoned more than 11,000 rape kits, the Michigan State Police began testing them, identifying 100 serial rapists as a result.

    Third, police departments continue to ignore rapes of women thought of as “fringe,” including prostitutes, runaways, trans women, drug addicts and people considered transient. Women of color in particular face difficulties. For example, for years, women repeatedly went to the police in Cleveland to report that Anthony Sowell had raped, beaten or otherwise violently assaulted them at his house. Little was done until 2009, when police finally found eleven decomposing bodies of women there.

    Fourth, people making complaints are often harassed out of pursing them. In 2012, the police department of Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh, was held liable in a case in which police accused a reporting victim of lying during her interview, at one point telling her, “Your tears won’t save you now,” and failing to pursue the investigation. In St. Louis, victims were strongly urged by police to sign Sexual Assault Victim Waivers absolving police from responsibility to investigate or report the crime as a rape to the FBI. Yung points out in his report that until relatively recently, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department defied the law by using so-called “corroboration requirements” and reporting only those assaults deemed, in the words of LA police and prosecutors, “winnable” in court (“corroboration requirements,” referring to evidence supporting victims’ claims such as bloody clothes or bruises, have deep roots in jurisprudence but are no longer legal in most of the country, including California).

    Victims of sexual assault still encounter hostility, doubt and aggressive questioning. When they do not conform to officers’ preconceived ideas about how rape victims “should” act, officers’ implicit biases come into play and, as a result, victims often feel they are the ones being investigated. These issues are often compounded by racism. Native American women, who suffer the highest rates of sexual assault in the country, describe being questioned about mental illness, drug use, alcohol abuse and more when reporting assaults. While some jurisdictions have substantially improved their policies, with many women reporting compassionate treatment by police, many others continue to report the opposite.

    These preconceptions, rooted in myths about rape and a still-powerful cultural predisposition to blame victims, are serious and consequential. Police officers display the same implicit biases as the general public, a tendency also evident at colleges and universities, where campus police are often more focused on investigating the credibility of victims than in whether or not their vulnerability was exploited in a predatory way. Studies show a strong correlation among police officers between rape-myth acceptance, sexist attitudes and an unwillingness to process or investigate reported assaults.

    Interestingly, the longer an officer has worked in a sexual assault unit, the less likely he or she is to believe in false claims. A majority of detectives with between one and seven years of experience believe that 40 percent of claims are false—in some cases that number is as high as 80 percent. But among officers with more than eight years’ experience, the rate drops precipitously, to 10 percent. On campus or off, these beliefs persist, despite the fact that rates of false allegations of rape are well understood by criminologists and other social scientists to be between 2 percent and 8 percent, in line with false allegations of other crimes.

    The other aspect of bias is that it informs not only attitudes toward victims but also those regarding perpetrators. Racism and sexism conspire both in police assessments of the credibility of victims and in the targeting of potential perpetrators. Estelle Freedman describes the sex- and race-based historical roots and contemporary legacies of both of these biases in her sprawling examination of rape in America, Redefining Rape.

    While police departments are not immune from these legacies, change is possible. In 1999, the Philadelphia Police Department improperly handled 2,300 out of 2,500 rape cases. As late as 2003, the unit investigating sex crimes was jokingly referred to as “the lying bitch unit.” In the wake of widespread criticism and protest, the department began a partnership with the Women’s Law Project to improve response to sex crimes, in an approach that subsequently became known as “the Philadelphia Model.” Both Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey and WLP executive director Carol Tracy testified at a 2010 Senate hearing that reviewed police handling of sex crimes, and in 2011, Ramsey convened a Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) summit. The resulting 2012 report, Improving the Police Response to Sexual Assault, which included research and commentary from multiple jurisdictions and advocacy groups, concluded that while progress is being made, many of the problems that existed in Philadelphia persist in other police jurisdictions.

    Two weeks ago, Tallahassee police chief Michael DeLeo agreed to allow PERF to review and analyze his department’s policies, largely because of critical coverage of his department’s egregious mishandling of the 2012–13 sexual assault case involving Florida State University football player Jameis Winston. Almost all of the common procedural failures responsible for undercounting were illustrated in that case, so it is unlikely the complaints against Winston were included in the FBI’s annual count.

    If we are to improve the handling and reporting of sexual assault crimes, external audits are critical, as is training of police departments by advocacy groups like the WLP. The fundamental approach of most police departments hasn’t change much in thirty years: training is not uniform or reliable, and often comes only at the behest of community advocates. Last year, the International Association of Chiefs of Police, whose membership comprises 21,000 departments, received a $450,000 grant from the federal Office on Violence Against Women to conduct training. While heartening, that comes out to roughly $22.50 per department.

    In the meantime, as Yung puts it, “the sheer magnitude of the missing data…is staggering.” Of course, we need far more than improved police work, and undercounting is only part of the problem. Even when cases are properly recorded and investigated, the patterns evidenced in Yung’s analysis and the PERF report are reproduced in courtrooms, where rapists in most states still have the right to sue for custody of the children born of their assaults. And only 3 percent of rapists are ever imprisoned—that’s a crime we aren’t talking about.

    Yung believes that these statistical distortions have significantly altered the nation’s historical record and understanding of rape in America. Accurate counts are vitally important—not only for the historical record, but because the data are used by academics, analysts, legislators, law enforcement officials, social justice advocates and media to determine trends, analyze crime, set policy and allocate resources. Law enforcement officials who are dedicated to addressing these problems understand that higher reporting numbers are a sign of trust in police departments.

    Yung’s report, by the way, is titled “How to Lie with Rape Statistics: America’s Hidden Rape Crisis.”
    Quote Originally Posted by malcolmjamalawesome View Post
    It's when we discuss Coachella that we are at our collective dipshittiest.

  28. #568
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Articles 2.0

    Ugh, that's awful. That needs to change.
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Because fucking millenials that's what

  29. #569
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    Default Re: Articles 2.0

    There was a discussion on Facebook about bedbugs, today I came across this article:

    http://healthyliving.msn.com/health-...-their-bites#1

    It's kind of gross, but helpful. I just can't post to facebook from work, so I thought I would leave it here for Salah.
    Quote Originally Posted by SlowMotionApocalypse View Post
    I have snuck in weapons before
    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    A butt plug is not a weapon.

  30. #570
    ankle biter guedita's Avatar
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    Default Re: Articles 2.0

    Hey so just a heads up: The New Yorker has put up every single article since 2007 for free on their website, but it's only going to be available for 3 months and then they are moving to a paid subscription service.

    8/30: Peaking Lights @ The Chapel
    9/3: Bear in Heaven @ The Independent
    9/11: Tomas Barfod @ The Rickshaw Stop
    9/12: Shifted @ Mercer
    9/24 - 28: Decibel Festival
    10/3-5: Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival
    10/4: Ought @ BoH
    10/5: The War on Drugs, Cass McCombs @ The Fillmore
    10/18-19: Treasure Island Music Festival

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