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Thread: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

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    old school Stefinitely Maybe's Avatar
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    Default The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    This has been doing the rounds on facebook etc so I decided to write mine today, and figured I'd post it here. Please feel free to contribute your own list, too.

    1. NWA - Straight Outta Compton

    I grew up in the leafy middle-class suburbs of North London, and went to a strict private boys school. All I remember listening to when I was a kid is inane daytime radio, or my parents' MOR vinyl collection - Barry Manilow, Simon & Garfunkel, Lionel Richie, The Beatles, etc - which was great, but fely very unexciting and unradical at the time. Then, when I was 9, my parents suddenly divorced, and my Dad moved into a small flat in Islington with the woman who was later to become my stepmother (and even later to become my ex-stepmother, when they too divorced). I used to visit him there every weekend, and after a few weeks I started hanging out with a kid who was the same age as me, whose aunt lived in the flat downstairs. His parents had also recently divorced, and we were both restless and displaced, and so we became friends almost immediately, despite the fact that we were polar opposites in almost every other way. Looking back, it's like I was living a double life - spending the weeks in the suburbs, at private school, with my Mum, and the weekends in the city with my Dad and my new friends who liked to hang out in arcades or go robbing sweet shops. Anyway, I had never really paid that much attention to music until I was sat playing computer games with these new friends one weekend, and they put "Straight Outta Compton" on the stereo, and I felt like it literally blew my mind. People swearing and singing about guns and bitches! Phat beats and ill rhymes! I had never heard anything like it. It was like a whole other world, and it sounded so fucking cool. So I got a copy of it on tape and took it home with me and would secretly listen to it over and over again on my headphones, in my bedroom or at school - and suddenly it made the misery of my life as a ten year old outcast in the London suburbs seem much more bearable. Interestingly, I've never been able to love a hip-hop album in the same way again, no matter how many times I've tried. I've just never heard anything that could compare, or blow my mind in the same way this record did.

    2. Prodigy - The Prodigy Experience


    So, I spent most of my time listening to NWA and being really disappointed by mainstream music and the stuff on the radio, and then I heard the Prodigy. Again, I thought the beats were amazing, and the samples and tunes were fucking AWESOME, and they just sounded badass. I started listening to this album on repeat, alongside NWA, all the time, and it really made me interested in music during a time when the rave scene was boring me shitless. The Prodigy are still fucking ace, too.

    3. KLF - The White Room

    The one great band which emerged from that whole rave scene for me was The KLF. They seemed to actually have something to say; and a purpose. I got this album and listened to it EVERY SINGLE MORNING in the car on the way to school and then EVERY SINGLE AFTERNOON on the way home. My poor Mum had to put up with it too. She is a saint. It wasn't just the songs that affected me, though; it was also their anti-establishment stance, when they started doing stuff like burning a million quid and self-destructing at the Brits, and Bill started writing his mental books. And "America (What Time Is Love)" is still a fucking TUNE.*

    4. Nirvana - Nevermind

    Looking back now, it seems almost inevitable that I would fall in love with this album. But at the time I had never really paid any attention to guitar music, or shown any interest in "rock bands" before. But I remember being at a party, when I was about 15, and I was really shy and had never even really talked to girls before, and this GORGEOUS girl came up to me and said "What music do you listen to?" and I said "NWA, Prodigy, and The KLF" and she said "I've never heard of them" and I was devastated. So I said "What do YOU listen to?" and she said "Nirvana" and I thought "Fuck... right... well if that's what girls are listening to, I'd better check them out." I never saw that girl again, but I did check them out, and fell in love; not just with Nirvana, but also with guitars.**

    5. Oasis - Definitely Maybe

    Nirvana were great, but they were from Seattle, and felt very distant from my everyday life. Then, in 1994, Kurt died, and there was a sudden hole in my musical landscape. I was 16 years old and wanted something I could really relate to, and feel a part of. And one day I heard "Cigarettes And Alcohol" on a mixtape, and I remember the hairs on the back of my neck standing on end. I loved the attitude of the songs; their simplicity, and their brutality, and their honesty (although of course if I'd ever listened to The Stones I would have known this was nothing new, but I hadn't, so it was). Noel Gallagher had written some of the best hooks and choruses I had ever heard, and he had an amazing way of writing lyrics that meant nothing but also everything at the same time.*** And I remember just listening to this album on repeat a million times and becoming obsessed with the final track 'Married With Children' and thinking, "Right, that's it, I need to get a guitar and learn to play that". So I did.

    6. The Manic Street Preachers - Everything Must Go

    The Britpop explosion followed and it was great to feel like a part of something new and exciting, but the most disappointing thing about it all, for me, was that most of the bands seemed to be so fucking dull, with nothing to say for themselves. The Manics were obviously an exception to this. They were intelligent and exciting, and Richey's lyrics were incredible. I could have put any of their albums here, but I think this one is actually my favourite Manics album of all. I think the songs are really strong, and the fact that it was the first post-Richey release meant a lot to me at the time.**** Plus this album has greatly influenced the people I've met and made friends with later in life, too.

    7. Oasis - Be Here Now

    I'm reluctant to put two Oasis albums on my list, but I'd simply be lying if I didn't include this here. I have to. It absolutely marks the end of an era for me - not just musically, but personally, too. For me, this album was the end of Britpop. It's overblown, and pompous, and bloated, and self-important, and ridiculous. It sounds like a bunch of guys blowing millions of pounds in a recording studio whilst taking loads of drugs. Which, of course, is exactly what it was. Nevertheless, it has some great songs on it, and also holds massive personal significance for me. I was really excited to hear it, because I had loved "Definitely Maybe", and "What's The Story", and been to the Knebworth gigs, and my expectations were high. And it just so happens that this album was being released on the exact same day I landed in the United States to start my year of studying abroad there. In my final few days in England I remember listening to Noel and Liam doing countless radio interviews and playing snippets from the album, and being more and more excited to hear it, and to be going abroad. Then, on the day I arrived in the US, a contact from the university met me at the airport, and we were in the car on the way back when she had to stop to get some food for her dog at a pet shop. She asked me if I wanted to go with or stay in the car, and I spotted a comic shop next door, so I said "I'll go in there and meet you back at the car". I went into the comic shop and said hello to the man behind the counter and he heard my accent and immediately wanted to have a conversation with me, about comic shops in London etc. We got to talking about English bands and then he said "Oh, the new Oasis album came out this morning; I just bought it but it's not really my kind of thing. Do you want to buy it off me for $5?" I couldn't believe it. It felt like fate. So I bought it off him, and listened to almost nothing else during my entire time in the States. It was the soundtrack to everything that happened to me over there - all the friends that I made, and the girlfriends I had, Princess Diana dying, missing my friends and family over here, etc etc. - plus many of the songs are about travelling, and missing people, and falling in and out of love; so at times it felt like it had been written just for me. Plus, the first track of this album is still my favourite opening track of any album ever: the bombast of the opening 30 seconds of "D'You Know What I Mean" is the closest I've ever come to the musical equivalent of a line of coke. I kind of wish Noel and Liam had called it a day after this album; Oasis would surely have been remembered as one of the greatest bands of all time, and we wouldn't have had to put up with some of the mediocre stuff they've released since.

    8. Blur - 13

    In my opinion, the first great post-Britpop album; by one of the most important Britpop bands. I fell in love with this album, and again it has a lot of personal significance for me. I was in Prague for a week, and I remember walking around the city and mostly listening to this album, on my Discman. And one night I was in a bar and I met this Finnish DJ / snowboarder dude there, and we got chatting about music, and both bonded over Blur. Then, on my last night in Prague I got REALLY ill, and had a fever and an epic flu, and I remember being really worried because I was alone and would have to check out of my hostel the next morning and wasn't due to fly home till the evening, so I had no idea what to do or where to go. But I checked out of the hostel, and walked out to the street with my bags, feeling like I was about to die, and suddenly who should walk past but the Finnish dude from the bar a few nights ago! So he said "What's up?" and I said "I'm leaving tonight, but I actually feel really ill" and he said "Well I'm just going home, do you want to just spend the day in my flat and chill out" and I said "Actually that would be amazing". So we went back to his flat and he gave me medicine and we just sat and talked and put this album on repeat in the background, and I remember thinking the universe has a weird way of always making sure that things turn out okay.

    9. Radiohead - The Bends

    Not much to say about this one except that it is the closest to a 'perfect' album I have ever heard, and the first album that really made me pay attention to Radiohead, and they've influenced me as much as any other band ever. They're always amazing, and still continue to be absolutely influential, with everything they do. And despite the fact that most 'real' Radiohead fans might scoff, this is still my favourite album of theirs. Fucking brilliant.

    10. Elbow - The Seldom Seen Kid


    The most important album of the past few years, for me. Another one of great personal and musical significance. If you take the feeling of being wrapped in a safe warm blanket and put that on record, this is what it would sound like. I fell in love with Elbow the first time I ever heard them; standing in the Virgin Megastore in Harrow and hearing 'New Born' come on over the speakers, years and years ago. Since then I've loved each and every one of their albums equally, and seen them in concert well over 20 times. Their lyrics and songs have probably touched me more than any other band ever. They always felt like a bit of a cult secret, but then this album came out, and then they won loads of awards, and obviously now they are a lot more than that, and I am more than happy for them*****. But following this album from its inception to the present day - from first hearing some of the songs at a tiny secret gig, to following them around West Coast USA on their tour there last spring, to seeing them win loads of awards and headline Wembley - has been a really special experience, and I still listen to it several times a week, and it's been the soundtrack to a year of really important decisions and realisations. I have spent many many nights lying awake and listening to 'Some Riot' on repeat and having it make me feel better about things, and for that I am eternally grateful.


    * And last year I got to participate in Bill's "The 17" project, andI got to meet him, and talk to him, and I am listed in his book! My life is amazing.
    ** And a few years ago I went to a secret Foo Fighters gig at the Underworld in Camden, and I got to meet Pat Smear and Dave Grohl, in person; and I have also seen Courtney Love and eaten one of her birthday maccaroons! My life is amazing.
    *** And if you had told me - back then, as a teenager, when I was standing amongst the 150,000 people at Knebworth - that I would one day have a drink with Liam Gallagher in a pub in Camden, and then one day meet Noel Gallagher, and go to his house, and then be in a band and support him in Moscow and party with him backstage; well, I would have thought it beyond my wildest dreams. But I did. My life is amazing.
    **** And a couple of years ago I met James Dean Bradfield at an aftershow party and he shook my hand and chatted with me and was lovely! My life is amazing.
    ***** And last year I got to rehearse with them all for two days and then sing with them, onstage, at the Royal Festival Hall! My life is amazing.
    "The first time I heard the new single off the Bravery album, I actually cried, and I do not even remember the name of that damn song. It reminded me of this girl I am in love with." - kroqken

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    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    1.R.E.M.-Out of Time: The first real musical memory I have was driving with my family through a red rock canyon in Arizona with this album playing as the sun set. It was just so perfect for that landscape, and it's an image that always comes up when I hear these songs. Even Shiny Happy People.

    2.Metallica-Ride the Lightning: Most of the music I listened to throughout my childhood was whatever my dad had on. That included lots of REM, The Smiths, Pearl Jam, Alice In Chains, and generally lots of good stuff. As a result, I never thought to question his taste when he told me something was "crap." We were watching MTV and the video for Turn the Page came on. We both liked it, and I decided to explore Metallica some more. I went to K-Mart (which was the only place to get music in my hometown) and Ride the Lightning was the only Metallica album they had. I picked it up, expecting that grungy southern rock sound. Fight Fire With Fire started and I was startled. I didn't think it was the same band. I initially disliked that track, but Ride the Lightning and For Whom the Bell Tolls were perfect. I played those on repeat for months on end; I even convinced our bus driver to play it on the way home from school. My parents hated it, and I realized that I was finding things that were my own.

    3.Fugazi-The Argument: Metallica turned me from a nerdy book addict into a nerdy music addict. I turned to finding anything that looked interesting to me, and realized that I liked stuff that was being called "punk" on the radio and MTV, stuff that sounded quite a bit like Green Day (a band I'd heard on the radio all the time as a kid and always liked). I was reading Rolling Stone at my Grandma's house and their review of The Argument said: "The Argument, Fugazi's eighth album, is a bracing corrective to the misconceptions of punk's original intent." I was intrigued, and just happened to find a copy at a small record store in Mammoth Lakes. When I played it, it didn't sound like punk. It was reserved, oddly chaotic at points and not conventionally melodic or poppy. I wrote it off at the time, but that album wormed it's way into my head. I found myself oddly compelled to return to it time and again. When I talked about them to my friends with similar taste, they had never heard of them. From here, I started to dig.

    4.Minor Threat-Complete Discography: After Fugazi, I started to read and research more about music, hunting down all the classic records I was reading about and generally getting a grasp on the history of punk, metal and anything else I could get my hands on. When I first listened to Minor Threat, I had one of those epiphany moments; despite the fact that these songs were all recorded before I was born, they sounded so fresh and exciting. I liked that they were loud fast and angry, but also intelligent and had a good sense of what makes a song work. I played the shit out of this cd, and it remains both one of my favorites and the record that showed me how perfect punk can sound.

    5.Yeah Yeah Yeahs-First EP: The first album I ever downloaded. I know that's a ridiculous reason to say it changed my life, but in a way that first act showed me how wide the breadth of the current musical landscape was, and how I could find just about anything with enough searching. I had read about the YYYs and they sounded like something I'd love. K-Mart didn't carry their albums though, so I didn't have any way to get ahold of them. Then I saw all those news reports on Napster and though, "Hey, why don't I try that?" I had to go to the school my mom teaches at, because our home internet was so slow that I couldn't even download the program to run Napster. I got the album, fell in love with it, and found a whole new world.

    6.Belle and Sebastian-Dear Catastrophe Waitress: By senior year of high school, myself and a group of friends were known around school as the music guys. While I liked being associated with that, and specifically with punk, which I was mired deep into (had liberty spikes, wore studded belts, back patches, the whole 9 yards), I was starting to find that I didn't connect with the anger and drive as much. I was reading frequently again, and my group of friends was coming out of the pit of high school angst. In Belle and Sebastian I found the perfect soundtrack to the positive future that I was starting to find myself heading towards. My best friend's older brother made me a mix with tracks from B&S and Elliott Smith, and I couldn't get enough of it, so he gave me a copy of this album when it came out. It soundtracked the end of my senior year and remains one of the most ecstatic sounding records I own.

    7.Slint-Spiderland: I had seen Mogwai live, and was a fan of G!YBE, but I was never obsessed with dark, brooding post-rock like I was with Spiderland. I bought the album my first year of college because I saw it in Amoeba and really liked the cover. THe songs were so stark, violent and yet beautiful. I'd rarely heard music so moving and captivating. Also, this one, along with Fugazi and Television and some other bands I was getting more into at the time, showed me how, even working within the limits of underground rock, people could stretch and contort new sounds and astonishing records.

    8.Neutral Milk Hotel-In the Aeroplane Over the Sea: It's almost cliche to say that about this particular album, but it's pretty true. When I got this, I was pretty much still a high schooler in mindset, with all the insecurities and dependencies on others that can suggest. Over the summer between my first and second years of college, this soundtracked the soul searching and changing I went through. I realized that I had changed over the year, that I didn't really know my friends and my home town in the same way. Being from a small town, it was quite a shock to find this, and this album was a source of comfort. It's no lie to say I listened to it every single day, and it really moved me time and again.

    9.The Mae Shi-Hlllyh: Last year was a blast for me. I was finishing up college, living with some great friends, booking concerts for a student group, working at radio and just generally doing everything I love, which includes going to tons of concerts. I saw the Mae Shi in 2007, liked the show, and decided to check them out again after that. Then, I went again, with some friends. And the next time, with more people. Soon, we were seeing them every time they played, and we were always blasting Hlllyh wherever we went. We played the album, acoustically, on the beach in Venice. A few of us incorporated pieces of the album into peformances. Jeff, the guitar player, would come up and talk to us before shows. This is what my community of friends sounds like.

    10.Deerhunter-Microcastle: Not a whole lot for me to say about it. It just locked on and wouldn't let go.
    Last edited by bmack86; 02-20-2009 at 06:27 PM.
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  3. #3
    Coachella Junkie bballarl's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    I will do this some point this evening. I enjoyed reading yours Stef.

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    Member justinaqui's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    this is pretty intense, and I feel like it will be interesting to think about the subject just for myself. thanks for sharing, and i look forward to reading other responses.

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    Coachella Junkie chiapet's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    I don't think I have the energy to dredge into my past but I'm really enjoying your posts. Stef, I am a wee bit envious of your amazing life.

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    Coachella Junkie MissingPerson's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Stef, your bit about Straight Outta Compton made me get all shiny-eyed about how awesome music is.

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    old school CrimesceneCookie's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    In order of discovery...


    Frankie Goes To Hollywood - Welcome to the Pleasuredome
    It was 1984, I was a geeky awkward 14 year old, not smart enough to fit in with the nerds, not hip enough to fit in anywhere else. This was the 2nd album I bought in my teen years (first was General Public's "All the Rage"). Something about the music on this album made me stand up and take notice... like this is what music could really be. The title track "Welcome to the Pleasuredome" took up one whole side of the album, and just devastated me every time. It was an adventure. It was also important for more obvious reasons (gay), but stories like that are always a boring dime a dozen.


    Depeche Mode - Some Great Reward
    Same year. This music was so weird to me that I thought it was punk at first. It had never occurred to me that music could be all electronic until I was getting my first doses of Depeche Mode. (Kraftwerk would be discovered later on for me.) Something about these sounds were so compelling that I became very obsessed with them. I would bike over to Hyde Park Records in Irvine and slowly buy every Depeche Mode record I could get my hands on. Every colored vinyl, every remix, every 12" single, I had to have it. It was one of those times in my life that was just swirling with new sounds.


    Talking Heads - Remain in Light
    I liked Talking Heads already, but when I started moving into their back catalogue, this one just took over. I remember thinking that this album is what taking drugs must feel like, but it would be about 10 years before I would confirm that. I found this utterly hypnotic. I would have this on my walkman in English class in high school, just trancing out.


    Love & Rockets - Express
    I entered a goth phase in 1986, probably because of this album. It had a big huge sound, and just rocked, while being psychedelic at the same time. I could feel electricity emanating from my fingertips every time I heard Khundalini Express. It was an empowering feeling that I still get when I put this on.


    Shriekback - Big Night Music
    During the pinnacle of my teen moodiness, this album was quiet, a little spooky, tranquil, and so compelling. I would read the weird names of the instruments they used to make this album (they printed them on the jacket) and it would just seem so mysterious and subversive. Listening to this album was like being in a waking dream. I wish Shriekback had kept making music like this instead of going more poppy in the dissappointing "Go Bang" followup.


    Meat Beat Manifesto - Satyricon
    With all that teen angst behind me, it was now time to rock, and crunchy industrialized electronic beats were all I wanted in the late 80s & very early 90s. I liked Meat Beat already, but this album was everything they could do right. It was hip hop without sounding like hip hop, industrial without sounding like industrial. It was cinematic, catchy, and invoked so much dark energy. I would follow Jack Dangers anywhere to this day.


    Coil - Love's Secret Domain
    Ahh, 1992, the year I discovered alternate realities. I was one foot in the industrial body music world, one foot in the techno-rave world, and this was the best of both. I remember driving around with my music pall at the time, smoking weed, and visualizing every sound this album threw at me. "Windowpane"? Shit. I don't know how anyone could have avoided the temptations of psychedelics after listening to that track. I consider this album to be the soundtrack for a very lovely & very weird summer that year.


    Lemon Jelly - 64-95
    The years went by and I was an adult now, ripe for new sounds, having spent most of the 90s filling my head with techno. I remember the weekend that my roomate played this album for me, and we must have played it 5 or 6 times that night, just hypnotized. It was smooth and cool, yet trippy and totally satisfying my now inherent need for dance beats. Everything clicked once again. I would dive head first into everything Lemon Jelly ever did, wondering why it took me so long to find out what I should have already known.


    Kasabian - Kasabian
    In the middle of somewhat of a 2nd rennaisance in my life, this album came along at just the right time. I wasn't satisfied with strictly rock, or strictly techno, and most band's attempts at infusing both just came off as gimmicky and pandering to me. This album did it right, and it also had just enough Happy Mondays in it to hit me square in the chest. Everything in this album is the perfect tempo, the perfect mood, the perfect execution. There are so many tunes on this record that will be in my top 25 songs of all time, but L.S.F. is just about one of the finest pieces of music ever recorded. No matter where I am or what I'm doing, this one gets me in a perfect mood to move.


    Animal Collective - Merriweather Post Pavillion
    What can be said about this album that hasn't already been said? Of course, it's very new still, but it will always be associated with one of the best Christmases I ever had. I had bought my friends tickets to see AC at the Fonda and the Troubadour, and they had absolutely no idea. When this album leaked Christmas day, the plan was perfect. Late at night, we put this album on and listened to it for the first time. After they heard My Girls, it was time to spring the gifts. I will never forget the looks on their faces. After that, we sat glowing, listening to the rest of this impossibly good album, secure in the knowledge that we were front row center of the highest point in a band's career thus far.
    Last edited by CrimesceneCookie; 02-20-2009 at 09:28 PM.

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    old school Jon Blazed's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    In chronological order…

    DJ Quick – ‘Quick is the Name’
    Too Short – ‘Cocktails’
    Spice 1 - 'Amerikkka's Nightmare’
    Wu Tang – ‘Enter the Wu’
    Outkast – ‘ATLiens’
    Twista – ‘Adreniline Rush’
    Outkast – ‘Aquemini’
    Natorious BIG – ‘Life After Death’
    Tu Pac – ‘Makaveli’
    Outkast – ‘Stankonia’

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    old school Jon Blazed's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life


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    Coachella Junkie stinkbutt's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Fuck 10 I only need 2

    If the first time you heard Sabbath didn't change your life you obviously are whiter than even the whitest of metalheads



    this one is my own I was eating my cereal about to go to school then seen the video for "Closer" have never been the same



  11. #11
    old school Stefinitely Maybe's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    5.Yeah Yeah Yeahs-First EP: The first album I ever downloaded. I know that's a ridiculous reason to say it changed my life, but in a way that first act showed me how wide the breadth of the current musical landscape was, and how I could find just about anything with enough searching. I had read about the YYYs and they sounded like something I'd love. K-Mart didn't carry their albums though, so I didn't have any way to get ahold of them. Then I saw all those news reports on Napster and though, "Hey, why don't I try that?" I had to go to the school my mom teaches at, because our home internet was so slow that I couldn't even download the program to run Napster. I got the album, fell in love with it, and found a whole new world.
    Thanks for sharing, Bryan. I really enjoyed your list but this one in particular resonated with me because I too remember the way it felt the first time I ever downloaded something; it just seemed like suddenly the world of music was limitless and exciting in a whole new way.
    "The first time I heard the new single off the Bravery album, I actually cried, and I do not even remember the name of that damn song. It reminded me of this girl I am in love with." - kroqken

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    The Fro PassiveTheory's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    I might answer this 5 years from now when it actually means something at all...

    Or the next time I get bored.

    Otherwise, it's still an interesting read, so keep posting shit, people.
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    Member seandlr's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    1. atmosphere- when life gives you lemons you paint that shit gold
    2. nirvana- unplugged (if that even counts)
    3. against me!- acoustic ep
    4. brother ali- the undisputed truth
    5. modest mouse- interstate 8
    6. julie ruin- julie ruin
    7. rage against the machine- the battle of los angeles
    8. radiohead- in rainbows
    9. sleater kinney- the woods
    10. wingnut dishwashers union- never trust a man who can play guitar

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    Member KungFuJay's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Blazed View Post
    In chronological order…

    DJ Quick – ‘Quick is the Name’
    Too Short – ‘Cocktails’
    Spice 1 - 'Amerikkka's Nightmare’
    Wu Tang – ‘Enter the Wu’
    Outkast – ‘ATLiens’
    Twista – ‘Adreniline Rush’
    Outkast – ‘Aquemini’
    Natorious BIG – ‘Life After Death’
    Tu Pac – ‘Makaveli’
    Outkast – ‘Stankonia’
    These are mine too. These are the albums that confirmed to me that rap sucked.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Mos Def – Black on Both Sides

    I guess I should start by saying that I’m one of the younger mates on the board, but this album was probably the first album I bought that would have an influence on me. When I started looking at music, hip-hop was the genre I was in to. Mos, Talib, Black Star, Tupac, and many many others were what I was listening to. I was staying away from the radio the best I could, and in high school, that was hard to do. But Mos’s BOBS was the defining one for me. This record is so damn crisp, so well produced, so much freaking talent in every song. The lyrical content is absolutely brilliant. For me, this is one of the greatest hip hop albums ever made.

    The Prodigy – Fat of the Land


    To this day, this is my favorite album of all time. I got it back in high school, right before my sophomore year, just to hear SMBU and Breathe. I fell in love with instantly, and continued to get more by the gang. Prodigy became my near obsession; at one point in time, I had every song, single, and remix they had ever done. But FOTL is the one that started it for me. And now, thanks to this album, I am an electronic music junkie.

    Radiohead – OK Computer

    Cliché, maybe. But you can’t deny the skill in this album. I bought it after hearing all of the hype, and was floored. I spent an entire weekend listening to Subterranean Homesick Alien alone. I considered learning to play guitar just so I could play Exit Music. This album is a masterpiece, and it helped open me up to more forms of alternative and experimental music.

    Ulrich Schnauss – A Strangely Isolated Place

    Ambient music. My very first taste at the landscape-making beauty of ambient music. I remember hearing this back in high school, and I didn’t know what it was. I would show my friends and say “I don’t know what this is, but it could be the most peaceful sounding music I have ever heard”. Thanks to this album, I learned how “peaceful” music could get. This album has played a role in my life, especially through tough times. Ulrich is one of my idols – seeing him perform in a lounge of only 150 people last June was a moment I will never forget.

    Sigur Ros – ( )

    This is an example of an album that you have to listen to as a whole, because that’s just the way it works. You can’t really listen just to one song off of it – the album works as a whole, from start to finish. It tells its own story. If you can grasp that concept, then you realize the brilliance of this album. That is just half of it, too – the other half that made this powerful for me were the lyrics. Words can’t describe how powerful the lyrics are here. When you listen to a song, and you understand what the lyrics mean, then the meaning is “set”, kind of meaning “well this is how the song is supposed to make you feel. Its supposed to make you feel happy” or “its supposed to make you feel sad”. But with a made up language, your mind will decide what they mean, and the interpretation your mind creates for you will always be more powerful than anything someone else can come up with. Combine all of that with the haunting guitar work and string production, and it’s beautifully intense album closer (Untitled 8), and you have an album that the word “masterpiece” can’t describe. Seriously, Sigur Ros could be the most talented band on the planet. When I first heard Radiohead, I said “wow, this is amazing”. When I heard Sigur Ros, I didn’t know what to say.

    Nine Inch Nails – The Downward Spiral

    At first, I wasn’t a big fan, because how dark it was. I felt like I should be taking drugs and taking steps closer to hurting myself and suicide. It just didn’t seem like it was for me. But then I saw them live, and gained a renewed interest in the group. And then, after reading someone’s interpretation of the album, I realized the idea of a “concept album”. In my opinion, Spiral tells the story of a person’s downward slope in life that eventually in his/her own suicide. Some may disagree, but this is what I got out of it, and for me, it’s a brilliant work. Trent is one hell of a mastermind when it comes to making music.

    Underworld – Dubnobasswithmyheadman

    Another EDM masterpiece for me, this album is just one of the grooviest, funkiest works that my ears have ever heard. Prodigy taught me how intense EDM can be, the Chems and Orbital taught me how cheesy yet fun it can be, but this record taught me how you could put “soul” into it. There is more depth and meaning in this album than almost any other electronic album I’ve ever heard.

    My Bloody Valentine – Loveless

    You can’t beat the layered, dreamy sounds of shoegaze. This album will always have a place in my heart due to its unique sound that has constantly been tried to duplicate, but no one has yet to do so the right way. The guitar work on this record is phenomenal; Kevin Shields is a sonic genius.

    Plaid – Restproof Clockwork

    This is the album that single handedly made me a fan of IDM electronic music. The melodies, beats, and rhythms on this piece manage to create a very unique atmosphere when combined together. Sounds that would sound hilarious when heard by themselves are combined to make music that can be so smart that it’s almost scary. “Ralome” is probably one of the most beautiful instrumentals I’ve ever heard.

    The Cure – Disintegration

    I really don’t know what else to say that hasn’t be said already about the above 9 albums, so whatever. This is Robert Smith’s masterpiece and, in my opinion, one of the most accessible forms of gothic rock and new wave out there. The album is solid from start to finish. “Plainsong” is the greatest album opener out there, and is one of my favorite tunes of all time. I’m so thankful that I have to chance to see to these guys before they call it quits.

    Honorable mentions go to:

    Boards of Canada - Geogaddi
    Aphex Twin - Selected Ambient Works 85-92
    Orbital - Brown Album
    The Chemical Brothers - Surrender
    Rage Against the Machine - Evil Empire
    Primal Scream - Vanishing Point
    The Flaming Lips - Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots
    Overseer - Wreckage
    Burial - Untrue

  16. #16
    Entry level Alt kitt kat's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    I feel this would just read like my top 10 albums list.... ?

  17. #17
    old school Stefinitely Maybe's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Quote Originally Posted by kitt kat View Post
    I feel this would just read like my top 10 albums list.... ?
    No, this is a totally different thing. Several of the ten albums I named would not make it onto my top 10 albums list, but I cannot deny the effect they had on my life and way they shaped me at the time, and the way I listened to music.
    "The first time I heard the new single off the Bravery album, I actually cried, and I do not even remember the name of that damn song. It reminded me of this girl I am in love with." - kroqken

  18. #18
    Member justinaqui's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    I'll take a shot at this. The only order to it is that I tried to spread it out so it didn't seem like my entire musical taste was born in the 7th grade. Reading this after typing it all has shown me that genre plays a big part of my music listening. I'm glad I took the time to do it.

    1. Nirvana - "Nevermind"
    This is what changed me from a casual music fan to someone that spends more time on music than anything else. It was the first record I heard that I had to listen to over and over.
    2. Radiohead - "OK Computer"
    I picked this up when I was in middle school. I signed up for the 11 cds for 1 or whatever BMG was offering and it was coming down to the last couple. I'd never heard a song from it, I just picked it because I'd heard of Radiohead. I still listen to it at least once a week.
    3. Outkast - "ATLiens"
    The record that made me a fan of hip hop music. My taste in hip hop is still pretty limited, but without hearing this, I probably wouldn't have started listening to it at all.
    4. Bjork - "Post"
    The contrast of her voice over the percussion and bass in "Hyper-ballad" convinced me that I needed a better stereo system. I was hooked and to this day will still spend time trying to convince someone who isn't hooked yet.
    5. White Stripes - "De Stijl"
    After hearing "White Blood Cells" I was just a casual fan, but this really made me obsessed with The White Stripes. The White Stripes also changed the way my father and I hang out. They opened me up to this bluesy/country genre, and all of a sudden we had a lot more in common. My Black Keys fandom probably starts here too.
    6. Nine Inch Nails - "The Downward Spiral"
    Christ, I should have edited my above post so it wouldn't have looked like I copied from so many. This is his/their best record. I've never thought about it as a concept album, but I can kind of see it now. I do think that you have to listen to the whole thing.
    7. Mogwai - "Come On, Die Young"
    The first "Post-Rock" record I'd heard. I probably spend most of my time today listening to these types of bands, and I love all of them. Mono probably has become my favorite, but this is where it started.
    8. Tool - "Lateralus"
    I hated this record when I first bought it. It was so complicated to me at the time. Ever since, I can't listen to anything that isn't a full album.
    9. Panda Bear - "Person Pitch"
    The token newer album. This was my first experience of whatever people are calling this genre. I listen to Animal Collective a lot more, but I love this record.

    This is absolutely not my top nine albums list. Only two or three are even my favorite album by that person/band.

  19. #19
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    1. U2 - The Joshua Tree
    6 days after I was born, U2 released their greatest work, The Joshua Tree. I don't have a lot of memories of my childhood, especially my early childhood. The only things I remember are a chocolate racecar cake on my fifth birthday, and sitting in the back seat of a little blue car with tinted windows (with air bubbles) and The Joshua Tree playing from the tape deck. Those songs are deeply ingrained into my childhood.

    2. Oasis - What's the Story (Morning Glory)
    When I was 8 years old, my music knowledge was quite limited. I grew up with my cousins, Nat and Val, recording songs off the radio with our tapes. I wasn't a fan of certain bands, just certain singles. That, of course, gets boring, as the radio doesn't have a lot of variety. Then one day, while redeeming a coupon for a free personal pizza at Pizza Hut with my mom, I walked over to their jukebox, which had a free credit in it. At random, I selected "She's Electric" from What's the Story (Morning Glory), and it became the first thing I discovered on my own.

    3. Dave Matthews Band - Crash
    After discovering Oasis, it was just something I kept in my mind. My parents used to not let me get music with the parental sticker on it, and Morning Glory had one, so although I loved Oasis, I wasn't allowed to have their CDs. Meanwhile, my cousin Val got me into Dave Matthews Band, and they ended up being the first band that I would listen to regularly and buy their CDs. They sort of started out as the thing I had to listen to because I wasn't allowed to listen to Oasis, but I fell in love with their music anyway.

    4. Fiona Apple - When the Pawn...
    I think that What's the Story (Morning Glory), Crash, and The Joshua Tree are all important for sentimental reasons, aside from being great works of music; but the first album that I fell in love with for being a masterpiece of music was Fiona Apple's When the Pawn... I used to listen to that CD over and over and over again. I can still listen to that album over and over.

    5. Dave Matthews Band - Everyday
    Everyday pretty much marked the end of my radio days. The radio was really the only thing I could listen to for new music, but after Everyday, I had pretty easy access to the internet, which would lead to many different things. I think this album is amazing though. It's not just great because it changed my life, but because I also put that beast on repeat. To me, this album was like Dave Matthews Band trying to write a When the Pawn... because it's pretty dark for DMB, except for the titular song, which is a very happy song.

    6. Nine Inch Nails - The Fragile
    There was a period in my life where I listened to crap like Staind, Disturbed, KoRn, and Slipknot, and I hated the world, and I wore black clothes, and I was a tortured soul. My fellow tortured souls showed me The Fragile (as well as The Downward Spiral, but The Fragile really hit home), and afterwards, I realized that all those other dark bands were shit. One of the main reasons that The Fragile is important, other than being amazing, is that it was my first influence when I started writing my own music.

    7. Doves - Lost Souls
    This album introduced me to real music. This might be the first album on my list that the entire board could probably appreciate. I came to Lost Souls via the internet. AOL Internet Radio, to be exact. I don't know why--maybe, I was looking for something different--but I would put on the britpop station all the time, and (although they are a 2nd generation of britpop) Doves stood out a lot. Other than leading me back to Oasis, and then paving the path for my further investigations into Blur, Pulp, Massive Attack, Suede, and all those others, Lost Souls also sealed the deal for Coachella. If you all remember, Doves was one of the earliest confirmations for Coachella 2005, and once that happened, I was sold... Of course, it was a shame that they'd drop off the line-up...

    8. Radiohead - OK Computer
    I was reluctant to listen to Radiohead at first. Some friends would tell me about how they were great, but I was always busy rushing off to those other britpop bands. Once I got OK Computer though, I immediately got the rest of their albums. The Bends holds more significance to me because it makes me sad, but OK Computer is what started my Radiohead love.

    9. Sigur Rós - ( )
    During my senior year at high school, the library started making this cool section where you could take out DVDs of movies and TV shows, as well as take out CDs. I took ( ) out of curiosity and burned it on my computer and returned it the following day. This album has made one of the largest influence on my music, and it's eight songs of genius.

    10. Godspeed You! Black Emperor - F#A#(Infinity)
    Of the albums that have influenced my music; The Fragile, ( ), Songs for the Deaf, and others, F#A#(Infinity) made the largest impact. For a while, I tried hard to write music exactly like Godspeed You! Black Emperor. Eventually I started working on my own unique sounds and styles, but some of the music I made in this phase locked in my decision to write music. The songs I wrote for this marked my first performances around El Paso, and my getting serious about music composition.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  20. #20

    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    in no particular order

    Amputenture-the mars volta

    elephant-the white stripes

    sublime-sublime

    nevermind-nirvana

    in rainbows-radiohead

    doolittle-the pixies

    fuck world trade-leftover crack

    electric ladyland- the jimihendrix experience

    raw power-the stooges

    doggystyle-snoop dogg


    honerable mentions

    nevermind the bollocks-sex pistols
    onthe frontline-the casualties
    broken boy soldiers-the racontuers

  21. #21
    Coachella Junkie bballarl's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    The Strokes - Is This It

    People laugh at me when I talk about this record changing my life, but it did, thoroughly and completely. I had been playing guitar for 6 years when this album came out and I had grown increasingly more frustrated with the fact I wasn't Jimmy Page or Eric Clapton. It felt like the guitar held no possibilities for me. I had written my first song the year before, but that felt isolated and accidental. I remember hearing "Last Nite" on the radio and becoming obsessed. That was the first tune I can ever remember downloading on my own, on 56k internet. I listened over and over and over. My grandma took me to Borders in October 2001 and I immediately grabbed this album. I went over to my friend's house afterwards and we listened to this over and over and over again. I had never heard music like this, and at first I was a little disappointed it didn't all sound like "Last Nite." But at the same time, it was so exciting and foreign. I dl'd everything I could get my hands on, including videos from their TV performances and stuff. I remember dling the Two Dollar Bill concert from Morpheus and waiting a couple of days for it to finish on the 56K internet. I remember watching their performance of "Someday" on Letterman and thinking how unbelievably fucking cool they were. This was rock n' roll to me. I could do this. Most importantly, this record coincided with my newfound ability to figure out songs by ear. I figured out the entire album, even some of the solos, and felt really accomplished. I could write songs and start a band. I could do something with my guitar. This record didn't leave the 3-disc changer of my stereo (the Disc One slot) from the day I bought it until the day Room on Fire came out. I can sing the whole thing by heart. And I could talk about the memories associated with this album all day.

    The White Stripes - White Blood Cells

    Essentially the same story as above. Totally fucking blew my mind. It was so raw and exciting and new to me. And I could do it. It occupied Disc 3 in the 3-disc changer from the day I bought it until the day Elephant came out.

    The Hives - Veni Vidi Vicious

    Ditto.

    The Vines - Highly Evolved

    Ditto. All four of these albums were my gateway into so much music.

    The White Stripes - Elephant

    I was already a huge fan and familiar with the first three albums, by way of White Blood Cells, when I heard "Seven Nation Army" leaving Berkeley after my last freshman soccer game. That song, overplayed as it is now, sounded absolutely magical. I had no idea that records could "leak", so I was shocked when some guy on a White Stripes site claimed to have the album. He sent it to me that evening. I listened to it over and over and over again. When it came out, it replaced White Blood Cells in the changer and I spent endless hours listening to it and learning the songs. This record inspired me to buy the Big Muff Pi and the Digitech Whammy. When my friend called me to say he had bought a drum kit, I went over to his house and we jammed on White Stripes songs. My guitar teacher called it primitive (in a good way), but to me it sounded like Bach.

    My Bloody Valentine - Loveless

    I was into garage rock and various offshoots of the genre when I heard this album for the first time. I had never heard of the band before, so I was shocked to see Kevin Shields at something like 96 on Rolling Stone's 100 Greatest Guitar Players of All Time list (ahead of Angus Young, which I felt was incredibly stupid.) I remember one element specifically about the blurb on Shields: that he played at such incredible volume "overtones suggested instruments that weren't even there." I decided to put a bunch of mix CDs together based on the list (each guitar player was accompanied by a song showing off their abilities), and "Only Shallow" was the song for Shields. I had never heard anything quite like it. I downloaded the rest of the album and had never heard anything as beautiful as this album, despite the volume and noise. Loveless was both my introduction to shoegazing and the catalyst of my Anglophilia. It also inspired me to play guitar really fucking loud.

    The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses

    I heard "Love Spreads" on Live 105 and the DJ made a comment along the lines of "I hope this song gets someone who has never heard this band before into them, because they were great." I didn't know what the song was called though, and only remembered the lyric "Yeah, she's my sister." So I searched for it on Soulseek and the song that came up was "(Song For My) Sugar Spun Sister" and the rest of the first album. I dl'd it, and while it wasn't what I was looking for, I became obsessed with it. "Waterfall" just might be my favorite song of all time. This was another crucial record in broadening my horizons beyond garage rock.

    Oasis - What's the Story (Morning Glory)?

    I bought this record sometime during my sophomore year of high school after hearing "Morning Glory" on the radio. For some reason, I vividly remember where I was when I heard that song: it was in the car after an indoor soccer game, listening to Live 105, and it had just finished raining. I had only heard "Wonderwall" and "Champagne Supernova" before, and there was this quality of greatness about this record. It rocked, but it was extremely rich to my ears. I think I fundamentally understood its mood and ambition, though I don't know why. This started my love affair with Oasis, and I maintain they are the best rock n' roll band in the world.

    Ride - Nowhere

    There used to be a program Sunday nights on Live 105 called "Soundcheck", where this guy Aaron Axelsen (who I think is still programming director) would play newer, more underground stuff, as well as old favorites. He loves Britpop and shoegaze, and I remember hearing "Twisterella" one day and being blown away. I bought Nowhere the same day I bought What's the Story... despite it not having "Twisterella" and was struck by its feeling. The heavy drums and beautiful noise on "Dreams Burn Down" blew my mind. Moreso than Loveless, this album began my obsession with the shoegaze sound.

    Pixies - Doolittle

    In 7th grade, a couple of kids and I had a jam session. One of them (who also happened to produce my band's almost-finished new EP 8 years later) suggested we play "Gigantic", but instead we just fucked around and played blues and stuff cause I had never heard tje song or the Pixies. A couple years later, I read about them in Rolling Stone and was fascinated by the description, which was something like "They screamed songs about mutilation and slicing up eyeballs, yet they were nerds at heart." I dl'd Doolittle and it weirded me out a bit at first. But I couldn't stop listening to it. I remember downloading the videos to "Debaser" and "Here Comes Your Man" and thinking, "Man, I wish I had been around to see these guys live." A couple weeks later, they announced the lineup for Coachella 2004, and there were the reunited Pixies. I have been going to Coachella ever since.

  22. #22
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Fun story. I was super super obsessed with Pixies in late 03. I was at Amoeba Berkeley talking to a record clerk and he told me that the reunion that he most wanted to see was Pixies. I concurred, but he told me he doubted it'd ever happen. I got home, and a few weeks later I read that Pixies were getting back together to play Coachella. I literally jumped out of my chair, ran around the house and didn't sleep that night. Nerd fest.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

  23. #23
    Member Mister DVNO's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    I'm tired but I want to do this. Keep in mind I'm 18. Also, my parents never listened to American music, so I grew up on classical music and ABBA, which explains the lack of classic albums such as The Beatles and Pink Floyd. I've listened to them since.

    1. Brand New - The Devil and God are Raging Inside Me

    I grew up listening to Brand New. Call it teenage angst, but I connected a lot with Jesse Lacey's music. Most of his music was borderline Dashboard Confessional, until this album came out. It was raw and majestic. Although the lyrics as far as I'm concerned are still teenage angsty, Jesse jumps across all spectrums of sadness here, going from whispering to full on screaming. I don't know, it remains one of my favorite albums because of how raw it is. It's haunting, but it's beautiful.

    2. The Arcade Fire - Funeral

    Before this album, I was still listening to bands like Job for a Cowboy, Every Time I Die, and other bands with ridiculous names like Cattle Decapitation. Then, my friend Darlene passed this album along to me. It changed me completely. Listening to it from start to end is like following along a story, with Win telling it to you in his wavering voice. With violins, accordions, huge ensembles of instruments... it was a departure from hardcore bands, all playing as fast and as difficult as they could. I came to realize that if 7 band members played simple melodies together, it could sound about 50x better. Changed the way I listened to music forever.

    3. Muse - Absolution

    Matthew Bellamy's vocals are absolutely amazing. He remains one of my favorite vocalists, ever. With all the distortion in this album from Hysteria to Stockholm Syndrome, mixed in with the little ballads thrown here and there, this album was gorgeous from start to finish. Had the chance to see them open for Guns N Roses (I know, right?) my sophomore year. I recall my friend Mark (wearing a bandanna and a Guns N Roses shirt) having his jaw just drop lower and lower as Bellamy made all sorts of weird shit come out of his guitar and hit impossible notes.

    4. Explosions in the Sky- The Earth is Not a Cold Dead Place

    The first track of the album starts with a single guitar note repeated over and over while a bass drum comes in with slowly, like a heartbeat. I'll never forget how I got shivers listening to this album. For months, I had to play through this album at least once a day. It reminds me a lot of my English teacher. He insisted that we always journal in the start of class, and while we wrote he always put on Nick Drake or Iron and Wine. His classroom lights were always dim (I always joked that a sign of the apocalypse would be when the lights were on). Everyone has their writing zone, and his classroom has been mine. I gave him a copy of this CD a few weeks ago as an early present to him, before I graduate. He loves it.

    5. Sigur Ros - Takk...

    I was lying in my friend's bedroom late at night when she put this on. My ears perked up at Saeglopur and I thought my heart was going to split open. I had to get this album and I never regretted it. They call themselves "slow motion rock", I think Sigur Ros's music is the soundtrack to dreams. I had a once in a lifetime opportunity to see them in pit at the Greek Theater. It remains the best show I've ever seen in my life. Grown men and women next to me started to openly sob. Having their music ring out and echo against the trees surrounding the Greek...it was incredible.

    6. Mewithoutyou - Brother, Sister

    Imagine a progressive rock band with a frontman that sounds like a drunk raving lunatic preaching manically. That's Mewithoutyou. This one was a grower...took me a while to embrace the concept. But I started to really get into the man's lyrics...he paints an elaborate picture of scenes and landscapes. There was this one particular lyric that always stuck with me: "You watch me like a ten car highway wreck with detached, vulgar curiosity." I see that look on other people's faces about 50 times a day.

    7. Daft Punk - Alive 2007

    I had always had some mild curiosity for the electronic genre but never found what I wanted in Basshunter and all the house stuff I was referred to. I popped this in my car one day when I was driving to LA and listened to the entire thing through. I owned Homework and Discovery already, but it was a mild interest at the time. I must have jizzed in my pants at least 50 times on the way over. The way all these tracks were dissected and meshed together to create new ones blew my mind. This album provoked me into attending my first electronic show.

    8. Backstreet Boys - Millenium

    This was my dad's favorite album. I'm not kidding. He borrowed it from my younger cousin when I was 9 years old and played it constantly in the living room stereo. It was listenable and catchy but it wasn't really something I was into. Still though what's interesting is that this is when I lived in Hong Kong. When I do hear songs off that album now it brings up memories in the apartment we lived in. Considering that I can't even remember what my room in my apartment looked like, it's a nostalgic thing. On a funny note, a few months ago I had to call my dad (who works in Taiwan) for an emergency, so I dialed his business cell phone. He has a ringback tone that plays while you wait for him to pick up, and it's "I want it that way." I can't imagine what kind of impression that leaves his clients. I think as I turned 10 I tried to be as different as my dad as possible, so I tried not to listen to similar music. I avoided the whole boy band NSYNC fad as a result. Maybe that's why I don't like Keane.

    9. ABBA - Greatest Hits

    So this was the album my parents were obsessed about, and played constantly. Unlike the BB, I also became obsessed with this album. My dad has footage of me pounding my little baby fingers on the bed when I'm 3, pretending to play the piano and singing "Money Money Money" off key in an Asian accent. My parents also dragged me along to see Mamma Mia! countless times. My mom even tried recently to get me to go see the movie version with Pierce Brosnan and Meryl Streep with her. This album was the first music I was ever exposed to, and I guess I really do owe it for not turning me into some dull guy who doesn't listen to music at all (and those people DO exist...I can't really understand that)

    I have so many more albums I'd rather choose but I'll pick just one:

    10. Queen - Greatest Hits

    First album I bought myself with my own money because I really liked the song "We Will Rock You." I ended up falling in love with every single song on the album and had each song turn into an anthem for every possible scenario I would encounter in my life. Don't Stop Me Now is such a happy song that it never ceases to cheer me up. More research into Queen led me to discover Bohemian Rhapsody, which is one of my favorite songs of all time. It brings up this proud moment my sophomore year where my history teacher mentioned Galileo inventing the telescope, to which my friend Craig said "Galileo Galileo!" and I replied "Galileo Figuro!" The ENTIRE class including the teacher joined in and we just sang Queen for a solid 2-3 minutes. One of the fondest moments of my high school career. I have a theory that MIKA is the openly homo resurrection of Freddy Mercury (because his vocal range is RIDICULOUS), but that's just me.

    I hope you guys liked my top 10...and try not to give me too much shit for 8 and 9.


    Mar. 16: Simian Mobile Disco @ Henry Fonda
    Mar. 27: Pelican @ Troubadour
    Apr. 17-19: COACHELLA
    May 2: Yann Tiersen @ El Rey
    May 16: Mogwai @ Orpheum
    May 23: SASQUATCH


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  24. #24
    old school stuporfly's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    I opted for albums released during my initial development as a music fan. There are others I now prefer to some of these, many of which came along before my time. But the following 10 changed everything for me in their time.


    Devo - Freedom of Choice
    I'd followed the herd before this, listening to Kiss and Led Zeppelin during elementary school. Devo felt like they dropped from outer space, and while it found its way to me via a hit single on the radio, it changed the way I sought out music. If this was out there, I reasoned, there was so much more to discover.


    The Clash - Sandinista!
    This was actually one of the last Clash albums I bought, though the music drew me in long before then. I'd already been swept up by the new wave thanks to Devo, but hearing "The Magnificent Seven" on New York City radio was something of a revelation. I was 11 years old, and my friend's father - an entertainment attorney - took us to one of the Bonds Casino shows.


    Duran Duran - Rio
    Bought this after seeing the band on Saturday Night Live. I was 13 years old, and I'd never considered being a musician until I witnessed what Duran Duran did to the girls in my school. I took up the drums a short while later, spending the rest of my high school and college days playing in a host of garage punk and funk bands.


    Minutemen - Double Nickels on the Dime
    If Duran Duran made me want to be a musician first, Minutemen made me want to take my drumming in new directions. It also provided a link to the Southern California that had been a part of my life since my father moved to Los Angeles when I was seven.


    Public Enemy - It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back
    I'd been listening to hip-hop for years, thanks to DJ Red Alert's radio show. But while I'd bought several singles - as well as Licensed to Ill by the Beastie Boys - this was the first album in the genre that felt worthy of its status.


    De La Soul - 3 Feet High and Rising
    Married art and hip-hop in ways I'd never heard before. I was swept up by the whole Native Tongues crew, and this was my gateway drug.


    The Stone Roses - The Stone Roses
    I'm not sure what made me pick up the NME. I'd never paid it any mind before. But an article on the Stone Roses - who'd just released their debut - caught my attention. I sought out an import copy immediately, and wound up immersed in another genre. Some of the other Madchester bands were good, though none were able to match the brilliance of the Stone Roses' initial volley.


    My Bloody Valentine - Loveless
    There are few albums that have left me absolutely floored upon first listen, leaving me to wonder what the fuck I'd just heard. The first few moments of "Only Shallow" was enough to change everything, but the rest of the album continued to unfurl and wash over me. Still stuns me.


    The Verve - A Storm in Heaven
    I'd already bought the first US EP, then went back and bought the full length "Gravity Grave" and "She's a Superstar" singles by the time this dropped. It hit me perhaps more emotionally than intellectually. A poorly attended, but still brilliant show in Atlanta was all I needed to see.


    Primal Scream - XTRMNTR
    Screamadelica was amazing, but they'd kind of been hit or miss since then. This came along at just the right time for me, a heady mix of technology and full on rock. I've no idea if the boastful final track - "I'm 5 Years Ahead of My Time" - is accurate, but I'm still unable to play this album and not feel absolutely electric.
    Quote Originally Posted by garspaceman View Post
    well hello my fancy pants.

  25. #25
    old school JSam67's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    What a great thread, Stef, I definitely need to work on my list.

  26. #26
    Coachella Junkie C DUB YA's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemy View Post
    1. U2 - The Joshua Tree
    6 days after I was born, U2 released their greatest work... The Joshua Tree.
    2. Oasis - What's the Story (Morning Glory)
    When I was 8 years old...
    9. Sigur Rós - ( )
    During my senior year at high school...
    I am old.
    The Glitter Freeze

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  27. #27
    Coachella Junkie C DUB YA's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    OK

    Well let me just say I had to do 25. Why? Because I'm old and have always have life changing experiences thru music.

    Let me also say that some these are not even my favorites by that particular artist (some are) and there are some that are comps or hit packages, but for whatever reason certain comps (Louder than Bombs, Substance) were basically worn out in my stereo (tape deck) compared to the albums proper. Nothing wrong with that, esp. when some of those comps gave us yanks singles we couldn't get otherwise (Please Please, True Faith, etc...)

    Hell, I could make a list of 50/100 albums with no hesitation at all. Because for my 35+ years, almost everyday has had good music playing - kinda staggering when you think about it. I have a reference for almost every album mentioned here in this thread - music surely is the soundtrack of your life.

    I won't get into each one of these unless someone asks why. I'd be glad to tell you.

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  28. #28
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    But, CDub, telling is the whole point of this thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

  29. #29
    Coachella Junkie C DUB YA's Avatar
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    But, CDub, telling is the whole point of this thread.
    alright, I give short burst answers on a few of them:

    Ramones: Ramones
    When I younger (like 10), I was always a Ramones guy instead of a Clash or Sex Pistols guy. maybe it was because I lived in NY at the time? Who knows? While records of theirs since then improved upon their debut - you never forget your first. It was only later on that bands like The Clash and the Pistols joined the Ramones on the same level for me.

    Stone Roses: Stone Roses
    Like a brand new movement in one record. During my first year in college - this ruled my stereo and basically re-kindled my love affair with all things from Manchester, England (something that was always there, thanks to the Smiths) Not only fresh and new to me in sound, but this was just a cool record to own and play, still is.

    The Beatles: Abby Road
    My dad played this more than the other Beatles records - therefore, I heard it more than the White album or Sgt Pepper and it was stuck in my head for ever as a wee little boy. I knew the words of Here Comes the Sun and Come Together at a very early age. The really great thing about this record is I think I look at it in the same light as I did when I was 4, and will prolly love it just as much when I'm 64. Did you guys hear that one of the guys responsible for this is going to be at Coachella?

    Duran Duran: Rio
    I got beat up in 6th grade for wearing a Duran Duran t-shirt. I paid a price for loving something that didn't have ACDC written on it, nuff said I guess. While I listened to Seven and the Ragged Tiger a bit more, I always thought Rio was stronger, and during the MTV heyday, it was hard not to like what they were doing.

    Oasis: Definitely Maybe
    Maybe the last record that I heard cold and was immediately floored. Everything was right for this one to rule my world then. I was over things like grunge or rap (something I never really connected to in the first place), so this was right in my wheel house. 1994 was a good year for me, because it also gave me...

    Blur: Parklife
    An anglophile's wet dream of a record. Songs were catching and fitting of the time, Parklife had everything on it, from dance tunes to melancholy. It still is my fave Blur record even though I love them all. I also never bought into the whole Oasis vs Blur thing. I liked them both then and i still do today.

    The Smith: Louder Than Bombs
    What can I say? This is the true definition of life changing for me. This came right about the time of my own self discover and self-awareness. Couple all that with an amazing catalog of tunes and it all makes perfect sense. Highly affecting right done to the trademark cover art. While I now view this differently in comparison to the actual records, this is still a fine place to hang one's hat. Also thanks to John Hughes.

    U2: War
    Not my favorite U2 record by any means - but it was the first one I bought after hearing Sunday Bloody Sunday on the radio. They have since given albums far greater and far worse than War, but it served as my watershed moment with this band for many many years to come. I will always love them and what they have done, something new fans don't have the luxury of having.
    Last edited by C DUB YA; 02-25-2009 at 07:57 AM.
    The Glitter Freeze

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  30. #30
    thestripe
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    Default Re: The 10 Records That Changed Your Life

    The Beatles-Abbey Road

    I bought this album when I was in high school and fell in love with it immediately, thus starting my obsession with the Beatles. I loved everything about this album, from the sound, track placement, to the cover art. I wasn't necessarily into classic rock at the time I found this album but, I had started to take notice in the 60's era and was beginning to judge music based on that time frame. This album opened my eyes to how genius the Beatles truly were. I want You (She's So Heavy) completely floored me. I had always viewed the Beatles as a "love, love you, hold my hand, cartoon band" and "I Want You" shattered that conception. There were still silly songs on the album, but instead of feeling stupid they felt playful, adding to the fun of listening to a rock album. After hearing this album I wanted to listen to their other albums, so basically this was my real introduction to the Beatles, an act that I still feel is the best thing I'll ever listen too.

    Pink Floyd-Dark Side of the Moon

    My dad used to play this record late at night in our living room. He'd turn off the T.V. sit in his chair and just listen to it, while I laid on the floor coloring or whatever a seven year old does when trying to avoid bed. I remember the album being smooth, and weird. It made me feel like I was watching a movie in my head. The sounds of crazy laughter, money being exchanged, and clocks going off interested me even though I wasn't old enough to fully understand any of it in context. I finally revisited the album in my late teens (as most do) and found that DSOTM still sounded unlike anything I had ever heard. Damn near perfection.

    Nirvana - Nervermind

    This album came out when I was in the 4th grade. I remember this clearly because my 4th grade teacher quit her job in the middle of the school year because her daughter was dying of leukemia. The replacement was a new teacher and was really young. He used music as a reward system. At the end of the week he would pick a model student to bring in a record of his/her choice to play on Friday (no cursing/crude stuff allowed, Jerky Boys was a no go). Well, one week someone brought in an album they had stolen from their older brother. The album was Nevermind. I rode my bike to Music Plus the next day and bought the cassette. I don't think I voluntarily listened to another record for 5 years.

    Peal Jam-Ten

    One year we took a family vacation to Oregon to visit my grandmother. My dad can't really stand his mother in law, so we spent just about everyday playing Golf. All that was played in the car that week was Ten, Out of Time, and Joshua Tree. I remember liking Ten because it was a "rock" album that had big guitars, big vocals, and weird lyrics but didn't sound overblown. There were other bands out there besides Nirvana. Songs from that album still remind me of that trip.

    Radiohead-OK Computer

    At the end of my high school year/beginning of the year I did nothing, I found Radiohead. I was at the point that I was sick of listening to shit punk bands, and classic rock acts that were dead or broken up. I was looking for something new, something that I would never get sick of. I read this article that went "Radiohead the new Pink Floyd?" So I went out bought OK Computer, and so goes the day I found Radiohead story. The album was futuristic, isolated, weird, everything that Y2K was supposed to feel like. I loved everything on it.

    Pixies-Doolittle

    I found the Pixies around the same time I found Radiohead. I was at a record store and saw Doolittle and remembered reading something about how Nirvana owed their sound to the Pixies. Bought the album, and was amazed by how "new" sounded. The album is timeless, and I still haven't put it on and skipped a track. Four years later I would find a festival called Coachella that had the Pixies and Radiohead playing the same day. I was in heaven.

    Radiohead-Kid A

    Bought the album and didn't care for it. I was expecting OK Computer part2, which it was anything but. I was still heavy into OK/the Bends and discarded Kid A for at least a year. That was until I caught a BBC performance of Kid A, and was blown away by how well the songs translated live. Listened to it again and fell in love. The record would go on to be one of my all time favorite albums, and is responsible for turning me on to different genres of music.

    Bob Dylan-Freewheelin' Bob Dylan

    I didn't get into Bob Dylan until I was about 20, and I'm glad. I'm glad because I think when I discovered Freewheelin' I was at age when I could appreciate it. I'm more of a music guy than a lyric guy, but when listening to this album you have no choice but to hear what Bob's say'n. The first time I heard Masters of War, I was blown away. It was the most honest song I had ever heard up until that point. It was protest that was made for a generation decades ago, that still rings true today. This may not be my favorite Dylan album today, but it was a step'n stone to a discography that I hold close to my heart.

    White Stripes-White Blood Cells/De Stijl/ S/T

    2001. Radio sucked, MTV sucked, any decent new bands were pretty much inaccessible. Then I found Napster. I took a shot and DL'd the WS after a friend told me about them. Back then DLing took forever and you never really knew what you were going to get, and to my luck I got something good. WS was the first wave of 00's new band's that I wanted to see live. High energy, mysterious, and guitar driven, I loved how they sounded both new and old at the same time. They had a few albums under their belt, so I felt like I had hit the DL gold mine.

    Neutral Milk Hotel-In the Aeroplane Over the Sea

    I originally put "Pavement-Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain" here, but I decided there was no way I could leave "In the Aeroplane" off. NMH is a band that I discovered directly from the board. I bought the album because of the praise that it received from board members that had similar tastes in music that I had. Aeroplane is an easy album to put on the shelf if you don't give it a "real" listen. With the internet making music so easy to obtain, it's easy to move along to other things and lose good albums in the process. But I eventually gave it the listen that it deserved. ITAOTS is a staple in the albums I listen to. I can easily listen to that thing for a week straight. I can listen to it back to back, regardless of mood and still get a different feeling from it with each listen. It connects with me in a way that I can't really explain, and if I could would probably sound lame. Plus, it's all been said on here before.
    Last edited by thestripe; 03-01-2009 at 07:34 AM. Reason: only had nine, left Dylan out. NMH replaced Pavement.

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