Page 63 of 78 FirstFirst ... 5859606162636465666768 ... LastLast
Results 1,861 to 1,890 of 2313

Thread: Hey, Books

  1. #1861
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    9,112

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Even though I haven't finished Joyce's Ulysses (414/783), I've started to read Jennifer Egan's A Visit from the Goon Squad. I'm enjoying it so far. I'm 75 pages in. It's a nice change of pace from Ulysses, that's for sure. Ulysses has had some extraordinary parts, but not the part I'm currently in, which reads like a big legalese riddle. I peeked at the next section, and it also seems like it could make my brain explode, which is why I've decided to take a break from it.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  2. #1862
    old school RageAgainstTheAoki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,647

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Ulysses is on my list. It's funny, I actually know the closing passage very well thanks to Kate Bush. I love what Joyce wrote about the word "yes".

    Just finished The Year of Magical Thinking. It's been a busy month at work, so it took me forever to finish it. It was so clear-eyed, stark, unflinching. I guess with the subject matter (the death of her husband and the near death of her daughter) I was expecting it to be much more weepy. I'm glad it wasn't. It was probably much more affecting with Didion's somewhat cool approach than it would have been as a chest-pounding sob fest.

  3. #1863
    MENACING Courtney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,961

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I just finished Sarah Vowell's Unfamiliar Fishes, an irreverent history of Hawaii circa 1887.

    I like Sarah Vowell. I like her writing I've heard on This American Life, and I liked hearing her speak when she came to the Hawaii Book and Music Festival last year. But here's the thing: this book was a disappointment. The passages on her experiences in contemporary Hawaii -- her interactions with Native Hawaiian activists and her recalling of pithy comments by her nephew Owen -- sing. But by the end of the book, the actual history-telling devolves into a prolonged and overly-laborious research report of whatever she spent all her time reading in the Mission Houses archives. I wish she could have maintained her snarky, acerbic voice throughout the book instead of noticing the rising page count half way through and then breathlessly racing pack in everything before the finish.

  4. #1864
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    9,112

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Just finished Jennifer Egan's A Visit from the Goon Squad. I liked it, but I wasn't crazy about it. I'm a little baffled about how the Pulitzer works. I think I wasn't crazy about it, because it just reminded me of David Mitchell's books - especially his first novels, Ghostwritten, number9dream, and Cloud Atlas. She experiments with form like he does, although in slightly different ways. She also looks to the future like he did in Ghostwritten and Cloud Atlas. The form of Egan's book is actually a lot like Ghostwritten.

    But something that Egan did better than those three Mitchell books is making a lot of great characters. I loved most of them. Very few sections didn't move me a lot, but even then, I don't know if any sections fell flat. Like Mitchell, some of Egan's "futuristic" parts were the low points for me (the very last part, more so)... but Egan did have some of her best ideas in those parts. Mitchell's ideas of the future always felt too science-fiction, but Egan's is a bit frighteningly real. Of course, in Mitchell's defense, I'm thinking of Ghostwritten more than Cloud Atlas, and Ghostwritten was written about ten years before A Visit from the Goon Squad.

    Whatever about that future stuff, though. It was the stories that took place now and in the past that I liked about Egan's book. There were some really great stories dealing with all the great topics, like death and love and failure and success. And, of course, the music is great. I think everybody on this board would appreciate how she writes about music.

    I don't think I'd read it again, but I'm glad that I read it.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  5. #1865
    MENACING Courtney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,961

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Phenomenally weird Baudelaire prose poem translated into a phenomenally weird youtube:


  6. #1866
    MENACING Courtney's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,961

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I finished Baudelaire's Twenty Prose Poems last night. I learned that my french is not nearly as good as it used to be.

  7. #1867
    VigoTheCarpathian
    Guest

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I'm one third through Jane Eyre by Charlatte Bronte and so far it's about the most beautiful writing I've ever had the pleasure to read.

  8. #1868
    old school RageAgainstTheAoki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,647

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by Courtney View Post
    Phenomenally weird Baudelaire prose poem translated into a phenomenally weird youtube:
    Oh God that was dreadful. Brings to mind some of the misguided student film projects I was involved in back in college. I actually read a Baudelaire collection in college. The Flowers of Evil, I think. Some very sexually charged stuff as I recall. I'm sure it doesn't really compare to reading it in the original language, though.

  9. #1869
    Coachella Junkie boarderwoozel3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    18,350

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    bump

    I'm reading Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond. It's unbelievably informative. And yes, I'm a dork.

    guns-germs-and-steel.jpg

  10. #1870
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Bishop, CA
    Posts
    27,955

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I just read Habibi, the new graphic novel from Craig Thompson, the guy who wrote Blankets. It was pretty damn good, especially considering the themes he deals with in a graphic novel. I thought the imagery really added to the telling of the story, made it more weighty and real. Heavy themes and some really awesome qu'ranic stories.
    Last edited by bmack86; 01-16-2012 at 11:29 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

  11. #1871
    foof roberto73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stately Wayne Manor
    Posts
    2,983

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Yesterday I finished reading Tom Perotta's Little Children. If you've seen the movie you know what you're getting, which probably sounds like an insult but is really a compliment directed to the folks who adapted the novel. The biggest difference is that Ronnie (the pedophile who lives with his mother) is much less sympathetic in the book. In fact, the one big change from book to movie deals with his character. In the film, for those who have seen it, Ronnie does something big toward the end – something horrific and over-the-top that acts as a catalyst for Larry the cop's partial redemption, as well as casting Ronnie as a pitiable, broken human. Know which scene I'm talking about? It's a showstopping moment, but it's not in the book. At all. The scene that is (and I won't give it away) is much more ambiguous (and therefore more realistic), but probably wouldn't have played as well on the big screen.

    Anyway. For those who haven't seen the movie, Little Children is an effective take on the "look how fucked up suburbia is" genre. Perotta – in his typically dry, unadorned style – focuses on the immaturity of the characters and makes the case that no matter how old we get, we make mistakes because we're still essentially the same person we were at 10 years old.

    I've also read a boatload of Young Adult Lit for work, the standout of which is called The Chosen One, by Carol Lynch Williams. It's a troubling story about a young girl in a polygamist cult who learns she's going to be forced to marry her 60-year-old uncle. It's not at all lurid or sensational. Instead, there's a lot of good stuff in it about free will, loyalty, and the transporting power of literature. YA has seriously come a long way since the Hardy Boys.

  12. #1872
    Coachella Junkie weeklymix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    7,332

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Name drop moment, my family is pretty good friends with the actor who played Ronnie. I know the scene you're talking about & read the book. Thought the exact same thing. Definitely not as explicit in the book.

  13. #1873
    Coachella Junkie chiapet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seattle area
    Posts
    20,709

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by boarderwoozel3 View Post
    I'm reading Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond. It's unbelievably informative. And yes, I'm a dork.

    guns-germs-and-steel.jpg
    I hated that book so much. A lot of the ideas he tries to present as facts are... not. I've heard some of his other books are better, but I was so annoyed with him after Guns, Germs and Steel that I haven't picked up any of his others.

  14. #1874
    old school casey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    los angeles
    Posts
    2,657

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by weeklymix View Post
    Name drop moment, my family is pretty good friends with the actor who played Ronnie. I know the scene you're talking about & read the book. Thought the exact same thing. Definitely not as explicit in the book.
    He's Rorschach too, yeah?

    I haven't read Little Children but I really, really loved how the film was done and since then the book has been on my 'need to read' list. Maybe after I finish A Visit from the Goon Squad...
    Quote Originally Posted by Newro7ic View Post
    Lakers fans are some of the most delusional people in the world, I swear.
    my name is casey. i love pavement and i want to pet every dog in the world.

  15. #1875
    Member OnlyNonStranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Calgary, AB
    Posts
    2,423

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by jimmycrackcorn View Post
    Dude i went to the bookstore and saw $35 coverprice and decided to put the book back... That's just OUTRAGEOUS!?! It's not like an oversized book with lots of glossy pictures... Not a textbook in college...

    I called my local library and added my name to the short waiting list to check out the book instead
    -shrugs-
    I got it on my kindle for like $14. Pretty sweet as I have literally no space for a huge hardback book to be floating around my house after I've finished it. I still have to finish Inheritance, just to appease my high school self. Then I was thinking about rereading the Hobbit as I haven't read it since grade 9. Then who knows.

  16. #1876
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    stately Rain Manor
    Posts
    17,454

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by Courtney View Post
    I just finished Sarah Vowell's Unfamiliar Fishes, an irreverent history of Hawaii circa 1887.

    I like Sarah Vowell. I like her writing I've heard on This American Life, and I liked hearing her speak when she came to the Hawaii Book and Music Festival last year. But here's the thing: this book was a disappointment. The passages on her experiences in contemporary Hawaii -- her interactions with Native Hawaiian activists and her recalling of pithy comments by her nephew Owen -- sing. But by the end of the book, the actual history-telling devolves into a prolonged and overly-laborious research report of whatever she spent all her time reading in the Mission Houses archives. I wish she could have maintained her snarky, acerbic voice throughout the book instead of noticing the rising page count half way through and then breathlessly racing pack in everything before the finish.
    With the exception of Assassination Vacation, which I loved, I tend to find her a lot more enjoyable when she's discussing something she's very passionate about instead of something very heavily researched - she seems to allow herself a little more room for playfulness in the writing. Take The Cannoli is good, and contains some of the stories you've probably liked on the radio as well as others written in that same manner. Try that one.

    Speaking of TAL contributors, the new Shalom Auslander book is imminent. I'm excited.

  17. #1877
    Coachella Junkie weeklymix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    7,332

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Currently reading:


    If you plan on reading any Bulgakov, Tolstoy, Pasternak, Gogol, Dostoevsky, or Chekhov please do yourself a favor and get the English translations by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky. They really don't compare to anybody else.

  18. #1878
    Coachella Junkie boarderwoozel3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    18,350

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by chiapet View Post
    I hated that book so much. A lot of the ideas he tries to present as facts are... not. I've heard some of his other books are better, but I was so annoyed with him after Guns, Germs and Steel that I haven't picked up any of his others.
    O rly? I was under the impression that it's considered one of the seminal texts on the subject. Can you remember any specific parts of his argument that you objected to or any texts that provide alternative explanations?

  19. #1879
    VigoTheCarpathian
    Guest

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    The sex scene in Little Children. The sex scene. that damn sex scene.

  20. #1880
    old school RageAgainstTheAoki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    2,647

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Business trip all this week. I'm finally in St. Paul after nearly 4 hours of delays on connecting flights. The good news? Someone left a copy of Bossypants in the beside table drawer. Bible's still there. This is the perfect kind of light reading I could use this week. Looking forward to some... LOL?

  21. #1881
    Coachella Junkie chiapet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Seattle area
    Posts
    20,709

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by boarderwoozel3 View Post
    O rly? I was under the impression that it's considered one of the seminal texts on the subject. Can you remember any specific parts of his argument that you objected to or any texts that provide alternative explanations?
    It's been ages since I read it (like almost 15 years) - we read it during my undergrad (in biological anthropology), and at the time, I was far more familiar with the topics at hand than I am (or recall) now -- so I don't remember the specifics. My main objection that so very much of the book is not factual (he presents his ideas -- that's fine -- but offers little/no evidence), yet he writes in a way that clearly is intended to make the reader believe that the information is proven. It's a non-fiction book yet has no direct references cited? (He includes a list of "further reading" which does not make direct citations and does not state which information he obtained from which texts). His suppositions were, largely, poorly thought out and ill-supported, and trying to backtrack the sources he claims to have used to prove his statements is nearly impossible. That alone prevents me from taking his work seriously.

    I looked at it as miscategorized fiction, and something that was intended to be consumed by a casual reader, not as a scientific read. It irritates me that he got a Pulitizer in non-fiction for it.

    Suppose at some point I should re-read it and see if it still bothers me so much, but I'm kind of unwilling to do so....

  22. #1882
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    9,112

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I scored some excellent first edition hard cover copies of Don Delillo's Underworld, Libra, and Mao II on eBay today - the whole bundle for $26. I'm excited. I really enjoyed White Noise.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  23. #1883
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    9,112

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I've been reading The Broom of the System (about halfway through). This is my first David Foster Wallace. I didn't realize how great of a writer he is. The first section of the book was so tense and crazy... Really good stuff. After I finish it, I'm going to continue with Ulysses. I've gone too far to abandon it.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  24. #1884
    Coachella Junkie SoulDischarge's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Vampire State Building
    Posts
    16,075

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I have a $50 B&N gift card that I've been to indecisive to spend yet (I bought the latest Amy Sedaris book but I'm going to return it as there's not a whole lot of content in it). I don't really like buying novels since I can always get them from the library and don't re-read stuff often enough to warrant buying a book at full price. I was thinking of picking up some short story collections so I could soak them up over time. Any suggestions? I'd prefer longer collections by masters of the form, or if you know of any good anthology books. I already have collections by Lovecraft, Flannery O'Connor, Borges, Poe, Kafka.
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Thanks for giving us the opportunity to not give a fuck again.

  25. #1885
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Pasadena
    Posts
    12,257

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemy View Post
    Just finished Jennifer Egan's A Visit from the Goon Squad. I liked it, but I wasn't crazy about it. I'm a little baffled about how the Pulitzer works. I think I wasn't crazy about it, because it just reminded me of David Mitchell's books - especially his first novels, Ghostwritten, number9dream, and Cloud Atlas. She experiments with form like he does, although in slightly different ways. She also looks to the future like he did in Ghostwritten and Cloud Atlas. The form of Egan's book is actually a lot like Ghostwritten.

    But something that Egan did better than those three Mitchell books is making a lot of great characters. I loved most of them. Very few sections didn't move me a lot, but even then, I don't know if any sections fell flat. Like Mitchell, some of Egan's "futuristic" parts were the low points for me (the very last part, more so)... but Egan did have some of her best ideas in those parts. Mitchell's ideas of the future always felt too science-fiction, but Egan's is a bit frighteningly real. Of course, in Mitchell's defense, I'm thinking of Ghostwritten more than Cloud Atlas, and Ghostwritten was written about ten years before A Visit from the Goon Squad.

    Whatever about that future stuff, though. It was the stories that took place now and in the past that I liked about Egan's book. There were some really great stories dealing with all the great topics, like death and love and failure and success. And, of course, the music is great. I think everybody on this board would appreciate how she writes about music.

    I don't think I'd read it again, but I'm glad that I read it.
    I sat in the back of the geffen contemporary yesterday and watched a bunch of videos from punk artists performing at the mabuhay gardens.
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  26. #1886
    foof roberto73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Stately Wayne Manor
    Posts
    2,983

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post
    I was thinking of picking up some short story collections so I could soak them up over time. Any suggestions? I'd prefer longer collections by masters of the form, or if you know of any good anthology books. I already have collections by Lovecraft, Flannery O'Connor, Borges, Poe, Kafka.
    Some off my shelf, in order of personal preference: Carver, Hempel, Hemingway, Faulkner, Cheever.

  27. #1887
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Space
    Posts
    9,112

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I would second Hemingway. He has amazing short stories... Chekhov is often considered the "master of the form," and for good reason... I recently read Murakami's Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman and loved it. I don't know how it stands amongst his other stuff, because it's all I've read of his - so far - but I really enjoyed it... I would also recommend George Saunders' Pastoralia, which pretty much sealed the deal on my wanting to be a writer. His other books are good, but that one is the best one.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  28. #1888
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    stately Rain Manor
    Posts
    17,454

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    I'm not very well-read when it comes to the world of short stories, but I really like Shalom Auslander's short stories (Beware of God is the collection title) and am very much looking forward to picking up his new novel (Hope: A Tragedy). I also bought on impulse Ben Loory's Stories For the Nighttime and Some for the Day last week after reading a review that said "If Mother Goose and Philip K. Dick had a love child and Richard Brautigan raised him in Watermelon Sugar, he might write stories like Ben Loory." If it's true, it's a damn good thing that never happened because holy fucking bloody hell, this book is garbage. He's got sentence flow like a crate of rusty hammers.

  29. #1889
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    stately Rain Manor
    Posts
    17,454

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    Also would have accepted "like a hate of crusty rammers."

  30. #1890
    Member Premium Roast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    there is no escape
    Posts
    897

    Default Re: Hey, Books

    picked up Paul Bowles 'Travels' book just finishing off the "Batism of Solitude" chapter the other day. Hope to experience it this summer in egypto. Also interesting, and funny, when he descibes natives dancing and celebrating the rain...even if it ends up flooding them.

    le bapteme de la solitude

    "Immediately when you arrive in the Sahara, for the first or the tenth time, you notice the stillness. An incredible, absolute silence prevails outside the towns; and within, even in busy places like the markets, there is a hushed quality in the air, as if the quiet were a conscious force which, resenting the intrusion of sound, minimizes and disperses sound straightaway. Then there is the sky, compared to which all other skies seem faint-hearted efforts. Solid and luminous, it is always the focal point of the landscape. At sunset, the precise, curved shadow of the earth rises into it swiftly from the horizon, cutting it into light section and dark section. When all daylight is gone, and the space is thick with stars, it is still of an intense and burning blue, darkest directly overhead and paling toward the earth, so that the night never really grows dark.

    You leave the gate of the fort or town behind, pass the camels lying outside, go up into the dunes, or out onto the hard, stony plan and stand awhile, alone. Presently, you will either shiver and hurry back inside the walls, or you will go on standing there and let something very peculiar happen to you, something that everyone who lives there has undergone and which the French call le baptÍme de la solitude. It is a unique sensation, and it has nothing to do with loneliness, for loneliness presupposes memory. Here, in this wholly mineral landscape lighted by stars like flares, even memory disappears; nothing is left but your own breathing and the sound of your heart beating. A strange, and by no means pleasant, process of reintegration begins inside you, and you have the choice of fighting against it, and insisting on remaining the person you have always been, or letting it take its course. For no one who has stayed in the Sahara for a while is quite the same as when he came.

    Perhaps the logical question to ask at this point is: Why go? The answer is that when a man has been there and undergone the baptism of solitude he can't help himself. Once he has been under the spell of the vast , luminous, silent country, no other place is quite strong enough for him, no other surroundings can provide the supremely satisfying sensation of existing in the midst of something that is absolute.

    He will go back, whatever the cost in comfort and money, for the absolute has no price."
    100% Caffeinated

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •