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Thread: The Science/Science News Thread.

  1. #241
    Act Like You Know real talk's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Don't be gross.

    It's a machine being a machine. If it got up and did the hustle, or walked away, then we're talking impressive.
    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    You were right. I was wrong.

  2. #242
    The Encyclopedia bmack86's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    That video has made me giggle and chortle. The japanese can do anything.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Remember Hitler? I don't but here we are again .. cr****

  3. #243
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    That video is all sorts of goodness.

  4. #244
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Is this limited to OP's genres of science because I saw some cool shi- on archeology/buildings today..

    http://bldgblog.blogspot.com/2009/01...s-of-lake.html

  5. #245
    Dick Nicewonger kreutz2112's Avatar
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    US President Barack Obama will on Monday sign an executive order reversing Bush administration restrictions on Federal funding for stem cell research, a senior administration official said.

    The official would not divulge the exact wording of the order, but confirmed - on condition of anonymity - that it would be in line with Mr Obama's campaign vow to restore funding to embryonic stem cell research.

    Mr Obama will sign the document in a White House ceremony Monday morning, the official said.

    The move will spark delight among scientists who have long campaigned for the Bush policy to be overturned, but will likely be condemned by conservative right-to-life groups.

    Mr Obama spelled out his campaign policy on stem-cell research last August in a list of answers to the Science Debate 2008 scientific lobby group.

    "I strongly support expanding research on stem cells," Mr Obama wrote.

    "I believe that the restrictions that President Bush has placed on funding of human embryonic stem-cell research have handcuffed our scientists and hindered our ability to compete with other nations.

    "As president, I will lift the current administration's ban on federal funding of research on embryonic stem cell lines created after August 9, 2001, through executive order.

    "I will ensure that all research on stem cells is conducted ethically and with rigorous oversight."

    'Slap in the face'

    Reports about Mr Obama's plans were immediately condemned by Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council.

    "Today's news that President Obama will open the door to direct taxpayer funds for embryonic stem-cell research that encourages the destruction of human embryos is a slap in the face to Americans who believe in the dignity of all human life," Mr Perkins said.

    Mr Bush barred Federal funding from supporting work on new lines of stem cells derived from human embryos in 2001, allowing research only on a small number of embryonic stem-cell lines which existed at that time.

    He argued that using human embryos for scientific research - which often involves their destruction - crossed a moral barrier and urged scientists to consider other alternatives.

    Embryonic stem cells are primitive cells from early-stage embryos capable of developing into almost every tissue of the body.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2...?section=world
    RAPE STOVE

    white power?!

  6. #246
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Yesssss. Those cell lines are all screwed up so we kind of need new options.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  7. #247
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Woohoo! Time to dust off the old microscope!
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  8. #248
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    IF GRAVITY CAN AFFECT TIME, AND LIGHT CAN AFFECT GRAVITY, THEN LIGHT CAN AFFECT TIME

  9. #249
    Member fiyahhh!'s Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    National Ignition Facility for Sahara Tent 2010!!!!

    SAN FRANCISCO (AFP) A US weapons lab on Friday pulled back the curtain on a super laser with the power to burn as hot as a star.

    The National Ignition Facility's main purpose is to serve as a tool for gauging the reliability and safety of the US nuclear weapons arsenal but scientists say it could deliver breakthroughs in safe fusion power.

    "We have invented the world's largest laser system," actor-turned-governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said during a dedication ceremony attended by thousands including state and national officials.

    "We can create the stars right here on earth. And I can see already my friends in Hollywood being very upset that their stuff that they show on the big screen is obsolete. We have the real stuff right here."

    NIF is touted as the world's highest-energy laser system. It is located inside the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory about an hour's drive from San Francisco.

    Equipment connected to a house-sized sphere can focus 192 laser beams on a small point, generating temperatures and pressures that exist at cores of stars or giant planets.

  10. #250
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Does anybody know what the fuck this is? I felt like I had discovered the offspring of Mothra.


  11. #251
    Coachella Junkie PlayaDelWes's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.


  12. #252
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110117...20110117104445

    TOKYO (AFP) Japanese researchers will launch a project this year to resurrect the long-extinct mammoth by using cloning technology to bring the ancient pachyderm back to life in around five years time.

    The researchers will try to revive the species by obtaining tissue this summer from the carcass of a mammoth preserved in a Russian research laboratory, the Yomiuri Shimbun reported.

    "Preparations to realise this goal have been made," Akira Iritani, leader of the team and a professor emeritus of Kyoto University, told the mass-circulation daily.

    [Related: Scientists find living 34,000-year-old organism]

    Under the plan, the nuclei of mammoth cells will be inserted into an elephant's egg cell from which the nuclei have been removed, to create an embryo containing mammoth genes, the report said.

    The embryo will then be inserted into an elephant's uterus in the hope that the animal will eventually give birth to a baby mammoth.

    The elephant is the closest modern relative of the mammoth, a huge woolly mammal believed to have died out with the last Ice Age.

    Some mammoth remains still retain usable tissue samples, making it possible to recover cells for cloning, unlike dinosaurs, which disappeared around 65 million years ago and whose remains exist only as fossils

    Researchers hope to achieve their aim within five to six years, the Yomiuri said.

    The team, which has invited a Russian mammoth researcher and two US elephant experts to join the project, has established a technique to extract DNA from frozen cells, previously an obstacle to cloning attempts because of the damage cells sustained in the freezing process.

    Another Japanese researcher, Teruhiko Wakayama of the Riken Centre for Developmental Biology, succeeded in 2008 in cloning a mouse from the cells of another that had been kept in temperatures similar to frozen ground for 16 years.

    The scientists extracted a cell nucleus from an organ of a dead mouse and planted it into the egg of another mouse which was alive, leading to the birth of the cloned mouse.

    Based on Wakayama's techniques, Iritani's team devised a method to extract the nuclei of mammoth eggs without damaging them.

    But a successful cloning will also pose challenges for the team, Iritani warned.

    "If a cloned embryo can be created, we need to discuss, before transplanting it into the womb, how to breed (the mammoth) and whether to display it to the public," Iritani said.

    "After the mammoth is born, we will examine its ecology and genes to study why the species became extinct and other factors."

    More than 80 percent of all mammoth finds have been dug up in the permafrost of the vast Sakha Republic in eastern Siberia.

    Exactly why a majority of the huge creatures that once strode in large herds across Eurasia and North America died out towards the end of the last Ice Age has generated fiery debate.

    Some experts hold that mammoths were hunted to extinction by the species that was to become the planet's dominant predator -- humans.

    Others argue that climate change was more to blame, leaving a species adapted for frozen climes ill-equipped to cope with a warming world.

  13. #253
    Coachella Junkie rage patton's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    So, its Jurassic Park. Fucking awesome.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    And it's been long established that Chris hates fun.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hatinisbad View Post
    I took my niece this year and it was her first Coachella. It was so fun to see it through her eyes. She thought it felt like a magical scene from Shreck. The one where all the fairy tale creatures meet for the first time in Shreck's swamp.

  14. #254
    Wheels Of Cheese
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    I remember when they discovered that mammoth. I was in 8th grade. We should be riding Woolies by now.
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    Yea I think a lot of men think they are bad ass, but a 12 year old with a AK can take me out I know ...... cr****

  15. #255
    Coachella Junkie rage patton's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Thoughts?

    Earth could have two suns?

    2011-02-03

    Daniel Reid
    Earth could have two suns when Betelgeuse, the second largest star in the constellation Orion, explodes.

    Crack out the SPF 8,000. Scientists are predicting a second sun could illuminate the Earth for a period of about two weeks.

    I’m going to repeat that for anyone that temporarily lost consciousness. The Earth. Could soon have. Two freaking suns.

    This mind-blowing event could happen as soon as this year when Betelgeuse, one of the brightest stars in the sky, explodes – causing enough brightness to illuminate both day and night.

    The only real issue of debate is over when exactly this event will happen. Some scientists say the blast might have already happened and we just haven’t seen the light rays yet.

    Brad Carter, senior lecturer of physics at the University of southern Queensland in Australia, told the London Telegraph that the blast could happen in the next few months . . . or any time over the next million years. Talk about an open-ended timeframe.



    Though the bright red supergiant Betelgeuse is a frightening 100,000 times brighter than our sun, it remains a comfortable 640-light years away.



    Though a lot of questions come to mind – namely whether we should start buying stocks in Oakleys or beach towels – experts claim the event should not otherwise affect our planet.

    Earth will simply have a front-row seat for what promises to be one of the most incredible light shows in our planet’s history, reports the Daily Mail
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    And it's been long established that Chris hates fun.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hatinisbad View Post
    I took my niece this year and it was her first Coachella. It was so fun to see it through her eyes. She thought it felt like a magical scene from Shreck. The one where all the fairy tale creatures meet for the first time in Shreck's swamp.

  16. #256
    The Bionic Listener Theijuiel's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Check another site for that, the brightness is only supposed to be equal to a crescent moon not another full sun.
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  17. #257
    Member BKsaysAction!'s Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Still pretty cool.

  18. #258
    Coachella Junkie rage patton's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Theijuiel View Post
    Check another site for that, the brightness is only supposed to be equal to a crescent moon not another full sun.
    Damn. I really wanted to feel like I was on Tatooine.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    And it's been long established that Chris hates fun.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hatinisbad View Post
    I took my niece this year and it was her first Coachella. It was so fun to see it through her eyes. She thought it felt like a magical scene from Shreck. The one where all the fairy tale creatures meet for the first time in Shreck's swamp.

  19. #259
    old school DFrank's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by rage patton View Post
    Damn. I really wanted to feel like I was on Tatooine.
    awesome.
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  20. #260
    Coachella Junkie greghead's Avatar
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    My uncle works for NASA and we were discussing this yesterday. Incredible that so many planets have been found in such a miniscule portion of the sky.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-12354390
    Exoplanet hunt turns up 54 potentially habitable worldsBy Jason Palmer

    Science and technology reporter, BBC News

    Astronomers have identified some 54 new planets where conditions may be suitable for life.

    Five of the candidates are Earth-sized.

    The announcement from the Kepler space telescope team brings the total number of exoplanet candidates they have identified to more than 1,200.

    The data release also confirmed a unique sextet of planets around a single star and 170 further solar systems that include more than one planet circling far-flung stars.

    The Kepler telescope was conceived to hunt for exoplanets, staring into a small, fixed patch of the sky in the direction of the constellations Cygnus and Lyra.

    It looks for the minuscule dimming of light that occurs when an exoplanet passes in front of its host star. Kepler spots "candidate" planets, which typically are confirmed by ground-based observations to confirm their existence.

    In just its first few months of operation, as a paper posted to the Arxiv server reports, Kepler has spotted 68 Earth-sized candidates, 288 so-called "super-Earths" that are up to twice Earth's size, 662 that are Neptune-sized, and 184 that are even larger.

    Continue reading the main story
    THE KEPLER SPACE TELESCOPE

    Stares fixedly at a patch corresponding to 1/400th of the sky
    Looks at more than 150,000 stars
    In just four months of observations has found 1,235 candidate planets
    Among them, it has spotted the first definitively rocky exoplanet
    It has found 68 Earth-sized planets, five of which are in the "habitable zone"
    Bill Borucki talks about Kepler
    On Wednesday, members of the team announced it had confirmed the Kepler-11 solar system, comprising six large exoplanets tightly circling an eight billion-year-old star that lies about 2,000 light-years away.

    "The fact that we've found so many planet candidates in such a tiny fraction of the sky suggests there are countless planets orbiting sun-like stars in our galaxy," said William Borucki, who heads Kepler's science programme at Nasa's Ames Research Center.

    "We went from zero to 68 Earth-sized planet candidates and zero to 54 candidates in the habitable zone, some of which could have moons with liquid water."

    The bountiful nature of the data from just a few months of observing time from Kepler makes profound suggestions about the preponderance of exoplanets in general, and about the existence of multiple planets around single stars in particular.

    In a separate paper, team members outlined how the Kepler candidates include 115 stars that host a pair of planets, 45 with three, eight stars with four, one with five planets, and Kepler-11, which hosts six.

    "Even in first four months of Kepler data, a rich population of multiples appeared, and we recognised this was going to be a very important discovery," David Latham, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, told BBC News.
    EDIT: And someone on Gawker having fun with it. 374.01 is probably my favorite.

    http://gawker.com/5751693/why-we-can...itable-planets

    Astronomers have identified 54 new exoplanets in the "habitable zone" of their solar systems—meaning they could potentially sustain life as we know it. But we won't be able to live on any of them! Here's why:

    KOI 683.01: Atmosphere filled with poisonous gasses
    KOI 1582.08: Barren, rocky wasteland
    KOI 1026.01: Commute would be awful
    KOI 1503.01: Weird color
    KOI 1099.01: Right near a really loud planet
    KOI 854.01: Month-to-month lease
    KOI 433.02: Other planets in solar system kind of creepy
    KOI 1486.01: No deserts
    KOI 701.03: [Rolls eyes]
    KOI 351.01: Soil makes vegetables taste like vomit
    KOI 902.01: No. Just, no.
    KOI 211.01: Already occupied by race of alien beings
    KOI 1423.01: Dangerous solar system
    KOI 1429.01: Just a weird vibe
    KOI 1361.01: Really cold
    KOI 87.01: Requires guarantor
    KOI 139.01: No subways nearby
    KOI 268.01: Gravity works in opposite direction
    KOI 1472.01: [Sarcastic laugh]
    KOI 536.01: Schools are bad
    KOI 806.01: Weird smell
    KOI 1375.01: Shared bathroom
    KOI 812.03: Probably used to be really nice, but now...
    KOI 865.01: Absurd broker's fee
    KOI 351.02: Entire planet is on fire, always
    KOI 51.01: Orbit induces nausea
    KOI 1596.02: Don't even ask about this one
    KOI 416.02: Too far away from your parents
    KOI 622.01: Actually a star, not a planet
    KOI 555.02: No good restaurants
    KOI 1574.01: Too many craters
    KOI 326.01: Yeah, right
    KOI 70.03: Not enough gravity
    KOI 1261.01: Ugly
    KOI 1527.01: Couldn't even find this one
    KOI 1328.01: Constant earthquakes
    KOI 564.02: Completely gentrified
    KOI 1478.01: Badly-done renovation
    KOI 1355.01: Sun is way too bright
    KOI 372.01: Just couldn't really see us living there, you know?
    KOI 711.03: High taxes
    KOI 448.02: Native species make weird noises
    KOI 415.01: Saw a mouse
    KOI 947.01: Oceans bad for surfing
    KOI 147.01: Funny shape
    KOI 401.02: Other planets just not really our scene
    KOI 1564.01: Terrible view of ugly part of galaxy
    KOI 157.05: Actually too much like Earth, if that makes sense
    KOI 365.01: Tides are totally out of whack
    KOI 374.01: Home to highly addictive spice, dangerous giant worms
    KOI 952.03: Too fancy
    KOI 817.01: Not wired for cable
    KOI 847.01: Bad Yelp review
    KOI 1159.01: Priced out
    Last edited by greghead; 02-04-2011 at 11:02 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by nathanfairchild View Post
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  21. #261
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110218...litaryresearch

    Thought-controlled bionic arm unveiled in US

    AFP Todd Kuiken (left), Director of the Center for Bionic Medicine and Director of Amputee Services at The

    by Kerry Sheridan Fri Feb 18, 6:59 am ET

    WASHINGTON (AFP) A bionic prosthetic arm that is controlled by its operator's thoughts and feels like the amputee's lost limb went on display at a major US science conference.

    More than 50 amputees worldwide, many of them military veterans whose limbs were lost in combat, have received such devices since they were first developed by US doctor Todd Kuiken in 2002.

    The arm uses technology called Targeted Muscle Reinervation (TMR), which works by rerouting brain signals from nerves that were severed in the injury to muscles that are working and intact.

    "What we do is use the nerves that are still left," Kuiken said on Thursday. "Muscle becomes the biological amplifier."

    Glen Lehman, a retired US military sergeant who lost his arm in Iraq, demonstrated the latest technology at the annual conference of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington.

    "It feels great, if feels intuitive. It is a lot better than the other prosthetic I have now," said Lehman, whose forearm and elbow were blown off in a Baghdad grenade attack in 2008.

    "The other one is still controlled by muscle impulse, you just flex muscle to make it move, it is not intuitive. This arm is more trained to me, whereas the other arm I had to train to it," he said.

    "It does feel like my own hand."

    Lehman demonstrated for reporters how he could pinch his finger and thumb together, lift his forearm and bend his elbow, and turn his wrist just by thinking about those actions.

    Kuiken said more advances, such as the ability to transfer some sensation to the limb, are being studied in the lab but have not yet made it to patients.

    Other drawbacks include the inability to sense how hard the battery-powered prosthetic hand is squeezing, but Kuiken said scientists are working on ways to improve the technology with added sensors.

    "Our goal would be to put sensors in the prosthesis to, for example, know how hard you are squeezing and then bring that up and have a device squeeze on this area (of the bicep) so the patient has an idea of how hard he is squeezing."

    Kuiken said the team has encountered some technological "challenges" that have slowed progress but is "excited about moving forward."

    A series of other efforts to test and improve on these mind-reading robotics, known as brain-computer interfaces, were also showcased at the conference.

    Among them, how researchers can now place computer chips on the surface of the brain to interpret neural activity, potentially allowing spinal cord injury patients to control a range of devices from computer games to prosthetics.

    Someday, patients who are bed-ridden will be able to wear a special electronic cap that allows them to maneuver a rolling robot carrying a video camera, so that the patient could join in the dinner conversation without leaving the bedroom.

    But the stunning technology is anything but easy work for the patients.

    According to Jose del R. Millan and his team at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland, in a "typical brain-computer interface (BCI) set-up," users send mental messages of either left, right, or no-command.

    "But it turns out that no-command is very taxing to maintain and requires extreme concentration. After about an hour, most users are spent. Not much help if you need to maneuver that wheelchair through an airport," his team said in a statement.

    So now researchers are figuring out how to hook up a machine to interpret a user's brain signals and read their intent.

    Users are asked to read or speak aloud while thinking of as many left, right or no commands as possible. The technology learns to sift through the fray and figure out when a command has been delivered.

    The result "makes multitasking a reality while at the same time allows users to catch a break."
    As soon as I rustle up some scratch I'm going to be like Shiva.

  22. #262
    Coachella Junkie M Sparks's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    http://io9.com/5836605/a-chemical-th...ns-transparent

    A chemical that can turn your organs transparent

    Who needs an invisibility cloak when you can be transparent? Researchers in Japan recently developed a chemical reagent that turns biological tissue transparent, opening doors to optical imaging techniques and avenues of research that scientists have long only dreamed of. And speaking of dreaming — if you're going to start turning body parts transparent, where better to start than the brain?

    What if you could dissect an organism without so much as picking up a scalpel? For years, researchers have used animals like zebrafish — which are naturally transparent at the embryological stage of development, and were recently genetically engineered to remain transparent through adulthood — to do just that. But for other model organisms, like mice and rats, scientists have always had to get at their insides the old fashioned way: by cutting them up.

    Slicing and dicing is necessary because modern techniques for looking at the insides of an organism can't see deep enough to be of any real use; the tendency for tissue to scatter light, for instance, keeps modern optical methods of observation from probing deeper than 1mm into biological matter.

    A chemical that can turn your organs transparentBut all that is about to change. Take a look at the image pictured here. The object on the right may look like a pineapple gummi bear, but it's actually a mouse embryo that's been treated with a new chemical reagent that turns biological tissue transparent. Compare it to the embryo on the left, and you'll get a sense of why scientists are heralding this discovery as a revolution in the field of optical imaging.

    The reagent, known as Scale, was developed by a group of scientists from Japan's RIKEN Brain Science Institute, and the team has already used it to study neurons in the brains of mice at unprecedented levels of detail. See, what's really impressive about Scale is that it not only renders tissue transparent, it manages to do so without interfering with fluorescent labels and signaling. (Fluorescent labeling is a well-establish imaging technique that allows scientists to genetically alter proteins of interest so that they light up with a specific color when exposed to certain wavelengths of light.)

    A chemical that can turn your organs transparentThe researchers' findings, which are documented in the latest issue of Nature Neuroscience, demonstrate their ability to visualize in three dimensions the intricate networks of neurons and blood vessels in the brains of embryonic mice at sub-cellular resolution, like the neural stem cells (green) and blood vessels (red) pictured here.

    This latest research uses Scale to visualize fluorescently-labeled brain samples, but the researchers say that their reagent will prove invaluable in the study of other tissues, as well. Dr. Atsushi Miyawaki, who led the RIKEN research team, says they envision using Scale on organs like the heart, muscles, and kidneys, and even on tissues from other organisms, including primates and humans.

    And while the reagent in its current form is too powerful to use on living organisms, Miyawaki says that could change:

    We are currently investigating another, milder candidate reagent which would allow us to study live tissue in the same way, at somewhat lower levels of transparency. This would open the door to experiments that have simply never been possible before.

  23. #263
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Now I know what I'm wearing to Coachella next year.

  24. #264
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    That doesn't make any fucking sense.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  25. #265
    Dick Nicewonger kreutz2112's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Algunz comment, or the article as a whole?
    RAPE STOVE

    white power?!

  26. #266
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Gunz. The chemical is actually pretty cool, and I'm already daydreaming about how much easier it would make my life.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  27. #267
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    You're right it doesn't really, but if I slather my skin with the reagent it would be cool. It'd be better than a speedo and athletic socks.

  28. #268
    Coachella Junkie M Sparks's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by algunz View Post
    You're right it doesn't really, but if I slather my skin with the reagent it would be cool. It'd be better than a speedo and athletic socks.
    This will be the next thing after eyelid piercings dies off. Like, some girl walking around and you can see her left scapula through the skin.

  29. #269
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Hawt!

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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Antonio Ereditato, spokesman for the international group of researchers, said that measurements taken over three years showed neutrinos pumped from CERN near Geneva to Gran Sasso in Italy had arrived 60 nanoseconds quicker than light would have done.
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/8...-of-light.html

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