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Thread: The Science/Science News Thread.

  1. #181
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Students aren't supposed to be productive, semi or otherwise.
    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

  2. #182
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    I'm mostly unproductive. I just have my moments where I get stuff done.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  3. #183
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    happy 5000.
    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

  4. #184
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Oh hey I didn't even notice. Thanks.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  5. #185
    Member theburiedlife's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Sun's Movement Through Milky Way Regularly Sends Comets Hurtling, Coinciding With Mass Life Extinctions

    ScienceDaily (May 2, 2008) — The sun's movement through the Milky Way regularly sends comets hurtling into the inner solar system -- coinciding with mass life extinctions on earth, a new study claims. The study suggests a link between comet bombardment and the movement through the galaxy.

    Scientists at the Cardiff Centre for Astrobiology built a computer model of our solar system's movement and found that it "bounces" up and down through the plane of the galaxy. As we pass through the densest part of the plane, gravitational forces from the surrounding giant gas and dust clouds dislodge comets from their paths. The comets plunge into the solar system, some of them colliding with the earth.

    The Cardiff team found that we pass through the galactic plane every 35 to 40 million years, increasing the chances of a comet collision tenfold. Evidence from craters on Earth also suggests we suffer more collisions approximately 36 million years. Professor William Napier, of the Cardiff Centre for Astrobiology, said: "It's a beautiful match between what we see on the ground and what is expected from the galactic record."

    The periods of comet bombardment also coincide with mass extinctions, such as that of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. Our present position in the galaxy suggests we are now very close to another such period.

    While the "bounce" effect may have been bad news for dinosaurs, it may also have helped life to spread. The scientists suggest the impact may have thrown debris containing micro-organisms out into space and across the universe.

    Centre director Professor Chandra Wickramasinghe said: "This is a seminal paper which places the comet-life interaction on a firm basis, and shows a mechanism by which life can be dispersed on a galactic scale."

    The paper, by Professor Napier and Dr Janaki Wickramasinghe, is to be published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0502092145.htm
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
    http://www.last.fm/user/theburydlife

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  6. #186
    Young blood
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    mmmmm milky way. I didnt know a candy bar could have so much going on inside it.

  7. #187
    Member theburiedlife's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    They certainly do get a good deal of PR.
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
    http://www.last.fm/user/theburydlife

    2011 Wishlist: Soviet Soviet, Swans, Heroin and Your Veins, Lower Dens, The December Sound, Scarlet Youth, Faunts, Bad Lieutenant, The Besnard Lakes, The Raveonettes, Screen Vinyl Image, Sway

  8. #188
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Here I am busting my ass to lose weight and quit smoking, and for what? to be killed by a fucking comet?
    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

  9. #189
    Member theburiedlife's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    Here I am busting my ass to lose weight and quit smoking, and for what? to be killed by a fucking comet?
    New DNA Variants Found That Can Help To Pile On The Pounds

    ScienceDaily (May 5, 2008) — A study of 90,000 people has uncovered new genetic variants that influence fat mass, weight and risk of obesity. The variants act in addition to the recently described variants of the FTO gene: adults carrying variants in both genes are, on average, 3.8 kg (or 8.5 lb) heavier.



    The variants map close to a gene called MC4R: mutations in this gene are the most common genetic cause of severe familial obesity. The study highlights the power of large collections of volunteer samples to uncover common variants that influence health.

    "By working together with many international groups we have been able to assemble a sample collection which was large enough to allow this finding to be made," explains Dr Ruth Loos, leading author from the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit. "Several groups had shown that rare, highly disruptive variants in the MC4R gene were responsible for very severe, genetic forms of obesity: this collaboration has uncovered more common variants that affect more people."

    The study, published in Nature Genetics, is led by investigators from the Cambridge GEM consortium (Genetics of Energy Metabolism) and Oxford University and is a collaboration between 77 institutions from the UK, USA, France, Germany, Italy, Finland and Sweden.

    The team studied more than 77,000 adults and found that two copies of genetic variants resulted in an average increase in weight of about 1.5 kg.

    This is the second set of common variants that are associated with weight and obesity, following the study, involving many of the same team, published in April 2007 that uncovered a role for the FTO gene. People who carry two copies of an FTO variant are about 2-3 kg heavier than those who have no copies of the variant.

    Importantly, the effects of the new gene add to those of FTO; people who carried both the FTO variant and new variants were on average 3.8 kg (8.5 lb) heavier.

    "This is a great example of how cooperation can bring about new findings that can be missed when researchers work in isolation," explains Dr Inęs Barroso, Investigator at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and one of the senior authors on the study. "The precise role in obesity of genetic variants in FTO and near MC4R remains to be discovered, but we can now begin to understand the biological consequences of these variants. This is where this research will make a difference."

    MC4R protein plays a pivotal role in many aspects of physiology, including regulation of appetite and energy expenditure. The severe form of MC4R-related obesity is a consequence of alterations in the gene sequence, resulting in an inactive or less active MC4R protein.

    By contrast, the new variants lie some distance from the MC4R gene. The team suspect that the sequence variant changes activity of the MC4R gene, perhaps by disrupting DNA regions required for normal activity of MC4R.

    "Through this new and powerful genetic approach we are increasingly finding that the genes known to play a role in severe - but rare - diseases are also implicated in much more common disease," explains Professor Mark McCarthy, Robert Turner Professor of Diabetes at the University of Oxford, UK. "The common variants we are uncovering do not have such a dramatic effect on the normal functioning of the gene as do the rare mutations in MC4R that can cause rare examples of very serious, early onset obesity."

    Dramatically, in a study of almost 6000 children, they found that the effects were almost double those seen in adults. Between the ages of four and seven, this additional increase in weight was the result, almost exclusively, of gain of fat tissue, and not due to gain in muscle or other solid tissues.

    This more dramatic effect in young children reflects the more extreme consequences seen with rare variants of MC4R that severely disrupt its activity, suggesting that the novel variants do indeed exert their effect through action on MC4R.

    "Our work to understand common disease, such as obesity, depends on the participation of thousands of people - members of the public who provide samples," explains Professor Nick Wareham, Director of the MRC Epidemiology Unit. "Without their willing participation, we could never achieve the power in our research to make striking findings like this.

    "For each discovery, our efforts and the contribution of the participants will lead to improved healthcare for the population at large."

    The team will now look to uncover how the DNA variants affect activity of the MC4R protein, which is a key player in orchestrating information from the body to control appetite and energy expenditure to keep body weight in balance. The team propose that altered activity of MC4R, imposed by the variants, might reduce its ability to carry out this important role.

    The team emphasize that, although gene variants can affect weight, body mass index and obesity, they are only part of the story: lifestyle actions such as good diet and regular exercise are vital to control of weight.

    Reference: Loos RJF et al. (2008). Association studies involving over 90,000 people demonstrate that common variants near to MC4R influence fat mass, weight and risk of obesity. Nature Genetics Published online on Sunday 4 May 2008. doi: 10.1038/ng.140.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0504153814.htm
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
    http://www.last.fm/user/theburydlife

    2011 Wishlist: Soviet Soviet, Swans, Heroin and Your Veins, Lower Dens, The December Sound, Scarlet Youth, Faunts, Bad Lieutenant, The Besnard Lakes, The Raveonettes, Screen Vinyl Image, Sway

  10. #190
    Member anti-square's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Missing matter found in deep space

    By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Editor Tue May 20, 3:17 PM ET

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Astronomers have found some matter that had been missing in deep space and say it is strung along web-like filaments that form the backbone of the universe.
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    The ethereal strands of hydrogen and oxygen atoms could account for up to half the matter that scientists knew must be there but simply could not see, the researchers reported on Tuesday.

    Scientists have long known there is far more matter in the universe than can be accounted for by visible galaxies and stars. Not only is there invisible baryonic matter -- the protons and neutrons that make up atoms -- but there also is an even larger amount of invisible "dark" matter.

    Now about half of the missing baryonic matter has turned up, seen by the orbiting Hubble space telescope and NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, or FUSE.

    "We think we are seeing the strands of a web-like structure that forms the backbone of the universe," said Mike Shull of the University of Colorado, who helped lead the study published in The Astrophysical Journal.

    The matter is spread as superheated oxygen and hydrogen in what looked like vast empty spaces between galaxies.

    However, observations of a quasar -- a bright object far off in space -- show its light is diffused much as a lighthouse can reflect on a thin fog that was invisible in the dark.

    "It is kind of like a spider web. The gravity of the spider web is what produced what we see," Shull said in a telephone interview. "It's very thin. Some of it is very hot gas, almost a million degrees."

    This is where the dark matter comes in. The dark matter is heating up the gas, Shull said.

    "Dark matter has gravity. It pulls the gas in," Shull said. "This causes what I call sonic booms -- shock waves. This shock heats it to a million degrees. That makes it even harder to see."

    The atoms of oxygen are in a stripped-down, ionized form. Five of the eight electrons are gone. It emits an ultraviolet spectrum of light that instruments aboard FUSE and Hubble can spot, Shull said.

    These web-like filaments of matter are the structure upon which the galaxies form, he said.

    "So when we look at the distribution of galaxies on a very large scale, we see they are not uniform," Shull said. "They spread out in sheets and filaments."

    Some faint dwarf galaxies or wisps of matter in these structures could be forming galaxies right now, the researchers said.

    Shull and colleagues said these webs of hydrogen and oxygen are too hot to be seen in visible light and too cool to be seen in X-rays.
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080520/...pace_matter_dc
    ...

  11. #191
    Coachella Junkie
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.


  12. #192
    No Clownery full on idle's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    but can it vacuum like a roomba

  13. #193
    old school Stefinitely Maybe's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    I spent most of this afternoon reading about Peak Attention and Distributed Cognition. It's pretty interesting stuff.
    "The first time I heard the new single off the Bravery album, I actually cried, and I do not even remember the name of that damn song. It reminded me of this girl I am in love with." - kroqken

  14. #194
    Young blood
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    Tell me more stef. I dont get it. Isn't Distributed cognition user generated content?

    Peak attention....such as advertising and marketing and the overload of information processing?

  15. #195
    Young blood
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    Ted Kennedy cant win.....

    Research Links Herpes Virus and Brain Tumors
    By Aaron Rowe EmailMay 22, 2008 | 6:08:07 AMCategories: Biology, Brain, Chem Lab, Disease, Politics


    If Ted Kennedy's cancerous lesion is a glioblastoma multiforme, the most common kind of brain tumor, it may have been caused by a virus from the herpes family.

    Last year, Duane Mitchell and his colleagues at Duke University learned that cytomegalovirus is present at elevated levels in over ninety percent of glioblstoma multiforme tumors. Armed with that knowledge, they are testing a vaccine that fights the common virus as a brain cancer remedy.

    Their patients also receive standard cancer treatments, which includes the drug temozolomide, a staple in the treatment of some gliomas, that may also enhance the effects of the vaccine.

    Mitchell is testing Daclizumab, an antibody that can suppress the immune system, in combination with the vaccine. When the natural defenses bounce back after being knocked down by the drug, they may more vigorously attack the cancer-causing virus.

    Brain tumors are not the only type of cancer that can be caused by a virus. Most cases of cervical cancer can be prevented by taking the vaccine gardasil, which wards off human papillomavirus.

  16. #196
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Speaking of robots.

    Dude's name is Flame, though. You can just tell he's a douche.

  17. #197
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.


  18. #198
    Dick Nicewonger kreutz2112's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    we all have herpes.
    RAPE STOVE

    white power?!

  19. #199
    thestripe
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    Mary Jo Kopechne gave him the herps right before he dumped her in the river.

  20. #200
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    So we could all benefit from the brain cancer vaccine.
    Quote Originally Posted by chairmenmeow47 View Post
    i fucking hate women with their lives together who try and help other people. where are the needy bitches at?!

  21. #201
    Dick Nicewonger kreutz2112's Avatar
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    no, well yes, but there a several different herpes variants and only a few different strains can/do cause cancer. I am almost certain that the vaccine for the herpes that causes cervical cancer would be ineffective against the strain that causes brain cancer. However, once a vaccine is inevitably developed for this particular strain of herpes then, yes, we would all benefit from it.
    RAPE STOVE

    white power?!

  22. #202
    Young blood
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    I wanna be one less, one less.

    It spread from his junk.

    chowdah.

  23. #203
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    http://judson.blogs.nytimes.com/

    June 3, 2008, 8:28 pm
    The Weird Sisters
    They just keep getting weirder. The “they” I’m referring to are the bdelloid rotifers — small transparent animals that live in damp places such as puddles, or patches of moss. Among evolutionists, these animals have something of a cult following, because they have a lifestyle that is not supposed to exist. As far as anyone can tell, the bdelloid rotifers are ancient asexuals: they appear to have been living entirely without sex for more than 85 million years. And each time we learn more details of their lifestyle, the wackier it becomes.
    Evolving to live without sex is easy; all sorts of organisms do it the whole time. For example: aphids, weevils, snails, water fleas, nematode worms, scorpions, even the occasional lizard, have all been known to evolve asexuality. Instead of reproducing via eggs and sperm, asexuals can reproduce in any number of ways. For instance, some bud off a piece of themselves; the piece grows into a whole new animal. The bdelloids, like many other asexuals, reproduce by means of eggs that don’t need to be fertilized.
    No, evolving asexuality isn’t the hard part. The hard part is making an evolutionary success of it.
    In the short-term, asexuals seem to have an advantage: they don’t have to waste time finding and seducing mates, but can just get on with reproducing. Not having to find a mate makes it easy for asexuals to live in transient habitats, such as puddles, for it doesn’t matter if they never encounter anyone else. Moreover, because asexuals only have daughters, their populations can grow rapidly. In a sexual population such as humans, females must have, on average, two children for the population to remain the same size. In an asexual population, females only need to have one. If each female has two, the population grows. Sex, in other words, is expensive.
    Yet if you look at the great tree of life, asexual groups tend to be out on the twigs: there are no great branches of the tree that contain only asexuals. In other words, no one can point to a big group, such as birds or fish, or even snails, and say, “That’s a group composed only of asexuals.” What this means is that asexuality evolves often, but rarely persists for long: asexuals typically go extinct soon after they appear.
    The swift extinction of asexuals, and the absence of big asexual groups, suggests that sex is essential for long-term evolutionary success: giving up sex is a Bad Idea, a kind of evolutionary suicide.
    Exactly why this is so remains unclear. But it’s thought to have something to do with the fact that sex generates new gene combinations. Whereas a sexual creature like you or me inherits a unique mix of genes from our parents, asexuals are lumbered with the same set of genes their mother had. For an asexual, then, the only source of genetic novelty is mutation. (Mutations and sex are both sources of genetic variation, but they work differently. Mutations — accidental changes to DNA — are the ultimate source of genetic novelty. However, mutations tend to be harmful more often than they are helpful: they tend to disrupt genes that are already working. Sex, in contrast, takes pre-existing genetic variation and shuffles it, generating new gene combinations.)
    Which brings me to the bdelloids. These animals are the great exception: a group of more than 450 species from which sex is entirely absent. How are they managing to flourish despite this epic period of abstinence? For they do flourish: bdelloids are everywhere. Go outside, collect some damp moss, and stick it under the microscope, and the odds are you’ll find some. You can even find them in Antarctica.
    One possibility is that they are having sex after all, just very secretly. Certainly, other supposed ancient asexuals turned out to be having sex on the sly. For instance one group of aphids that were thought to be ancient asexuals turned out to be producing males. And genetic evidence has revealed sex in several groups, such as the Placazoa (small animals that live in the sea), that have never actually been seen doing it.
    But genetic evidence suggests that the bdelloids are not having conventional sex: their genomes show no sign of it. Instead, they seem to be getting up to something else entirely.
    It now looks as though the bdelloids do acquire new genes from time to time — that mutation isn’t their only source of genetic novelty. Yet their means of getting new genes is unlike anything previously known for an animal. Namely: they seem to pick up genes from the environment, and add them into their genomes.
    The latest analysis of bdelloid genomes shows that the animals don’t just have rotifer genes. They also have dozens of genes from bacteria, fungi, and plants. For instance, the genome of the bdelloid rotifer Adineta vaga contains genes that bacteria use for making components of their cell walls. (What the rotifer is using them for is unclear.) Some of the other genes the animal has acquired are known only from a few groups of bacteria and fungi.
    Which is seriously weird. Horizontal gene transfer — the technical term for when genes move sideways between distantly-related species — is common among bacteria, but extremely rare in animals. The likely reason for the difference is that bacteria have only one cell, and their genes are not sequestered in a cell nucleus, so adding a new piece of DNA here or there is easy. Animals, in contrast, not only keep their genes away from the rest of the cell, in a cell nucleus. They also have specialized sex cells — eggs and sperm. In order for a gene from a fungus to be permanently added to, say, the human genome, it must somehow get into the sex cells.
    No one knows how the bdelloids pick up these genes. One idea is that it may be due to another oddity of their lifestyle: their ability to dry up and blow away. When the piece of moss they are living in dries up, these animals often dry up, too. It’s a state of suspended animation — add water and, all being well, they come back to life as frisky, or even friskier, than before. (This isn’t unique to bdelloids — some other small animals have evolved to endure desiccation. But most of these others can only do it at particular stages of their lives. The bdelloids can do it at any time. They can also — probably as a consequence of their desiccation abilities — survive high levels of radiation. Much higher than other animals can.) During the drying and rehydration, cell membranes may become disrupted, and their DNA fragmented. Perhaps all this makes it easier for stray bits of foreign DNA to get into the cells that will become eggs.
    Some of the bacterial genes were clearly acquired a long time ago. We know this because they have evolved features that bacterial genes lack. Which suggests that getting new genes this way may be rather rare — the sort of thing that happens maybe once every five hundred thousand years or so. All the same, the occasional acquisition of foreign genes may have helped the bdelloids to their profoundly unorthodox success.
    But personally, I’m glad that making a go of chastity is so difficult. For the real lesson from these weird sisters is that, for most of us, it’s far better to have sex.
    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

  24. #204
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    I don't have any moss outside. i live in the fucking desert.
    Quote Originally Posted by chairmenmeow47 View Post
    i fucking hate women with their lives together who try and help other people. where are the needy bitches at?!

  25. #205
    Beef Supreme Mr.Nipples's Avatar
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    they fixed the toilet on the space station...
    looking to purchase:big brother skateboarding magazine back issues. travis bean tb1000s electric guitars.

  26. #206
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    I wonder how much that cost?
    Quote Originally Posted by chairmenmeow47 View Post
    i fucking hate women with their lives together who try and help other people. where are the needy bitches at?!

  27. #207
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    OK SO THIS ISN'T IN THE NEWS TYPE OF SCIENCE BUT IT IS GOOD SCIENCE NEWS FOR ME

    We just found out our senior design projects and I got my first choice. It is all about building a device for in-situ cardiac engineering and figuring out how to make a cell/polymer blend that can be injected and grow new heart cells after a myocardial infarction. I am terribly excited.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  28. #208
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    congrats...!


    edited to change ? to !
    Quote Originally Posted by chairmenmeow47 View Post
    i fucking hate women with their lives together who try and help other people. where are the needy bitches at?!

  29. #209
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Thank you!
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  30. #210
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    See a Huge Moon Illusion Wednesday

    Robert Roy Britt
    Senior Science Writer
    SPACE.com Tue Jun 17, 11:15 AM ET

    As the full moon rises this Wednesday evening, June 18, many people will be tricked into thinking it's unusually large

    The moon illusion, as it's known, is a trick in our minds that makes the moon seem bigger when it's near the horizon. The effect is most pronounced at full moon. Many people swear it's real, suggesting that perhaps Earth's atmosphere magnifies the moon.

    But it really is all in our minds. The moon is not bigger at the horizon than when overhead.

    The illusion will be particularly noticeable at this "solstice moon," coming just two days before summer starts in the Northern Hemisphere. The reason, according to NASA, lies in lunar mechanics: The sun and full moon are like kids on a see-saw; when one is high, the other is low. This week's high solstice sun gives us a low, horizon-hugging moon and a strong, long-lasting version of the illusion.

    If it's any consolation, space station astronauts report the same effect.

    Here's how it works: Your mind believes things on the horizon are farther away than things overhead, because you are used to seeing clouds just a few miles above, but the clouds on the horizon can indeed be hundreds of miles away. So if we think something (such as the moon) is farther away, and it's not, then it seems larger.

    If you remain doubtful, test the idea yourself. Go out at moonrise with a small object, perhaps a pencil eraser. Hold it at arm's length as the moon rises and compare the sizes of the moon and the eraser, then repeat the experiment an hour or two later when the moon is high in the sky. A rolled up tube of paper works well, too.

    Moonrise times vary by location. On Wednesday, it will come up at these local times at these locations, according to NASA: New York City, 8:58 p.m.; Miami, 8:35 p.m.; Seattle, 9:51 p.m.

    The moon rises about 50 minutes earlier Tuesday night, when the effect will also be noticeable because the moon will be nearly full. Oh, and that raises another fallacy: There's no such thing as a full moon.

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