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Thread: The Science/Science News Thread.

  1. #121
    Member theburiedlife's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Chemical brain controls nanobots
    By Jonathan Fildes
    Science and technology reporter, BBC News


    Artificial brain

    The researchers have already built larger 'brains'
    A tiny chemical "brain" which could one day act as a remote control for swarms of nano-machines has been invented.

    The molecular device - just two billionths of a metre across - was able to control eight of the microscopic machines simultaneously in a test.

    Writing in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists say it could also be used to boost the processing power of future computers.

    Many experts have high hopes for nano-machines in treating disease.

    "If [in the future] you want to remotely operate on a tumour you might want to send some molecular machines there," explained Dr Anirban Bandyopadhyay of the International Center for Young Scientists, Tsukuba, Japan.

    "But you cannot just put them into the blood and [expect them] to go to the right place."

    Dr Bandyopadhyay believes his device may offer a solution. One day they may be able to guide the nanobots through the body and control their functions, he said.

    "That kind of device simply did not exist; this is the first time we have created a nano-brain," he told BBC News.

    Computer brain

    The machine is made from 17 molecules of the chemical duroquinone. Each one is known as a "logic device".

    How nanotechnology is building the future from the bottom up

    In pictures


    They each resemble a ring with four protruding spokes that can be independently rotated to represent four different states.

    One duroquinone molecule sits at the centre of a ring formed by the remaining 16. All are connected by chemical bonds, known as hydrogen bonds.

    The state of the control molecule at the centre is switched by a scanning tunnelling microscope (STM).

    These large machines are a standard part of the nanotechnologist's tool kit, and allow the viewing and manipulation of atomic surfaces.

    Using the STM, the researchers showed they could change the central molecule's state and simultaneously switch the states of the surrounding 16.

    "We instruct only one molecule and it simultaneously and logically instructs 16 others at a time," said Dr Bandyopadhyay.

    The configuration allows four billion different possible combinations of outcome.

    The two nanometre diameter structure was inspired by the parallel communication of glial cells inside a human brain, according to the team.

    Robot control

    To test the control unit, the researchers simulated docking eight existing nano-machines to the structure, creating a "nano-factory" or a kind of "chemical swiss army knife".


    Nano dust (SPL)
    Scientists believe nano-machines could have medical applications

    The attached devices, created by other research groups, included the "world's tiniest elevator", a molecular platform that can be raised or lowered on command.

    The device is about two and a half nanometres (billionths of a metre) high, and the lift moves less than one nanometre up and down.

    All eight machines simultaneously responded to a single instruction in the simulation.

    "We have clear cut evidence that we can control those machines," said Dr Bandyopadhyay.

    This "one-to-many" communication and the device's ability to act as a central control unit also raises the possibility of using the device in future computers, he said.

    Machines built using devices such as this would be able to process 16 bits of information simultaneously.

    Current silicon Central Processing Units (CPUs) can only carry out one instruction at a time, albeit thousands of times per second.

    The researchers say they have already built faster machines, capable of 256 simultaneous operations, and have designed one capable of 1024.

    However, according to Professor Andrew Adamatzky of the University of the West England (UWE), making a workable computer would be very difficult at the moment.

    "As with other implementations of unconventional computers the application is very limited, because they operate [it] using scanning tunnel microscopy," he said.

    But, he said, the work is promising.

    "I am sure with time such molecular CPUs can be integrated in molecular robots, so they will simply interact with other molecular parts autonomously."
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7288426.stm
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
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  2. #122
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Nanotechnology reaches the age of the punch card.

  3. #123
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Yep.

    Also paging Melville.

  4. #124
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    This is more of a technology news story:

    U.S. Spies Want to Find Terrorists in World of Warcraft
    Be careful who you frag. Having eliminated all terrorism in the real world, the U.S. intelligence community is working to develop software that will detect violent extremists infiltrating World of Warcraft and other massive multiplayer games, according to a data-mining report from the Director of National Intelligence.

    The Reynard project will begin by profiling online gaming behavior, then potentially move on to its ultimate goal of "automatically detecting suspicious behavior and actions in the virtual world."

    The cultural and behavioral norms of virtual worlds and gaming are generally unstudied. Therefore, Reynard will seek to identify the emerging social, behavioral and cultural norms in virtual worlds and gaming environments. The project would then apply the lessons learned to determine the feasibility of automatically detecting suspicious behavior and actions in the virtual world.

    If it shows early promise, this small seedling effort may increase its scope to a full project.
    Reynard will conduct unclassified research in a public virtual world environment. The research will use publicly available data and will begin with observational studies to establish baseline normative behaviors.

    The publicly available report -- which was mandated by Congress following earlier concerns over data-mining programs -- also mentions several other data-mining initiatives. These include:

    Video Analysis and Content Extraction - software to automatically identify faces, events and objects in video

    Tangram - A system that wants to create surveillance and threat warning system that evaluates known threats and finds unknown threats to issue warnings ahead of an attack

    Knowledge Discovery and Dissemination - This tool is reminiscent of the supposedly-defunct Total Information Awareness program. It seeks to access disparate databases to find patterns of known bad behavior. The program plans to work with domestic law enforcement and Homeland Security.
    The report gives no indication why the find-a-terrorist cell in Sims project is called Reynard, though that is a traditional trickster figure in literature.
    http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/200...s-spies-w.html
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  5. #125
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    I can't wait til the future is so much a reality that it's just a fucking joke. Just one big fucking laughingstock, like World Of Warcraft. Like TERRORISTS in World Of Warcraft. I just want things to keep going in this same ridiculous direction until everyone thinks shit's still serious but all the reality TV shows of people playing characters in MMORPGs will just keep me laughing in madness until the bombs start to explode...

    The nuclear apocalypse will have been triggered because somebody unlocked the wrong box in Final Fantasy XX
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  6. #126
    Member theburiedlife's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    If you stop playing MMORPG's you're letting the terrorists win.
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
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  7. #127
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Why our brains are programmed to eat doughnuts

    Last updated at 11:20am on 10th March 2008



    Homer Simpson can't resist doughnuts and it's all because our brains are programmed that way, according to new research
    Scientists have discovered that it is not just Homer Simpson who finds it impossible to keep his hands off doughnuts.

    Apparently our brains are programmed to leap into action when presented with the sugary treats.

    A study found that when hungry volunteers were shown a picture of a Krispy Kreme doughnut or a screwdriver, the sugary snack sent the brain into overdrive.

    The same response did not occur after participants had stuffed themselves with up to eight of them.

    Researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago carried out functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain scans while volunteers were shown the pictures.

    After the eating binge, neither image generated much of a reaction.

    But after volunteers had fasted for eight hours, two distinct parts of the brain "lit up" at the sight of the doughnuts.

    The first was the limbic brain, an ancestral part of the brain present in all animals from frogs to humans.

    "That part of the brain is able to detect what is motivationally significant," said Dr Marsel Mesulam, senior author of the research published on line in the journal Cerebral Cortex.

    "It says, not only am I hungry, but here is food."

    Next the brain's spatial attention network locked onto the doughnuts, deciding they were more important than the screwdrivers.

    Dr Aprajita Mohanty, another of the scientists, said: "There's a very complex system in the brain that helps to direct our attention to items in the environment that are relevant to our needs, for example, food when we are hungry but not when we are full."

    The research demonstrated how the brain sifts out all sorts of relevant material, not just doughnuts, from a world full of stimuli.

    "If you are in a forest and you hear rustling, the context urges you to pay full attention since this could be a sign of danger," said Dr Mesulam.

    "If you are in your office, the context makes the identical sound less relevant. A major job of the brain is to match response to context."
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/liv...n_page_id=1798
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
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  8. #128
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    What the fuck kind of a useless study is that? Hungry people react more strongly to a picture of a donut than one of a screwdriver?

  9. #129
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    I think they like the biological influences that our body experiences when we see said foods.

    Not just that fat people like cake.
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
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  10. #130
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Sure but here are the only two things that article says besides "hungry people like food":

    The first was the limbic brain, an ancestral part of the brain present in all animals from frogs to humans.
    Hungry animals of all types like food.

    Next the brain's spatial attention network locked onto the doughnuts, deciding they were more important than the screwdrivers.
    No, really. People too.

  11. #131
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Ok I admit, not much science on the news today.

    Here's a better story:

    Searching For A Tiny New Dimension, Curled Up Like The Universe Before The Big Bang

    ScienceDaily (Mar. 12, 2008) ó The universe as we currently know it is made up of three dimensions of space and one of time, but researchers in the Department of Physics and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech are exploring the possibility of an extra dimension.

    Sound like an episode from the "Twilight Zone?" Almost, but not quite; according to John Simonetti, associate professor of physics in the College of Science and Michael Kavic, graduate student and one of the investigators on the project.

    "The idea we're exploring is that the universe has an imperceptibly small dimension (about one billionth of a nanometer) in addition to the four that we know currently," Kavic said. "This extra dimension would be curled up, in a state similar to that of the entire universe at the time of the Big Bang."

    The group is looking for small primordial black holes that, when they explode, may produce a radio pulse that could be detected here on Earth. These black holes are called primordial because they were created a fraction of a second after the beginning of the universe.

    Black holes are expected to evaporate over time, losing mass and therefore shrinking. A black hole larger than the extra dimension would wrap around it like a thick rubber band wrapped around a hose. As a black hole shrinks down to the size of the extra dimension, it would be stretched so thin it would snap, causing an explosion.

    The explosion could produce a radio pulse. Under a National Science Foundation grant, the Virginia Tech group is preparing to set up an Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array radio telescope in Montgomery County to search the sky for these radio pulses from explosions up to 300 light years away. They have a similar telescope in southwestern North Carolina that has been looking for events for several months.

    "We have a number of things in mind that have been predicted to produce radio pulses, which have not been seen," Simonetti said. "One of them is a primordial black hole explosion."

    "Basically we're looking for any exotic, high-energy explosion that would produce radio waves," Simonetti said. He said the establishment of the second radio telescope would help the two telescopes validate one another.

    "If a pulse is detected in both instruments at about the same time, that's a good indication we're talking about something real as opposed to a pulse from manmade interference," Simonetti said.

    Why search for extra dimensions? One reason has to do with string theory, an area of physics that postulates that the fundamental building blocks of the universe are small strings of matter that oscillate much like a guitar string, producing various harmonics.

    "String theory requires extra dimensions to be a consistent theory," Kavic said. "String theory suggests a minimum of 10 dimensions, but we're only considering models with one extra dimension."

    Some theorists believe the Large Hadron Collider, a giant particle accelerator being constructed near Geneva, Switzerland, might be able to detect an extra dimension. The Virginia Tech group hopes to detect them via radio astronomy, a much less elaborate and costly endeavor.

    The Virginia Tech research team plans to run the search for at least five years. Others involved in the project include physics graduate student Sean Cutchin; College of Engineering professors Steven Ellingson and Cameron Patterson; and graduate students Brian Martin, Kshitija Deshpande, and Mahmud Harun.

    "If we had evidence there is an extra dimension, it would really revolutionize how we think about space and time," Kavic said. "This would be a very exciting discovery."
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0310151949.htm
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
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  12. #132
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    That's bullshit. I hate donuts.
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Because fucking millenials that's what

  13. #133
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Ants are assholes, too.

    The use of "altruistic" two paragraphs in a row bothers me, but otherwise I think this is interesting.

    Royal Corruption Is Rife In The Ant World

    ScienceDaily (Mar. 17, 2008) — Far from being a model of social co-operation, the ant world is riddled with cheating and corruption -- and it goes all the way to the top, according to scientists from the Universities of Leeds and Copenhagen.

    Ants have always been thought to work together for the benefit of the colony rather than for individual gain. But Dr Bill Hughes from Leeds' Faculty of Biological Sciences has found evidence to shatter this illusion.
    With Professor Jacobus Boomsma from the University of Copenhagen, he's discovered that certain ants are able to cheat the system, ensuring their offspring become reproductive queens rather than sterile workers.

    "The accepted theory was that queens were produced solely by nurture: certain larvae were fed certain foods to prompt their development into queens and all larvae could have that opportunity," explains Dr Hughes. "But we carried out DNA fingerprinting on five colonies of leaf-cutting ants and discovered that the offspring of some fathers are more likely to become queens than others. These ants have a 'royal' gene or genes, giving them an unfair advantage and enabling them to cheat many of their altruistic sisters out of their chance to become a queen themselves." But what intrigued the scientists was that these 'royal' genetic lines were always rare in each colony.

    Says Dr Hughes: "The most likely explanation has to be that the ants are deliberately taking steps to avoid detection. If there were too many of one genetic line developing into queens in a single colony, the other ants would notice and might take action against them. So we think the males with these royal genes have evolved to somehow spread their offspring around more colonies and so escape detection. The rarity of the royal lines is actually an evolutionary strategy by the cheats to escape suppression by the altruistic masses that they exploit."

    A few times each year, ant colonies produce males and new queens which fly off from their colonies to meet and mate. The males die shortly after mating and the females go on to found new colonies. The researchers are keen to study this process, to determine if their hypothesis is correct and the mating strategy of males with royal genes ensures their rarity, to keep their advantages undetected by their 'commoner' counterparts.

    However, the scientists' discovery does prove that, although social insect colonies are often cited as proof that societies can be based on egalitarianism and cooperation, they are not quite as utopian as they appear.

    "When studying social insects like ants and bees, it's often the cooperative aspect of their society that first stands out," says Dr Hughes. "However, when you look more deeply, you can see there is conflict and cheating -- and obviously human society is also a prime example of this. It was thought that ants were an exception, but our genetic analysis has shown that their society is also rife with corruption -- and royal corruption at that!"

    The research was funded by the Carlsberg Foundation and carried out in collaboration with Professor Jacobus Boomsma, Director of the Centre for Social Evolution at the University of Copenhagen. It is published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  14. #134
    old school whynotsmile99's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    I think this qualifies as amazing


    click for video

    http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/...n3960219.shtml

    Three years ago, Lee Spievack sliced off the tip of his finger in the propeller of a hobby shop airplane.

    What happened next, Andrews reports, propelled him into the future of medicine. Spievack's brother, Alan, a medical research scientist, sent him a special powder and told him to sprinkle it on the wound.

    "I powdered it on until it was covered," Spievack recalled.

    To his astonishment, every bit of his fingertip grew back.

    "Your finger grew back," Andrews asked Spievack, "flesh, blood, vessels and nail?"

    "Four weeks," he answered.

    Andrews spoke to Dr. Steven Badylak of the University of Pittsburgh's McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine and asked if that powder was the reason behind Spievack's new finger tip.

    "Yes, it is," Badylak explained. "We took this and turned it into a powdered form."

    That powder is a substance made from pig bladders called extracellular matrix. It is a mix of protein and connective tissue surgeons often use to repair tendons and it holds some of the secrets behind the emerging new science of regenerative medicine.

    "It tells the body, start that process of tissue regrowth," said Badylak.

    Badlayk is one of the many scientists who now believe every tissue in the body has cells which are capable of regeneration. All scientists have to do is find enough of those cells and "direct" them to grow.

    "Somehow the matrix summons the cells and tell them what to do," Badylak explained. "It helps instruct them in terms of where they need to go, how they need to differentiate - should I become a blood vessel, a nerve, a muscle cell or whatever."

    If this helped Spievack's finger regrow, Badylak says, at least in theory, you should be able to grow a whole limb.

    Advances That Go Beyond Theory

    In his lab at Wake Forest University, a lab he calls a medical factory, Dr. Anthony Atala is growing body parts.

    Atala and his team have built, from the cell level up, 18 different types of tissue so far, including muscle tissue, whole organs and the pulsing heart valve of a sheep.

    "And is it growing?" Andrews asked.

    "Absolutely," Atala said, showing him, "All this white material is new tissue."

    "When people ask me 'what do you do,' we grow tissues and organs," he said. "We are making body parts that we can implant right back into patients."

    It's very much the future, but it's today. We are doing this today.
    Dr. Patrick Shenot
    Dr. Atala, one of the pioneers of regeneration, believes every type of tissue already has cells ready to regenerate if only researchers can prod them into action. Sometimes that prodding can look like science fiction.

    Emerging from an everyday ink jet printer is the heart of a mouse. Mouse heart cells go into the ink cartridge and are then sprayed down in a heart shaped pattern layer by layer.

    Dr. Atala believes it's a matter of time before someone grows a human heart.

    "The cells have all the genetic information necessary to make new tissue," Atala explained. "That's what they are programmed to do. So your heart cells are programmed to make more heart tissue, your bladder cells are programmed to make more bladder cells."

    Atala's work with human bladder cells has pushed regenerative medicine to a transformational breakthrough.

    In this clinical trial at Thomas Jefferson Hospital in Philadelphia, Dr. Patrick Shenot is performing a bladder transplant with an organ built with this patient's own cells. In a process developed by Dr. Atala, the patient's cells were grown in a lab, and then seeded on a biodegradable bladder-shaped scaffold.

    Eight weeks later, with the scaffold now infused with millions of regrown cells, it is transplanted into the patient. When the scaffold dissolves, Dr. Shenot says what's left will be a new, functioning organ.

    "The cells will differentiate into the two major cells in the bladder wall, the muscle cells and the lining cells," he explained. "It's very much the future, but it's today. We are doing this today."

    Repairing The Wounded

    Today, one of the biggest believers in regeneration is the United States military, which is especially interested in the matrix that regrew Lee Spievack's finger.

    The Army, working in conjunction with the University of Pittsburgh, is about to use that matrix on the amputated fingers of soldiers home from the war.

    Dr. Steven Wolf, at the Army Institute of Surgical Research, says the military has invested millions of dollars in regenerative research, hoping to re-grow limbs, lost muscle, even burned skin.

    "And it's hard to ignore this guys missing half his skin, this guy's missing his leg," Wolf said. "You start asking the question, is there somebody out there with the technology that can do this for us?"

    "You mean regrow the tissue?" Andrews asked.

    "The answer," Wolf said, "is maybe."

    At the burn unit at the Brooke Army Medical center, the very idea of regeneration brings a glimmer of hope.

    Army Staff Sgt. Robert Henline was the only survivor of an IED attack on his Humvee north of Baghdad.

    "It's a great idea," Henline said, talking with Andrews about the military's investment into the new technology. "If they can come up with something that's less painful and can heal it with natural growth, without all this scarring, it's definitely something to check into."

    Regeneration Race Goes Global

    Several different technologies for harnessing regeneration are now in clinical trials around the world. One machine, being tested in Germany, sprays a burn patient's own cells onto a burn, signaling the skin to re-grow.

    Badylak is about to implant matrix material - shaped like an esophagus - into patients with throat cancer.

    "We fully expect that this material will cause the body to re-form normal esophageal tissue," Badylak said.

    And in a clinical trial at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, patient Mary Beth Babo is getting her own adult stem cells injected into her heart, in hopes of growing new arteries. Her surgeon is Dr. Joon Lee.

    "It's what we consider the Holy Grail of our field for coronary heart disease," Lee said.

    The Holy Grail, because if stem cells can re-grow arteries, there's less need for surgery.

    "It's a big difference from open heart surgery to this," said Babo. "If people don't have to go through that, this would be the way to go ... if it works."

    The Business Of Regeneration

    Corporate America, meanwhile, already believes regeneration will work. Investment capital has been pouring in to commercialize and mass produce custom-made body parts.

    The Tengion Company has bought the license, built the factory, and is already making those bladders developed at Wake Forest that we told you about earlier.

    "We're actually building a very real business around a very real and compelling patient need," said Dr. Steven Nichtberger, Tengion's CEO.

    Tengion believes regeneration will soon revolutionize transplant medicine. Transplant patients, instead of waiting years for a donated organ, will ship cells off to a lab and wait a few weeks to have their own re-grown.

    "I look at the patients who are on the waitlist for transplant," said Nichtberger. "I look at the opportunity we have to build bladders, to build vessels, to build kidneys. In regenerative medicine, I think it is similar to the semi-conductor industry of the 1980s, you don't know where it's going to go, but you know it's big."
    Then I will hold you down and spit her percolations all over you until you're as greasy as the day she regrets pushing your big fat ass out her big fat cunt.

  15. #135
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    maybe you guys can help me out with this...

    about a month ago i heard a story about how this satellite or something that was floating around out there in space was moving at a constant speed and when they checked back on it, it had somehow began to move faster...

    so they began to question the current laws of gravity or somethin....

    does anyone know what im talkin bout?

    i havent been able to find any stories on it...

  16. #136
    Member Melanie.Dawn's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    I think people were talking about that in the 2012 thread?
    Take this job and shove it. Adios, I'm a ghost, I am leaving for the coast and I'll never work for anyone again...

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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    that's pretty awesome whynotsmile.
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Because fucking millenials that's what

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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Therapeutic cloning has been successfully used to treat Parkinson's disease in mice, US researchers say.

    The study in Nature Medicine provides the best evidence so far that the controversial technique could one day help people with the condition.



    The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Centre team say it is the first time animals have been successfully treated with their own cloned cells.

    UK experts said the work was promising and exciting development.

    No rejection

    In Parkinson's disease, nerve cells in the part of the brain that controls muscle movement either die or become impaired.

    Normally, these cells produce a vital chemical known as dopamine, which allows smooth, co-ordinated function of the body's muscles and movement.


    This is an exciting development, as for the first time, we can see that it may be possible to create a person's own embryonic stem cells to potentially treat their Parkinson's
    Dr Kieran Breen, Parkinson's Disease Society
    In therapeutic cloning, the nucleus of a cell is inserted into an egg with the nucleus removed.

    This cell then develops into an embryo from which stem cells can be harvested and used as a treatment.

    In this study, stem cells were developed into dopamine-producing neurons the missing nerve cells in Parkinson's disease.

    The mice that received neurons derived from their own clones showed significant signs of improvement.

    But when these neurons were grafted into mice that did not genetically match the transplanted cells, the cells did not survive and the mice did not recover.

    The researchers say the therapy is promising because, as the cells originally came from the animal that was ill, they were not rejected by its immune system.

    'Great hope'

    Scientists are pursuing the use of stem cell therapy for Parkinson's disease because it would allow the replacement of the dead dopamine-producing nerve cells with new, healthy cells.

    This should restore the supply of dopamine within the brain and allow it to work normally again.

    However, the challenge has been to produce nerve cells which can survive after transplantation.

    Dr Kieran Breen, director of research and development at the Parkinson's Disease Society said: "This is an exciting development, as for the first time, we can see that it may be possible to create a person's own embryonic stem cells to potentially treat their Parkinson's.

    "Researchers in this area now need to carry out more studies to satisfy safety concerns and to make the process more efficient before these studies are carried out on people living with Parkinson's."

    He added: "Stem cell therapy offers great hope for repairing the brain in people with Parkinson's.

    "It may ultimately offer a cure, allowing people to lead a life that is free from the symptoms of Parkinson's."

    Professor Robin Lovell-Badge, an expert in stem cell research at the National Institute of Medical Research, said this was good research which showed using therapeutic cloning could be beneficial.

    "There was a very significant level of recovery.

    But he added: "They only studied the mice for 11 weeks afterwards, which is not a huge amount of time to see how persistent the repaid would be."

    However, the experts said much more research in both animals and humans was needed before the treatment could be offered to people with Parkinson's.

    In a separate study, a team from University College London have discovered mutations in a gene which may trigger Parkinson's in people with a family history of the condition.

    The finding could provide scientists with a clue as to what causes Parkinson's - and could contribute to the search for new treatments.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7306886.stm
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
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  19. #139
    Member theburiedlife's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Looks Like Jello, Works Like Cartilage
    Eric Bland, Discovery News


    Replacement Part?

    March 21, 2008 -- It may not look like much, but a slippery, Jello-like material developed by scientists in the United States and Japan could soon be improving everything from artificial joints to contact lenses.

    The material is a hydrogel, and as the name implies, is made mostly of water. But it's also surprisingly resilient.

    "Most hydrogels are like gelatin; you touch them and they break into pieces," said Wen-li Wu, a scientist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and an author of the new study.

    "What we are talking about is a gel that you can squeeze as hard as you can, but it's still slippery," he said.

    Produced from materials that are cheap and readily available, the hydrogel is held together by two polymers. The first is a charged solid that clings to a second, uncharged liquid polymer. If a crack develops in the solid polymer, the liquid polymer flows into the defect and essentially heals it.

    The hydrogel is clear and as slippery as natural cartilage -- an improvement over current materials used in artificial joints. The hydrogel is also softer and more resistant to wear than current materials, say its makers.

    "It will definitely absorb more shocks than current materials," said Wu.
    http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/0...cartilage.html
    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCoachellaHellYeah View Post
    this is fantastic news...we can all fist ourselves in peace now...
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  20. #140
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.



    this post is fucked up. I cant fix it. Oh well.




    This robot is crazy though.

  21. #141
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.


  22. #142
    Banned thelastgreatman's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    I might start a thread dedicated solely to reposting Scott Adams blog entries because he is smarter and more interesting than all of us. But here's a recent one that includes some interesting pseudo-news that claims the Earth is expanding.

    Expanding Earth Theory
    I love hearing about science conspiracy theories. My new favorite, that I stumbled across the other day, is that Earth is increasing in size, and that expansion is the only plausible explanation for what looks like the continental drift.



    This interests me because years ago I proposed a thought experiment about gravity, where I noted that if all matter in the universe were expanding, you would appear to be attracted to other objects when all that was happening is that those objects were growing and closing the space gaps between them.

    Naturally there are many holes in this theory, including the lack of evidence that planets are getting larger. But now I discover this theory that the earth has indeed grown. And it must be true because it is on Youtube!

    My theory of gravity held that if you and the earth were the only things in existence, and you both grew at the same time, you wouldnít notice the growth because all the reference points are growing too.

    One of the big criticisms to this theory is that mass would increase if size increased. Originally, I waved my hand at that problem and just said the theory includes an ongoing shift of the laws of physics to keep everything in balance, such as orbits and the relative strength of structures.

    But isnít the mass of earth increasing? People are being born and new trees are growing every day. Perhaps that increase in mass is borrowed from other places, such as dust landing here from space, but clearly some objects are gaining mass, as the expanding matter theory of gravity requires, and the source of that gain is not obvious to the eye.

    For the expanding matter theory of gravity to be true, youíd expect some things to expand at different rates than others. Thatís consistent with the youtube video on how the earth expanded while the land mass didnít change much. Itís also consistent with the universe itself expanding, which we observe.

    The expanding matter theory of gravity isnít a serious one. Itís just a fun mental detour. And like all fringe theories, you can always find clues that make it seem as though it all fits together, so long as you donít know too much about science.

    [Question: Photons have mass. What happens when all those photons from the sun hit Earth? Does the mass stay here?]
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  23. #143
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

  24. #144
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    fuselage is a funny word.

    fuckin fuselage...

  25. #145
    LOLocaust Survivor Hannahrain's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Voice recording pre-dates Edison.
    That's an interesting link, Tom. Did anyone else listen to the recording? Creeeepy. Reminds me of the whole archaeoacoustics debate.

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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    that recording is fucking creepy...


    sounds like it should be coming from this little guy...


  27. #147
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by thestripe View Post
    Fucking hell. We had a good run.

  28. #148
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by TomAz View Post
    Bullshit.

    Quote Originally Posted by linked article
    The recordings were not intended for listening; the idea of audio playback had not been conceived. Rather, Scott sought to create a paper record of human speech that could later be deciphered.
    Words from a phonetic language written on paper are a record of human speech, if you wanna play that game.
    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post
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  29. #149
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hannahrain View Post
    That's an interesting link, Tom. Did anyone else listen to the recording? Creeeepy. Reminds me of the whole archaeoacoustics debate.
    That recording sucks. It sounds like it's from 1760.
    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post
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  30. #150
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    Default Re: The Science/Science News Thread.

    The recordings were not intended for listening; the idea of audio playback had not been conceived. Rather, Scott sought to create a paper record of human speech that could later be deciphered.
    yeah that's the most retarded thing I've ever heard. John's right, paper records of human speech have been around since the beginning of history (that being defined as the point in time in which we start seeing shit written down)

    Of course the point encoding sound as another form of information is reproducing the sound later. What a retarded thing to write. I hope that author didn't say that out loud to anyone.

    In a self-published memoir in 1878, [Scott] railed against Edison for “appropriating” his methods and misconstruing the purpose of recording technology. The goal, Scott argued, was not sound reproduction, but “writing speech, which is what the word phonograph means.”
    dipshit.

    sure, Edison got it wrong. People would have been much better off reading Scott Joplin as squiggles on paper than hearing the music he played.
    Last edited by jackstraw94086; 03-31-2008 at 09:49 PM.

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