View Poll Results: Which book do you want to read?

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14. You may not vote on this poll
  • Goodnight, Nebraska by Tom McNeal

    0 0%
  • The Queen of Spades by Alexander Pushkin

    0 0%
  • White Noise by Don Delillo

    4 28.57%
  • Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov

    1 7.14%
  • The Master & Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov

    1 7.14%
  • The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

    1 7.14%
  • The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami

    6 42.86%
  • Zazzie in the Metro by Raymond Queneau

    0 0%
  • Great Expectations by Kathy Acker

    0 0%
  • The Name of the World by Denis Johnson

    1 7.14%
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Thread: Book Club

  1. #1
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Book Club

    After we decide what book to read, we can figure out deadlines and how or if we'll break it up.

  2. #2
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    You're starting a coachella board book club?
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Because fucking millenials that's what

  3. #3
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Yes.

  4. #4
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Can someone with some time post little summaries or synopses or something so we're not blindly choosing?
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  5. #5
    Dark Lord mountmccabe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    This poll should be multiple choice. It doesn't matter what book is everyone's first choice, what matters is what books people will participate for.
    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post
    See how wrong you are, Tommy? Randy is agreeing with you.

  6. #6
    Brackish African wmgaretjax's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Quote Originally Posted by miscorrections View Post
    Can someone with some time post little summaries or synopses or something so we're not blindly choosing?
    there is always google... or head straight to amazon.

    I chose Wind Up Bird Chronicles. Because I've been meaning to read it again, and it's one I would love other people's perspectives on. Not to mention it's a damn fun, wild ride.

    Others I'm excited about: White Noise, Pale Fire, Queen of Spades... The only one I wouldn't participate in would be The Fountainhead. I don't care for the book, or the woman, and reading it twice is enough for me.
    Last edited by wmgaretjax; 12-31-2007 at 12:07 PM.

  7. #7
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    I guess I haven't been keeping up with the hey books thread. I thought John's list for a list for himself. Oops.
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Because fucking millenials that's what

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Can I just hang out for the orange drink and pink cookies?

  9. #9
    No Clownery full on idle's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    It would be useful to have a leader, not it, and please someone who isn't on ignore.

  10. #10
    Dark Lord mountmccabe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    I will write up something on the books I suggested (at least) but I don't have time to do so now and I wanna do it in the new and improved poll thread.
    Quote Originally Posted by SoulDischarge View Post
    See how wrong you are, Tommy? Randy is agreeing with you.

  11. #11
    Coachella Junkie algunz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Quote Originally Posted by mountmccabe View Post
    This poll should be multiple choice. It doesn't matter what book is everyone's first choice, what matters is what books people will participate for.
    I thought about that. Unfortunately, it's too late now.

    If you want to put together a different poll, I won't be the least bit offended.

  12. #12
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Quote Originally Posted by wmgaretjax View Post
    there is always google... or head straight to amazon.
    I don't want google's opinions, I want the suggester's opinions.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  13. #13
    Brackish African wmgaretjax's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    i say we just stick with this poll. if we add another it'll just get confusing for people that haven't been paying full attention.

  14. #14
    MENACING Courtney's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Here is a short write-up of each book, in case people aren't familiar with all of them:

    1. Goodnight, Nebraska by Tom McNeal

    "Randall Hunsacker, the protagonist of Tom McNeal's first novel, Goodnight, Nebraska, is only 17, but already he has two strikes against him: his father's death when Randall was thirteen led to a succession of "stepfathers" moving through his life and the last one, Lenny, Randall has shot. The shooting, a suicide attempt, and a stint in juvenile hall is what brings Randall to the small town of Goodnight, Nebraska--a place where he hopes to start over. He gets a job, earns a place on the high school football team and even starts dating one of the cheerleaders; things are looking up for Randall. But in a town like Goodnight--Hicksburg, to Randall, or ShitdeVille--what goes up must eventually come down. And so it is for Randall--he gets injured during a football game and his girlfriend, thinking he's dead, announces they are engaged, and before he knows it, he is married, living in a trailer, facing a life that seems to have dead-ended before it even got started.

    Appearances can be deceiving, however. To Randall and his wife, Marcy, Goodnight seems like the last place on earth; he never imagined himself coming here, she never stopped dreaming about getting out. Much of McNeal's novel has to do with the gradual disintegration of Randall and Marcy's marriage; at the same time it limns a warm portrait of a middle-American town that may not be very exciting to live in, but one where people know they can count on each other in a pinch. It takes Marcy leaving--and Randall going after her--to finally teach them both that there's really no place like Goodnight."

    2. The Queen of Spades by Alexander Pushkin

    "The Queen of Spades has long been acknowledged as one of the world's greatest short stories. In this classic literary representation of gambling, Alexander Pushkin explores the nature of obsession. Hints of the occult and gothic alternate with scenes of St Petersburg high-society in the story of the passionate Hermann's quest to master chance and make his fortune at the card-table. Underlying the taut plot is an ironical treatment of the romantic dreamer and social outcast."

    3. White Noise by Don Delillo

    "Something is amiss in a small college town in Middle America. Something subliminal, something omnipresent, something hard to put your finger on. For example, teachers and students at the grade school are falling mysteriously ill:

    Investigators said it could be the ventilating system, the paint or varnish, the foam insulation, the electrical insulation, the cafeteria food, the rays emitted by microcomputers, the asbestos fireproofing, the adhesive on shipping containers, the fumes from the chlorinated pool, or perhaps something deeper, finer-grained, more closely woven into the fabric of things.

    J.A.K. Gladney, world-renowned as the living center, the absolute font, of Hitler Studies in North America in the mid-1980s, describes the malaise affecting his town in a superbly ironic and detached manner. But even he fails to mask his disquiet. There is menace in the air, and ultimately it is made manifest: a poisonous cloud--an "airborne toxic event"--unleashed by an industrial accident floats over the town, requiring evacuation. In the aftermath, as the residents adjust to new and blazingly brilliant sunsets, Gladney and his family must confront their own poses, night terrors, self-deceptions, and secrets.

    DeLillo is at his dark, hilarious best in this 1985 National Book Award winner, a novel that preceded but anticipated the explosion of the Internet, tabloid television, and the dialed-in, wired-up, endlessly accelerated tenor of the culture we live in. He doesn't just describe life in a hypermediated society, he re-creates it. His characters repeat phrases, information, and rumor gleaned from television, radio, and other media sources like people speaking in code. And DeLillo has seeded the book with short gemlike episodes that demand to be read aloud, and that haunt the imagination years after their first reading: a visit to the Most Photographed Barn in America. A plane that nearly falls out of the sky. An hour in a classroom, canonizing Elvis. These vignettes are vivid and unique, yet, like the phrases from television shows that interject themselves, out of context, into Gladney's consciousness, they are strangely unconnected to one another--reflections of the lives DeLillo is showing us we lead."

    4. Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov

    "Like Lolita, Vladimir Nabokov's Pale Fire is a masterpiece that imprisons us inside the mazelike head of a mad émigré. Yet Pale Fire is more outrageously hilarious, and its narrative convolutions make the earlier book seem as straightforward as a fairy tale. Here's the plot--listen carefully! John Shade is a homebody poet in New Wye, U.S.A. He writes a 999-line poem about his life, and what may lie beyond death. This novel (and seldom has the word seemed so woefully inadequate) consists of both that poem and an extensive commentary on it by the poet's crazy neighbor, Charles Kinbote.

    According to this deranged annotator, he had urged Shade to write about his own homeland--the northern kingdom of Zembla. It soon becomes clear that this fabulous locale may well be a figment of Kinbote's colorfully cracked, prismatic imagination. Meanwhile, he manages to twist the poem into an account of Zembla's King Charles--whom he believes himself to be--and the monarch's eventual assassination by the revolutionary Jakob Gradus.

    In the course of this dizzying narrative, shots are indeed fired. But it's Shade who takes the hit, enabling Kinbote to steal the dead poet's manuscript and set about annotating it. Is that perfectly clear? By now it should be obvious that Pale Fire is not only a whodunit but a who-wrote-it. There isn't, of course, a single solution. But Nabokov's best biographer, Brian Boyd, has come up with an ingenious suggestion: he argues that Shade is actually guiding Kinbote's mad hand from beyond the grave, nudging him into completing what he'd intended to be a 1,000-line poem. Read this magical, melancholic mystery and see if you agree."

    5. The Master & Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov

    "Surely no stranger work exists in the annals of protest literature than The Master and Margarita. Written during the Soviet crackdown of the 1930s, when Mikhail Bulgakov's works were effectively banned, it wraps its anti-Stalinist message in a complex allegory of good and evil. Or would that be the other way around? The book's chief character is Satan, who appears in the guise of a foreigner and self-proclaimed black magician named Woland. Accompanied by a talking black tomcat and a "translator" wearing a jockey's cap and cracked pince-nez, Woland wreaks havoc throughout literary Moscow. First he predicts that the head of noted editor Berlioz will be cut off; when it is, he appropriates Berlioz's apartment. (A puzzled relative receives the following telegram: "Have just been run over by streetcar at Patriarch's Ponds funeral Friday three afternoon come Berlioz.") Woland and his minions transport one bureaucrat to Yalta, make another one disappear entirely except for his suit, and frighten several others so badly that they end up in a psychiatric hospital. In fact, it seems half of Moscow shows up in the bin, demanding to be placed in a locked cell for protection.

    Meanwhile, a few doors down in the hospital lives the true object of Woland's visit: the author of an unpublished novel about Pontius Pilate. This Master--as he calls himself--has been driven mad by rejection, broken not only by editors' harsh criticism of his novel but, Bulgakov suggests, by political persecution as well. Yet Pilate's story becomes a kind of parallel narrative, appearing in different forms throughout Bulgakov's novel: as a manuscript read by the Master's indefatigable love, Margarita, as a scene dreamed by the poet--and fellow lunatic--Ivan Homeless, and even as a story told by Woland himself. Since we see this narrative from so many different points of view, who is truly its author? Given that the Master's novel and this one end the same way, are they in fact the same book? These are only a few of the many questions Bulgakov provokes, in a novel that reads like a set of infinitely nested Russian dolls: inside one narrative there is another, and then another, and yet another. His devil is not only entertaining, he is necessary: "What would your good be doing if there were no evil, and what would the earth look like if shadows disappeared from it?"

    Unsurprisingly--in view of its frequent, scarcely disguised references to interrogation and terror--Bulgakov's masterwork was not published until 1967, almost three decades after his death. Yet one wonders if the world was really ready for this book in the late 1930s, if, indeed, we are ready for it now. Shocking, touching, and scathingly funny, it is a novel like no other. Woland may reattach heads or produce 10-ruble notes from the air, but Bulgakov proves the true magician here. The Master and Margarita is a different book each time it is opened."

  15. #15
    Brackish African wmgaretjax's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Quote Originally Posted by miscorrections View Post
    I don't want google's opinions, I want the suggester's opinions.
    the suggesters were probably 7 or 8 people. i can post mine I guess.

    "White Noise" is probably the best introduction into Don DeLillo's canon. It's fun, insane, and not quite as difficult to get into as some of his meatier books. In my opinion, it has a sequence that stands in my mind as flawless post-modernism (whatever that means...). I've recommended this book to countless people over the years, and all have loved it. It's funny as hell and revolves around a "Hitler-studies" professor and his family as a nearby chemical plant releases toxic waste into the air.

    "The Wind-Up Bird Chronicles" is probably NOT the best introduction to Haruki Murakami's work. However, it was my introduction and it seemed to work fine for me. This novel is kind of a mystery and saying anything about it might ruin the purity of the experience. Needless to say, it's my favorite example of magical-realism. It is the only book I have ever read and wanted to write a screenplay for.

  16. #16
    MENACING Courtney's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    6. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand

    "The Fountainhead has become an enduring piece of literature, more popular now than when published in 1943. On the surface, it is a story of one man, Howard Roark, and his struggles as an architect in the face of a successful rival, Peter Keating, and a newspaper columnist, Ellsworth Toohey. But the book addresses a number of universal themes: the strength of the individual, the tug between good and evil, the threat of fascism. The confrontation of those themes, along with the amazing stroke of Rand's writing, combine to give this book its enduring influence."

    7. The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami

    "Bad things come in threes for Toru Okada. He loses his job, his cat disappears, and then his wife fails to return from work. His search for his wife (and his cat) introduces him to a bizarre collection of characters, including two psychic sisters, a possibly unbalanced teenager, an old soldier who witnessed the massacres on the Chinese mainland at the beginning of the Second World War, and a very shady politician.

    Haruki Murakami is a master of subtly disturbing prose. Mundane events throb with menace, while the bizarre is accepted without comment. Meaning always seems to be just out of reach, for the reader as well as for the characters, yet one is drawn inexorably into a mystery that may have no solution. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle is an extended meditation on themes that appear throughout Murakami's earlier work. The tropes of popular culture, movies, music, detective stories, combine to create a work that explores both the surface and the hidden depths of Japanese society at the end of the 20th century.

    If it were possible to isolate one theme in The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, that theme would be responsibility. The atrocities committed by the Japanese army in China keep rising to the surface like a repressed memory, and Toru Okada himself is compelled by events to take responsibility for his actions and struggle with his essentially passive nature. If Toru is supposed to be a Japanese Everyman, steeped as he is in Western popular culture and ignorant of the secret history of his own nation, this novel paints a bleak picture. Like the winding up of the titular bird, Murakami slowly twists the gossamer threads of his story into something of considerable weight."

    8. Zazie in the Metro by Raymond Queneau

    "Impish, foul-mouthed Zazie arrives in Paris from the country to stay with Gabriel, her female-impersonator uncle. All she really wants to do is ride the metro, but finding it shut because of a strike, Zazie looks for other means of amusement and is soon caught up in a comic adventure that becomes wilder and more manic by the minute. In 1960 Queneau's cult classic was made into a hugely successful film by Louis Malle. Packed full of word play and phonetic games, Zazie in the Metro remains as stylish and witty as ever. "

    9. Great Expectations by Kathy Acker

    "Using postmodern form, Kathy Acker’s Great Expectations moves her narrator through time, gender, and identity as it examines our era’s cherished beliefs about life and art."

    10. The Name of the World by Denis Johnson

    "The Name of the World finds Denis Johnson the visionary poet and Denis Johnson the sober novelist engaged in a puzzling tug of war. What begins as a muted evocation of grief takes increasingly strange turns, until the novel's second half spins away from the narrative logic of the first. The result is, well, mixed, a beautiful mess glued together mostly by the power of Johnson's transcendent prose. The protagonist this time around is not a junkie or a drug dealer or even a writer, but a college professor whose wife and child died four years earlier in an automobile accident. Michael Reed walks, he talks, he teaches, but inside his thoughts rip "perpetually around a track like dogs after a mechanized rabbit." Not much has happened since their death, and numbed by the habit of grief, he thinks that's just fine. "Nothing was required of me," Reed thinks. "I just had to put one foot in front of the other, and one day I'd wander wide enough of my dark cold sun to break gently from my orbit."

    That occasion comes when Reed reaches the premature end of his university appointment--and meets a redheaded cellist, the sort of wild, witchy, and becomingly deranged coed often found in books but perhaps less often in life. Flower Cannon (not, as one may imagine, the name she was born with) also shaves her pubic hair as public performance art and offers stripteases for fun and profit on the side. As the novel grows less coherent, Reed blunders into her childhood dream, or memory, which echoes his own dream and is also somehow haunted by the ghost of his daughter, or maybe Flower herself is the ghost of his daughter, or, well, something to that effect. (Dialogue such as "You. Are you a siren? A witch?" does little to clarify the situation.) But in the end it doesn't matter, because the dilemma this student presents Reed is as old as all time, and as easy to describe: "To let my wife and child be dead. I didn't think I was cruel enough for that. Because that is what the imperfections in Flower's skin invited me to do. There was a sense in which Anne and Elsie had to be killed, and killing them was up to me."

    Actually, this sort of straightforward psychological exposition isn't really Johnson's bag. Like his antihero, he's after "the unforeseen"--that which can't be explained in words but only suggested through imagery, the more shocking the better. "In my current frame of mind I'd hoped for warnings much stranger and not so obvious," Reed thinks after reading a religious tract. In a similar vein, Johnson instructs us how to read his book: "I think this narrative might cohere, if I ask you to fix it with this vision: luminous images, summoned and dismissed in a flowering vagueness." Vagueness does indeed flower here, but it does so amid flashes of genuine brilliance, the kind of writing that gave the classic Jesus' Son its particular brand of unhinged lyricism.

    Reed, for instance, is surrounded by characters in memorably Johnsonian states of desperation. History professor Tiberius Soames, fresh on the heels of a nervous breakdown: "Michael, we must get out of this flatness. The flatness and the regimented plant life. The vastly regimented plant life"; the caterer, a Peter Lorre look-alike who calls herself the Froggy Bitch and has the "smashed sinuses of an English bulldog"; the head trauma patient who wanders the grounds of a former lunatic asylum, holding aloft a small, imaginary object like an invisible torch: "I don't know. I can't see it. It's very light." No one but Johnson could bestow such radiant strangeness upon the inhabitants of a Midwestern college town. And if Reed's final, defiantly unreflective stance isn't much of a revelation, well, one hates to request a man with a knife sticking out of his eye in every Denis Johnson book. As brief and vivid as a hallucination, The Name of the World is the work of a prose musician who wisely refuses to play the same note twice."

  17. #17
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Reading these I wish the poll were multiple choice. The Russians and Murakami are rather appealing.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  18. #18
    MENACING Courtney's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Oh this isn't a multiple choice poll. Well, if it was, I would vote for:

    The Queen of Spades by Alexander Pushkin
    White Noise by Don Delillo
    Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov

    And maybe The Master & Margarita.

    I've already read The Fountainhead and The Wind-up Bird Chronicle, so I probably will not re-read those if they're chosen.

  19. #19
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    What a great area!
    -The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami (because he's a jazz freak)
    -Zazzie in the Metro by Raymond Queneau (Never read a bad book that takes place in Paris)
    -The Name of the World by Denis Johnson (I love grief)
    -White Noise by Don Delillo (I hear it is an awesome book)

    Not trying to add an 11th book, just wanted feedback on this one:
    -The 48 Laws of Power - Robert Greene
    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  20. #20
    Coachella Junkie dorkfish's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    I like when books I own lead in book club polls.
    *based upon tedious fact checking.

  21. #21
    Coachella Junkie Alchemy's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    So Angela's Ashes is about Angela?
    Quote Originally Posted by canexplain View Post
    I try to be politically pc more than most here: As a dude, anyone who could put a shark up a gals pc body, is pretty creepy, different and interesting. Just saying big time ..... cr****

  22. #22
    Gummi bear sultan miscorrections's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Can we have the other books that people generally agree on just be later in the queue? Like Netflix, but with books. Because I really want Queen of Spades and Pale Fire, too.
    Last edited by miscorrections; 12-31-2007 at 03:47 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by bmack86 View Post
    Has anyone gone on a date with a sandwich recently? What base did you get to? Ham?

  23. #23
    Member Cpt. Funkaho's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    I piled on the Wind-Up Bird train, because it seemed like the right thing to do. I'll read any of them, though, so if others don't want to read Wind-Up Bird, I'm totally amenable.
    Quote Originally Posted by youguysallsuckfatcock View Post
    now you guys are really pissing me off. especiall you walrus fucker

  24. #24
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    I'm not familiar with any of these (except Ayn Rand, which I haven't read), but I would be willing to read whatever. I usually read sci-fi or horror as a general rule.
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Because fucking millenials that's what

  25. #25
    Peaceful Oasis TomAz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    I would rather smear feces on myself than read Ayn Rand.
    Quote Originally Posted by efrain44 View Post
    Anyone know who the guy in the Cardinals jersey is? I've seen him in pictures on the board and I thought I saw him this year.

  26. #26
    zeezus amyzzz's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    It's that bad? I was actually thinking about reading that. Then I forgot. But y'all reminded me again. I might re-read some D. H. Lawrence if I can find some of his books in my garage. Damn unpacked boxes from last year ('06 even!)
    Quote Originally Posted by guedita View Post
    Because fucking millenials that's what

  27. #27
    Coachella Junkie fatbastard's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Quote Originally Posted by Alchemy View Post
    So Angela's Ashes is about Angela?
    It's about dried skin.

    Whiskey Sour

    2 oz blended whiskey
    Juice of 1/2 lemon
    1/2 tsp powdered sugar
    1 cherry
    1/2 slice lemon

    Shake blended whiskey, juice of lemon, and powdered sugar with ice and strain into a whiskey sour glass. Decorate with the half-slice of lemon, top with the cherry, and serve.

  28. #28
    Member keriann's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Quote Originally Posted by miscorrections View Post
    Can we have the other books that people generally agree on just be later in the queue? Like Netflix, but with books. Because I really want Queen of Spades and Pale Fire, too.
    I like this idea.

  29. #29
    MENACING Courtney's Avatar
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    Default Re: Book Club

    If this round is successful, we could do a new poll for the next selection, including the top runners up from this poll and any new suggestions. I definitely think we should keep them as options for next time.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Book Club

    Quote Originally Posted by dorkfish View Post
    I like when books I own lead in book club polls.
    It does make things convenient. I might actually be able to participate.
    I haven't finished Wind Up Bird yet, even though I've had it for a few months.

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