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santasutt
07-24-2012, 06:26 PM
Sex Workers, Drug Users Protest Stigma During AIDS Conference

By KYLE BLAINE
abcnews.go.com

A crimson wall made its way across Washington D.C., Tuesday as more than 1,000 sex workers, drug users and AIDS activists -- many of them carrying red umbrellas to fend off the rain -- marched toward the White House to protest the stigma associated with their activities, a stigma they believe contributes to the spread of HIV/AIDS.

Protesters held up signs reading "Fight AIDS! No More Drug War!" and "Stop the Witch Hunt against Sex Workers."

"Sex work is work" the group chanted, responding to demonstration leaders holding megaphones.

The demonstrators were calling for the decriminalization of drugs and sex work, which they argue would encourage people to practice safer sex.

Quincy McEwen, a sex worker in Guyana, marched in today's protest for sex workers' rights.

"It's our body, our business," said McEwen. "You can give oral sex for free, but if you collect money for it it's illegal. That's wrong."

"That stigma is allowing the disease to spread," she said.

The march was one of five protests that joined -- in front of the White House -- different groups affected by HIV and AIDS. The demonstrations coincided with the 19th International AIDS Conference, which is taking place in the nation's capital this week, the first time the U.S. has hosted it in 22 years. Until 2009, a U.S. travel ban denied visas to people who had HIV.

Want a different take on politics? Check out OTUS on Facebook and follow us on Twitter @OTUSNews. Most protesters delivered their message on posters and chants, but a group of Canadian AIDS activists wore only underwear that bore the message, "I party, I bareback, I'm positive, I'm responsible."

"Bareback" refers to the practice of engaging in sex without condoms.

"People who are positive have sex," said activist Jessica Whitbread. "They should be able to negotiate the kind of sex they want to have. Putting the responsibility of prevention on them creates stigma, and only continues the spread of the disease."

Bryan Floury also opted for a more eye-catching display, wearing a hat littered with different condom brands while holding a sign reading, "Teach Condom Sense." One of the wrappers on his head belonged to a Barack Obama condom, with the tagline "The ultimate stimulus package.

"Everybody likes looking at the guy in condoms," Floury joked, but later, on a more serious note, compared sex education to basic training.

"We need to train students like soldiers, train them to protect themselves," he said.

malcolmjamalawesome
07-24-2012, 06:29 PM
Terrible thread

santasutt
07-24-2012, 06:45 PM
Terrible thread

Not the ice-breaking, well-thought-out response i was looking for.

gaypalmsprings
07-24-2012, 06:46 PM
The real question is Is sex "work work"?

greghead
07-24-2012, 07:07 PM
Yes. You perform a service for money. It's work. Those girls in the windows of Amsterdam are professionals, I can tell you that.

miscorrections
07-24-2012, 08:20 PM
Uh, duh? Of course it's work. It's not like you get to bang your significant other or dream date all day long, and since in the US the chances of you getting raped/assaulted/murdered are way high since it's illegal, it's particularly high risk and probably fairly low reward work (unless you're a Congressmen's call girl, in which case a) congrats and b) you probably paid your dues with less desirable clients anyway).

miscorrections
07-24-2012, 08:21 PM
Also Congressmen probably ask for some pretty weird repugnant shit.

Gribbz
07-24-2012, 08:27 PM
http://i.imgur.com/CfcCc.jpg

algunz
07-24-2012, 08:41 PM
Isn't it the oldest "female" profession?

miscorrections
07-24-2012, 09:07 PM
Pretty sure it's the oldest profession no matter which gender you're looking at.

marooko
07-24-2012, 09:59 PM
Why would you do that, Gribbz?

jackstraw94086
07-25-2012, 12:11 AM
wrong question. Of course it's work. The question is whether a progressive society should condone it.

And that question has a correct answer.

santasutt
07-25-2012, 03:52 AM
wrong question. Of course it's work. The question is whether a progressive society should condone it.

And that question has a correct answer.

Notwithstanding the old adage, " if you love your job, it ain't work," I don't think anyone can make the argument that it's not work.

This article begs so many interesting questions though.

nathanfairchild
07-25-2012, 04:33 AM
it's work, but it's not hard work.

malcolmjamalawesome
07-25-2012, 05:16 AM
Notwithstanding the old adage, " if you love your job, it ain't work," I don't think anyone can make the argument that it's not work.

This article begs so many interesting questions though.

Threadworthy questions

chairmenmeow47
07-25-2012, 05:26 AM
only if you're doing it wrong. amirite guys?

santasutt
07-25-2012, 08:45 AM
Threadworthy questions

For instance:

1. Does the perceived stigma associated with prostitution and illegal drug use contribute to the spread of HIV/AIDS?

2. Is there a real ongoing "witch hunt" against prostitutes in this country?

3. Would the decriminalization of drugs and prostitution encourage people to practice safer sex?

4. Is "bareback" sex, as it pertains to the sex industry, really responsible?

5. Do "negative people" have sex? If not, what is preventing them from doing so?

6. Where can one get a box of Barack Obama " ultimate stimulus package" condoms?

7. Why has the term "sex work" replaced the (perfectly good) word prostitution in media stories?

Have at it.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-25-2012, 08:49 AM
"Sex work" seems a much broader term than prostitution. Wouldn't this include pornography as well?

Mugwog
07-25-2012, 11:14 AM
For instance:

1. Does the perceived stigma associated with prostitution and illegal drug use contribute to the spread of HIV/AIDS?

2. Is there a real ongoing "witch hunt" against prostitutes in this country?

3. Would the decriminalization of drugs and prostitution encourage people to practice safer sex?

4. Is "bareback" sex, as it pertains to the sex industry, really responsible?

5. Do "negative people" have sex? If not, what is preventing them from doing so?

6. Where can one get a box of Barack Obama " ultimate stimulus package" condoms?

7. Why has the term "sex work" replaced the (perfectly good) word prostitution in media stories?

Have at it.

Basically, if there were more orgasms for everyone, there would be less crazy people shooting up the world

chairmenmeow47
07-25-2012, 11:33 AM
"Sex work" seems a much broader term than prostitution. Wouldn't this include pornography as well?

i thought this was some sort of dig at my phone sex operator question in the office space thread.

bobert
07-25-2012, 11:46 AM
wrong question. Of course it's work. The question is whether a progressive society should condone it.

And that question has a correct answer.

As a progressive member of society, I'd like to know the correct answer.

santasutt
06-30-2013, 10:35 AM
Aussie-inspired bump


Clash over sex worker rights in rural Australia
The Associated Press
Sunday, June 30, 2013 | midnight


A lone woman checking into a motel in the Australian mining town of Moranbah can expect some blunt questioning from the owners: "Are you a working girl?"

Turning on a heel and storming away indignantly will be taken as an admission to prostitution.

"That sort of reaction is really positive proof as far as I'm concerned," said Joan Hartley, the 67-year-old owner of the Drover's Rest Motel and champion of motel operators who want to rid their businesses of sex workers cashing in on a mining boom.

Moranbah in the coal-rich Bowen Basin is part of the new landscape of Australian mining. Workers are increasingly leaving their homes and families for weeks on end to earn big money in distant mines in the Outback. It's a workforce known as fly-in, fly-out, or FIFO (feye-foh) for short.

Where the FIFO miners go, the FIFO prostitutes follow. With miners earning 110,000 to 160,000 Australian dollars ($100,000 to $150,000) a year, many sex workers find working the remote mining towns more lucrative than the economically moribund cities in which they live, despite the travel costs and a recent slowdown that has seen the mothballing of some inefficient mines.

Not everyone in small-town Australia has welcomed the sex workers. Though prostitution is legal nationwide, the two main mining states _ Queensland and Western Australia _ have promised or passed laws restricting their activity. Their arrival has fed into broader fears that transient workers _ miners included _ and their urban values pose a threat to a close-knit, rural way of life.

Moranbah, a town in Queensland, is one such place. Its population of 11,000 doubles if the FIFO miners housed in nearby camps are counted. Until a recent slump in coal prices, the 42-year-old town was one of the fastest-growing places in Australia.

It also remains the kind of place where people make eye contact with passers-by and smile. Where everyone knows everyone else's business _ and many of their secrets.

So Hartley was suspicious of a regular guest, an attractive woman in her early 40s, at her modest, cement-brick Drover's Rest Motel.

The guest claimed to be an interior designer, but cleaners once counted 10 used condoms inside a tied-up, translucent plastic garbage bag left in her motel room trash can.

The final evidence came in June 2010 when the woman, who worked under the name Karlaa, was given a room with a door that could be seen from reception.

Hartley said the first client, a spotty-faced youth, arrived at 11.45 a.m., half an hour after Karlaa checked in. The men kept arriving all day and into the night.

All were well behaved and well presented _ no grimy work clothes or coal blackened faces, said Hartley, who added that sex workers reduce the rate of sexual violence and address some of the "disharmony" created when miners are separated from their home communities.

Still, when Karlaa checked out, Hartley told her never to return.

"This world needs the likes of yourself and any other lady or man who does your sort of work," she recalled telling the woman. "The world needs you big time. But I don't want it in my motel."

Karlaa, whose real name has been suppressed by a court order, sued the motel under the Queensland state Anti-Discrimination Act, which bans discrimination against sex workers. She demanded AU$30,000 for stress, anxiety and lost earnings.

She lost before a state tribunal in 2011 but won on appeal last year. That ruling outraged hotel and motel owners, and the Queensland government responded by amending the Anti-Discrimination Act last November to allow owners to refuse accommodation to sex workers if there is reason to believe they plan to work on the premises.

"We have leveled the playing field so the laws suit the majority, not the minority," state Attorney General and Justice Minister Jarrod Bleijie said in a statement at the time.

The Queensland Supreme Court subsequently overturned the appeals court ruling anyway, saying in May that Drovers Rest did have the right to deny Karlaa a room, even before the law was amended.

Tougher limits on prostitution are also on the table in the state of Western Australia, where iron ore is excavated from its sparsely populated north. Proposed laws would limit the sex trade to a few designated areas and require self-employed sex workers to be licensed. No more than two such licensed prostitutes could work from the same premises.

John Scott, a criminologist at Australia's University of New England, said that Queensland and Western Australia are tightening restrictions after a loosening of controls by Australian states that began in the 1990s.

"There does seem to be a reverse trend in both those mining states, and I suspect part of it relates to the mining industry and some of the concerns raised in rural areas," Scott said.

The FIFO sex workers tend to be older than their city counterparts and don't dress as provocatively. With housing tight, some arrive in motor homes or sublet spare rooms in clients' homes. They advertise in newspapers and on websites, and have even handed out fliers at Moranbah's main shopping mall.

Karlaa, who lives more than 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) away in the tourist city of Gold Coast, said she used to send text messages to regular clients announcing the dates of her next visit. Word would quickly spread among hundreds of men across mine sites by two-way radio.

Another Gold Coast-based sex worker said she doesn't plan to return to Moranbah because escorts are made to feel unwelcome. The woman, who is in her early 20s, said young and attractive sex workers are particularly conspicuous and likely to be given a room near the reception if they stay at Drover's Rest, so they can be kept under surveillance. She continues to work in other mining towns in the region.

Some say that a more open sex industry and even a legal brothel would be good for Moranbah.

Real estate agent Marie Plahn sees a brothel as a better option than miners potentially spreading disease or impregnating women they meet in bars. "Paying for sex is cheaper than child support if it resulted in that," she said.

But Roger Ferguson, a former deputy mayor and a motel owner also sued by Karlaa, said the Moranbah council would probably reject a brothel.

Miners often drive 190 kilometers to the nearest brothel in the port city of Mackay, a regional support center for mining.

Club 7 sits discretely on the fringe of an industrial estate on a cul-de-sac called Enterprise Street. Nearby, boilermakers weld day and night in aircraft hangar-sized workshops, repairing the giant dragline buckets that excavate coal-bearing earth, 45 cubic meters (1,600 cubic feet) at a time.

It was one of Queensland's original legal brothels, built 12 years ago as the state was relaxing prostitution laws.

Manager Warwick Bumstead said all but one of the 60 sex workers are FIFO, working 4- to 10-day stints before flying home to distant cities. He said a typical "mattress actress" at his brothel makes between AU$5,000 and AU$9,000 a week.

A Club 7 worker, a New Zealander in her late 20s, said she is thinking of branching out to some of the smaller mining towns such as Moranbah, where she has heard she can make more money working on her own.

It may no longer be as lucrative as she thinks. Karlaa said the money is not as good or consistent as it was when she started coming to mining towns five years ago. It's not the new law, she said, but the economy: Hundreds of miners have been laid off as falling coal prices take some of the sheen off Australia's mining boom.



Read more: http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2013/jun/30/as-australia-sex-workers/#ixzz2Xj3nqem2

canexplain
06-30-2013, 10:46 AM
I know I paid 5 gals in J town for something. I think it's work....cr****

ActionComics
06-30-2013, 04:17 PM
I know I paid 5 gals in J town for something. I think it's work....cr****

J = Jumanji

thizzin my brains out
06-30-2013, 08:51 PM
Were they black?