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rage patton
10-17-2007, 10:13 AM
Wasnt Tom Waits already done? I dont remember...

Courtney
10-17-2007, 11:01 AM
I still heart this thread a lot.

Page 1
#1 - Radiohead - swdshfsk - intro
#3 - David Bowie - Courtney - intro
#4 - Boredoms - bmack86 - full
#5 - Can - bmack86 - intro
#6 - Spiritualized - bmack86 - intro
#9 - Elvis Costello - TomAz - intro
#10 - the Wedding Present - roberto73 - intro
#12 - Tom waits - Slushmier - extended intro
#13 - Mogwai - swdshfsk - extended intro
#14 - Hanson - tessa|asset - extended intro
#15 - Guided by Voices - mountmccabe - intro
#23 - the Velvet Underground - PsyGuyRy - extended intro
#24 - Luna - york707 - intro with discog listed
#25 - Jonathan Richman - breakjaw - full

Page 2
#32 - The Dismemberment Plan - Tylerdurden31 - full
#33 - Bob Dylan - TomAz - extended intro
#36 - Talking Heads - bballarl - full
#37 - Pink Floyd - PsyGuyRy - very extended intro
#45 - Pearl Jam - Slushmier - full
#51, 53 & 56 - Fugazi - PotVsKtI - ranked list of albums

Page 3
#65 - the Beatles - TomAZ - full

Page 4
#101 - the Kinks (early period) - bmack86 - extended intro
#109 - Beethoven's 7th Symphony - mountmccabe - full (selected, incomplete)
#117 - the Cure - bmack86 - full
#118 - the Dandy Warhols - Hannahrain - full

Page 5
#124 - the Jesus and Mary Chain - mountmccabe - full
#131 - Yo La Tengo - Courtney - full
#132 - the Roots - Slushmier - full
#138 - Sonic Youth - bmack86 - full
#141 - the Rolling Stones (US albums) - sydaud - full
#146 - the White Stripes - bballarl - full

Page 6
#173 - Faith No More - thinnerair - full
#175 - Failure - thinnerair - full
#176 - Magazine - breakjaw - full

Page 7
#196 - Creed - bmack86 - full
#200 - Metallica - bmack86 - full
#202 - the Who - sydaud - full
#217 - Massive Attack - Thinnerair - Full
#219 - Elf Power - Bmack86 - Full
#225 - Genesis - Thinnerair - Intro
#232 - Bikini Kill - Mountmccabe - Full
#238 - Muse - Thinnerair -

Page 9
#241 - Big Black - Bmack86 - Full
#249 - The Arab Strap - Hannahrain - Intro
#253 - The Clash - TomAz - Full
#267 - Nick Cave - roberto73 - Full

Page 10
#299 - Jeff Buckley - PassiveTheory - Full

Page 12
#334 - Jawbox - Tylerdurden31 - Full
#338 - Hum - thinnerair - Full
#344 - REM - sydaud - Full

Page 13
#375 - Depeche Mode - Amyzzz - Extended Intro

Page 14
#395 - The Replacements - TomAz - Full
#402 - Spinal Tap - Breakjaw - Full
#405 - Cheech and Chong - Anita Bonghit - Discography
#416 - Pixies - Bmack86 - Full
#419 - Spiritualized - Bmack86 - Full

Page 15
#425 - Rush - MonsoonSeason - intro
#427 - The Orb - Desphrs - full
#446 - Miles Davis - sydaud - full

Page 16
#455 - Boards of Canada - desphrs - full
#463 - Blur - Slushmier - full
#474 - Serge Gainsbourg - bmack86 - intro
#477 - Beat Happening - bmack86 - full
#479 - Circle Jerks - york707 - full

Page 17
#504 - Joe Jackson - MsTekno - extended intro
#505 - Oasis - Stefinitely Maybe - full

Page 18
#518 - The Magnetic Fields - mountmccabe - full

Page 19
#562 - Wilco - mountmccabe, york707, and TomAz (compiled by Hannahrain) - full

Page 20
#573 - Spoon - sydaud - full
#580 - Decemberists - Hannahrain - full
#600 - Led Zeppelin - sydaud - full

Page 21
#616 - Minutemen - sydaud - full
#619 - Can - bmack86 - full (selected, incomplete)
#625 - PJ Harvey - bballarl - full

Page 22
#635 - Bjork - bmack86 - full
#649 - Cake - PassiveTheory - full
#650 - The Faint - hawkingvsreeve - full

Page 23
#672 - Death Cab For Cutie - hawkingvsreeve - full

Page 24
#720 - Leonard Cohen - mountmccabe - incomplete

Page 25
#735 - Bruce Springsteen - Yablonowitz - first installment
#738 - Arto Lindsay - ragingdave - Solo work only

Page 26
#757-755 TomAz vs Yablonowitz RE: Springsteen review.
#769 - XTC - Roberto73 - partial (to be continued)

Page 27
#798 - Cursive - Hawkingvsreeve - full
#800 - XTC (II) - Roberto73 - Continuation
#801 - Joy Division/New Order - sydaud - full
#806 - Springsteen - Yablonowitz - quick overview

Page 28
#812 - Springsteen (different) - TomAz - full
#820 - Elliott Smith - mountmccabe - full
#837 - Ben Folds - Jenniehoo - full (with mix!)

Page 29
#842/847 XTC - roberto73 (w/mixes!)
#865 Replacements mix - TomAz
#868 Elvis Costello mix -TomAz

Page 30
#871 Bob Dylan mixes - TomAz
#881 Animal Collective - BMack86 - complete
#884 The Go-Betweens - Roberto73 - complete (w/mix!)
#887 Tool - Passive Theory - complete

Page 31
#904 Boris - BMack86 - incomplete
#909 Johnny Cash - Sydaud - incomplete (1957-59)

Page 32
#945 John Lennon - breakjaw - full (w/mix)
#959 Lucinda Williams - TomAz - full (w/mix)

Page 33
#976 Pavement - bmack - full
#984 Pavement mix - breakjaw
#988 Underworld - bballarl - intro

Page 34
#995 The Appleseed Cast - comiddle - full
#996 (summary of rock canon) - C DUB YA

bmack86
10-17-2007, 07:08 PM
please do a Merzbow. There's too much going on there for me to just dive in. I've heard 1930, Pulsedemon and Merzbuddha, but that's it.

bug on your lip
10-18-2007, 06:47 AM
i've been listening to alot of The Go-Betweens this year solely cuz of roberto73's review/mix
props again brother....


i also checked out a good Elvis album thanks to TomAZ, checked out Minutemen thanks to sydaud, checked out Can & Kinks thanks to bmack86

there have also been great write-ups on bands i already knew alot aboot

i hearts u guyz
bug

roberto73
10-18-2007, 08:13 AM
A few months ago, several people requested I do Midnight Oil and Eels, but I never got around to it because, well, I'm lazy. Is the interest in these still there? If so, perhaps I can delazify myself.

bmack86
10-18-2007, 08:49 AM
indeed there is

Hannahrain
10-18-2007, 09:18 AM
If there's any interest, I'll do The Black Keys. They aren't that daunting to start listening to, but they've got quite a discography [five albums and several EPs] for a few guys who have only been making albums since 2001.

bug on your lip
10-18-2007, 09:35 AM
i just went back & read that Courtney dissed Yo La Tengo's "Summer Sun"..
daymmmm, i was gettin into that one lately



roberto suggested we team up to do the Fall
also, i want a few people to help me do Prince's Discog..PM me

PassiveTheory
10-18-2007, 10:02 AM
Alright, I have a couple of requests. 1) The Smiths 2) Patti Smith 3) Turbonegro 4) Tom Waits

I am working on Kyuss/Qotsa and the Bouncing Souls

FUCK. YES. Wait till' I get out of class

Hannahrain
10-18-2007, 10:03 AM
That's not an upcoming show, you stupid slut.

PassiveTheory
10-18-2007, 10:05 AM
*blinks* that was directed at me?... o.o

If so, who said it was?

Hannahrain
10-18-2007, 10:06 AM
PassiveTheory's Upcoming Shows:


Quote:
Originally Posted by betao
radio rap never ceases to amaze me... every time i think we, as a society, have hit a new low, i tune into the radio and realize...that we have.

PassiveTheory
10-18-2007, 10:08 AM
Oh, usually I have a show to designate under that, Hannah. I just don't have any one's in the near future to go to.

I just like that betao quote, anyway.

Hannahrain
10-18-2007, 10:09 AM
Thanks for clearing that up. It all makes sense now.




Of course I already fucking knew that.

PassiveTheory
10-18-2007, 10:09 AM
"already fucking knew that"

No need for thanks. =D

Hannahrain
10-18-2007, 10:11 AM
Ouch. I had a typo. Clearly, that means you're smarter than I am. I concede.

PassiveTheory
10-18-2007, 10:13 AM
It's okay, you can be a bitter smarmy bitch if it makes you feel more important. =D

bug on your lip
10-18-2007, 10:24 AM
hay u two
take yer slut talk somewhere else
we're trying to work here

Hannahrain
10-18-2007, 10:25 AM
I'm sorry, Mr. Bug. He just makes me so stabby. I won't do it again.

PassiveTheory
10-18-2007, 10:26 AM
hay u two
take yer slut talk somewhere else
we're trying to work here

You're right, bug... Let's work together to make the world a better place. =D

bmack86
10-18-2007, 03:29 PM
I'm listening to Boris again to get through the reviews. I'm taking the initiative

mountmccabe
10-18-2007, 05:09 PM
Hahaha. Wow. THAT was Underworld? Do they still play any of that stuff live? Im guessing not...

That was Underworld before Darren Emerson joined. They have two albums along those lines.

As of whenever I checked 5-10 years ago their official website didn't even list those albums in the discography. They've since realized that they can't hide from their past and they do acknowledge them now. Underworld Mark 1 or something.

I was kind of hoping from something from them at the Coachella set in 2003 - the only time I've seen them - but it didn't happen. Actually I kind of hoped one of the DJs would mix something from those hidden albums as a joke/dig; if that happened I never heard about it.

wmgaretjax
10-18-2007, 05:20 PM
I'm listening to Boris again to get through the reviews. I'm taking the initiative

just LPs? Merzbow is gonna be tough if I do anything other than LPs. Boris is kind of the same way... so many 7 inch releases/collabs.

PassiveTheory
10-18-2007, 06:06 PM
Alright... Because the Smiths discography is one massive clusterfuck of albums, repackaged albums, singles, repackaged singles and something like 4 greatest hits albums... I'm going to tackle the 3 main records they released... I really only suggest getting into Strangeways, Here We Come if you've listened to these 3 anyway.

http://www.inkblotmagazine.com/rev-archive/images/ca_Smiths.jpg
The Smiths - [1984]

The album I have the least degree of familiarity with (given I've tried to torrent it numerous times, and failed in my endeavors) but I've listened to it enough in stores and via loans to have it in mind. Depending on the age and/or location of the record itself, you might find the track "This Charming Man" on this record... Or you may not. Essentially, that track MADE the Smiths. The guitar hook, the driving bass, the fact that in less than 2 and a half minutes, Morrissey is able to convey the story of a boy's struggle through adulthood, as well as place some cleverly sexually suggestive lyrics. This record is worth owning JUST for that track. The album, admittedly, starts off rather slow, not in song speed but in overall enjoyability, seeing as I've never been a huge fan of the first 3 songs off of the record, but when Morrissey, Marr and the boys kick it into gear with "Pretty Girls Make Graves" (YES, that band DID take the name from THIS song... sheesh) which is one of the better tracks on the record. What "Pretty Girls" does is essentially lead off a 6 track succession of nothing but sheer Smiths genius. "The Hand The Rocks The Cradle" lures you in with it's sly tempo and possible references to pedophilia, "Still Ill" which is one of, if not, the best songs every written concerning heartbreak (a theme prevalent in the rest of the band's work), "Hand In Glove" probably the most underrated single released by the Smiths, the epic "What Difference Does It Make?" which is, essentially, one of the top 10 Smiths songs EVER written (Marr's guitar work on this song is fucking righteous) especially with lyrics like "The devil will find work for idle hands to do, I stole and lied and why, because you asked me to!", as well as the aforementioned "Hand In Glove". "I Don't Owe You Anything" and "Suffer Little Children" rout out the rest of this more-than impressive debut from the Smiths.

Rating: A- (Nothing tremendous towards the start, IMO. Rest of album compensates for this)

http://www.inkblotmagazine.com/rev-archive/images/ca_Smiths_Meat.jpg
Meat Is Murder - [1985]

Don't listen to the crap people might say about this record being a "grower" or "difficult to listen to", it's pretty fucking amazing (especially if you get the version with "How Soon Is Now?", which I'll get to in a second). The album is probably the Smiths' most political record, seeing as it starts off with an ode to anti-corporal punishment in school, "The Headmaster Ritual", which is a decent track (an alright opener). "Rusholme Ruffians" is a good track, and it segues into one of the album's most clever tracks; "I Want The One I Can't Have". Another personal favorite of mine, as it's frustrated Morrissey at his best. "What She Said" is some of Marr's most creative guitar work at his best, even though Morrissey takes over this song and never lets go, it's still a very good track, given that some of the lines are fucking classic ("I smoke cause I want an early death!"). Then come the two big guns on the album, first off "That Joke Isn't Funny Anymore" which is probably THE most sorrowful track ever written by Morrissey and Marr... And the line "I've seen this happen in other people's lives, and now it's happening in mine!" is amazing. And then, the ultimate Smiths track (IMO), "How Soon Is Now?". This album is worth owning for the sole reason of listening to that fucking song over and over and over again, pure genius. Although nowhere near is awesome as it's predecessor, "Nowhere Fast" is a personal fave of mine, as it makes light of the frustration we feel daily. "Well I Wonder" is more of pining Morrissey at his finest, and the bassline is pretty fucking spectacular. "Barbarism Begins At Home" is Marr, Rourke and Joyce channeling the fucking Talking Heads just in terms of how funky this tune is, seeing as it's another anti-corporal tune (2 on the same record... yeah...), and "Meat Is Murder" itself, well, if you're a vegetarian, it's a tune for you, but for me? I feel like it is a pretty bad album ending, I tend to skip it a lot when I put the disc on...

Rating: A (If the title track wasn't such a buzzkill, this would be a fucking stellar album... also, 2 songs on the same political subject is kind of hitting me over the head with it... yeah that was a poorly misconstrued pun, so sue me.)

http://www.notsopop.com/reviews/music/images/thequeenisdead.jpg
The Queen Is Dead - [1986]

My favorite fucking record by Morrissey and company. The title track and opener is just impressive as all hell. A clever parody of the media as well as the debacle known as the English Royal Family. The album is full of self-referential material (especially in "Bigmouth Strikes Again" and "Cemetary Gates") given how much critical pressure Morrissey was being given in lieu of his lyrics and political stances. Back to the record, "Frankly, Mr. Shankly" is an amusing tune penned in scathing Morrissey fashion against an old record exec, but it can be taken out of context and used against any authoritative figure who's ever wronged you before. "I Know It's Over" is another one of Morrissey's soul-crushing tunes about heartbreak, loneliness and death, but it's a guilty favorite of mine. "Never Had No One Ever" continues the streak of marvelous tune after marvelous tune, as it's haunting lyrics probably concern Morrissey's presumed celibacy and what event(s) may have prompted it. "Cemetary Gates" possesses one of the best Rourke basslines, and Marr chimes in with some real nice riffs. The tune itself concerns itself primarily with Morrissey and the accusations of plagiarism on his account. Another top 10 track follows immediately after, "Bigmouth Strikes Again" as Morrissey tackles his critics while Marr sizzles with his guitar, making this track one to fucking remember. Pretty much establishing that the album has hit after fucking hit, the following track "The Boy With The Thorn In His Side" is more Smiths greatness. "Vicar In A Tutu" characterizes more of what "Nowhere Fast" brought on the previous record, and is followed by yet another top 10 track in "There Is A Light And It Never Goes Out" (which ought to have been the album closer). This beautiful record ends with the ambiguous track "Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others" which is really only saved by Marr's guitar work... Otherwise, fucking amazing record.

Rating: A+ (You're splitting hairs if you're giving the record a lower rating due to the final track, really)

bmack86
10-18-2007, 06:24 PM
No, Passive, if you do the Smiths, you do them right. Which means you also cover Strangeways, as well as Hatful of Hollow/Louder than Bombs and Rank.

Garet, I'm going to do the LPs, the Merzbow collabs, the Sunn O)) collab, the Michio Kurihara Collab, the Keiji Haino collab and, because I feel like it, the Walrus 7".

york707
10-18-2007, 07:44 PM
I just realized I fell off this board last summer right before people started posting mixes in this thread. boo to me.

betao
10-18-2007, 08:13 PM
Oh, usually I have a show to designate under that, Hannah. I just don't have any one's in the near future to go to.

I just like that betao quote, anyway.

anytime. appreciate the honor. even if you did take it down haha.

PassiveTheory
10-18-2007, 10:58 PM
Sorry man. I liked it, but it had it's time...

And I can't get cut any slack for being sick, Bmack?... Ugh, fine. Let's go with it being unfinished and I'll tackle most of that stuff when I get the chance. And I own Louder Than Bombs, so that's a plus.

Hannahrain
10-18-2007, 11:00 PM
I was going to wait until people said they were interested, but then I figured I was going to want to write it anyway, so fuck it. Without further ado, I present to you all...

The Black Keys: Considerably More Awesome than You Are.

"People can depend on Pat and I to play music and be around for life. We have to. It's the only job skill we have."
-Dan Auerbach

Here (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=3IU96L1Y) is a mix that I uploaded a while ago. The link should still be good, but if it isn't, get really mad at me and I'll fix it.

The Black Keys are, in short, a couple of dropouts from Ohio. In long, they are a blues-rock duo made up of Akron natives Dan Auerbach, a twenty-eight year old guitarist and cousin to Robert Quine, and Patrick Carney, a twenty-seven year old who "attacks his drums like they stole his mother's purse".

It's easy to forget that the Keys almost always employ only two instruments. The tracks are simple, but you rarely miss anything. They maintain a raw, distortion-heavy sound throughout the whole discography.

The Big Come Up
2002

http://www.fatpossum.com/covers/bigcomeup.jpg

The Black Keys' first album, released about a year after they started playing together. The first track on the album, "Busted", begins with rapid and a little bit schizophrenic guitar notes that don't seem to be going in any particular direction. They eventually turn into a steady, bluesy riff and beat that sets a good pace for the rest of the album. All the rest of the albums, actually. This isn't by any means one of my favorite Keys songs, but it does a nice job of saying "This is what we're about".

From here, we move into a great Junior Kimbrough cover (you'll see quite a few of these in the next few paragraphs), A few love songs (don't worry, the Keys are never saccharin), a great version of the old standard "Leavin' Trunk", "Heavy Soul", which is one of my personal favorites, A cover of The Beatles' "She Said, She Said", and a few more [great] songs about wanting something you can't have. The album finishes with a bizarre, mostly instrumental (a few old narrative pieces and an answering machine message are used, but Dan has no vocals) piece called "240 years before your time", which has two parts, the second of which appearing as a hidden track a good 15-20 minutes after the first part ends. The album overall tends to fall on the easygoing side of energetic.

Rating: Awesome.

Thickfreakness
Released in April 2003, recorded almost in full in 14 hours in Carney's basement the previous December.

http://cdn.last.fm/coverart/300x300/1419355.jpg

The Keys' second album starts off a little heavier than most of what we heard on the first one. The first and second tracks are mostly guitar-driven, with Carney sitting on the sidelines a bit. He makes his reappearance with the third track, "Set You Free", which boasts a get-your-blood-pumping drum intro. Pay special attention to their cover of "Have Love, Will Travel". Other highlights include another Kimbrough cover ("Everywhere I Go"), "Midnight in her Eyes" (one of the only Keys' songs to use a bass), and "No Trust."

Rating: Excellent.

The Moan EP
2004

http://media.musictoday.com/store/bands/1416/product_medium/K8CD06.jpg

The Moan's title track only has one short, desperate, world-weary vocal segment (repeated only twice), and relies mostly on one guitar riff. But, like all of their simplest songs, you don't miss a thing. The second track is an alternate version of the song "Heavy Soul". This one has a few more layers to it in comparison to the original version, and it's a little less pounding. And you hear more Patrick.

Next, we've got a cover of The Stooges "No Fun", which is excellent. They don't lose any of what the original had, but it's not too similar to the original sound, either. The last track on The Moan is an alternate "Have Love, Will Travel", which is the version that was released to radio. It's faster and a little more distortion-heavy. The Moan is definitely a must-have.

Rating: Mmm.

Rubber Factory
2004

http://www.fatpossum.com/covers/normal/80379.jpg

I don't do favorites, but if I had a favorite Keys album, this would be it. Only it would be tied with all the others. Somehow, it always seems to sync my heartbeat. Yeah, I know. That's a load of crap. But it's a great fucking album. I'd recommend that, if you're unfamiliar with the band and should choose to get a full album instead of downloading the mix that I have provided, get this one (there is one exception to this, which will be explained when we get to the next album). Tracks to pay attention to are the Kinks cover "Act Nice and Gentle", "Girl is on my Mind", "Stack Shot Billy", "The Lengths", which has a phenomenal, heavy sadness to it a little different than the standard blues-sadness you hear most often from them, and "When the Lights Go Out". Honorable mentions go to "10 A.M. Automatic" and "Aeroplane Blues" for getting your goddamn blood pumping.

Stack Shot Billy on The Late Show:
XoG3TACGXZo

Rating: Eargasm

Chulahoma: The Songs of Junior Kimbrough
2002

http://fatpossum.com/images-php/covers/blackkeys-chulahoma-cvr.jpg

I confess that ordinarily, I listen to the entire Keys discography on shuffle. But this album is special. A standalone. This is one that you listen to from start to finish. If you're a Delta blues fan, you must get this one first. Six of Kimbrough's songs (different than the ones already covered) are adapted in the Keys' style of blues-rock. Auerbach's throaty moan manages to be only a little more understandable than the original songs, but it's well worth the ear strain. The EP ends with a message that Kimbrough's widow left on Dan's answering machine, telling them they were the only ones who could "really, really play like Junior played".

Rating: Holy Moses.

There's an "official" bootleg that should go here, but I'm a bad person and don't have it.

Magic Potion
2006

http://www.popboks.com/img/albumi/theblackkeys.jpg

This is the first of the Keys' full-length albums that consists entirely of original songs. I have two favorites on this album. The first one is "Your Touch", which is (as William Miller would say) incendiary. The second is "You're the One", which is earnest and sweet without being insipid. This album tends to be cleaner (a lot of the earlier stuff has some background noise left in), and on the heavier side too. Stripped down. Heavy, naked blues. Mmm. If you listen to it next to "The Big Come Up", you'll hear a lot of distance between the two. This is those li'l Akron boys all grown up, and they've grown up fantastically.

Your Touch, live at Grimey's Records in Nashville:
Hcc07MyG1aU
You're the One, Live in Perth:
yayTteDP7lw

Rating: Goddamn. Why am I not a groupie?

The Live EP
2007

Four tracks from the fall 2006 tour released free for download on their myspace page (http://myspace.com/theblackkeys). They're still available. "Girl is on my mind" is great here. And it's free. The band says so. The REAL kind of free, not the "I know how to use the internet, so it's all free" kind of free.

Rating: Not the best they've got, but still better than a lot of other good music. And did I mention it's free?

In addition, here (http://youtube.com/watch?v=y-CukK3eYt0) is their video for 10 AM Automatic, which was directed by David Cross. Bitches won't let me embed.

breakjaw
10-19-2007, 05:35 AM
http://www.notsopop.com/reviews/music/images/thequeenisdead.jpg
The Queen Is Dead - [1986]

My favorite fucking record by Morrissey and company. The title track and opener is just impressive as all hell. A clever parody of the media as well as the debacle known as the English Royal Family. The album is full of self-referential material (especially in "Bigmouth Strikes Again" and "Cemetary Gates") given how much critical pressure Morrissey was being given in lieu of his lyrics and political stances. Back to the record, "Frankly, Mr. Shankly" is an amusing tune penned in scathing Morrissey fashion against an old record exec, but it can be taken out of context and used against any authoritative figure who's ever wronged you before. "I Know It's Over" is another one of Morrissey's soul-crushing tunes about heartbreak, loneliness and death, but it's a guilty favorite of mine. "Never Had No One Ever" continues the streak of marvelous tune after marvelous tune, as it's haunting lyrics probably concern Morrissey's presumed celibacy and what event(s) may have prompted it. "Cemetary Gates" possesses one of the best Rourke basslines, and Marr chimes in with some real nice riffs. The tune itself concerns itself primarily with Morrissey and the accusations of plagiarism on his account. Another top 10 track follows immediately after, "Bigmouth Strikes Again" as Morrissey tackles his critics while Marr sizzles with his guitar, making this track one to fucking remember. Pretty much establishing that the album has hit after fucking hit, the following track "The Boy With The Thorn In His Side" is more Smiths greatness. "Vicar In A Tutu" characterizes more of what "Nowhere Fast" brought on the previous record, and is followed by yet another top 10 track in "There Is A Light And It Never Goes Out" (which ought to have been the album closer). This beautiful record ends with the ambiguous track "Some Girls Are Bigger Than Others" which is really only saved by Marr's guitar work... Otherwise, fucking amazing record.

Rating: A+ (You're splitting hairs if you're giving the record a lower rating due to the final track, really)
OK I actually saw The Smiths before he was born,but Passive did a much better job with this than I would have.And he had the good sense to realize that this was their finest record,so cut him some slack.

bug on your lip
10-19-2007, 06:55 AM
http://www.inkblotmagazine.com/rev-archive/images/ca_Smiths.jpg
The Smiths - [1984]

The album I have the least degree of familiarity with (given I've tried to torrent it numerous times, and failed in my endeavors) but I've listened to it enough in stores and via loans to have it in mind. Depending on the age and/or location of the record itself, you might find the track "This Charming Man" on this record... Or you may not. Essentially, that track MADE the Smiths. The guitar hook, the driving bass, the fact that in less than 2 and a half minutes, Morrissey is able to convey the story of a boy's struggle through adulthood, as well as place some cleverly sexually suggestive lyrics. This record is worth owning JUST for that track.


So in NoFro's review he sayz dis LP is worth owning yet admits he himself has failed in procuring it

-10 rad points

PassiveTheory
10-19-2007, 08:55 AM
Sorry, Bug. ;___;

And thanks, Breakjaw.

mountmccabe
10-19-2007, 09:24 AM
No, Passive, if you do the Smiths, you do them right. Which means you also cover Strangeways, as well as Hatful of Hollow/Louder than Bombs and Rank.

Good start, Passive. Though I wholeheartedly agree with Bryan; it's unconsciousable to ignore Strangeways Here We Come and I can't imagine not including the other discs Bryan mentioned. HoH & LtB are comps but they're (mostly) comps of non-album singles and alternatve versions.

So I guess what I'm saying is yay for saying you're going to finish this at some point.


Great job, Hannah. I must admit that I was mostly a bad person.

PassiveTheory
10-19-2007, 09:34 AM
I guess it's just my personal sentiment that Strangeways IS the grower disc, and not Meat is Murder... But yeah, give me a few days and I'll complete the review.

Louder than Bombs, though? Amazing comp. I prefer it to HoH, though.

mountmccabe
10-19-2007, 09:54 AM
Interesting. I found Strangeways to be the more immediate record, the easier record.

Also I actually don't have Hatful of Hollow so I'mn't sure how that is, exactly.

bmack86
10-19-2007, 06:37 PM
Interesting. I found Strangeways to be the more immediate record, the easier record.

Also I actually don't have Hatful of Hollow so I'mn't sure how that is, exactly.

Hatful and Louder overlap

roberto73
10-19-2007, 08:55 PM
Hatful also overlaps with their debut and Meat Is Murder, but I actually prefer the versions on HoH to the proper albums. For me, Hatful has the greatest replay value of all their discs.

I'll also second (or third or fourth) the inclusion of Rank, which I think is one of the all-time great live albums.

breakjaw
10-20-2007, 02:45 AM
Hatful also overlaps with their debut and Meat Is Murder, but I actually prefer the versions on HoH to the proper albums. For me, Hatful has the greatest replay value of all their discs.

I agree with this.I didn't have their first album,but my friend Josh in Newport did,and played it all the time.I didn't like it as much as he did,and preferred the harder stuff at the time,like X and The Dickies.Then when Meat Is Murder came out for some reason I decided to buy the album,and I really liked it,and went to see them live at The Palladium,where Morissey is probably STILL playing.Then when The Queen Is Dead came out I saw them again at either Irvine Meadows or Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa,I forget which,and everyone jumped onstage at the end.
Anyway,I owned Meat Is Murder on vinyl,The Queen Is Dead on tape,and Hatful Of Hollow on tape,and I always played HoH the most.

EDIT 11/29/07
Here's the mix that goes with PassiveTheory's rundown
http://img136.imageshack.us/img136/742/ittakesstrengthhy5.jpg (http://www.sendspace.com/file/lkb478)
What Difference Does It Make?
Sheila Take A Bow
The Boy With The Thorn In His Side
I Know It's Over
Shoplifters Of The World Unite (live Brixton Academy 12/12/1986)
Girl Afraid
Half A Person
Panic
How Soon Is Now? (live Irvine Meadows 8/28/1986)
The Queen Is Dead
Back To The Old House
Bigmouth Strikes Again
This Charming Man (NY instrumental mix)
This Night Has Opened My Eyes (John Peel session 9/21/1983)
Frankly,Mr. Shankly
Girlfriend In A Coma
Nowhere Fast (John Peel session 8/9/1984)
I Started Something I Couldn't Finish
Rubber Ring
Asleep
Death Of A Disco Dancer

PassiveTheory
10-20-2007, 01:26 PM
You, sir, have my envy.

Courtney
10-20-2007, 01:49 PM
Hannah this is excellent. Also makes me feel less guilty for liking Rubber Factory best, which I feel is somewhat predictable. But yeah.

radiohead727
11-10-2007, 12:12 AM
yes yes I'm a radiohead ran...thom is god, i wanna have sex with him...blah blah the usual

For deprived beings who have never listened to radiohead, OK Computer is best to start with because it's the best combination of all of their works

Hail to the Thief is great and it combines all of their styles but it's not as amazing

Kid A, Amnesiac, and In Rainbows have a lot of the electronic complexity that makes them so versatile

If guitars are your thing, take a listen to The Bends...not as complex, but still amazing

Pablo Honey is decent...but it's not nearly as amazing as everything else they've released

OK Computer is their best album and probably the best of the last 15 years...top 50 ever


Listen to the albums as a whole, not singles

All of their albums except pablo honey and the bends will take a few listens to get into it...but once you're into them...you suddenly have the passion to lick thom's balls

PassiveTheory
11-10-2007, 12:43 AM
Radiohead was already done... Try page 1.

roberto73
11-10-2007, 06:02 AM
Midnight Oil
I always thought Midnight Oil should've been as big as U2. They hail from a similarly exotic location (Sydney, Australia), boast a charismatic frontman (seven-foot-tall Peter Garrett), are fiercely political (about the environment and nuclear disarmament), boast legendary live performances (check out the video of them performing on a flatbed truck in front of the Exxon building in New York following the Valdez oil spill in Alaska) and share similar early influences ('70s punk). In the late '80s they threatened to become massive, but it never panned out. They recorded 12 albums between 1978 and 2002, along with a couple EP's and a live album.

Midnight Oil (1978)
http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/3379/covermidnightoilic7.jpg
A raw, rough-and-tumble debut owing a lot to the British punk and Australian pub rock scenes. The band hadn't quite found its voice yet, and the predictable result is a group of musicians whose energy outpaces their talent. Singer Peter Garrett has a commanding presence, and the rest of the band (guitarists Peter Moginie and Martin Rotsey, drummer Rob Hirst, and bassist Andrew James) kick up a lively racket, but the only truly memorable song here is opener "Powderworks." A promising start, but the best was definitely yet to come. Grade: C+

Head Injuries (1979)
http://img489.imageshack.us/img489/2047/coverheadinjuriesan7.jpg
A monumental step forward, the Oils' sophomore effort is an exciting, ferocious album that sees the musicians' talents begin to coalesce around Garrett's intelligent, literate lyrics. The band's secret weapon, though, is drummer Hirst, who propels these anthems-in-waiting with the force of an automobile out of control. "Back on the Borderline" and "Cold Cold Change" are two of the standouts that proved this was a band ready for its close-up. Grade: A-

Place Without a Postcard (1981)
http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/9638/coverpostcardvm7.jpg
While not the great leap forward represented by their previous album, Place Without a Postcard saw the band further diversifying their sound. There are still anthemic rockers ("Don't Wanna Be the One"; "Brave Faces"), but there also heretofore unseen shadings and nuance, and experiments with tempo and dynamics ("Armistice Day"; "Burnie"). In light of the previous two albums, one thing becomes a dead certainty here: Peter Garrett doesn't write love songs. He specializes in polemic, tackling the Big Issues in a way few other popular musicians try. Not an altogether successful album, but an interesting one, with a couple of their best songs. Grade: B

10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 (1983)
http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/7562/cover1098pr6.jpg
Their first masterpiece. The album comes out swinging (with the palpable dread of "Outside World" and righteous indignation of "Only the Strong") and never lets up. Garrett and co. are angry: Rotsey and Moginie's guitars are on overdrive throughout, and the rhythm section of Hirst and new bassist Bones Hillman push these songs to the breaking point. What truly sets this album apart from their others (as well as from most of the band's peers) is the melodic sensibility that until now had only been seen in fits and starts. These are huge, piledriving, world-conquering songs, and this album deserves to be held in the same esteem as U2's War, released the same year. A must-own. Grade: A+

Red Sails in the Sunset (1984)
http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/2741/redsailsinthesunsetvf0.jpg
The strangest album in their discography, Red Sails is a curious assortment of straightforward rockers and left-field experiments. "Best of Both Worlds" and "Kosciusko" belong to the former category, while bizarro tracks like "Bakerman" and "Bells and Horns in the Back of Beyond" mess about with brass and strings and song structures far more intricate than anything they had attempted before. And for the first time, Garrett's lyrics sound like lectures, further diminishing the overall quality of this album. There's some undeniably great stuff here, but after the high-water mark of 10, 9, 8, this album can't help but seem a little disappointing. Grade: B

Diesel and Dust (1987)
http://img489.imageshack.us/img489/5812/coverdieselps3.jpg
Three years in the making, Diesel and Dust is their second masterpiece, and the album that temporarily made them the Next Big Thing in the U.S. Perhaps realizing that the strident music and hectoring tone of Red Sails was making them an acquired taste, the band turned instead to couching their lyrics in the catchiest songs of their career. There's not a duff track here: "Beds Are Burning," "Dream World," "The Dead Heart," and "Sell My Soul" are all stirring, inspiring, first-rate political anthems, and album closer "Sometimes" is a song for the ages. Rotsey and Moginie's guitars are forceful and roaring one moment, soaring and atmospheric the next, and Garrett's vocals have matured into one of the most distinctive and effective voices in modern rock. If you're unfamiliar with Midnight Oil, this is the album to start with. Grade: A+

Blue Sky Mining (1990)
http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/643/coverblueskyvu8.jpg
Or, Diesel and Dust, Part 2. This is no bad thing. Picking up where their breakthrough album left off, the songs here are the same passionate, skyscraping paeans listeners have come to expect. Future albums would see them deviate from their formula; this is where they cement their status not just as songwriters of the first order, but as some of the most principled figures in modern music. While not quite living up to the standard established by Diesel and Dust, "Blue Sky Mine," "Forgotten Years," "River Runs Red," and "King of the Mountain" are all welcome additions to the Oils' canon. Grade: A

Earth and Sun and Moon (1993)
http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/9690/earthandsunandmoonge7.jpg
Midnight Oil's winning streak continues with this, their most varied album yet. Dialing down the intensity that marked their previous albums, Earth and Sun and Moon dabbles in love songs, slower tempos, and a kinder, gentler Peter Garrett. The anthems and guitars are still present ("My Country"; "Truganini"), but there are also songs that are more tender and reflective ("Outbreak of Love"; "In the Valley"), marking a noticeable maturation in the band's modus operandi. They can still be uncompromising and powerful, but Earth and Sun and Moon shows the band expanding their parameters in new and exciting ways. Grade: A

Breathe (1996)
http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/5663/coverbreatheub4.jpg
Following the triumph of their previous three albums, Breathe can't be seen as anything but a letdown. The fuzzy edges that had been so successful on the previous album seem soporific and stultifying here – a series of mid-tempo ballads that feature almost nothing of the energy that had become their trademark. The melody is still present ("Surf's Up Tonight"; "Time to Heal"), but for the first time the songs seem interchangeable. After almost twenty years of uniformly strong albums, the band was long overdue for a serious misstep. Here it is. Grade: C

Redneck Wonderland (1998)
http://img80.imageshack.us/img80/2824/coverredneckxd6.jpg
The break evidently did them good, for Redneck Wonderland sees the band roaring back to life in impressive form. The title track and "Concrete" are two of the angriest, most violent tracks in the band's history, the jagged guitars wrestling in a minefield of – unbelievably – electronic percussion. The balance of Earth and Sun and Moon is back, though, with "Cemetery in My Mind" and "Seeing Is Believing" representing two of their most melodic compositions. And then there's closer "Drop in the Ocean," a delicate ballad that is unlike anything else they've ever done. The melodies aren't quite on par with their strongest work, but Redneck Wonderland sees Midnight Oil as enlivened and enraged as ever. Grade: B+

Capricornia (2002)
http://img489.imageshack.us/img489/6936/covercapricorniaqx0.jpg
On this, their final album, the band does what it has come to do so well: mix punchy, anthemic rock with slower, more reflective tunes. The songs on this album are strong, and Peter Garrett seems as testy as ever, but there is an air of "going through the motions" to this collection. The album is not a failure (it's better than Breathe, their low point), and there is a handful of typically stellar songs here ("Tone Poem," "Golden Age," and the title track among them), but it came as no surprise to anyone when the band broke up shortly after Capricornia's release. Grade: B-

Also of particular interest are two EP's: Bird Noises (1980) and Species Deceases (1985). The latter features "Progress," one of their best and most powerful songs. A concert album, Scream in Blue Live (1992), is a decent selection of live tracks encompassing the albums between their debut and Blue Sky Mining, and gives a reasonable idea of the intensity of their live shows.

Two mixes, representing the band roughly pre- and post-U.S. breakthrough. Click the title to download.

Midnight Oil, 1978-1987 (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=1XG0U0TW)
1. Powderworks
2. Back on the Borderline
3. Section 5 (Bus to Bondi)
4. Cold Cold Change
5. Brave Faces
6. Armistice Day
7. Burnie
8. Only the Strong
9. Read About It
10. US Forces
11. Best of Both Worlds
12. Kosciusko
13. Progress
14. Beds Are Burning
15. Dream World
16. Sell My Soul
17. Sometimes

Midnight Oil, 1990-2002 (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=MCWQSXKG)
1. Blue Sky Mine
2. Forgotten Years
3. King of the Mountain
4. My Country
5. Truganini
6. In the Valley
7. Surf's Up Tonight
8. Time to Heal
9. Redneck Wonderland
10. Cemetery in My Mind
11. Seeing Is Believing
12. Tone Poem
13. Golden Age

breakjaw
11-10-2007, 11:10 AM
This is why this thread rules.Good job,Roberto!Really top notch!

roberto73
11-10-2007, 11:13 AM
Midnight Oil, Appendix A

Only the Strong (The Capitol Theatre; Sydney, Australia; 1982)
i78Id1BHsPY

Hercules (Le Spectrum; Montreal, Canada; 1985)
BE9i-NxAmNE

River Runs Red (in front of the Exxon Building; New York, USA; 1990)
0EyQkc2w5E4

Blue Sky Mine (Newtown Theatre; Sydney, Australia; 2000)
Sm8yqQhw46o

mountmccabe
11-10-2007, 11:37 AM
Nice job, Roberto! I have a friend that had great respect for them but not much in the way of music to let me hear. This'll do the trick.

radiohead727
11-10-2007, 02:49 PM
Radiohead was already done... Try page 1.

I really don't give a fuck

gaypalmsprings
11-10-2007, 02:51 PM
http://mermaid.test.at/tokyo/signs/sign.JPG

roberto73
11-23-2007, 09:22 AM
Eels
Originally marketed as a band, Eels is really a vehicle for Mark Everett (or "E," as he bills himself in his albums' liner notes). Possessing one of the most individual visions in modern music, Eels' songs run the gamut from quiet ballads to skronking rockers to truly cuckoo sound collages and experiments. The albums are never dull, never predictable, and always memorable.

Beautiful Freak (1996)
http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/2392/beautifulfreakts3.jpg
Coming in the mid-90's alt-rock heyday, Eels' debut was lumped together with many of the lesser lights riding on Nirvana's coattails. This isn't necessarily unfair, as Beautiful Freak is the most conventional album in the band's discography. There are definitely signs of Mark Everett's skewed lyrical perspective ("Susan's House"; "My Beloved Monster"), and there are quieter songs here that hint at his future experimentation ("Your Lucky Day in Hell"; "Flower") but this is, by and large, a straightforward rock album, with meaty, distorted guitars and propulsive drums driving many of the songs. One thing this set accomplishes is to establish Everett as a first-rate songwriter: the melodies are memorable from first song to last, and are an obvious harbinger of things to come. Grade: B+

Electro-Shock Blues (1998)
http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/7489/eelsbluesrj1.jpg
A beautiful and devastating album, Electro-Shock Blues built on the promise of Eels' debut and, in the process, became a modern classic of therapeutic songwriting. Reeling from the deaths of several friends and family members, Everett's second album is a meditation on loss that somehow manages to be uplifting and cathartic, and features some of his most melodic compositions ("3 Speed"; "P.S. You Rock My World"). Despite the potentially morose subject matter, there are also songs here that reveal Everett as a truly left-field musical visionary, out-Becking Beck on songs like "Cancer for the Cure" and "My Descent Into Madness." There simply aren't enough superlatives invented for this album. This is one of those life-changing records, and easily one of the best in recent memory. Grade: A+

Daisies of the Galaxy (2000)
http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/6992/eelsdaisiesofthegalaxyqe2.jpg
From the oompah band that heralds opener "Grace Kelly Blues," it's clear that Everett is plowing a different musical furrow than on his sophomore effort. Daisies of the Galaxy is a distinctly lighter affair, with songs like "Tiger in My Tank," and the title track bouncing along sprightly. There are also moments of substantial darkness, and that schizophrenia is what holds back the album. Everett never seems quite certain what he wants to accomplish here: the songs feel half-formed and the melodies don't quite stick like they have on previous albums. There are certainly some enjoyable moments here (especially "Mr. E's Beautiful Blues" and "Flyswatter"), but overall, Daisies of the Galaxy feels like the work of someone with too many ideas and too little direction. Grade: B-

Souljacker (2001)
http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/2498/souljackercu2.jpg
Everett's destination becomes even less clear on his fourth album. A bizarro mix of garbled, distortion-heavy songs and lush melodies, Souljacker is Eels' batshit-crazy record, as Everett appears to indulge every musical urge that appealed to him in the studio. There's pedal-to-the-metal rock ("Dog Faced Boy"; "Souljacker Part 1"), flourishes of tropicalia ("That's Not Really Funny"), string-drenched melancholy ("Fresh Feeling"), and songs that simply beg to be asked, "What the fuck was that?" ("Teenage Witch"). It's a challenging listen, but there's some undeniably exciting stuff going on here. It's an album about risk-taking and experimentation, and even when it doesn't work, it's never less than fascinating. Grade: B

Shootenanny! (2003)
http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/5227/shootenannytx8.jpg
Taking a step back from the abyss, Everett delivers his most stripped-down and conventional set of songs since the days of Beautiful Freak. There's still ambition here, but the arrangements are simpler and easier to digest than the experimentation of Souljacker, and there's a knowing, tongue-in-cheek feel to his lyrics ("Restraining Order Blues"; "The Good Old Days") that might appeal to people turned off by the intimate feel of Electro-Shock Blues. But even an accessible Eels album is unlike anything else out there, and songs that at first seem like straightforward, guitar-based tunes ("Saturday Morning"; "Rock Hard Times") reveal hidden depths over time. Grade: B+

Blinking Lights and Other Revelations (2005)
http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/6505/blinking265x265lg4.jpg
Ever the iconoclast, Everett follows up his most concise and listener-friendly songs with a 90-minute, 33-song double album. It's the rare musician, though, who can make an album of this length so consistently solid, and Everett delivers the second classic of his career. Blinking Lights reconciles the dueling moods of Daisies of the Galaxy, and the songs here manage to be both sentimental and uplifting, morose and euphoric, but not in a way that seems splintered or disjointed. There are rockers ("Going Fetal"), lullabies ("Blinking Lights (For Me)"), meditations ("Suicide Life"), rave-ups ("Hey Man (Now You're Really Living)"), and love songs ("To Lick Your Boots"). It's a cornucopia, a smorgasbord, and the one thing that holds it all together is Everett's unique voice. I, for one, can't wait to see where he goes next. Grade: A

Also worth a look is With Strings: Live at Town Hall (2006), where Everett performs a career-spanning set with a seven-piece band. In lieu of an official greatest hits or best-of album, this'll do nicely.

And here's a mix, running chronologically from Beautiful Freak through Blinking Lights. Click the title to download.

Best of Eels (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=CKRCPNVO)
Novocaine for the Soul
Spunky
Your Lucky Day in Hell
Cancer for the Cure
My Descent Into Madness
3 Speed
Last Stop: This Town
P.S. You Rock My World
Grace Kelly Blues
Flyswatter
Mr. E's Beautiful Blues
That's Not Really Funny
Fresh Feeling
Souljacker Part 1
Saturday Morning
Restraining Order Blues
Rock Hard Times
Old Shit/New Shit
Hey Man (Now You're Really Living)
To Lick Your Boots
Ugly Love
Losing Streak

roberto73
11-23-2007, 11:42 AM
Eels, Appendix A

Novocaine for the Soul; French television (song starts at :42)
nVfta2-LoQA

Cancer for the Cure; Live With Jools Holland
vUBKfhK2mgw

Hey Man (Now You're Really Living); Live With Jools Holland
L_1cNtZ1h4o

Souljacker Part 1; Last Call With Carson Daly
hMsJZS5ie84

full on idle
11-23-2007, 12:11 PM
I am so happy that I checked this thread again. D/ling Midnight Oil and the Eels mixes as I type this.

roberto73
11-23-2007, 01:18 PM
I am so happy that I checked this thread again. D/ling Midnight Oil and the Eels mixes as I type this.

Ah, good. Hope you like 'em, FOI. I think this finally catches me up with all the ones I promised I'd do in ... oh, June, I think. Better late than never?

Neutral Milk Hotel
11-24-2007, 02:34 PM
Could someone do Os Mutantes? I've recently become interested in listening to them but I don't really know where to start.

roberto73
11-25-2007, 10:50 AM
Copied, so it didn't get lost in the holiday shuffle at the bottom of the previous page:

Eels
Originally marketed as a band, Eels is really a vehicle for Mark Everett (or "E," as he bills himself in his albums' liner notes). Possessing one of the most individual visions in modern music, Eels' songs run the gamut from quiet ballads to skronking rockers to truly cuckoo sound collages and experiments. The albums are never dull, never predictable, and always memorable.

Beautiful Freak (1996)
http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/2392/beautifulfreakts3.jpg
Coming in the mid-90's alt-rock heyday, Eels' debut was lumped together with many of the lesser lights riding on Nirvana's coattails. This isn't necessarily unfair, as Beautiful Freak is the most conventional album in the band's discography. There are definitely signs of Mark Everett's skewed lyrical perspective ("Susan's House"; "My Beloved Monster"), and there are quieter songs here that hint at his future experimentation ("Your Lucky Day in Hell"; "Flower") but this is, by and large, a straightforward rock album, with meaty, distorted guitars and propulsive drums driving many of the songs. One thing this set accomplishes is to establish Everett as a first-rate songwriter: the melodies are memorable from first song to last, and are an obvious harbinger of things to come. Grade: B+

Electro-Shock Blues (1998)
http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/7489/eelsbluesrj1.jpg
A beautiful and devastating album, Electro-Shock Blues built on the promise of Eels' debut and, in the process, became a modern classic of therapeutic songwriting. Reeling from the deaths of several friends and family members, Everett's second album is a meditation on loss that somehow manages to be uplifting and cathartic, and features some of his most melodic compositions ("3 Speed"; "P.S. You Rock My World"). Despite the potentially morose subject matter, there are also songs here that reveal Everett as a truly left-field musical visionary, out-Becking Beck on songs like "Cancer for the Cure" and "My Descent Into Madness." There simply aren't enough superlatives invented for this album. This is one of those life-changing records, and easily one of the best in recent memory. Grade: A+

Daisies of the Galaxy (2000)
http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/6992/eelsdaisiesofthegalaxyqe2.jpg
From the oompah band that heralds opener "Grace Kelly Blues," it's clear that Everett is plowing a different musical furrow than on his sophomore effort. Daisies of the Galaxy is a distinctly lighter affair, with songs like "Tiger in My Tank," and the title track bouncing along sprightly. There are also moments of substantial darkness, and that schizophrenia is what holds back the album. Everett never seems quite certain what he wants to accomplish here: the songs feel half-formed and the melodies don't quite stick like they have on previous albums. There are certainly some enjoyable moments here (especially "Mr. E's Beautiful Blues" and "Flyswatter"), but overall, Daisies of the Galaxy feels like the work of someone with too many ideas and too little direction. Grade: B-

Souljacker (2001)
http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/2498/souljackercu2.jpg
Everett's destination becomes even less clear on his fourth album. A bizarro mix of garbled, distortion-heavy songs and lush melodies, Souljacker is Eels' batshit-crazy record, as Everett appears to indulge every musical urge that appealed to him in the studio. There's pedal-to-the-metal rock ("Dog Faced Boy"; "Souljacker Part 1"), flourishes of tropicalia ("That's Not Really Funny"), string-drenched melancholy ("Fresh Feeling"), and songs that simply beg to be asked, "What the fuck was that?" ("Teenage Witch"). It's a challenging listen, but there's some undeniably exciting stuff going on here. It's an album about risk-taking and experimentation, and even when it doesn't work, it's never less than fascinating. Grade: B

Shootenanny! (2003)
http://img233.imageshack.us/img233/5227/shootenannytx8.jpg
Taking a step back from the abyss, Everett delivers his most stripped-down and conventional set of songs since the days of Beautiful Freak. There's still ambition here, but the arrangements are simpler and easier to digest than the experimentation of Souljacker, and there's a knowing, tongue-in-cheek feel to his lyrics ("Restraining Order Blues"; "The Good Old Days") that might appeal to people turned off by the intimate feel of Electro-Shock Blues. But even an accessible Eels album is unlike anything else out there, and songs that at first seem like straightforward, guitar-based tunes ("Saturday Morning"; "Rock Hard Times") reveal hidden depths over time. Grade: B+

Blinking Lights and Other Revelations (2005)
http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/6505/blinking265x265lg4.jpg
Ever the iconoclast, Everett follows up his most concise and listener-friendly songs with a 90-minute, 33-song double album. It's the rare musician, though, who can make an album of this length so consistently solid, and Everett delivers the second classic of his career. Blinking Lights reconciles the dueling moods of Daisies of the Galaxy, and the songs here manage to be both sentimental and uplifting, morose and euphoric, but not in a way that seems splintered or disjointed. There are rockers ("Going Fetal"), lullabies ("Blinking Lights (For Me)"), meditations ("Suicide Life"), rave-ups ("Hey Man (Now You're Really Living)"), and love songs ("To Lick Your Boots"). It's a cornucopia, a smorgasbord, and the one thing that holds it all together is Everett's unique voice. I, for one, can't wait to see where he goes next. Grade: A

Also worth a look is With Strings: Live at Town Hall (2006), where Everett performs a career-spanning set with a seven-piece band. In lieu of an official greatest hits or best-of album, this'll do nicely.

And here's a mix, running chronologically from Beautiful Freak through Blinking Lights. Click the title to download.

Best of Eels (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=CKRCPNVO)
Novocaine for the Soul
Spunky
Your Lucky Day in Hell
Cancer for the Cure
My Descent Into Madness
3 Speed
Last Stop: This Town
P.S. You Rock My World
Grace Kelly Blues
Flyswatter
Mr. E's Beautiful Blues
That's Not Really Funny
Fresh Feeling
Souljacker Part 1
Saturday Morning
Restraining Order Blues
Rock Hard Times
Old Shit/New Shit
Hey Man (Now You're Really Living)
To Lick Your Boots
Ugly Love
Losing Streak

brando4n82
11-28-2007, 07:15 PM
I don't know if he has been discussed, but

Brian Eno

I have no idea where to start, but would like to hear his more accessible work, with melody and beat. Later I can delve into the more avant-garde work.
I've been watching his "77 million paintings" for the past 25 minutes and its amazing.
But ya, i've heard so much about this guy, so I'd love to know what all the fuss is about. I've listened to his song with David Byrne, "Mea Culpa" and, "and then so clear" they were alright. soooooooooo whatcha got for me?

breakjaw
11-29-2007, 07:04 AM
Another Green World is my favorite album.I am familiar with about four or five others,including his stuff with Byrne.
Did anyone do Roxy Music yet,btw?

breakjaw
11-29-2007, 07:22 AM
Page 1
#1 - Radiohead - swdshfsk - intro
#3 - David Bowie - Courtney - intro
#4 - Boredoms - bmack86 - full
#5 - Can - bmack86 - intro
#6 - Spiritualized - bmack86 - intro
#9 - Elvis Costello - TomAz - intro
#10 - the Wedding Present - roberto73 - intro
#12 - Tom waits - Slushmier - extended intro
#13 - Mogwai - swdshfsk - extended intro
#14 - Hanson - tessa|asset - extended intro
#15 - Guided by Voices - mountmccabe - intro
#23 - the Velvet Underground - PsyGuyRy - extended intro
#24 - Luna - york707 - intro with discog listed
#25 - Jonathan Richman - breakjaw - full

Page 2
#32 - The Dismemberment Plan - Tylerdurden31 - full
#33 - Bob Dylan - TomAz - extended intro
#36 - Talking Heads - bballarl - full
#37 - Pink Floyd - PsyGuyRy - very extended intro
#45 - Pearl Jam - Slushmier - full
#51, 53 & 56 - Fugazi - PotVsKtI - ranked list of albums

Page 3
#65 - the Beatles - TomAZ - full

Page 4
#101 - the Kinks (early period) - bmack86 - extended intro
#109 - Beethoven's 7th Symphony - mountmccabe - full (selected, incomplete)
#117 - the Cure - bmack86 - full
#118 - the Dandy Warhols - Hannahrain - full

Page 5
#124 - the Jesus and Mary Chain - mountmccabe - full
#131 - Yo La Tengo - Courtney - full
#132 - the Roots - Slushmier - full
#138 - Sonic Youth - bmack86 - full
#141 - the Rolling Stones (US albums) - sydaud - full
#146 - the White Stripes - bballarl - full

Page 6
#173 - Faith No More - thinnerair - full
#175 - Failure - thinnerair - full
#176 - Magazine - breakjaw - full

Page 7
#196 - Creed - bmack86 - full
#200 - Metallica - bmack86 - full
#202 - the Who - sydaud - full
#217 - Massive Attack - Thinnerair - Full
#219 - Elf Power - Bmack86 - Full
#225 - Genesis - Thinnerair - Intro
#232 - Bikini Kill - Mountmccabe - Full
#238 - Muse - Thinnerair -

Page 9
#241 - Big Black - Bmack86 - Full
#249 - The Arab Strap - Hannahrain - Intro
#253 - The Clash - TomAz - Full
#267 - Nick Cave - roberto73 - Full

Page 10
#299 - Jeff Buckley - PassiveTheory - Full

Page 12
#334 - Jawbox - Tylerdurden31 - Full
#338 - Hum - thinnerair - Full
#344 - REM - sydaud - Full

Page 13
#375 - Depeche Mode - Amyzzz - Extended Intro

Page 14
#395 - The Replacements - TomAz - Full
#402 - Spinal Tap - Breakjaw - Full
#405 - Cheech and Chong - Anita Bonghit - Discography
#416 - Pixies - Bmack86 - Full
#419 - Spiritualized - Bmack86 - Full

Page 15
#425 - Rush - MonsoonSeason - intro
#427 - The Orb - Desphrs - full
#446 - Miles Davis - sydaud - full

Page 16
#455 - Boards of Canada - desphrs - full
#463 - Blur - Slushmier - full
#474 - Serge Gainsbourg - bmack86 - intro
#477 - Beat Happening - bmack86 - full
#479 - Circle Jerks - york707 - full

Page 17
#504 - Joe Jackson - MsTekno - extended intro
#505 - Oasis - Stefinitely Maybe - full

Page 18
#518 - The Magnetic Fields - mountmccabe - full

Page 19
#562 - Wilco - mountmccabe, york707, and TomAz (compiled by Hannahrain) - full

Page 20
#573 - Spoon - sydaud - full
#580 - Decemberists - Hannahrain - full
#600 - Led Zeppelin - sydaud - full

Page 21
#616 - Minutemen - sydaud - full
#619 - Can - bmack86 - full (selected, incomplete)
#625 - PJ Harvey - bballarl - full

Page 22
#635 - Bjork - bmack86 - full
#649 - Cake - PassiveTheory - full
#650 - The Faint - hawkingvsreeve - full

Page 23
#672 - Death Cab For Cutie - hawkingvsreeve - full

Page 24
#720 - Leonard Cohen - mountmccabe - incomplete

Page 25
#735 - Bruce Springsteen - Yablonowitz - first installment
#738 - Arto Lindsay - ragingdave - Solo work only

Page 26
#757-755 TomAz vs Yablonowitz RE: Springsteen review.
#769 - XTC - Roberto73 - partial (to be continued)

Page 27
#798 - Cursive - Hawkingvsreeve - full
#800 - XTC (II) - Roberto73 - Continuation
#801 - Joy Division/New Order - sydaud - full
#806 - Springsteen - Yablonowitz - quick overview

Page 28
#812 - Springsteen (different) - TomAz - full
#820 - Elliott Smith - mountmccabe - full
#837 - Ben Folds - Jenniehoo - full (with mix!)

Page 29
#842/847 XTC - roberto73 (w/mixes!)
#865 Replacements mix - TomAz
#868 Elvis Costello mix -TomAz

Page 30
#871 Bob Dylan mixes - TomAz
#881 Animal Collective - BMack86 - complete
#884 The Go-Betweens - Roberto73 - complete (w/mix!)
#887 Tool - Passive Theory - complete

Page 31
#904 Boris - BMack86 - incomplete
#909 Johnny Cash - Sydaud - incomplete (1957-59)

Page 32
#945 John Lennon - breakjaw - full (w/mix)
#959 Lucinda Williams - TomAz - full (w/mix)

Page 33
#976 Pavement - bmack - full
#984 Pavement mix - breakjaw
#988 Underworld - bballarl - intro

Page 34
#995 The Appleseed Cast - comiddle - full
#996 (summary of rock canon) - C DUB YA

Page 35
#1024 The Smiths (w/mix here (http://coachella.com/forum/showpost.php?p=320867&postcount=1038)) - Passive Theory
#1029 The Black Keys (w/mix) - Hannahrain
#1041 Radiohead (redux) - Radiohead727
#1043 Midnight Oil (w/2mixes!) - Roberto73
#1049 Eels (w/mix) - Roberto73

Page 36 #1054 Eels (w/mix) -Roberto73


OK I wouldn't mind tackling Eno/Roxy Music w/mixes if everyone can wait until Mon/Tue (my next days off)

canexplain
11-29-2007, 07:55 AM
Another Green World is my favorite album.I am familiar with about four or five others,including his stuff with Byrne.
Did anyone do Roxy Music yet,btw?

the last time i was in the bay area, and the last show i saw there was bryan ferry at the warfield .... great show, but very very bittersweet :( ... canx**

brando4n82
11-29-2007, 05:41 PM
OK I wouldn't mind tackling Eno/Roxy Music w/mixes if everyone can wait until Mon/Tue (my next days off)

sounds good to me

breakjaw
12-03-2007, 10:05 PM
http://imageigloo.com/images/339577million Eno fans.jpg (http://coachella.com/forum/showpost.php?p=358139&postcount=881)

OK,so it's been about 23 years since I've had any kind of "school project" or report to turn in,but I found myself facing the task of describing Eno in this thread in the way I used to dread finishing those projects.Why?Because it is impossible to encapsulate the effect this person has had on the music you and I listen to in a forum post.
I was however really looking forward to putting together the mix that goes with the report,so here's what I'll do,I'll run down the mix(which you can obtain by clicking the man's picture above),why I chose those songs,what albums they came from,a little something on those albums(click on the album covers to learn more about them from Wikipedia),and some of the great stuff I had to leave off.


http://www.galu.info/grafika/album-takingtigermountain.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taking_Tiger_Mountain_By_Strategy_%28album%29)Taki ng Tiger Mountain (By Strategy)
I tried to go roughly in chronological order with this mix,but I had to start with Third Uncle.This album is actually Eno's 2nd and one I much prefer over "Warm Jets".It was painful to have to leave off Fat Lady of Limbourg and Back In Judy's Jungle.The song The True Wheel is where the band A Certain Ratio got their name.Also on this album,you can hear the style of music he would later use when he produced the Talking Heads albums "Fear of Music (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fear_of_Music_%28album%29)" and "More Songs About Buildings and Food (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/More_Songs_About_Buildings_and_Food)".
1. Third Uncle
I first heard this song covered by Bauhaus before I'd heard any Brian Eno stuff.Their version is way more propulsive and punker,until you consider that he put his out in 19fucking72!A year I believe dominated by sensitive singer/songwriters.Critic Dave Thompson writes that the song is
a near punk attack of riffing guitars and clattering percussion, Third Uncle could, in other hands, be a heavy metal anthem, albeit one whose lyrical content would tongue-tie the most slavish air guitarist.
2. Taking Tiger Mountain
The beginning of his ability to capture timelessness in minutes of music.You listen to this song and tell me if 2 minutes or 10 have gone by,I dare you.Maybe the Velvets could achieve this also,but that's it.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e7/Eno_-_Here_Come_the_Warm_Jets_album_cover.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_Come_the_Warm_Jets)Here Come The Warm Jets
This was Eno's solo debut,and perfectly illustrates why his sensibilities no longer meshed with Roxy Music,even though he uses guitarist Phil Manzanera on 3 tracks (not on this mix) as well as keyboardist Andy Mackay on Faraway Beach.The Paw Paw Negro Blowtorch,Blank Frank,and Dead Finks Don't Talk are all songs that are kind of silly and frivolous,as is Baby's On Fire,with the difference being Baby's On Fire has an unbelievably catchy groove.It was also a little difficult leaving the title track off.
3. Baby's On Fire
Funny song.Also really good.
4. On Some Faraway Beach
At some time or other,I put this on a mix of songs I would want played at my funeral,and this is the sole choice that would cause me to come back and haunt everybody,were it omitted.Beautiful,yearning,perfect.

http://therisingstorm.net/wp-content/uploads/2007/02/eno12.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Another_Green_World)Another Green World
So now I have to choose which songs to include from my favorite album of all time.I could have easily just put this entire album up as an example of Eno and been done.It's got everything that's brilliant about him musically (and lyrically!) on it.Get this,if you are just going to buy one from him.
5. St. Elmo's Fire
This song is so innovative musically.I also love the "Spitting irons in the ether" line although I have no idea what it means.
6. Another Green World
Beautiful.Beautifully short.But that's not what's beautiful about it.It's just so beautiful.
7. Everything Merges With The Night
I always wondered who Rosalie was...

http://www.weareie.com/audio/mixes/shwantology2/shwant2_pics/eveningstar.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evening_Star_%28album%29)Evening Star
8.Evening Star (w/Robert Fripp)
When I was 15 I stayed with my agent and her son,who was my age,on Roosevelt Island in New York City.He was big on REM,who had only just released "Chronic Town" and Robert Fripp.One night,we snuck down into the unfinished subway tunnels that were supposed to connect Queens and NYC with Roosevelt Island.We brought a ghetto blaster and he brought the tape of Brian Eno and Robert Fripp playing Evening Star.It was so unreal and bizarre to be in an unfinished deserted subway station listening to Eno & Fripp.Note:This is actually their second collaboration,I'm not familiar with their first ("No Pussyfooting (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fripp_%26_Eno_%28No_Pussyfooting%29)") at all.I think a case could be made that there is not a single person in music that it is better to collaborate with than Eno.

http://www.progreviews.com/reviews/images/BE-BaAS.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Before_and_after_Science)Before and After Science
9. Here He Comes
For a long time,the only Eno I had was a CD called "Desert Island Selection (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/More_Blank_Than_Frank/Desert_Island_Selection)" which is the one I recommend you get,along with "Another Green World".This song is on it,which is my favorite song from the "Before and After Science" LP.I hate King's Lead Hat,which is why it's not on here.The rest of the album is ok,but it sounds a little too much like "Warm Jets".

http://www.invisible-face.com/pics/collins_sessions/session_eno_music.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_for_Films)Music For Films
This is a really strong collection of some of Eno's shorter ambient pieces.If you are looking for an eclectic mix of instrumentals this (and "Apollo") are good choices.
10. M386

http://www.zoilus.com/documents/bushofghosts.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/My_Life_in_the_Bush_of_Ghosts_%28album%29)
My Life in the Bush of Ghosts
Being such a huge Talking Heads fan back in the '80s,I tried to get my hands on everything David Byrne put out,including this record.I never really enjoyed it,because frankly it scared the shit out of me.There was a track on it called The Jezebel Spirit that featured recordings from the radio of an exorcism,and it frightened me.I was also disappointed that you there was no vocals from David Byrne anywhere on the album.That being said,it's a pretty good album,with rhythms kind of reminiscent of "Remain In Light (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remain_in_Light)".
11. Moonlight In Glory (w/David Byrne)

http://hot.dyndns.tv/new-age/media/b/b/brianenoharoldbudd/Ambient2ThePlateauxOfMirror.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Plateaux_of_Mirror)Ambient 2:Plateaux of Mirror
12. Above Chiangmai (w/Harold Budd)
This is a short and pretty piano piece.I chose it because it is a fine example of his collaboration with Harold Budd.

http://image.blog.livedoor.jp/recomints_part3/imgs/3/b/3bd8ac6e.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo:_Atmospheres_and_Soundtracks)Apollo (Atmospheres & Soundtracks)
13. Deep Blue Day
I have to be honest,I first became familiar with this song from the Trainspotting soundtrack (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trainspotting_%28soundtrack%29) and I then tracked down where it was from.The whole Apollo album is a fantastic collection of interesting ambient tracks,and well worth owning.It was hard to leave off An Ending (Ascent),and particularly Under Stars,which I have used on another mix I made a long time ago,never posted here.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41DBXA03ZWL._AA240_.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_for_Films%2C_Volume_3)Music For Films III
14. White Mustang (w/Daniel Lanois)
Again,I hate to admit,another album I'm not at all familiar with,but an interesting example of his collaboration with Lanois.I chose this track because I have a white '66 Mustang.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000002LNB.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrong_Way_Up)Wrong Way Up
One of the fun things about making a mix like this is discovering great stuff you can't believe you never knew about.This is probably the most accessible album Eno has released (as an artist not producer) and I'm a pretty big fan of John Cale too,so I don't know how this one slipped by me.It's got several good songs on it,notably Been There, Done That (which actually made the US charts!) and Lay My Love.
15. Spinning Away (w/John Cale)
http://magesy.ws/uploads/posts/1175708489_brian_eno_and_jah_wobble__spinner.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinner_%28album%29)Spinner
16. Spinner (w/Jah Wobble)
I was curious too hear this as well since I'm a fan of Wobble from his days with PiL

http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/f/f1/BrianEnoAliClick.jpgAli Click
17. Ali Click (Rural "Doo Gap" Mix by Markus Draws)
This is a cool trance style track that was originally on the "Nerve Net (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerve_Net_%28album%29)" album

http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/diary/the_drop.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Drop)The Drop
Again,another album I had not heard before putting the mix together,but one I like alot.
18. Back Clack

http://s.yottamusic.com/i/af5f.5oku/375x375 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Another_Day_on_Earth) Another Day On Earth
19. Just Another Day
I believe I'd heard this song before on some internet radio station or other,and I thought it'd be perfect to close out this mix.
Songs that I hated to exclude(besides the ones already mentioned):
His version of The Lion Sleeps Tonight which I have owned on 7" 45 for over 20 years
Something from 801 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/801_%28band%29),the art-rock "super-group" he was in on and off
Oh,and everything you love about the Talking Heads,Bowie,Devo and U2 is because of Eno.Also all that stuff they influenced,which is everything good.
And if you used a PC at all 10 years ago,you've probably heard something he composed:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/d9/Windows95BOXSHOT.jpg/250px-Windows95BOXSHOT.jpg (http://www.whitwell.ndo.co.uk/musicthing/sounds/mssound1.mp3)
Doo, dudududingggggg.... ding.... ding... ding...
In an interview with Joel Selvin at the San Francisco Chronicle, Brian Eno explains.


Q: How did you come to compose "The Microsoft Sound"?

A: The idea came up at the time when I was completely bereft of ideas. I'd been working on my own music for a while and was quite lost, actually. And I really appreciated someone coming along and saying, "Here's a specific problem -- solve it."

The thing from the agency said, "We want a piece of music that is inspiring, universal, blah-blah, da-da-da, optimistic, futuristic, sentimental, emotional," this whole list of adjectives, and then at the bottom it said "and it must be 3 1/4 seconds long."

I thought this was so funny and an amazing thought to actually try to make a little piece of music. It's like making a tiny little jewel.

In fact, I made 84 pieces. I got completely into this world of tiny, tiny little pieces of music. I was so sensitive to microseconds at the end of this that it really broke a logjam in my own work. Then when I'd finished that and I went back to working with pieces that were like three minutes long, it seemed like oceans of time.

breakjaw
12-14-2007, 12:31 AM
I'm not going to do Roxy Music after all,even though I posted the mix already.It's December and I work for the post office,so that's why.But here's some of their album covers,which is really one of the best things about them anyway:

http://damagedsoul.altervista.org/immagini/RoxyMusic.gif
http://www.vinylhaven.com/images/ForYour_Pleasure.JPG
http://www.progreviews.com/reviews/images/RM-Str.jpg
http://www.theovangogh.nl/Roxy_MusicCountry_Life-front.jpg
http://www.rollingstonesnet.com/images/Siren.jpg
http://www.connollyco.com/discography/roxy_music/viva_hi.jpg
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B0000256VR.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg
http://pixhost.eu/avaxhome/avaxhome/2007-09-29/Roxy_Music_B_FleshYBlood.front.jpg
http://www.connollyco.com/discography/roxy_music/avalon_hi.jpg
http://images-jp.amazon.com/images/P/B000002LN7.09.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

kreutz2112
12-14-2007, 01:01 AM
wow, nice work. good job.

breakjaw
12-14-2007, 02:45 AM
Wow,thanks!That's more than was said about the Eno rundown,which I actually spent a little time on.Less is more.

kreutz2112
12-14-2007, 02:47 AM
Wow,thanks!That's more than was said about the Eno rundown,which I actually spent a little time on.Less is more.

I was referring to the eno guide.

breakjaw
12-14-2007, 02:48 AM
Oh.

















Shit!

kreutz2112
12-14-2007, 02:53 AM
its my bad, I thought you posted both of them at the same time.

PassiveTheory
12-14-2007, 01:19 PM
lol

I can wait for a Roxy Music guide. What sucks is there are like 4 bands I'd want to do but all of them have 3 CDs or less... ;____;

ThomThom
12-27-2007, 10:41 AM
I scanned the table of contents posted above by breakjaw and didn't see Modest Mouse anywhere on that list...Anybody care to provide a complete Modest Mouse review?

mountmccabe
12-27-2007, 11:15 AM
I could do that, ThomThom. I will listen to some Modest Mouse this afternoon to help me gather my thoughts.

ThomThom
12-27-2007, 11:49 AM
I could do that, ThomThom. I will listen to some Modest Mouse this afternoon to help me gather my thoughts.

Thank you kind sir, I am looking forward to it...I have been shifting back and forth between The Lonesome Crowdest West & The Moon and Antartica all day, I can't seem to just pick one over the other.

TomAz
12-27-2007, 10:38 PM
breakjaw, that Eno stuff is awesome. I haven't looked at this thread for a while or I'd've responded sooner.

bmack86
12-27-2007, 10:47 PM
Give me a year and I'll write one on Liars, when they inevitably release their fifth album next year.

betao
12-27-2007, 11:39 PM
hmm I guess I shall contribute to the thread as well.

The Prodigy

If you want to take a dive into what aggressive electronic music can sound like, Prodigy is your answer. They're are a group that has managed to evolve their sound from breakbeat rave tracks from the early 90s, onto to punkish dance music of the late 90s, and then a practically indescribable sound from more recent times. They have always been my personal favorite band.

Start with The Fat of the Land (1997). This album is their landmark album and marks the highest point of their career. It contains the famous dance anthem "Smack My Bitch Up", as well as the hits "Breathe" and "Firestarter". The album is a very important album in the EDM scene of the late 90s - it helped bring EDM into the States (if only for a short time) with its punkish vibe. The album was #1 in over 20 countries (including the US) upon release, and remains my personal favorite album. In my opinion, this is one that can help break the ice for someone wanting to get into EDM.

From here, i'd move on to Music for the Jilted Generation (1994). This shows a Prodigy in between their rave sound and punkish sound. It actually shows a start in their punkish sound with the track Their Law (featuring Pop Will Eat Itself). This is probably one of the most "danciest" of their albums; seriously, if Voodoo People cant make you move, then I dont know what will. Selected favorites include Break & Enter, Voodoo People, Poison, and 3 Kilos.

The previous albums are often regarded by fans as the two most common favorites. From here on, you have 2 choices. You can either move on to Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned (2004), or Experience (1991). If you enjoyed FOTL more, I'd say move onto AONO. If you had more fun with MFTJG, then proceed to Experience.

AONO is a very rockish/almost industrial album, featuring guest vocals from artist such as Juliete Lewis, Liam Gallagher, and even Twista. The album features very rough and dirty beats, and is often considered as an album meant to be played live. The studio versions sound weak compared to a live version. It should also be known that this was the first album that Liam did on his own - neither Maxim nor Kieth made an appearance.

Experience is the Prodigy's debut album, which showcases Liam's raving roots. The album consists of fast-paced breakbeat tunes, many of which contain various samples that fit in well. If you enjoyed the less rockish MFTJG, then move on to Experience next. Also, if you pick up this up in a shop somewhere, chances are you'll get the Expanded version, which features many solid b-sides from that era, as well as some decent remixes.

Once you are enjoying them, check out their live material. I have various bootlegs from each period of their career, all of which hold alot of energy - more compared to the studio tracks. Let me know if you're interested.

Also, if you're still hungry for more, check out "The Dirtchamber Sessions, Vol. 1" (1999). This is a mix of tunes done by Liam Howlett, which just shows him getting back to his roots as a DJ. The mix includes artists such as Jane's Addiction, Primal Scream, Ultramagnetic MCs, the Beastie Boys, Sex Pistols, and the Chemical Bros. So if you're a fan of DJ mixes, this is for you.

breakjaw
12-28-2007, 04:31 AM
This is why the thread is so great.I knew nothing about The Prodigy,except that the video for "Smack My Bitch Up" was really freaky,and my brother said they rocked the joint at Coachella.Now thanks to betao's thoughtful summary,if I want to jump in,I'll probably check out Music For The Jilted Generation,and if they played Coachella again,I definitely would see them.

betao
12-28-2007, 08:14 AM
haha anytime man. They are my favorite group, and that is how I got into them. And even if you aren't exactly a fan of EDM, they put on one hell of a live show (they managed to make in Q magazine's list of "50 bands to see before you die" i believe). I hope my guide helps!

J~$$$
12-28-2007, 08:24 AM
I really enjoyed The Dirtchamber Sessions, Vol. 1. Not really a prodigy album but more of a Liam mix tape.

betao
12-28-2007, 08:25 AM
I really enjoyed The Dirtchamber Sessions, Vol. 1. Not really a prodigy album but more of a Liam mix tape.

snap, I knew i was forgetting something. Lemme throw that into the post. thanks for reminding me.

and yeah, he does have some decent mixes on that album.

brando4n82
12-28-2007, 08:48 AM
Wow,thanks!That's more than was said about the Eno rundown,which I actually spent a little time on.Less is more.

Hey man. sorry my bad.

I was the one that requested Brian Eno a while back, and forgot all about it. This is the first time ive visited this thread since i posted the request. Thanks a lot I apprciate you taking the time to tackle that one. I had No Idea he crafted the Windows "theme" that is a neat lil fact.

I went to download the Eno mix you posted but its been taken down. Would you be able to make another link to that? If not, its cool. Thanks again brothah

breakjaw
12-29-2007, 01:27 AM
OK,it's back up.Just try clicking Eno's picture above...

mountmccabe
12-30-2007, 07:33 PM
I scanned the table of contents posted above by breakjaw and didn't see Modest Mouse anywhere on that list...Anybody care to provide a complete Modest Mouse review?


I could do that, ThomThom. I will listen to some Modest Mouse this afternoon to help me gather my thoughts.

I am near halfway done with this. I am covering everything they've released (though often in compilation form) apart from a few bonus tracks I don't have.

How much interest is there in a mix to accompany the discography review?

kreutz2112
12-30-2007, 07:35 PM
How much interest is there in a mix to accompany the discography review?

I am not interested in a mix. I am not being an asshole either, just telling the truth. I am, however, looking forward to the guide.

mountmccabe
01-10-2008, 09:05 PM
Modest Mouse


Introduction/Overview

Modest Mouse are from some hole in not-Seattle, Washington. Originally it was Isaac Brock, Eric Judy and Jeremiah Green. They managed to release an EP in 1994. Their early material was in the vein of Pavement, Sebadoh, Guided By Voices and the Minutemen. Over the years they worked in similarities to Pixies and Built to Spill. I don't know what I'd say their Epic-era recordings sound like; a good start is older Modest Mouse with a fuller band. And a little bit more lush. And poppy. Yeah, whatever.

Isaac sings weirdly fantastic lyrics, often in an odd, affected voice. He ranges from a lazy sing-speak to strained yelling, often in the same song, often over and back through very short spans. He also peppers his lyrics with "god damns" and "fuckers" like they are grunts. It is kind of awesome.


The Albums

Sad Sappy Sucker, 2001 - This compilation comes off as a bit of a mess if you try to accept it as a unit. This is because it's a compilation of 12 songs recorded for their debut album - "Birds vs Worms" was released as a 7", everything else was shelved - another early EP and a number of "Dial-a-songs" which are interesting as archival documents (you had to call a number to hear a track) but they're best left until you're really aching more more. So yeah, the first 14 tracks on this disc make a fantastic 28-minute debut album that wasn't actually released. "Dukes Up" is almost fully formed Modest Mouse, Isaac sings with the aggressiveness found on their best songs of their classic indie period rather than the preciousness found on much of the rest of the disc. Many of the songs feel like fragments, especially when held up against latter-era material. Grade: B-

http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/drc900/c901/c901686711k.jpg
This Is A Long Drive For Someone With Nothing To Think About, 1996 - The 16 tracks on their official debut album come off with greater weight and confidence than their earlier recordings. "Dramamine" is a hazy and slow opener; the 2nd track "Breakthrough" starts the same way but then explodes in crashing drums and guitars. "Custom Concerns" talks about "losing all touch, building a desert." "Dog Paddle" has Isaac singing with himself in a round and wheezing over a repetitive guitar/bass/drum beat; the affect is menacing. This is a powerful, fully realized band flirting with greatness. Grade: A

Modest Mouse, 1997 (EP, aka The Fruit That Ate Itself) - Track 8, "Summer" features a dancy beat and upbeat lyrics; this is their most fun song thus far, "just the sound of the summer can make me fall in love." There are 9 tracks here though 3 of them are uninteresting < 1 minute sections of the other songs played backwards. Grade: B

http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/drd200/d235/d2352767is2.jpg
Lonesome Crowded West, 1997 - SSS starts out precious, TIALDFSWNTTA starts hazy, the self-titled EP starts with a song played backwards. And, now, LCW starts with a violent angular riff and Isaac belting out with full weight "From the top of the ocean - Yeah, from the bottom of the sky - Goddamn" it is shocking. This song ebbs and flows for almost seven minutes. And this is only tied for the 3rd longest song on the album. We have been given notice that something just changed with Modest Mouse. They've allowed themselves room to take songs in new directions, for Isaac to ramble lyrically. This is such a wonderful thing. "Jesus Christ Was An Only Child" is a light acoustic romp prominently featuring a violin. This is followed by the aggressive and violent "Doin' the Cockroach" where Isaac runs through 4 minutes worth of lyrics in 2.5 but forgets to tell the other instruments so they continue the workout for another 2 minutes. This is somehow topped by "Cowboy Dan," a multi sectioned epic which builds and crushes you through several disparate sections. Lyrics like "Cowboy Dan's a major player in the cowboy scene. He goes to the reservation, drinks and gets mean he didn't move to the city, 'the city moved to me and I want out desperately'" somehow comes off as the greatest thing ever. This album is exceedingly fun to listen to, put together and tracked amazingly well. One of the greatest things I've ever heard. Top 5 all time, no joke. Grade: A+

Building Something Out of Nothing, 2000 (comp) - A compilation of a dozen songs from singles and the Interstate 8 EP. It opens with "Neverending Math Equation," one of my favorite Modest Mouse songs. "Baby Blue Sedan" is a vinyl bonus track from LCW and shows their softer, acoustic side with lyrics like "I miss you when you're around." "A Life of Artic Sounds" works the repetitive building angle in a quick 2:29 run time. This is a strong compilation even though it isn't much as an album. Grade: B

http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/dre100/e182/e18256ickky.jpg
The Moon & Antarctica, 2000 - Their first album for Epic is full and varied. It shows a Modest Mouse more confident in their quiet and poppy side without giving any significant ground on their more aggressive and propulsive numbers. The disc opens with "3rd Planet," another broad cosmological push, and one of my favorite songs by anyone. "Gravity Rides Everything" is tuneful and lazy with softer edges than would've been possible in the past. "I wanna live in a city with no friends or family. I wanna look out the window of my color T.V. I wanna remember to remember to forget you forgot me" opens "A Different City." "Wild Packs of Family Dogs" is a playful sounding song about the narrator's family and, eventually, self being split apart by a wild pack of domestic dogs. "the Stars are Projectors" is a near-9 minute jam that is far more fluid whole than their past epics. This album is packed with great songs. Grade: A

Everywhere and His Nasty Parlour Tricks, 2001 (EP) - An 8 song EP that has largely failed to grab me. "So Much Beauty In Dirt" is a great take away song and there's an interesting variation on "I Came As A Rat" as well. There's nothing wrong with these songs but the brief running time doesn't do them justice. Grade: C-

Ugly Casanova - Sharpen Your Teeth, 2002 - Not a Modest Mouse album in name or sound but related as Isaac is one of the major creative forces. The rest of the band consists of members of Califone, the Black Heart Procession and Holopaw. Isaac is the main lead singer here but others - most notably John Orth - also make significant vocal contributions. I don't know, I suppose this is something Modest Mouse could've become if they went a more avant garde route back in 1995 or so. These are not paranoiac violent workouts but rich and varied songs with more folk and country influence. "Things I Don't Remember" is the highlight for me but actually now that I look I can't find my copy to hear it. Grade: A-

http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/drg200/g283/g28347e9yd5.jpg
Good News For Someone Who Likes Bad News, 2004 - The brightness is a major factor here; that is a significant change. "One Chance," for example, is not a bad song but it being the rule rather than the exception makes it odd. It's also not entirely believable, given that the next album doesn't really continue in that vein. "The Devil's Workday" sounds like it could be from Sharpen Your Teeth except that without Orth and the others to sing it is just multiple tracks of Isaac. "Dance Hall" and "Bukowskwi" share a playful approach but different in loudness. "Bury Me With It" (a personal favorite) and "The View" switch between disparate sections but there's an unfamiliar fluidity to the shifts. "Black Cadillacs" actually does hearken back to the Lonesome Crowded West approach. This is not a bad disc and there are some great songs... but what is new to Modest Mouse here isn't particularly new or interesting. Grade: B-

Baron Von Bullshit Rides Again, 2004 (live) - 10 song live recording compiled from two shows in February 2004 at the Social in Orlando. This included "The Good Times are Killing Me" from the soon to be released new album and nine others including "3rd Planet" and a version of "Never Ending Math Equation" with slightly altered lyrics and "Doin' the Cockroach." Also captured is Isaac's lengthy response to a drunken request for "Freebird" that concludes "...life is too short to play or hear 'Freebird.'" Not essential but worth hearing. Grade: C+

http://image.allmusic.com/00/amg/cov200/dri400/i449/i44932o8oly.jpg
We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank, 2007 - With the addition of Johnny Marr (I don't hear it, sorry) and the passage of time Modest Mouse have managed to blend their poppier more fluid approach with some of the old aggressiveness. Or, maybe it's just that the songs are more upbeat, like the (indie-style) dancy hit "Dashboard." Or the wild workout that "Parting of the Sensory" builds into. My favorite track may be "Education" with it's snarling stomp but the focal point of the album is the epic "Spitting Venom." It starts as a bouncy solo acoustic number; that figure is taken up by a full electric band that moves into wild blues as the vocal, lyrical and song style changes... for a couple minutes. Then the bouncy acoustic approach comes back, transformed... until we move out of that with some horns... and that's only half the song. This sounds like it'd be annoying but the stylistic shifts are more blends and the parts fit together well; this is really a remarkable song. There are dull points on this album and a fair bit of songs that just feel tired (or overdone) but this album is certainly worthwhile. Grade: B


What To Do
If you are not familiar with the band go out and get Lonesome Crowded West. Actually, buy two copies in case one of them is defective. I mean, I suppose it may be an interesting bit of historiocity to go get the compilation Sad Sappy Sucker first and absorb that and also their early EPs and their first full length (a double album) and take those in before being struck upside the head by the brick what is Lonesome Crowded West but god damn you could be listening to LCW now.

After that a good move is The Moon & Antarctica. This is their first album for Epic. It is also damned good. Don't bother moving forward in time until you can accept this one. Well, maybe for the non-Modest Mouse (and Sub Pop-released) Sharpen Your Teeth. If you prefer the fuller, more lush sounds this record starts to show then you should enjoy Good News For People Who Love Bad News but otherwise move straight to We Were Dead Before the Ship Even Sank which is more essential despite the flaws.

Moving back in time also should be done with trepidation; partially because of how monstrous Lonesome Crowded West is. If you like early Sebadoh (pre-III) and Guided By Voices (pre-Bee Thousand) then you'll do fine with Sad Sappy Sucker, if you've the patience for the long, languid This Is A Long Drive For Someone With Nothing To Think About then YAY because it is broad and fantastic.

full on idle
01-10-2008, 09:10 PM
A hole in the thread mended!

samiksha
01-10-2008, 09:55 PM
i love when this thread gets bumped. thanks for that one mount! i'm a big fan - i think you're right on and way to work ugly casanova in there.

ThomThom
01-10-2008, 09:59 PM
MountMccabe,

I have been waiting for this one, thanks again!

breakjaw
01-11-2008, 12:20 AM
Outstanding job on this.This is why John is my favorite.I now know a lot more about this artist and their albums and stuff.

kreutz2112
01-11-2008, 06:53 AM
good job John.

Jenniehoo
01-17-2008, 04:19 AM
Hey - I just read this ENTIRE thread. It took me like an hour and a half. I downloaded whatever mixes were still available that I missed, which is awesome.

I'm going to work on another review - but I also wanted to say that reading this whole damn thread gave me an entire new respect for roberto, who I've never really interacted with.

Now I'm going to go listen to my free music and eat a muffin.

thelastgreatman
01-17-2008, 04:28 AM
Jennie, why are you usually posting at these ridiculous hours? With me it's obvious, but you're not batshit crazy, so what's the sitch?

Jenniehoo
01-17-2008, 04:34 AM
Ugh. I'm in Florida, so it's 7:30 here, but I've been getting up at 5AM. I was up late last night, too. The real deal is that I'm working a CA job from home - so I work noon to six, but without work to regulate my sleeping schedule for me, I'm not mature or responsible enough to sleep normal human hours.

It's not a good or funny story. I'm a big child. Just believe I'm on meth and it will seem more interesting.

thelastgreatman
01-17-2008, 04:37 AM
Madam, I envy you more than you could imagine. All I've ever wanted from life is a job that would let me sleep through those horrible hours known as "daytime."

waxybk
01-17-2008, 06:17 AM
Hanson
I think the best way to go is to start with their best known album "Middle of Nowhere." You will recognize the most songs on there and easily be hooked. From there, it is rather nostalgic to look back to their earlier recordings/versions, in the shape of "3 Car Garage." Listening to "Mmmbop" at a slower pace with even higher, more angelic voices is quite a treat. You can really see how much they fleshed it out and made it their own. Then, I'd go with their 'sophomore' album "This Time Around." You can already see how much they've grown in the past 3 years since MON came out. Their songs are less poppy and more melodic and lush. Try the song "A Song to Sing," for instance. They also have some killer guest artists in John Popper and Johnny Lang. After TTA I'd go into "Underneath," which just showcases their growth in leaps and bounds as songwriters and lyricists. And you can even listen to this cd side by side with its acoustic twin, appropriately titled "Underneath Acoustic." This is where you get to see the skin and bones of the songs on "Underneath" that you're sure to love by now. Before you know it, you're on to "Best of Hanson - Live & Electric." This is a great example of one of their live shows, starting out with a cover of none other than Radiohead. You'll really get a feel for the energy of the crowd and the band. And finally I'd go back to "Live at Albertane" for some live nostalgia, although it's not required.


HAHA! That made my morning! Thank you. Serious or not...doesn't matter, thank you for making my morning shine!

thestripe
01-17-2008, 06:28 AM
She is very serious.

waxybk
01-17-2008, 06:36 AM
That makes it all the more awesome!

roberto73
01-17-2008, 07:39 AM
I'm going to work on another review - but I also wanted to say that reading this whole damn thread gave me an entire new respect for roberto, who I've never really interacted with.

Thanks, Jennie. Nice to meet you. I used to think my rule for posting on the board was quality over quantity, but after nearly a year I'm realizing the rule is pretty much just not-quantity.

Jenniehoo
01-17-2008, 09:34 AM
You're quality, my friend. I hope you aren't worn out on this thread and it picks back up.

bmack86
01-17-2008, 11:06 AM
So i need to finish Boris (They have released a few things since I started. I'm a failure) and there are a few other bands I was thinking of tackling at some point.

Courtney
01-21-2008, 11:19 PM
If anyone feels so inspired, guides to Madness and Love and Rockets would probably be good.

bmack86
01-21-2008, 11:32 PM
very good

In a few days, I'll amend the four Malkmus albums to my Pavement review, to help anyone interested in seeing them, because Malk doesn't do Pavement songs hardly ever.

breakjaw
01-21-2008, 11:56 PM
Love & Rockets don't have enough albums and Madness is a singles band,and I mean that in the most complimentary way.They are the quintessential singles band.Get Complete Madness and call me in the morning.

Courtney
01-22-2008, 12:02 AM
Love & Rockets don't have enough albums

I thought they had like eight albums? But see, my confusion is exactly why I need a guide!

bmack86
01-22-2008, 12:06 AM
Someone could do Bauhaus/Love and Rockets. That'd be good.

Roger Waters
01-24-2008, 05:11 PM
Someone should do Pink Floyd.

roberto73
01-24-2008, 05:40 PM
Love & Rockets have seven albums. I can do them, but it won't be anytime soon.

i_like_cake530
01-24-2008, 05:54 PM
Amazing review John...i agree with almost everything you said, except, IMO TM&A is better than LCW, and also although EW&HNPT isn't that great of an album/ep whatever it is, Night On the Sun is one of their best songs, and i just feel like it needed to be mentioned....Besides that, Great Work.

Mr.Wyndham
01-24-2008, 05:56 PM
someone should do king crimson.

bmack86
01-24-2008, 11:13 PM
Consider this the appendix to Pavement.
Stephen Malkmus (and sometimes the Jicks)

Stephen Malkmus (2001) Pavement was done, and, after taking a break, Malk decided to release a solo album. This one, to me, has the feel of Terror Twilight without the confidence of Pavement or Nigel Godrich. It's got the songwriting, but the execution isn't always there. Somewhat tepid at times, but hey, the guy's on his own. Jenny and the Ess Dog is a great song, and I really like Jo Jo's Jacket. Not quite there, but it's fun to listen to, so there ya go. Grade: B.

Pig Lib (2003) AKA where Mr. Malkmus realizes that, in his solo career, he wants to be a guitar god. He's not quite there yet, but this is the sound of him branching out from traditional Pavement music and trying something different. 1% isn't loose enough to work all the way, but it has its moments over the course of 9 minutes, and Malk proves he can rock out more than anyone would have expected. I really like Dark Wave and (Do not feed) The Oyster, but it feels like these ideas are starting to be crafted, as if he's working towards something with this one. Baby steps. Grade: B

Face the Truth (2005) And this is what he was working towards. You don't start off with a track as awesome as Pencil Rot unless you know you have a corker of an album to back it up. More synths here than on the past two, and the songwriting is confident, assured, and fully there. This isn't the Malkmus of Pavement anymore, this is a whole new guy, and he rocks. I love every single song on this, and it has to be noted that, over the course of 8 minutes, No More Shoes never gets anywhere near stale. Also known as: Malkmus coming out from the shadow of Pavement for a second try at awesome. Grade: A

Real Emotional Trash (2008) It's still new in my mind, but damn it if this isn't at very least as good as Face the Truth. Dragonfly Pie is another kickass opener, the long song (10 minutes!) is fuckin' fantastic, the gimmicky song (Hopscotch Willie) isn't gimmicky at all after the first listen, and Baltimore kicks many Pavement songs asses. That's right, he wrote something that's better than many of his Pavement songs. I'm sayin' it, because I think it's true. Malkmus is at the top of his new game, this time not as a slacker indie icon, but as a rocker, blazing forth with guitar solos and riffage. Here's to whatever's next. Grade: A+

full on idle
01-24-2008, 11:17 PM
It's so nice to read things I agree with. Very well put, imo.

re: Jenny and the Ess Dog, I always get tripped out because it has the same guitar as an Elliott Smith song and I don't want to think that either ripped the other off. I have to find the song, I will do that tomorrow. So that you can tell me what you think.

bmack86
01-24-2008, 11:19 PM
When you report back, I will listen and report back.

Ready, break.

full on idle
01-25-2008, 10:38 AM
Ok, it's "Say Yes" by Elliott Smith vs "Jenny and the Ess Dog" by Stephen Malkmus. It might be a stretch, but you decide:

Say Yes - http://download.yousendit.com/E7C3C3163F1A5AC1

Jenny and the Ess Dog - http://download.yousendit.com/04A7A2F51B331CD3


I only have a live version of Say Yes on my work computer, it might be better compared with the studio version, but you should be able to get the idea.

edit* And I'm not even sure it's the guitar, it might just be the singing and it's really only at the beginning but man I can't hear one of those without thinking of the other.

Courtney
01-25-2008, 10:59 AM
Bryan, I have not heard Real Emotional Trash, but this makes me want to go listen to it right now. I hope it is that good because now I am really excited.

And FOI I agree those songs sound similar, in the very beginning of Jenny and the Ess Dog, especially.

thestripe
01-25-2008, 11:42 AM
Great job bmack, I can't wait to listen to Real Emotional Trash.

bmack86
01-25-2008, 02:03 PM
Well, good luck for all you, if you go to the Matador website and preorder the album, you can get a stream of the album starting RIGHT NOW. I'd recommend it. I'm going to do it, because you get all the B-Sides as they're released, and I'm sure they're going to be awesome based on the album they're coming from.

kreutz2112
01-25-2008, 02:24 PM
you get a poster too.

bmack86
01-25-2008, 02:39 PM
Valarie, good call. The vocal line at the start is almost identical.

full on idle
01-25-2008, 03:04 PM
Thank you for the validation.

I want a poster.

rage patton
02-16-2008, 09:11 PM
This thread is most excellent. Thanks Tom for the Elvis Costello, thatwas exactly what I was looking for.
I pretty much agree with Thinnerair's Faith No more review, but maybe one day I will do a more thorough acount.
Also, I 100% agree with Bryan's Metallica discography. Thier new album apparently channels the 80's, and Lars recently said in an interview they have continuously been turning to Ride The Lightning and Master or Puppets as reference points. Master of Puppets is definately in my top 5 albums of all time.
Also, John's Bikin Kill review was excellent. I was not expecting to find that in here. It would make my girlfriend very happy. Also, excellent job with the Modest Mouse review. The Lonesome Crowded West definately also has a place in my top 5 alums of all time. That is right, Metallica and Modest Mouse both have albums in my top 5 of all time.

Hmmm... I want to do this now. But who?

PassiveTheory
02-16-2008, 09:50 PM
Anybody, Rage... Has a non-FNM Mike Patton one been done yet?... Maybe that would be a good idea.

Also, I'm waiting for Stef to do Elbow seeing as I just bought Cast of Thousands and am loving it.

rage patton
02-16-2008, 10:00 PM
I could definately do Mr. Bungle. I would have to track down some of thier EPs before I attempt to do that though.
I was also thinking of doing The Mars Volta, Queens of The Stone Age and/or Gogol Bordello. But I don't know if anyone would be interested.

roberto73
02-16-2008, 10:01 PM
This thread is most excellent. Thanks Tom for the Elvis Costello, thatwas exactly what I was looking for.
I pretty much agree with Thinnerair's Faith No more review, but maybe one day I will do a more thorough acount.
Also, I 100% agree with Bryan's Metallica discography. Thier new album apparently channels the 80's, and Lars recently said in an interview they have continuously been turning to Ride The Lightning and Master or Puppets as reference points. Master of Puppets is definately in my top 5 albums of all time.
Also, John's Bikin Kill review was excellent. I was not expecting to find that in here. It would make my girlfriend very happy. Also, excellent job with the Modest Mouse review. The Lonesome Crowded West definately also has a place in my top 5 alums of all time. That is right, Metallica and Modest Mouse both have albums in my top 5 of all time.

Hmmm... I want to do this now. But who?

Whomever you choose, Rage, try to make sure they've got enough of a catalog to justify the descriptions. I think the original post specified five or more albums – you know, to help out those people for whom individual research might be a little unwieldy. What about Madness?

rage patton
02-16-2008, 10:03 PM
Whomever you choose, Rage, try to make sure they've got enough of a catalog to justify the descriptions. I think the original post specified five or more albums – you know, to help out those people for whom individual research might be a little unwieldy. What about Madness?

Ahhh right right. Well, as I said above, if use some of Mr. Bungle EPs, they would met qualifications.
I could definately do Madness. I will need some time before I do that one though.

breakjaw
02-23-2008, 07:00 PM
Please forgive the cross-posting,but I thought Bosco did a real good job with this (in the Top Ten songs thread) and I'd hate for it to get lost there:

Ok, Im gonna give you a small break down of my opinion, combined with my Chemical Junkie friends opinions, for each album.
------------------

1.

http://www.plong.com/MusicCatalog%5CC%5CChemical%20Brothers,%20The%20-%20Come%20With%20Us%5CChemical%20Brothers,%20The%2 0-%20Come%20With%20Us.jpg
My personal favorite of the Chemical Brothers is 'Come With Us'. To ME, its the most complex, yet, most interesting album I've ever heard. Its selection is very exotic and futuristic, but never uses the same idea twice. If you're looking for a dance heavy album, this is probably not the best one to go with. But instead, this album is more meant to take your ears on a ride of blissful crystal clear beats and psychedelic sounds. And by the end, it leaves your heart heart pounding for more.

Notable Tracks:

All of them.

Favorite Track:

Star Guitar

------------------

2.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000003RY5.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

'Dig Your Own Hole'. This is probably the one album all the music critics point to as the Chemical Brothers best, and for the most part, they're correct. Raw as fuck and aggressive, is how I would describe this album. Best played very LOUD.

Notable Tracks:

Again, All of them.

Favorite Track:

Elektrobank

------------------

3.

http://www.plong.com/MusicCatalog%5CC%5CChemical%20Brothers,%20The%20-%20Surrender%5CChemical%20Brothers,%20The%20-%20Surrender.jpg

'Surrender'. Hailed as indie-rock critics favorite album from the Chemical Brothers. Probably the most "dancey" album they've put out. Personally, my least favorite from The Chems, but I respect it as one of the top albums since my fellow Chemical Junkie friends all place it in their top 3. But disregarding my opinion, it's a very solid album at the least.

Notable Tracks:

Music: Response
Under The Influence
Out of Control
Let Forever Be
The Sunshine Underground
Hey Boy Hey Girl

Favorite Track:

The Sunshine Underground

------------------

4.

http://www.plong.com/MusicCatalog/C/Chemical%20Brothers,%20The%20-%20Exit%20Planet%20Dust/Chemical%20Brothers,%20The%20-%20Exit%20Planet%20Dust.jpg


'Exit Planet Dust'. A fantastic debut album from the Chemical Brothers. Similar to Dig Your Own Hole, this album is very raw sounding. But instead, more "fun" sounding than aggressive. Also,some very chill songs in the mix of this album too. A must have.

Notable Tracks:

In Dust We Trust
Song to Siren
Three Little Birdies Down Beats
Chemical Beats
Chico's Groove
One Too Many Mornings
Life Is Sweet


Favorite Track:

Three Little Birdies Down Beats

------------------

5.

http://www.astralwerks.com/chemical/we_are_the_night/ecard/images/0094639415823-LF.jpg

'We Are The Night'. The latest album from the Chemical Brothers, and maybe the most diverse album by the Chemical Brothers. At first, this album didn't sit with me at all. As a matter of fact if you look into my past post history you'll find me being very critical of this album. But, then I saw the album live and my eyes were opened. I would say this album is the riskiest album the Chems have released to date. Its certainly not the easiest album to swallow with its very random style. It's currently my third favorite album from the duo.


Notable Tracks:

We Are The Night
Saturate
Do It Again
Das Spiegel
The Salmon Dance (also, check out the "Crookers 'WoW' Remix")
Burst Generator
Battle Scars ( also, check out the "Beyond the Wizard Sleeve remix")
The Pills Won't Help You Now

Favorite Track:

Burst Generator

------------------

6.

http://www.plong.com/MusicCatalog%5CC%5CChemical%20Brothers,%20The%20-%20Push%20The%20Button%5CChemical%20Brothers,%20Th e%20-%20Push%20The%20Button.jpg

'Push The Button'. Probably the least notable album to date for The Chemical Brothers because not a lot of "new" ground is covered. I would best describe it as new mix of old. Meaning most of the songs that were created for Push The Button, all sound like they could be placed in one of their earlier albums that were released before Push The Button. If you enjoy 'Surrender', this is another album to go for. Still, again, a very solid album.


Notable Tracks:

Galvanize
The Boxer
Believe
Hold Tight London
The Big Jump
Marvo Ging
Surface To Air

Favorite Track:

The Boxer

------------------


And if you still cant get enough of all of these albums look for these...

B-sides (the good ones):

H.I.A.
Electronic Battle Weapon 6
Nude Night
Base 6
The Diamond Sky
Studio K
Let Me in Mate
Silver Drizzle
Snooprah
Morning Lemon
Spring
Clip Kiss
No Need
Electronic Battle Weapon 2
Not Another Drug Store
Electronic Battle Weapon 7
Flashback
If You Kling To Me I'll Klong To You
Chico's Groove (Mix 2)
Loops Of Fury
(The Best Part Of) Breaking Up
Freak Of The Week
Enjoyed
Power Move
Electronic Battle Weapon 8
Electronic Battle Weapon 9
The Duke
Otter Rock
Delik
Under The Influence (Mix 2)
Seal

Live Tracks (released as b-sides):

Setting Sun
Elektrobank
Piku Playground
Temptation/Star Guitar
Believe
The Big Jump
Out of Control
Got Glint?
Close Your Eyes
Surface To Air
Believe

Other Single Releases (appeared on singles compilation 'Singles 93-03':

Get Yourself High
The Golden Path

roberto73
02-23-2008, 09:48 PM
We should do a round of Coachella-specific discographies to keep this thread alive. I can do Love & Rockets, but I think these other 2008 bands could warrant discussion (even if they don't necessarily meet the 5-album minimum):

Kraftwerk (10 albums)
Minus the Bear (5 albums)
My Morning Jacket (4 albums)
Les Savy Fav (4 albums)
The National (4 albums)
Devotchka (4 albums)
Stars (4 albums)

And, for the record, the following Coachella artists have already been discussed:
Spiritualized - p. 1 & 14
Death Cab for Cutie – p. 23
Animal Collective – p. 30
Stephen Malkmus – p. 37

Any takers?

PassiveTheory
02-23-2008, 10:29 PM
The National have 4 albums?... Fucking christ.

I'll take Stars once I actually listen to their last 2 CDs... lol.

chiapet
02-23-2008, 11:10 PM
I'll take Stars once I actually listen to their last 2 CDs... lol.

Yea, I'd be interested in hearing some suggestions on their albums. I saw them in '01 when they toured with Momus and didn't think much of them, but I heard a couple of songs recently and they weren't bad.

kreutz2112
02-23-2008, 11:49 PM
I could do Minus the Bear and Stars, it would have to be post March 4th though.

breakjaw
02-23-2008, 11:55 PM
I think a musician should do Kraftwerk.I mean I would say get The Man-Machine,Trans-Europe Express, and Computer World immediately,but I know that's only scratching the surface..

bmack86
02-24-2008, 11:04 AM
I want to finish Boris first, but i have all the Kraftwerk albums (Including the first three when they were a different sort of band)

mountmccabe
02-24-2008, 02:49 PM
I could write up The National and Les Savy Fav. And be a backup/alternate on Stars.

Eventually.

PassiveTheory
02-24-2008, 02:53 PM
Can we collaborate on Stars?... I just really want to write the Nightsongs EP review.

kreutz2112
02-24-2008, 02:58 PM
nightsongs is not an ep...

PassiveTheory
02-24-2008, 02:59 PM
Er... The Nightsongs LP. Thanks for that one, Kreutz.

mountmccabe
02-24-2008, 03:34 PM
We can have dueling reviews for/commentary on that album. PM me your write-up when you've got it and I'll post 'em together.

And, hell, maybe I should gather an alternate reviewer for each of their albums. I am now accepting sign-ups for the other three discs.

Also I don't have any of the EPs or singles so I was going to ignore all that. Do You Trust Your Friends? too.

No rush, certainly.

PassiveTheory
02-24-2008, 04:17 PM
I'll send you my review of Nightsongs tonight.

Stefinitely Maybe
02-27-2008, 04:59 AM
All right, here's the Elbow write-up. Sorry it took so long!

I've actually taken most of this from a website I found, because I think it summarises everything really well, but I have added in some of my own thoughts and recommendations, and also updated with stuff on the latest album, which comes out in a few weeks...

Elbow is made up of five guys: Mark Potter (guitar), Richard Jupp (drums), Craig Potter (organ, and brother of Mark), Pete Turner (bass) and Guy Garvey (vocals). They met, ten years ago, at college in Bury, north Manchester. They bonded over U2, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Tom Waits and the Red Hot Chilli Peppers, eventually forming a band called Soft. For a while they played, what Pete calls, "chilled funk", and were, it's generally agreed, "shit".

Relocating to Manchester itself - most of the band getting work at local underground venue The Roadhouse - they changed their name to Elbow ("the most sensuous word in the world," according to a nurse in Dennis Potter's television-series, 'The Singing Detective') and began to evolve a new sound, wherein driving organ, star-kissed guitars, Guy's fallen-angel vocals and tough grooves were merged into (sometimes eight-minute long!) songs. Songs that owe as much to 60's folk and prog-rockers King Crimson - "We've described ourselves as prog-rock with no solos," offers Guy, unapologetically - as they do the quicksilver melodic rock of The Stone Roses, or funk influences like Sly Stone. In fact, I would say that their sound is notoriously difficult to categorise. They don't really fit into any one genre; but rather merge several genres together, with incredible success. You will most likely find them amongst the 'alt-rock' records of your music store though, I'm guessing.

Their mesmerising debut five-track demo, 'Noisebox EP', (now impossible to find even in the best Manchester collectors stores) was released in 1997 on their own Soft Records label and featured, according to Guy Garvey, "songs pretty much about the same things; love and failure, failure in love, small town frustrations." He went on to say "I wouldn't say we were angsty, more low-key melancholy." Despite only 200 copies being released, the EP gained them enough interest to attract the big record labels, with the brilliant track 'Powder Blue' receiving airplay from John Peel on Radio One.

Together with their friends and fellow Manchester band, Witness, they got signed up by Island Records in 1998 and soon people were talking about Elbow as The Next Big Thing. They contributed a track to Twisted Nerve's 'Christmas Stocking Filler' and the future looked bright for the Bury band. However, their luck was out. They disappeared to rural France to record where "It was," chuckles Guy, "strangely like 'Big Brother'. It ended with the biggest row we've ever had. It lasted 16 hours or something stupid." Barely a year later, just weeks before their album was due to be released, Island dropped them. A lifeline deal with EMI collapsed weeks later and Elbow were left without a contract or a deal.

Thank God then, for Manchester indie-label UglyMan, who in August 2000 released 'The Newborn EP' which featured early recordings of 'Newborn' and 'Bitten By The Tail Fly'.

Elbow are one of the very few bands whose songs affect me so deeply that I can actually remember exactly where I was the first time I ever heard them. The first time I ever heard Elbow was in July 2000, and I was standing in the Virgin Records store in Harrow, North London. A song came on over the speakers, and it was impossibly beautiful, and unlike anything else I had heard in a very long time. It featured male breathy vocals and beautiful guitar parts and harmonies and, from what I could hear on first listen, incredible lyrics too. I remember trying to figure out who it could be, and I thought it must be a new song by Doves. At the time, that was the only band I could imagine who would write anything like that. I was wrong, but the two bands still invite a lot of comparisons, to this day. Anyway, I went up to the desk and asked them what had just been playing, and they checked and handed me the Newborn EP. I went home and played it on repeat for days - completely in awe of the music and of the lyrics which were more poetry than song - and have been in love with the band ever since.

'The Newborn EP' was followed just 5 months later by 'The Any Day Now EP', featuring the title track and 'Don't Mix Your Drinks'. Both EP's received almost universal acclaim, and revitalised Elbow's career culminating in a new deal with V2. It was probably around this time that I saw Elbow live for the first time. I went to an NME showcase night at the Astoria, where Doves were headlining, supported by the Cooper Temple Clause, and Elbow were announced as the surprise opener. I went to the upstairs bar to get a drink, before the show, and Guy and Pete from Elbow were sat there, talking. Nobody else seemed to know who they were. I went over briefly just to say that I loved the EPs and was looking forward to seeing them live, and they were so friendly, and seemed genuinely touched and surprised that someone had recognised them. I have met them many times since then, and they continue to be lovely, down-to-earth guys. And their live show is ALWAYS incredible and has had me in tears many, many times.

Musically the early EPs were compared to the cerebral, experimental rock of Talk Talk, Radiohead and Doves, whilst lyrically they're in a more poetic slipstream to the kitchen-sink romanticism of fellow Mancunian Morrissey. The seven and a half minute epic 'Newborn' - about growing old and getting ill with the one you love - is typical: full of romantic yearning yet anchored in the gritty realities of life; corpses and senile dementia. "We wanted the EPs to be a pair," says Guy. "One ['Newborn'] is the love and loss, the personal stuff, which obviously stems from me. And we wanted the next EP ['Any Day Now'] to be more of the shared experiences which is small-town frustrations, getting out of Bury for us. It's an introduction to us, where we're from and all that's important."

Heralded by the beautiful single 'Red', which gave Elbow their first taste of the UK Top 40 (reaching number 36), their debut album, 'Asleep In The Back', was one of the most hotly-anticipated British rock records of 2001.

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A peerless fusion of the personal and political, it is both a widescreen insight to life in a Greater Manchester town and poignantly introspective. Guy is determined to maintain a lyrical honesty, and many songs are torn, still bloody, from his personal life. "'Newborn' is like the most in love I've ever been," he says, "and 'Bitten By The Tailfly', is about exactly what went wrong, going after the cheap thrills, chasing girls. I'm not a harsh moralist, but I don't think I can be wildly romantic in a song like 'Powder Blue', without offering a balance, the nasty side." There have been times, in the past, when Guy admits he has revelled in his own drunken, self-destructive behaviour, pushed himself into situations to fuel his writing. "I've gone too far in the past. I got to the point, where I didn't know whether I was fucking up my life deliberately so I had something to write about, or the other way around."

Either way, such introspective angst never becomes self-indulgent, balanced, as it is, by Elbow's keen eye on the wider world. 'Powder Blue' is a typically complex observational lyric, based on a fucked-up, druggie couple Guy once saw in a Manchester bar. Both a wondering tale of one couple's touching co-dependency and a grubby, unsettling look at drug-casualties, Elbow's songs are all set a against a very real backdrop - Manchester, with all its poverty, violence and drug-culture.

"You can't help but love the city, but, like any relationship, it's tinged with sadness. Everywhere you've got reminders of a proud industrial city littered with men not working, and shut-down mills. The generation that went before us were very badly disappointed at the hands of Margaret Thatcher." - Guy Garvey, 2001

The upshot? A band who have things to say. A band who draw you into their own dirty, magical world, a world of inky black despair and heart-bursting idealism. But, above all, a world that's alive with honestly rendered emotions and truths. That is, music and life at its richest."I would like people to pick up on some of the more romantic notions of what we do," says Guy. "But the truth of the matter was that I wasn't happy for a long time."

Elbow, however, cannot simply be tagged miserablists. "There are three songs about babies on the album," smiles Guy. "One that's a real positive, 'don't worry, it's fine', song."

The single 'Asleep In The Back' wasn't originally on the album, however after it reached Number 19 in the UK charts in February 2002, there was a quick re-issue with the new track included. The album climbed back up the chart eventually reaching UK number 14 and being nominated for the Mercury Music Prize. The band returned to the studio, this time without having to worry about losing their record contract before their next highly anticipated release.

Whether you have the reissue or the original pressing, there's no doubt that Asleep In The Back is an incredible album, and it's still one of my all-time favourites.

9 out of 10

Standout tracks:

Any Day Now
New Born
Red
Powder Blue
Bitten By The Tailfly
Scattered Black And Whites
Asleep In The Back


When the single 'Fallen Angel' was eventually released in August 2003 it took Elbow back to the UK Top 20 (again reaching no.19) and heralded the arrival of their second album, 'Cast Of Thousands'.

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Very similar to 'Asleep In The Back', it contained more downcast songs about relationships mixed with great rock tunes, albeit with slightly more epic aspirations, and the London Community Gospel Choir lending a hand on 'Ribcage'. Described by a cautious NME as "Very good. A classic perhaps!", it reached an impressive Number 7 in the UK album charts and spawned more singles with 'Fugitive Motel', 'Not A Job' and the Glastonbury favourite, 'Grace Under Pressure', which featured Manchester mates Alfie and Doves 'Jimi Goodwin on vocals.

I think it's also important to note that Elbow were able to explore the visual quality of their music more fully with this album (their songs often sound like soundtracks to unmade films, and conjure up whole worlds of their own) by releasing a limited edition DVD with the album, which had a series of short films accompanying all of the songs. They held a special event to unveil these short films on the big screen, at the Royal Festival Hall, in London. I managed to get a ticket, and was blown away by the show, and also got to talk to them in the Q&A session afterwards. This album will also always be close to my heart because it features my name on the credits! If you look closely, amongst the list of the 'cast of thousands' of dedicated fans, I am listed.

I love this album, and I think the songs on it are just as great as those on the first, but for me it doesn't quite have the same flow and consistency as the debut. For that reason alone I'll give it an 8 out of 10.

Standout tracks:

Ribcage
Fallen Angel
Fugitive Motel
Switching Off
Not A Job
Grace Under Pressure


Touring the world, promoting 'Cast Of Thousands' and also supporting the likes of Muse, Grandaddy and Blur meant that Elbow were struggling to find time to record their next album. They decided to take a portable studio on tour with them and record as they were on the road before finally returning to Blueprint Studios in Manchester and producing it themselves. The result was 'Leaders Of The Free World', released in September 2005.

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This album includes the first single 'Forget Myself' and the brilliant 'Station Approach', named after the road leading to Manchester Piccadilly train station ("Coming home I feel like I designed the buildings I walk by”). Again, the songs focus on introspection and the most personal aspects of relationships and breakups, whilst touching on broader, epic themes. The singles on this album had a slightly more accessible feel than anything they had done previously, as though the band had really found their groove, and the band started to see some real mainstream success as a result.

Again, they also released a limited edition DVD of short films with the CD, and again this was a reminder of the powerful visual quality of the band's music, and their ability to just pull you into another world with every song. The DVD was also noteworthy because it featured the video for "Mcgregor", which is an incredible song, but was left off the album at the last-minute because it did not quite fit with the rest of the tracks. The band still play it at most of their shows, though, and it is a live favourite, and definitely worth downloading or watching on YouTube!

Another incredible album, but perhaps still not quite up to the standards of the debut. Still an easy 8 out of 10 though.

Standout tracks:

Station Approach
Forget Myself
Leaders Of The Free World
Mcgregor (DVD only)
Great Expectations
Puncture Repair


And that brings us to the new album. Elbow have spent most of the past three years touring, and having kids, and now their fourth album, 'The Seldom Seen Kid' is finally upon us.

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Rumoured to be Elbow's last new album (please no!) in the traditional sense of the word (the band have hinted that future releases may be in the form of EP's / singles only) they return here with what can only be described as a beautiful, masterful, heartbreakingly delicate collection of simply brilliant songs; and although I have only had this album for four days, I think I can already say it is one of my all-time favourites, and perhaps Elbow's finest to date.

'Starlings' starts the album off with aplomb, a hushed harmonised intro of vocals, glockenspiel and piano giving way to a huge burst of horns before Guy Garvey begins his vocal. Garvey has the sort of voice that could sing the entire telephone book to you and you'd still find it deep, and meaningful and melancholically beautiful.

'Bones Of You' with it's flamenco influences, details lyrically that moment whereby you're rushing around a town centre when suddenly you catch a few bars of a song you last hear when you were happy, and somewhere else, and it blasts you back to that time. And back to the love you felt then; "And I'm five years ago/and three thousand miles away". Musically it's quite a commercial and accessible song, like a few on the album. And there's a bitter lyrical under taste in the fact that it becomes apparent that the singer of the song has been lying to himself to a greater or lesser extent, all these years. Brilliant stuff.

'Mirrorball' is a typically stunning and beautiful Elbow ballad; "Dawn gives me a shadow I know to be taller. All down to you. Everything has changed." over acoustic drums and semi-whispered, right in your ear and head vocals. Gorgeous strings too. Stirring and yet romantic.

'Grounds For Divorce', the first single, is based around a stinging guitar riff, part Bloc Party part Led Zep, and a darkly humorous lyric about spending far too much time in a spit and sawdust underground bar; "I've been working on a cocktail / Called grounds for divorce"

With 'Audience With The Pope' Garvey tackles religion in a song that he's dubbed "A Bond theme if Bond was from Bury and a recovering Catholic.". It even has the requisite Bond-theme-esque guitar solo.

Next track 'Weather To Fly' is beautiful and the sort of track Snow Patrol would record if they could actually write and sing songs that were anything deeper than shallow. It starts with a heartbreaking falsetto sub-vocal and a bass line that sounds distinctly 'Chasing Cars' before the beautiful lyrics spin out over the gentle beats;

"Pounding the streets where my fathers feet still
Ring from the walls,
we'd sing in the doorways,
or bicker and row
Just figuring how we were wired inside
Perfect weather to fly."

Brilliant.

'Loneliness Of A Tower Crane Driver' is a stunningly intelligent track in which the misery of someone else's life is played out through all of us. Sounds complicated - it's actually brilliant. It's a heartfelt song, the type which Elbow do best, an industrial percussive line underpinning a swooning vocal and a string laden melody.

Richard Hawley duets with Garvey on next track 'Fix', a chirpy, atmospheric, after last orders little number which lyrically deals with a pair of chancers making plans for their ill gotten gains.

'Some Riot' sounds like a mournful plea to a long lost friend, possibly "The Seldom Seen Kid" himself (Bryan Glancy, a friend of the band's who sadly died in 2007). "I think when he's drinking / he's drowning some kind of riot / what is my friend trying to hide / cos it's breaking my heart / it's breaking my heart". It's beautiful and other-worldly.

'One Day Like This' sounds like the natural successor to Asleep In The Back's 'Any Day Now', whether the main character's luck has changed. Or has it? The strings soar, the drums beat endlessly and Garvey swoons about seeing the light, and being in love. Perfect.

And closing track 'Friend Of Ours' is definitely a tribute to the bands lost friend Bryan Glancy, the seldom seen kid. It's beautiful, not at all sugary, and genuinely touching and moving. A fitting album closer if there ever was one. If Garvey's "Love you mate....." doesn't move you then you must have a heart of stone, surely.

(Incidentally, there is a deluxe version of the album listed for sale online, which apparently has a 12th track named 'We're Away', but I haven't heard this yet).

An album that's seriously hard to fault. 10 out of 10

Standout tracks:

Starlings
Bones Of You
Grounds For Divorce
Weather To Fly
Loneliness Of A Tower Crane Driver
The Fix
Some Riot
One Day Like This


The official Elbow website is at www.elbow.co.uk (http://www.elbow.co.uk)

breakjaw
02-27-2008, 08:32 AM
Great job on Elbow!

Bluesky
02-28-2008, 07:20 AM
Great job on Elbow!

I concur. Fucking awesome band. Nice write-up. Two very enthusiastic thumbs up.

amyzzz
03-12-2008, 05:25 PM
I found The Beatles on page 3. We don't have any of the earlier albums yet, just Abbey Road, Magical Mystery Tour, Sgt Pepper's Lonely Heart Club Band, the White album, and Yellow Submarine. I like Abbey Road quite a bit and various songs here and there on other albums.

TomAz
03-12-2008, 05:37 PM
amy I'm really proud of you. you should be sure to give the white album the attention it deserves.

amyzzz
03-12-2008, 05:42 PM
amy I'm really proud of you. you should be sure to give the white album the attention it deserves.
I listened to it yesterday--some good tracks on there like Dear Prudence, Happiness Is a Warm Gun, Blackbird, Piggies, Revolution 1, Helter Skelter (what a fucking great song!! everybody covers this).

I'm listening to the new NIN now because it's right smack in the middle of this mp3 CD with a bunch of Beatles surrounding it. Talk about trippy.

edit: I like how the weird album titles are fucking kick-ass songs in their own right like "Magical Mystery Tour" and "Sgt Pepper's..." Nice cheezy pop perfection.

I don't like when the Beatles fuck up their own great songs by not singing on key like in "Because."

PassiveTheory
03-12-2008, 05:58 PM
Can we now do Portishead?

amyzzz
03-12-2008, 06:02 PM
They only have 3 albums.

Cheddar's Cousin
03-12-2008, 06:38 PM
Also, I 100% agree with Bryan's Metallica discography. Thier new album apparently channels the 80's, and Lars recently said in an interview they have continuously been turning to Ride The Lightning and Master or Puppets as reference points. Master of Puppets is definately in my top 5 albums of all time.



There is absolutely no reason to waste any time whatsoever even contemplating listening to anything by Metallica this side of And Justice For All. The Black album just sucked, and as for the rest of it, We get it James, you can't sing. Why don't you get it. Get back to screaming so we can all appreciate you again. And Lars, Get over yourself. Also, you forgot Metallicas lowest point to date...S&M. If you want my opinion, I'd delete it. True fans will get that one.

Also, Am I evil first appeared on the Creeping Death EP.
Megadeth discography coming soon...

breakjaw
03-13-2008, 04:47 AM
I don't like when the Beatles fuck up their own great songs by not singing on key like in "Because."

That's actually them trying to sing Beethoven.
Amy,are you actually saying that you've only recently heard "I'm So Tired"?
Listen to it 300 more times,until it becomes part of your existence. Just like the rest of The White Album.


Because" is a ballad written by John Lennon[1] (credited to Lennon/McCartney) and performed by The Beatles. It features a 3-part harmony vocal performance between Lennon, McCartney and George Harrison, overdubbed three times to make nine voices in all.[2] The results of this have been compared in sound to the Beach Boys. It appeared on the 1969 album Abbey Road, and is the song that precedes the extended medley that formed side two of the original LP record.

The story has been told that this song is actually "Moonlight Sonata" by Ludwig van Beethoven played backwards. While this is not precisely true,[3] "Moonlight Sonata" certainly served as an inspiration for the song. "Yoko was playing Beethoven's 'Moonlight Sonata' on the piano ... I said, 'Can you play those chords backwards?', and wrote 'Because' around them. The lyrics speak for themselves ... No imagery, no obscure references."[1]

The song begins with electric harpsichord played by George Martin and then joined by Lennon's guitar doubling the harpsichord and played through a Leslie speaker. Vocals and bass guitar enter in what Alan Pollack calls the "mini-bridge."[4]

The song was one of the few Beatles songs to include an analog synthesizer arrangement (although analog keyboards such as the Mellotron had been used often by The Beatles, few songs featured the use of a traditional analog synthesizer with voltage-controlled oscillators). The Beatles at the time of Abbey Road were among the first contemporary rock bands to experiment with the Moog synthesizer.

The main recording session for "Because" was on 1 August 1969, with vocal overdubs on 4 August, and a Moog synthesizer overdub by George Harrison on 5 August.[5] As a result, this was the last song on the album to be committed to tape, although there were still overdubs for other incomplete songs.

A vocals-only version of the song can be found on Anthology 3 and Love and is an example of three part harmony from Lennon, McCartney, and Harrison.

superdeluxe
03-13-2008, 06:49 AM
Any love for the Smashing Pumpkins?

roberto73
03-13-2008, 09:43 AM
Rising from the pasty, black-clad ashes of Bauhaus, Love and Rockets wasted no time in stepping out from Peter Murphy's Bela Lugosi-shaped shadow. Daniel Ash, David J, and Kevin Haskins began exploring a danceable psychedelia that eventually shed the psychedelia and emphasized the dance. Perhaps not coincidentally, they also turned to shit. Theirs is a patchy catalog, but the good stuff is so good that it makes you forgive their less successful endeavors.

Seventh Dream of Teenage Heaven (1985)
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As a statement of purpose, Love and Rockets' debut begins curiously, with the vaguely dancey instrumental, "God and Mr. Smith." Coasting in on anthemic keyboards, mid-80's electronic drums, and a garbled vocal sample, it couldn't be more dissimilar to Bauhaus than if they had begun the album with a cover of "Y.M.C.A." The hazy, narcoleptic "A Private Future" follows, Daniel Ash's voice floating over acoustic guitars and synths, and just as it seems that the album is going to settle into a quiet, pastoral rut, the churning guitars of "Dog-End of a Day Gone By" kick in, and the listening becomes increasingly more interesting. The album continues through a second stab at the opener (this time with vocals and retitled "If There's a Heaven Above"), flirtations with dance ("Inside the Outside"), and quasi-Bauhaus guitar-based tunes, but the melodic sensibility of guitarist Ash and bassist David J (who also trade off on vocals) comes through in all cases. It's a fascinating debut, and one of their best albums. Grade: B+

Express (1986)
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Where their debut sometimes seemed a little too resigned (owing at least partially to Ash's distant, I'm-so-above-this-singing-thing vocals), Express comes down to Earth with a rich, guitar-based sound and propulsive rhythms. It's a monumental step forward, and if this album had come one year earlier, it would be hailed as one of the best debuts of the last thirty years. Opener "It Could Be Sunshine" coasts in on middle-Eastern percussion and distorted guitars, and "Kundalini Express" is genuinely exciting, a surging rhythm pushing forward Ash and David J's alternating vocals before the song explodes into a cloudbursting chorus. "All in My Mind" is another standout, appearing initially to be a gentle, acoustic number before accelerating into an upbeat tune with an unabashedly pop chorus. "Yin and Yang (The Flowerpot Man") is their most successful dance track yet, and hints at the direction they would later take. This album, from start to finish, is a winner. Grade: A

Earth Sun Moon (1987)
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The band's third album doesn't exactly explore any new territory, but you wouldn't ask The Ramones to incorporate a string quartet, would you? If anything, the songs are even fuzzier this time around. The distorted guitars swirl ominously and Ash and David J's monotone vocals emerge from the fog like bored ghosts. That might not sound like an endorsement, but by this point the band has become adept at creating a mood, and it's startling how effectively it works across the course of an album. Opener "Mirror People" and college rock hit "No New Tale to Tell" are two of the best examples of what Love and Rockets were doing: mixing fragile acoustic guitars with distortion and dance rhythms to create songs that managed to be fun and frightening at the same time. Grade: A-

Love and Rockets (1989)
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Perhaps it's not surprising that their big American hit is on their first weak album. The strategy that had worked so well on previous albums (mixing spare acoustic-based numbers with big, heavy, guitar-based numbers) now seems rote and by-the-book. While "**** (Jungle Law)" is a fun, rocking opener, much of the rest of the album relies on quiet songs that are so quiet they border on silence, and loud songs that sound like the band wants to be a postmodern Motorhead. It's an uneasy balance, and by the time the album arrives at slinky smash "So Alive," the net effect is one of life-threatening schizophrenia. The formula doesn't work this time, and even though there are highlights, the album as a whole is a serious letdown. Grade: C+

Hot Trip to Heaven (1994)
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Apparently not content to release one lousy album, Love and Rockets waited five years to release their Dance Album™, which is their unqualified low point. This might have been really impressive in 1990 or '91 (and if the world's population had simultaneously suffered ear trauma that affected their auditory judgment), but in 1994 it sounded like a band struggling to remain relevant. Their dance excursions on previous albums had managed to stay true to their dominant sound; here, the guitars disappear in favor of meandering ambient passages and aimless beats. 14-minute opener "Body and Soul" is a stultifying journey into the heart of boredom itself, and for the first time, the indifferent vocals seem due more to the quality of the music than the persona of the singer. Love and Rockets now sound like a band that has lost its way. Grade: C-

Sweet F.A. (1996)
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Returning to the guitars of their earlier albums was a good choice, but Sweet F.A. doesn't quite make up for lost time. That said, I really like this album. "Judgment Day" and "Sad and Beautiful World," while produced with more clarity and less haze than their previous albums, would still work well on Express or Earth Sun Moon, and dance numbers like "Fever" and "Words of a Fool" don't seem as contrived as the songs on Hot Trip to Heaven. Even more interestingly, there are songs of real ferocity on here. "Use Me" starts sparingly over delicate guitars but later erupts into a hailstorm of distortion and feedback. It's an exciting sound that the band should explore further. It would be inaccurate to say this is a return to form, and after the last two albums I might be faulted for being overly optimistic, but Sweet F.A. undoes some of the damage of the last six years. Grade: B

Lift (1998)
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It was all for nought, apparently. Lift now tries to have the best of both worlds, alternating between uptempo dance songs and guitar-based tunes reminiscent of previous work. The only problem is that they no longer do either world with any fluency. The dance songs sound anemic and uncomfortable, and the guitar songs sound like other guitar songs they did better ten years ago. It's not an outright failure; "Holy Fool" is the fun sound of this usually dour band attempting to get funky, and "Delicious Ocean" sounds like it could have been an outtake from Express. But the problem is that all these songs only serve to remind the listener to go back and listen to their good albums, and that can't be seen as anything but a problem. It's unfortunate that their final studio album can't reclaim some of their past glory. Grade: C

Here are two mixes. 1985-1987 chronicles their good years. 1989-1998 chronicles everything else. Click the title to download.

Love and Rockets, 1985-1987 (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=N5JGSAHP)
1. A Private Future
2. Dog-End of a Day Gone By
3. Haunted When the Minutes Drag
4. Kundalini Express
5. All in My Mind
6. Yin and Yang (The Flowerpot Man)
7. Mirror People
8. No New Tale to Tell
9. Earth, Sun Moon

Love and Rockets, 1989-1998 (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=LP8YAK6J)
1. **** (Jungle Law)
2. So Alive
3. Rock and Roll Babylon
4. Ugly
5. Judgment Day
6. Here Come the Comedown
7. Sad and Beautiful World
8. Holy Fool
9. Delicious Ocean

Cheddar's Cousin
03-13-2008, 09:52 AM
The band's third album doesn't exactly explore any new territory, but you wouldn't ask The Ramones to incorporate a string quartet, would you?


Phil Spector would...Worst Ramones album ever(barring Acid Eaters). Shit! Now I have to do the Ramones discography.

thinnerair
03-13-2008, 09:54 AM
There is absolutely no reason to waste any time whatsoever even contemplating listening to anything by Metallica this side of And Justice For All. The Black album just sucked, and as for the rest of it, We get it James, you can't sing. Why don't you get it. Get back to screaming so we can all appreciate you again. And Lars, Get over yourself. Also, you forgot Metallicas lowest point to date...S&M. If you want my opinion, I'd delete it. True fans will get that one.

Also, Am I evil first appeared on the Creeping Death EP.
Megadeth discography coming soon...

S&M wasnt there lowest point. Re-Load was easily their lowest.
S&M was them trying to do something interesting and not really succeeding.

The Black album isn't great but its certainly not the worst thing ever.

TomAz
03-13-2008, 09:57 AM
Phil Spector would...Worst Ramones album ever(barring Acid Eaters). Shit! Now I have to do the Ramones discography.

that would be good. Here's a start: The first 4 albums are great. End of the Century sucked. Everything after that is irrelevant.

amyzzz
03-13-2008, 10:18 AM
That's actually them trying to sing Beethoven.
Amy,are you actually saying that you've only recently heard "I'm So Tired"?
Listen to it 300 more times,until it becomes part of your existence. Just like the rest of The White Album.
One of the lower voices in the harmony of "Because" is flat, and it pisses me off. The rest of the voices are lovely. Tom and I have had a long-standing argument over The Beatles, and he finally won once I got addicted to the movie Across the Universe. My argument was I'm sick of Beatles songs because I've heard them all my life in doctors' offices, radio, etc, wherever. And there are a few songs which sound nostalgically cheesy soft rock doctor's office 70's music. I think most of those are Paul's songs or songs sung by Paul.

Has anyone ever noticed that Billy Joel sounds a lot like Paul McCartney? (in a not good way).

Anyway, I'm getting into a lot of the other songs. I like the 3 short, bouncy songs on Abbey Road that all run together starting with "Mean Mr. Mustard." Fun stuff.

canexplain
03-13-2008, 10:26 AM
love and rockets was one of my fav groups during when they were the thing .... then one night i went to a L&R show downtown ... came home early and found my ex with someone .. i hated L&R for the longest time ... now i like them again ... such is life x****

roberto73
03-13-2008, 12:08 PM
love and rockets was one of my fav groups during when they were the thing .... then one night i went to a L&R show downtown ... came home early and found my ex with someone .. i hated L&R for the longest time ... now i like them again ... such is life x****

I'm glad I could take you on a trip down memory lane, but I'm sorry those memories sucked.

mountmccabe
03-13-2008, 12:19 PM
Great work as always on the Love & Rockets, Roberto. I don't know their entire catalog but you are spot on for the ones I do know (1985, 1989, 1998, for the record.)

PassiveTheory
03-13-2008, 12:22 PM
Has anyone done Goldfrapp? I volunteer myself if this isn't the case.

bballarl
03-13-2008, 12:25 PM
I disagree with you assessments of the first and self-titled records. I like Seventh Dream... but it has the tendency to be boring. Self-titled is not as good as the two records that preceded it, but it is their best glam record. I haven't listened to anything beyond that.

roberto73
03-13-2008, 12:53 PM
Great work as always on the Love & Rockets, Roberto. I don't know their entire catalog but you are spot on for the ones I do know (1985, 1989, 1998, for the record.)

Thanks, John. If you like their debut (and are planning on seeing them at Coachella), you should check out Express and Earth Sun Moon. They'll be sure to play some songs from them.


I disagree with you assessments of the first and self-titled records. I like Seventh Dream... but it has the tendency to be boring. Self-titled is not as good as the two records that preceded it, but it is their best glam record. I haven't listened to anything beyond that.

I'll have to respectfully disagree, Andrew. I think Seventh Dream of Teenage Heaven is their most varied album. It's got the instrumentals that bookend the album, the spooky singsong of "The Game," the weird funk of "Inside the Outside" and the sprawling title track. All that, plus the three songs I included on the first mix, which are three delightfully weird pop songs. The later albums get more predictable, and more boring.

Their self-titled album is undeniably glam, but this is actually where the boredom sets in for me. Their quiet songs (almost half the album) don't really go anywhere or do anything – they seem more like sketches than full-bodied songs. And the uptempo songs are all distorted guitar and affected bravado; they sound like caricatures of themselves. I do like some of the songs on this album, but too many of them fall flat for me.

bballarl
03-13-2008, 01:04 PM
Part of my problem with Seventh Dream is it is their most 80s sounding album. I mean that in terms of production values, etc. I think I might dig it more if it were more immediate. Certainly the songs and ideas are good, but it wasn't often I was drawn in.

I have a thing for in-your-face guitars and posturing, so I think that is why I dig Love and Rockets. And I like the contrasts between the softer and heavier songs. I have a thing for feel with albums, and I like that feel.

At least we can agree that Express and Earth Sun Moon are their finest. Because both those records are fantastic. Hopefully they will focus on their first four albums at Coachella.

Cheddar's Cousin
03-13-2008, 03:52 PM
Following a most inauspicious departure from Metallica, the band he helped create with James Hetfield, Dave Mustaine, soaked in alcohol and rage set out to form the world’s state of the art speed metal band. His success was made apparent to the world on the day that Killing Is My Business…And Business Is Good was released.

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/kimb_usa_lp.jpg
1985 Was the year that Dave and his new band mates thanked Metallica “…for proving that the true blood of metal runs through our veins.” and gave us all the gold standard of thrash. From the piano intro of Last Rites/Loved to Deth, to the last gut wrenchig growl of the tongue securely in cheek rendition of These Boots, Killing…is a nonstop assault on the ears and mind of the most pleasant persuasion. This is straight up hardcore rock with no hint of any gimmicks. My only complaint is that the brutality doesn’t last long enough. It is difficult to pick any standouts from this list of metal gems, but Chosen Ones is among my favorites. Also, Mechanix is not to be missed. This is the way The Four Horsemen would have sounded had Lars not been such a whiney bitch. Search for the original mix, as the remastered version from 2002 has the alternate lyrics on These Boots bleeped out. This album is not for the faint of heart.

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/PEACE.jpg
1986 brought us the epic sophomore release Peace Sells…But Who’s Buying? This is quite possibly one of the best thrash albums ever produced. I say produced, because the raw sound from the first album is preserved yet refined. The mix is cleaner, the notes clearer, still the teeth remain. Another notable change is in the liner notes. This time, the band thanks their hair dressers. Dave snarls his way through the opener, Wake Up Dead, and stays with it all the way through My Last Words, a wonderful little ditty about Russian Roulette. In between are songs about witch craft, satanic cults, and politics. The cover this time is a rocking version of I Ain’t Superstitious. This is an ideal jumping off point for anyone considering giving Megadeth a whirl.


http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/SFSGSW.jpg
By the time 1988’s So Far, So Good…So What? was released original drummer Gar Samuelson, and Guitarist Chris Poland had been fired. Chuck Behler and Jeff Young stepped in to replace them, and did a less-than-stellar job. Dave had gone through, or perhaps was still in another of many low points in his life. The effects of drug abuse and alcohol are evident in this offering. His song crafting is still fierce, but the edge is starting to dull. Into The Lungs Of Hell starts the album off with a bang, but by the end, you are left wanting more. The two stand outs are Anarchy In The U.K. (which I saw them do live at the Santa Monica Civic Center), and In My Darkest Hour (a tribute to his dear friend Cliff Burton). By the end of touring for this album, Both Chuck and Jeff were fired.

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/RIP.jpg
1990 saw the release of Rust in Peace, and the deth of the ellipsis. This time around, the two Daves were joined by Nick Menza on drums, and Marty Friedman on guitar. While Menza was a welcome addition following Behler, Gar’s original beats were still missed. Friedman brought his own sound and style to Megadeth. The influence is well noted, and compliments Dave’s signature intricate riffing. Dave gave more of the solos to Marty. The sound was more progressive. Critics raved, while the core fan base longed for the mid 80’s Deth. This album served as Megadeth’s Black Album. It was their biggest exposure yet, debuting at 23 on the Billboard charts. It also received a Grammy nomination. There are some very good tunes on this album including Holy Wars…The Punishment Due(they got one in), Five Magics and Lucretia. There are also some very bad ones. Hanger 18(the single) and Dawn Patrol are among the worst. Casual metal fans might find Rust In Peace worth a listen.


http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/CTE.jpg
The lineup stays intact and releases Countdown To Extinction in 1992. This time to wider acclaim. This one reached #2 on the charts, and was also nominated for a Grammy. It seemed purposefully written to garner the attention of radio listeners and television watchers. The songs were more formulaic, lacking both the raw power of the originals, and the progressiveness of the late model Megaadeth. While pleasing to the masses, this effort was a disappointment. While Sweating Bullets and High Speed Dirt have some novelty appeal, the rest of this album is pure mainstream crap.

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/YOUTH.jpg
Youthanasia continued both Megadeth’s rise to the top of the charts, and fall to the depths of radio friendly crap metal. While Mustain’s cutting wit remained sharp, his blood curdling delivery was all but gone. Even the titles of the songs became sad and pretentious. There is really nothing more to say about this effort. Stay away!

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/HT.jpg
Hidden treasures, a collection of previously released tracks came out in 1995. Try as it might, it could not stop the bleeding. There are some very good covers on here. No More Mr. Nice Guy, Paranoid and Problems are done very well in the style of Megadeth. There are also a few Megadeth originals from movie sound tracks that are worth a listen. If you like anything about any of the full length releases, you will enjoy this one.

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/CW.jpg Once again nominated for a Grammy in 1997, Cryptic Writings was a critical success. The melodic (read boring) mix helped the album debut at #10. This one was directed straight at the heart of the radio listener. In fact, you can still hear Almost Honest played on the airwaves today. She Wolf shows up on some live recordings, but the rest is forgettable.

http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m260/robdowning/Megadeth/RISK_re.jpg
Just when you thought it couldn’t get any worse, Dave decided to release Risk without the slightest bit of irony. Debuting at #16, this album would fit nicely next to your dad’s Cheap Trick albums. There is nothing else worth mentioning here. Drivel.

Actually, there is nothing else worth mentioning past this point. What comes after are a couple of lack luster studio albums, a couple of live albums, and a pile of shitty “greatest hits” compilations. That makes me vary sad. Dave Mustain was a high school hero of mine. I wanted nothing more than to see him rise up and kick the shit out of Metallica. Instead, I got to see him open for the bastards, and then watch him cry about getting kicked out in Some Kind Of Monster. Definitely not the way he should be remembered. Back To The Start was released in 2005, and includes the best sampling across the range of Megadeth’s catalogue.

Cheddar's Cousin
03-13-2008, 03:53 PM
that would be good. Here's a start: The first 4 albums are great. End of the Century sucked. Everything after that is irrelevant.

Not true. I will prove it.

roberto73
03-13-2008, 04:47 PM
I have a thing for in-your-face guitars and posturing, so I think that is why I dig Love and Rockets. And I like the contrasts between the softer and heavier songs. I have a thing for feel with albums, and I like that feel.

I think you'd really like Sweet F.A., then. It's the loudest of their albums, and has, I think, some of their most effective rock/dance/ballad hybrids. Some of the songs are even more distortion-heavy than the ones on their self-titled album. Stuck between their two worst albums in their most irrelevant decade, I think Sweet F.A. gets a bum rap it doesn't really deserve.

bballarl
03-13-2008, 06:05 PM
Rad, I'll listen to it.

breakjaw
03-14-2008, 01:33 AM
Good job on the Love and Rockets and Megadeth run-downs!
Thanks for including the mixes for L & R and thanks especially for NOT including one with Megadeth.
(I still like Peace Sells...though.Guilty pleasure.)

TomAz
03-14-2008, 07:13 AM
I think you'd really like Sweet F.A., then. It's the loudest of their albums, and has, I think, some of their most effective rock/dance/ballad hybrids. Some of the songs are even more distortion-heavy than the ones on their self-titled album. Stuck between their two worst albums in their most irrelevant decade, I think Sweet F.A. gets a bum rap it doesn't really deserve.

Is that the one with 'Ballroom Blitz' on it??

roberto73
03-14-2008, 07:44 AM
No, but I've got all their albums and as far as I can tell, none of them have a song called "Ballroom Blitz." Any chance you've got the wrong band?

bballarl
03-14-2008, 10:03 AM
I think Tom might have been making a joke.

superdeluxe
03-14-2008, 10:20 AM
I want a Smashing Pumpkins run down plz.

Cheddar's Cousin
03-14-2008, 12:08 PM
No, but I've got all their albums and as far as I can tell, none of them have a song called "Ballroom Blitz." Any chance you've got the wrong band?

Sweet!

roberto73
03-14-2008, 01:51 PM
I think Tom might have been making a joke.

I think I should have realized that. But that's what I get for posting before fully awake.

Courtney
03-14-2008, 01:58 PM
Oh WIN. Thank you for doing the write-up on Love and Rockets, Rob. I'm not terribly familiar with them so this is helpful.

bballarl
03-14-2008, 02:13 PM
I'll do Smashing Pumpkins. Later today, though.

superdeluxe
03-15-2008, 12:49 AM
I'll do Smashing Pumpkins. Later today, though.

Cool thanks!

superdeluxe
04-09-2008, 07:24 AM
Bump :D

amyzzz
04-09-2008, 02:49 PM
do we have one for Prince yet?

PassiveTheory
04-09-2008, 02:55 PM
We need one for Prince.

NEED.

Tylerdurden31
04-09-2008, 03:19 PM
We need one for Prince.

NEED.

so you love Prince now? Man...what would've happened if NKOTB headlined

PassiveTheory
04-09-2008, 03:25 PM
OH OH OHHHOHHHOHHH

Sonicifyouwantit
04-09-2008, 07:23 PM
I've been considering this thread for sometime now, and I imagine I'm not the only one who'd be interested. So, there are a lot of artists whos names are thrown around on this message board, many of which sound like they have an extensive catalog of music to choose from. Stuff like David Bowie, Tom Waits, and even R.E.M. I'm not as well aquainted with as I'd like to be. I guess what I'm looking for is suggestions on what albums/recordings to pick up from some of these artists and any other artist that has released a lot of music. It sucks when you accidently buy the one crap album the artist made and wind up writting them off.

OK, so I'm thinking the only criteria is that the artist has to have released at least 5 albums; that does not rule out more recent acts, like Radiohead. Also, I'd say be as obscure as your music collection is...if you have five albums from some backwoods washbin player that you absolutely love and has been out of print for 10 years, please feel free to bring your pretentious music collection to our attention. I appreciate any help and hope this thread can be a reference to others, especially when it comes to checking out this years bands that have a lot to choose from.

I'll start with an obvious one:
Radiohead
I would start with either OK Computer or Hail to the Thief to have a mildly representative (though not holistic) concept of their sound. From there, I would pick up KID A, which is my favorite. If you like those first two, the others will probably suit your fancy.

buy a music hound essential albums guide

greghead
04-09-2008, 07:33 PM
We need one for Prince.

NEED.

I like how everyone on this board (suddenly) "loves" Prince, yet they are clueless about his music.



Hipsters, maybe?


EDIT: Obviously his 80s albums are key, but since 2004 he has released fantastic albums, Musicology, 3121, and Planet Earth. I recommend starting here. His 80s albums, once again, are vital, but these recent albums show where the man is now, and where he's (possibly) heading

clecirclecir@juno.com
04-09-2008, 07:39 PM
So i didn't read this whole thread, apologies if someone else already did the:

-Super Furry Animals-
just in the order I currently like

-Rings Around the World
-Outspaced
-Phantom Power
-Guerilla
-Radiator
-Mwng
-Fuzzy Logic
-Hey Venus
-Love Kraft

They would rock Coachella in their Golden Retriever outfits, have they played it before...i don't remember ever seeing them (on past lineups)

amyzzz
04-10-2008, 05:56 AM
I like how everyone on this board (suddenly) "loves" Prince, yet they are clueless about his music.



Hipsters, maybe?


EDIT: Obviously his 80s albums are key, but since 2004 he has released fantastic albums, Musicology, 3121, and Planet Earth. I recommend starting here. His 80s albums, once again, are vital, but these recent albums show where the man is now, and where he's (possibly) heading
Prince is not my usual style of music, and I never really bought Prince abums, However, I grew up on Prince hits in the 80's, and I do really like those songs. Also, that super bowl performance was amazing.

greghead
04-10-2008, 11:53 AM
Prince is not my usual style of music, and I never really bought Prince abums, However, I grew up on Prince hits in the 80's, and I do really like those songs. Also, that super bowl performance was amazing.

Amy, you're good shit, I was more referring to Passive.

Have you seen the clip from the George Harrison's Induction to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Prince, Tom Petty, Jeff Lynne, and Dani Harrison played "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". Prince laid down a solo that would give Clapton a run for his money, and when the song was over he simply tossed his guitar and walked off. Fucking brilliant.

hawkingvsreeve
04-10-2008, 12:39 PM
Yeah that video is ridiculous.

Oh look. Here it is.

D7sT1HRV2qU

amyzzz
04-10-2008, 01:01 PM
thank you, brandon.

apachedino
04-10-2008, 01:24 PM
Probable get shit for this one, but it was the first band I really fell in love with, back in around 5th grade and I still love their old stuff

311

MUSIC is by far the best album and the first major label release, yet one of the least trendy, from there they pretty much decline in quality chronological order.

MUSIC>Grassroots>311 (selftitle)>Transistor>Soundsystem>From Chaos>Evolver.......don't even bother with Don't Tread on Me

If you really like the first four check out Unity, Dammit and Hydroponic. All early releases, Unity being the best with some songs that have later been radically redone
Ex. "Do You Right"
My personal favorite song ever. The MUSIC version, not Unity.
Their Live album is not bad either, they are really good live even though they haven't really changed their overall show much ever. But their is always a song I haven't heard live before.

PassiveTheory
04-10-2008, 01:57 PM
I like how everyone on this board (suddenly) "loves" Prince, yet they are clueless about his music.



Hipsters, maybe?

There is no way to win, lol.

Seriously, dude, this is some exciting shit. Prince is an amazingly talented artist, he always surrounds himself with the best artists, the Super Bowl performance 2 years ago was more epic than anything before or ever after (poor Tom Petty), and you think I'm going to be a jaded asshole and say that his addition is more harmful to the festival than good JUST because I'm clueless about his music?

What the fuck do you want? Unwarranted, ignorant dismissal, or believing the hype. It's Prince, he's just going to become more amazing as I discover his music.

Can't catch a goddamn break.

TomAz
04-10-2008, 02:07 PM
I've been busy.

I just now, 2:06 pm., realized Prince has been added.

holy shit. this is awesome.

Young blood
04-10-2008, 02:10 PM
I've been busy.

I just now, 2:06 pm., realized Prince has been added.

holy shit. this is awesome.

hi tom.

TomAz
04-10-2008, 02:16 PM
I ordered my Coachella ticket at 2:10 pm.

bmack86
04-10-2008, 02:36 PM
Lord, can you hear me when I call?

amyzzz
04-10-2008, 02:37 PM
Is this the thread that tipped you off, Tom?

TomAz
04-10-2008, 02:43 PM
well it finally dawned on me. "Hmm, why are all these people talking about Prince all of a sudden?"

Like I said. I been busy.

mountmccabe
04-10-2008, 06:03 PM
There is no way to win, lol.

...

What the fuck do you want? Unwarranted, ignorant dismissal, or believing the hype. It's Prince, he's just going to become more amazing as I discover his music.

Can't catch a goddamn break.

There's more than just the extremes, Lee.

mountmccabe
04-10-2008, 06:04 PM
I've been busy.

I just now, 2:06 pm., realized Prince has been added.

holy shit. this is awesome.


I ordered my Coachella ticket at 2:10 pm.


well it finally dawned on me. "Hmm, why are all these people talking about Prince all of a sudden?"

Like I said. I been busy.

I say goddamn this is a great set of posts.

amyzzz
04-10-2008, 06:23 PM
I like how it took Tom 4 minutes to decide to go after he found out about Prince.

PassiveTheory
04-10-2008, 06:29 PM
There's more than just the extremes, Lee.

But ambivalence, in this case, is pretty much equitable with ignorance, John...

Why can't I just be loved!>?!?!?!!?!?...

mountmccabe
04-10-2008, 09:52 PM
But ambivalence, in this case, is pretty much equitable with ignorance, John...

So?

The ignorance is there; that's the basic starting point. You're not going to hide ignorance by becoming an instant fanboy unless you're surrounded by people who are just as ignorant (so that won't work around here.)

You're ignorant. That's OK. It's just a thing. What we're talking about is what to do about that. And, more importantly, what to not do.

What people are attacking is not ignorance but willful ignorance and/or willful disregarding of ignorance. What is being attacked is self-denial about ignorance; that is acting in a forceful, brash and (worse) condescending matter from ignorance.

You don't have to immediately pick between swearing allegiance to Prince and hating him and his fans. You can be happy about his addition, have fun playing with Prince avatars, look into hearing more of his music... but don't go pretending to know what the fuck you're talking about when you don't.

You're talking about going in and listening to his music... that's exactly the response one should have to ignorance; working to change from the state of ignorance.

It's OK to say "I am not familiar with Prince but this opportunity to see him presents a great motivation for me to listen to more. What albums might you recommend?" or "I don't know" or, even better, just say nothing.

mountmccabe
04-10-2008, 10:13 PM
Also I have been listening 1991's White Light From the Mouth of Infinity by Swans and it is so wonderful. I mean, some of the wonderful is just how fucking good these songs are but also I was befuddled by trying to connect early Swans (to wit Cop and Filth) with the Angels of Light. It just didn't fit.

But "Song for the Sun" is playing right now and wow, I can see Gira going from this to the Angels of Light. I love it when that happens, when something makes sense. I'm not looking for boring, just comprehensible.

roberto73
04-10-2008, 10:30 PM
Also I have been listening 1991's White Light From the Mouth of Infinity by Swans and it is so wonderful. I mean, some of the wonderful is just how fucking good these songs are but also I was befuddled by trying to connect early Swans (to wit Cop and Filth) with the Angels of Light. It just didn't fit.

But "Song for the Sun" is playing right now and wow, I can see Gira going from this to the Angels of Light. I love it when that happens, when something makes sense. I'm not looking for boring, just comprehensible.

The Burning World is the one that does it for me, John. Gira's work would be a welcome addition to this thread. Maybe after Coachella, and once I've done a write-up for Marillion.

mountmccabe
04-10-2008, 10:50 PM
I don't know that album, Roberto. And I'd certainly like to hear your thoughts on his output. I know a total of 6 albums; 4 Swans and 2 from the Angels of Light.

Also I mostly posted that bit in this thread because I figured you'd see it here.

Also I am interested in hearing your take on Marillion. And I'm considering pulling a Greg (or is it a Tom?) and sniping you on that. But I probably won't. I think I still owe the board a Stars. And a Mountain Goats. And various others, if ya wanna get technical about it.

anti-square
04-10-2008, 10:51 PM
I like how it took Tom 4 minutes to decide to go after he found out about Prince.

Tom during those 4 minutes
QG0yEu6UUBE

breakjaw
04-11-2008, 02:55 AM
I got super-excited when I heard Prince was going to do a set of only covers of Neutral Milk Hotel,My Bloody Valentine,and Boards Of Canada songs.

greghead
04-11-2008, 07:11 PM
There is no way to win, lol.

Seriously, dude, this is some exciting shit. Prince is an amazingly talented artist, he always surrounds himself with the best artists, the Super Bowl performance 2 years ago was more epic than anything before or ever after (poor Tom Petty), and you think I'm going to be a jaded asshole and say that his addition is more harmful to the festival than good JUST because I'm clueless about his music?

What the fuck do you want? Unwarranted, ignorant dismissal, or believing the hype. It's Prince, he's just going to become more amazing as I discover his music.
Can't catch a goddamn break.

If you aren't familiar with his music, why are you all over the board posting about how awesome he is? I know it's fun to be in the cool crowd, but maybe you should spend more time listening to his albums than posting about how he is going to melt your brain or shred your face or whatever it is you people say to describe a good set.

bmack86
04-11-2008, 07:27 PM
I was in the cool crowd once. It was the best two hours of my life.

bballarl
04-11-2008, 07:31 PM
You are still in the cool crowd Bryan. Even without your mustache.

PassiveTheory
04-11-2008, 07:38 PM
If you aren't familiar with his music, why are you all over the board posting about how awesome he is? I know it's fun to be in the cool crowd, but maybe you should spend more time listening to his albums than posting about how he is going to melt your brain or shred your face or whatever it is you people say to describe a good set.

I haven't once posted that Prince is going to melt my brain or shred my face... I'm just really excited because the guy is KNOWN for putting on fantastic fucking live shows. If his show is even a SLIVER of a FRACTION of the Super Bowl performance a few years back, then I will be more than satisfied, especially because I will have the opportunity to witness it live.

And about being in the cool crowd... Please. I piss on the White Stripes and Kanye West all the time. And used to about Radiohead. Cool crowd, fuck that shit.

PassiveTheory
04-11-2008, 07:43 PM
So?

The ignorance is there; that's the basic starting point. You're not going to hide ignorance by becoming an instant fanboy unless you're surrounded by people who are just as ignorant (so that won't work around here.)

You're ignorant. That's OK. It's just a thing. What we're talking about is what to do about that. And, more importantly, what to not do.

What people are attacking is not ignorance but willful ignorance and/or willful disregarding of ignorance. What is being attacked is self-denial about ignorance; that is acting in a forceful, brash and (worse) condescending matter from ignorance.

You don't have to immediately pick between swearing allegiance to Prince and hating him and his fans. You can be happy about his addition, have fun playing with Prince avatars, look into hearing more of his music... but don't go pretending to know what the fuck you're talking about when you don't.

You're talking about going in and listening to his music... that's exactly the response one should have to ignorance; working to change from the state of ignorance.

It's OK to say "I am not familiar with Prince but this opportunity to see him presents a great motivation for me to listen to more. What albums might you recommend?" or "I don't know" or, even better, just say nothing.

I'm happy about Prince's addition, and what I initially said was supposed to be somewhat comedic, but that was clearly missed.

So, now that that's cleared up, I ask you:

What albums would you all recommend to listen to? Is there a greatest hits that's sufficient?

bballarl
04-11-2008, 07:45 PM
There is another thread about this, but:

1999

Purple Rain

Around the World in a Day

Sign O' the Times

PassiveTheory
04-11-2008, 07:48 PM
Oh Adam, you'll be pleased to hear I got around to getting a Spaceman 3 album today... the (or one of the) live one.

bballarl
04-11-2008, 07:49 PM
I'm Andrew. Nice to meet you

And which one?

PassiveTheory
04-11-2008, 07:52 PM
I mix up everybody's name... Sorry.

Performance: Live at the Melkweg 6/2/88

bballarl
04-11-2008, 07:53 PM
That is a good one.

PassiveTheory
04-11-2008, 07:59 PM
Yeah, now that I've completed my Spiritualized collection, I want to get on owning all of Spacemen 3.

bballarl
04-11-2008, 08:01 PM
They have a lot of stuff. But it is worth seeking out.

bmack86
04-11-2008, 08:13 PM
I was listening to Playing With Fire yesterday, and that album is golden.

And, check out Dirty Mind by Prince. Its my fave of his.

SoulDischarge
04-13-2008, 03:07 AM
Boredoms:

Soul Discharge-They make good on the interesting noises from Onanie. The playful, lets-do-whatever-the-fuck-we-can-to-make-a-racket atmosphere is still here, but the songs are more palatable this time around. It's still willfully abrasive, and not for the faint of heart. Grade:B


I only get a B???? Rip. Off.

hawkingvsreeve
04-13-2008, 11:11 AM
I'll do Smashing Pumpkins. Later today, though.

Ok. It's been almost a month. I'm taking this one from ya.

bballarl
04-13-2008, 01:18 PM
Yeah I forgot I said I would do that. I'll chime in after you do it.

hawkingvsreeve
04-13-2008, 02:03 PM
You'll chime in to agree with me.

bballarl
04-13-2008, 02:47 PM
Possibly.

hawkingvsreeve
04-14-2008, 02:02 PM
http://umsis.miami.edu/~amino/SmashingPumpkins.jpg

The Smashing Pumpkins

A (selected) discography in chronological order:



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7f/SmashingPumpkins-Gish.jpg
Gish (1991)

An extremely stong debut record, Gish sets the tone for a lot of what makes up the Smashing Pumpkins sound, and isn't a bad place to start if you are looking to get into the band. Guitar / riff heavy rock is pretty much the name of the game here, with a couple of acoustic tunes thrown in for good measure. Album highlights are "I Am One," "Bury Me" and "Tristessa." A lot of their records sound dated if you go back and listen to them now, so I think it is a bit harder to get into them now if you weren't into them or this kind of music while they were at the apex of their career, but compared to a lot of other music that came out in the 90s, the late 90s especially, I think the Pumpkins hold up well. Gish is no exception, even though it came out a lot earlier in the decade.

8/10



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5d/SmashingPumpkins-Lull.jpg
Lull (1991)

Lull is an EP with a few tracks that didn't make it onto Gish, one of which appears later on Pisces Iscariot. As an EP it's pretty good, but there really isn't a need to seek it out unless you are a big fan.

7/10



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/44/SmashingPumpkins-SiameseDream.jpg
Siamese Dream (1993)

Although this isn't my favorite Pumpkins record, I would start new listeners with this one. It's the album that really broke this band into the mainstream rock scene of the 90's and it's got a lot of the obvious hits ("Today," "Cherub Rock" and "Disarm"), but also some really great tracks that don't really get a lot of play. "Mayonaise" and "Sweet Sweet" are two of my favorite tracks by the band, and "Silverfuck" showcases what the Pumpkins do best. Huge fucking rock songs. There are plenty of other tracks that I'm not mentioning here that are great, and really the album is good from start to finish. If you haven't heard the band or just know them casually and want a place to start, this is it.

9/10



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fd/SmashingPumpkins-PiscesIscariot.png
Pisces Iscariot (1994)

This is a collection of B-Sides and other unreleased material from the Gish / Siamese Dream time period. As such, there are some pretty strong tracks on here, most notably "Frail and Bedazzled," "Whir" and "Hello Kitty Kat." "Pissant" is pretty badass as well. I should mention their cover of the Fleetwood Mac song "Landslide" being that it was a big single for the Pumpkins, but truth be told, I never thought it was that great and always skip it if I am listening to the album. Pisces Iscariot isn't as easy to listen to anyway and probably gets the least amount of rotations from me. The reason for this is that it feels very uneven (which is to be expected being that it's more of a compilation disc rather than an actual record) and some of the songs are just kind of weak. There is material here worth checking out though. Come back to it after Adore. I will list the order I would recommend listening to the albums in below.

6/10



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/Smashing_Pumpkins_-_Mellon_Collie_And_The_Infinite_Sadness.jpg
Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness (1995)

This is the Pumpkins finest work. At least, to me. A lot of people will contend that Siamese Dream is the strongest record they have released and that it is unfair to compare Mellon Collie to it being that Mellon Collie is two discs. Right. Well, these people are cry baby pussies. Siamese Dream is a fantastic record. Absolutely great. But as far as touching the scope and depth that this record has, it falls short. I must be fair and say that I am a bit biased, being that this is the record that got me into the band initially. I didn't know much of the earlier work other than the song "Today," and I remember being at home watching MTV when the video for "Bullet With Butterfly Wings" came on, and just being like: "Fuck." Then they released "Tonight, Tonight" and I finally realized I was missing out on something. I ended up having to buy a second copy of the album because my first one got beat up from listening to it over and over and over. Besides the 5 singles ("Bullet With Butterfly Wings," "1979," "Zero," "Tonight, Tonight" and "Thirty-Three"), Mellon Collie really shows just how varied the Pumpkins' (read: Billy's) songwriting was. I wouldn't say that I prefer one disc over the other, but they do differ in feel, with the first disc being a bit more driving and the second containing more of the calmer tracks, especially for the close of the album. As far as singles go, I think that even with the popularity of "Bullet..." and the recognizability of "1979," "Thirty-Three" is the strongest of the group, even if it doesn't immediately fall into the Pumpkins' guitar arena-rock paradigm. In another 10 or 15 years though, I think it will have been the single to age the most gracefully. Other album highlights (I really do recommend the entire album here though) include "Muzzle," "Porcelina of the Vast Oceans," "Where Boys Fear To Tread" (Fun fact: This song contains a sample of the rocket launcher from the PC game "Doom") and "Thru the Eyes of Ruby." The only thing I am not terribly crazy about, and that I haven't really mentioned vis a vis their other records is production. As much as I love this album, I feel like it is very muddy and a lot is lost due to that. The songs are still ace though.

10/10



http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/02/ciu/2f/3e/142bf96642a02d6105b36110._AA240_.L.jpg
The Aeroplane Flies High (1996)

Originally 57 songs were recorded for Mellon Collie, with only 28 making it to the album. The rest were released as a 5 disc box set, known as The Aeroplane Flies High. Each disc is a single from Mellon Collie, with tracks that loosely accompany them. There is a lot of material to listen to here, so I wont really go too in depth, but some obvious highlights that appear on later releases include "Set the Ray to Jerry," (Probably my favorite song by the band) "Aeroplane Flies High (Turns Left, Looks Right)," "God," "Ugly" and "My Blue Heaven." Because this is more of a collectors item for fans I would say to come back to this at a later time, after sampling the albums.

8/10



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b4/SmashingPumpkins-Adore.jpg
Adore (1998)

So a lot of shit happened on the Mellon Collie tour. A touring keyboardist died, Jimmy ODed and was later kicked out of the band, Billy's mom died and Billy got a divorce. Fuck. With Jimmy out of the band, the Pumpkins changed up their sound quite a bit, going a more electronic / acoustic route, and released Adore. A lot of long time fans were confused with Adore, being that it was such a radical sonic change for the band, and wrote it and the subsequent album (Machina/ The Machines Of God) off saying that the band had died or sucked, etc. etc. Well. That is wrong. Adore is an excellent album. It's just different. Like with Mellon Collie, I think that the scope of the songwriting abilities are showcased nicely here, especially with tracks like "Tear" and "Pug," and also on the singles "Ava Adore" and "Perfect." Jimmy's drumming is definitely missed here, but I really don't hear him playing on these songs. It just wouldn't fit I don't think, and even though some fans (and even Billy) will try to down play Adore, it has songs that still get played on tour.

9/10



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/a7/The_smashing_pumpkins_machina_cover.jpg
Machina / The Machines of God (2000)

If Adore tested the patience of the fans wanting the Pumpkins' big arena rock sound, Machina was the nail in the coffin to losing them as fans. A lot of fans felt this album was over produced and that it was just too pop sounding. While the record definitely leans toward being more pop oriented, I really like the production. Besides Adore, this is the only record that doesn't sound like it's being dragged through the mud. I feel like song quality is pretty high as well, even if they aren't what you would come to expect from the band. The album as a whole feels a bit more focused, probably because it is very concept heavy, along with Machina II. The two albums were originally intended to be packaged as a double album like Mellon Collie, but after poor sales from Adore, Virgin was reluctant to release the two together. As it turned out, Machina was the Pumpkins' worst selling album. But whatever. It's good, give it a listen. Just be sure to remember the context of where the band was at both musically and personally during this time period. I must be honest though and say that I am a huge Pumpkins apologist and will defend pretty much everything they have put out, with the exception of Zeitgeist and American Gothic. Also I should note that while Jimmy returned to the band for Machina, D'arcy left during the recording of the album.

7/10



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1b/Machina_ii.jpg
Machina II / The Friends and Enemies of Modern Music (2000)

Not widely known because it was never officially released, or printed rather, Machina II is the companion piece to Machina / The Machines of God. 25 copies were pressed to vinyl and handed out to friends as well as band members. Besides the album, there are 3 discs of B Sides from the recording sessions. As far as the record goes, it's pretty great. The first half is a sort of return to form, as the songs have a lo-fi feel to them as well as being pretty straight forward, driving rock songs. The second half sort of progresses along with their continually evolving sound over the course of their career. I think that is why I like this record quite a bit. It's like a sonic Smashing Pumpkins chronology with all new songs. Part of the reason for the lo-fi aesthetics of the first half is due to the the fact that the version that was released on the internet (which you can download along with the B Sides for free here (http://www.smashingpumpkins.com/audio_upload/audio/machinaii/)) is pulled from the vinyl, which was hand cut. Highlights from the record include "Dross," "Cash Car Star" and the would have been single "Let Me Give the World To You."

8/10



http://static.rateyourmusic.com/album_images/2435.jpg
Rotten Apples: The Smashing Pumpkins Greatest Hits (2001)

A collection of all of their singles. Well most of them anyway. If you are looking for a quick road to the hits, this is it.

N/A



http://smashingpumpkins.com.ar/misc/discos/j0.jpg
Judas 0 (2001)

Judas 0 came packaged with the limited edition of Rotten Apples, and is a disc of B-Sides and other unreleased material from Mellon Collie through Machina II. It is sort of the Pisces Iscariot of the later part of their career, and like Pisces it can be a little uneven, but generally it is still good.

7/10



http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00006LF56.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg
Earphoria (2002)

This is the soundtrack to Vieuphoria, which was released in 1994. It's mainly a collection of live performances from the Gish / Siamese Dream years of their career. It's not bad, but like Judas 0 or The Aeroplane Flies High, usually only big fans of the band get anything out of it.

6/10



http://pixhost.eu/avaxhome/avaxhome/2007-07-01/Zeitgeist_cover.jpg
Zeigeist (2007)

Meh. This record has some good tracks, but they are few and far between. I only bought this because I am a fan and it was 9.99. Essentialy the Pumpkins were always Billy and Jimmy, but I feel like this record is just different and doesn't feel like a proper Pumpkins album, even though it is the two of them doing everything. Even with the attempts at going back to their roots ("United States" feels like a modern day attempt at "Silverfuck"), it just fails to completely work. Also, production on this album is off. I'm not trying to say that I want them to make the same record over and over and that everything should sound the same, but Zeitgeist (to me) feels like more of a departure from their old sound than Adore was. Maybe it's just me.

5/10



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/87/SP_americangothic.jpg
American Gothic (2008)

A follow up EP to Zeitgeist. Sucks.

2/10



Odds and Ends:

Both from 1997:

The track "Eye" was released on the Lost Highway soundtrack.
The track "The End Is The Beginning Is The End" was released on the Batman and Robin soundtrack.



But Where Do I Start?

Siamese Dream
Gish
Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
Adore
Pisces Iscariot
Machina
Machina II
Zeitgeist

Or, if you would like to cheat, pick up Rotten Apples and call it a day.

PassiveTheory
04-14-2008, 02:14 PM
Again, like with Death Cab, I'm going to have to disagree with you a bit, Brandon.

I'm not going to get into an argument about whether Siamese Dream or Mellon Collie is better, but I still don't see how you can deny Siamese Dream a 10.

bballarl
04-14-2008, 02:37 PM
I am still not a huge Adore fan. I like the big guitars version of the Pumpkins. I thought American Gothic was unspectacular but not terrible...at least worthy of a 5. And Zeitgeist is not great by any stretch, but it rocks reasonably hard and reminded me of why I love the Pumpkins. I would give it a 6 or so.

bballarl
04-14-2008, 02:41 PM
Also, I agree with the criticism of Machina: it is waaay overproduced. Zeitgeist and American Gothic suffer from the same problem, although I dig those records a little more than Brandon.

PassiveTheory
04-14-2008, 02:43 PM
I'm with Andrew concerning Zeitgeist. Also, "That's The Way My Love Is" and "Doomsday Clock" are two stellar Pumpkins songs...

As for Adore... It does get shat on unnecessarily, so I think your score for it is fair, but I would have given it a 7.5. Jimmy's drums are more missed on that record, in my mind.

TomAz
04-14-2008, 02:46 PM
I have never heard an entire SP record.

hawkingvsreeve
04-14-2008, 02:50 PM
Again, like with Death Cab, I'm going to have to disagree with you a bit, Brandon.

I'm not going to get into an argument about whether Siamese Dream or Mellon Collie is better, but I still don't see how you can deny Siamese Dream a 10.

Spaceboy.

hawkingvsreeve
04-14-2008, 02:52 PM
I'm with Andrew concerning Zeitgeist. Also, "That's The Way My Love Is" and "Doomsday Clock" are two stellar Pumpkins songs...

They are good, but far from stellar. Vocal performance is pretty weak on Doomsday Clock. Don't let the big guitars fool you, Lee.

menikmati
04-14-2008, 03:31 PM
Good pumpkins round up Brandon and I pretty much agree with you on everything up until Adore. Has anyone done Nirvana yet? I haven't paid a lot of attention to this thread at all.

PassiveTheory
04-14-2008, 03:41 PM
You really think the vocal delivery on Doomsday Clock is poor?... I'll admit that the transition vocals aren't fierce and could use a Billy scream or two, but I kinda like how they segue into the guitar craziness.

Then again, you also said don't let the guitars fool me. I dunno, I was in a shitty place this summer and I'd blast that song a lot, so it resonates more with me right now. Probably won't in a while (not like the stuff off of MCatIS or Siamese Dream), but I can definitely see myself placing it alongside Adore.

I need to listen to Gish again, but man I do not remember it being that good...

Finally, I'll admit that Spaceboy is probably the weakest song on the record since I have NO FUCKING CLUE what the fuck the song's about... I still adore the instrumentation on that song... 9.5, maybe?

hawkingvsreeve
04-14-2008, 04:32 PM
Part of me scoring it a 9 is also to further illustrate how good I think Mellon Collie is. It nothing against Siamese Dream. Mellon Collie is just better.

thinnerair
04-14-2008, 04:40 PM
Gish is a fuckin' classic.
Siamese Dream is a classic.
Mellon Collie should have had been whittled down to one disc and it wouldve been a classic.

Machina 1 has some great songs.
The vocal production/layering on Zeitgeist is atrocious.

bballarl
04-14-2008, 05:20 PM
Mellon Collie is a classic. Part of the reason is because of its excesses. It is the best example of Billy's excessive, 70s rock star tendencies (very much a part of him) but with great songs.

PassiveTheory
04-14-2008, 06:22 PM
I agree. I almost WANT to argue that Siamese Dream is like MCatIS condensed into once CD... But it isn't.

And, for you Brandon, I'm cool with the 9 now that you've given me just cause.

shakermaker113
04-14-2008, 06:31 PM
I've not been in this thread before. can we make requests?

if someone can post a guide for Amon Tobin that would be appreciated.

PassiveTheory
04-14-2008, 06:33 PM
Yes you can make requests, and I'd take you up on Amon, but I've just recently gotten into his stuff. Hopefully someone else will take you up on it.

bballarl
04-14-2008, 06:43 PM
Part of me scoring it a 9 is also to further illustrate how good I think Mellon Collie is. It nothing against Siamese Dream. Mellon Collie is just better.

Brandon, you get a 9 in my book.

hawkingvsreeve
04-14-2008, 06:50 PM
A nine? All I muster is a nine?
Boo that's cold, I thought you was mine
I guess I shoulda known, cause I ain't into the gaze
Well good luck finding another man who got dick for days

bballarl
04-14-2008, 06:58 PM
Yo B that was whack
But I'm glad that you're back
We've gone months without battling
And you tried to attack

But you're toothless like Brokendoll
While my rhymes bite like Jaws
Oh, thats what I call your mother
Please, hold the applause

PassiveTheory
04-14-2008, 07:02 PM
Rebuttal?

hawkingvsreeve
04-14-2008, 07:22 PM
You've kept your game sharp, this much I can see
I'll break you into more singles than Radiohead
Someone call Supre-
Fan of my shit? Yeah, I know it's all ill
From my blade of a tongue your blood will be spilled

Emergency! Emergency! Ring up that 9-1-1
Get this kid on a stretcher, his rap days are done
What's that boy? You gotta speak up, you're spitting nothing but silence
Seriously, holy fuck guys. In twelve days we're all seeing Prince.

bballarl
04-14-2008, 07:27 PM
I am spending way too much time on the board. The excitement kicked in after I finished a large paper. A week from Thursday I will be in the desert. I can't wait.

denies the day
04-14-2008, 07:59 PM
I've not been in this thread before. can we make requests?

if someone can post a guide for Amon Tobin that would be appreciated.

Amon Tobin has always made fine quality drum n bass, downtempo breaks and glitchy trip hop. It's pretty foolish of me to even try to categorize his work.

His early works like Bricolage and Permutation have a lot of jazzy, atmospheric DnB and breaks. Check out "The Nasty", "Easy Muffin" and "People Like Frank".

Everything after that era finds him even more leftfield and slightly edgier. Supermodified has insane tracks from the very beginning. "Get Your Snack On", "Marine Machines" and "Rhino Jockey" are top notch. "Rosie's" and "Cosmo Retro Intro Outro" from Out From Out Where are pure sonic freakouts of the killer breaks kind while "Verbal" gets fitted with an awesome guitar-riff loop and an MC whose vocals are utterly chopped into chipmunk nonsense.

Foley Room is prolly his most experimental but he keeps the jazzy influence while almost forgoing some of the more aggressive angles. Check out "Bloodstone" and "Foley Room". It's not surprising he is moving towards film scores and this album definitely showcases that direction.

Solid Steel Presents... is just him mixing his stuff with a lot of other worthy material. If you can, nab some of his live sets like the Breezeblock and Dublab. Lots of funky hip hop and grimy breaks.

He was awesome at Coachella years ago although his set was way too short. The next night at Fischerspooner, I turned around and found him like six feet behind me. I was totally gonna go swing on his nuts but some six foot blond chick got there first.

superdeluxe
04-14-2008, 08:44 PM
Nice work on the pumpkins.

Will have to disagree a little with zeitgeist, while I agree the album is way over produced, It works much better live. Also the residency songs/songs written after zeitgeist were pretty good.

I think SD is tighter record than Mellon Collie, MC has more misses than SD, but MC was more epic in scale, and should be rewarded for that.

Also, if you want a essential collection, you have to include ultra rare trax 1 and 2, as well as Mashed Potatoes.

mountmccabe
04-14-2008, 09:48 PM
Good job on the Pumpkins, Brandon.

And nice work - and very quick work - on Amon Tobin, DTD.

Young blood
04-16-2008, 04:40 PM
I am spending way too much time on the board. The excitement kicked in after I finished a large paper. A week from Thursday I will be in the desert. I can't wait.

VGiHKmltt2k&feature

bballarl
04-16-2008, 06:09 PM
What the fuck was that? Hahahahaha

Young blood
04-16-2008, 07:54 PM
Its the greatest rap battle evah.

SoulDischarge
04-18-2008, 11:11 AM
What no one was probably asking for: a Butthole Surfers overview! Since the usual reaction to mentioning them is "That's actually a band?" or "I kind of liked 'Pepper'", it's ground well worth covering. Their 80s output is filled with totally damaged masterpieces. Damned near every song had it's own thing going on that sounds like nothing else in the world. As soon as the 90s rolled around, they slipped down an increasingly steeper decline, eventually hitting rock bottom at the corner of Irrelevant and Embarrassing. Chronologically (the only thing logical about them):


http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_g-bEQrV89uc/SnHjZBIROoI/AAAAAAAAAJk/jp88Ar_dNIU/s320/Brown_Reason_to_Live.jpg
Brown Reason To Live EP (1983)
Their debut, this announced the Surfers to the world. Well, a very small percentage of the world. Most of their signatures are already in place in these 7 songs: juvenile, surreal, often hilarious lyrics, Paul Leary's totally fucked guitar scrapings, Gibby Haynes stretching his vocals to sound like every breed of cartoonish Texas backwoods freak possible, and all manner of unusual sound effects. 'Something' and 'Bar-B-Q Pope' are stand outs, while 'The Shah Sleeps In Lee Harvey's Grave' and 'The Revenge of Anus Presley' are equal parts disturbing and amusing. This is about the closest they got to punk.

A

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/60/Butthole_Surfers_Live_PCPPEP_Front.jpg/200px-Butthole_Surfers_Live_PCPPEP_Front.jpg
PCPPEP Live EP (1984)
Basically a live ep revisiting everything from Brown Reason To Live. There's nothing worthwhile here that can't be found elsewhere in studio form, but if yr really into live albums, check it out I guess.

C

http://www.recordstore.co.uk/images/covers/buttholes-psychic.jpg
Psychic . . . Powerless . . . Another Man's Sac (1985)
This is the Surfers' first full length and it delivers on the promise of Brown Reason. It's a bit more atmospheric in parts, gentler (and weirder for it) in others, and even noisier in yet others. This is the most song based full length release of their early career, lacking some of the experimental, instrumental effects laden pieces of later albums. It's also probably the album fans of Big Black, Jesus Lizard, Pussy Galore, and their ilk would enjoy the most. Lots of distortion and up-tempo tracks. "Concubine", "Eye of the Chicken", and "Mexican Caravan" are great noise rock tracks, "Negro Observer" and "Lady Sniff" are delightfully whacked out and politically incorrect on every front with some debt to Frank Zappa, while "Cherub" and "Dum-Dum" have plenty of creepiness to spare.

A-

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_y-Qon5Eq6DE/SbNB4OsZ04I/AAAAAAAAAJ8/27WJhD5-XRQ/s320/Butthole_Surfers_Rembrandt_Front.jpg
Rembrandt Pussyhorse (1986)
While the Butthole Surfers had never been anything close to normal before, it's here that they turn the weirdness up to 11. There's a lot more variety on this one than anything that had come before as they moved further and further from punk. "Pussyhorse" is definitely their least abrasive 80s album, which isn't to say it's accessible. It's packed with avant-garde mood pieces, almost coming off as goth, except for kids who got erections when they had to slice up worms in biology class. There's definitely some good Krautrock vibes running through here if you know where to look, with the rhythm section laying down some strangely hypnotic grooves. There's a dub cover of "American Woman," a song that sounds like a mix between the Perry Mason theme and "96 Tears" ("Perry"), and an funereal organ workout called "Strangers Die Everyday." What more could you ask for?

A

http://991.com/gallery_180x180/Butthole-Surfers-Cream-Corn-From-T-440986-991.jpg
Cream Corn From The Socket Of Davis EP (1985)
This four song ep is now tacked on to the end of Rembrandt Pussyhorse, and I think it makes for a good extension of that album. This one's got a lot of stomp swamp, Link Wray, rockabilly juice running through it's veins, especially on the riotously funny "Moving To Florida." "Comb" is a sludge/noise track with some digital puking noises on top for good measure, "To Parter" is one of their catchiest tunes, with a little bit of Morricone Western epic thrown in, and "Tornadoes" is a fun piece of cow-punk. Probably one of their most enjoyable releases and not a half bad place to start.

A

http://strider01.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/buttholesurferslocustabortiontechnician.jpg
Locust Abortion Technician (1987)
Finally, the Surfers recorded their masterpiece. It's notorious as the aural equivalent of a really bad acid trip, and I can't say I disagree. The classic rock influence that would grow over the years first shows up here, with a Black Sabbath tribute/parody leading things off. Everything on this album crawls and creeps and shudders around like it had spent its entire life in the men's room at some shady saloon in a border town in south Texas. You can actually see the bad vibes rising off this thing. Gibby introduced his vocal effects box for this one, adding even more unpleasantness to what is already off-putting music. It all goes by way too quickly, but it sticks with you for a long time afterwards, in part due to the monster of a closing track, which piles on some of the most acid fried guitar solos imaginable over a sample of a rape victim calling in to a radio talk show and cows mooing.

A+

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Hairway To Steven (1988)
"Steven" continues the classic rock fed through a meat grinder sound of "Locust," but turns down the negativity and spreads out for some downright pretty, pastoral passages. They forgo actual track names on this one in favor of obscene primitive drawings. For some reason, this seems the most 'Texas' of their releases. It's the last great Surfers album of the 80s before they lost (or found) their minds in the 90s and got increasingly more worthless. There's songs about seeing an X-ray of a girl passing gas, Julio Iglesias performing a wide variety of unusual sexual acts, and a whole lot of other nonsense. This is probably a good first album to pick up, as it's still quality and has it's weird moments, but it's not the all out freak out the previous albums were.

B

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Double Live (1989)
A double live bootleg from the late 80s. Available for free on their website. I never really listen to it, but it's good. But this would be a good place to mention that their live DVD, BLIND EYE SEES ALL, is downright essential. Maybe even more essential than any of their albums. My biggest regret in life was not being born early enough to be able to catch them live during their prime. At least I can take solace in the fact that they were the first live show I went to voluntarily and they mostly played their 80s stuff. Anyway, fanatics should download Double Live, everyone else can survive without it.

B

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Widowermaker EP (1989)
Just a short, four song EP. The first track, "Helicopter," is Surfers by numbers, and goes on for far too long. The middle two songs, "Bong Song" and "The Colored FBI Guy," are the main attractions here and make the EP worth owning. The last song seems like a piece of willful self-parody, it's lyrics and title being "Booze Tobacco Dope Pussy Cars," which is mildly amusing but far from essential.

C+

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Pioughd (1991)
And so comes the decline. There's a few tracks on here that I'm actually quite partial too, but I have a really really hard time recommending this. The first two tracks are two parts of the same song, "Revolution," and it's kind of a fun freak-out, ending with Gibby screaming the names of minor celebrities, mainly Gary Shandling, over some spacey synth stuff, the ringing of telephones, and police sirens. The cover of "Hurdy Gurdy Man" somehow sounds exactly the same as and a million times more sinister than the original. "Something" is simultaneously a cover of their own song of the same name and the Jesus & Mary Chain track "Never Understand" that somehow works. "P.S.Y." originally appeared on Double Live as "Psychedelic Jam" and it's 12 minutes of exactly that. Finally, "Barking Dogs" is an apocalyptic sound collage that's quite good. Everything else on this is totally worthless, including all 4 parts of the failed faux-country piece "Lonesome Bulldog."

C-

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Independent Worm Saloon (1993)
This is kind of a weird one because it finds the Surfers apparently aiming at a different audience altogether. While there have definitely been classic rock influences in their work before now, this is pure RAWK riffery. Maybe they were trying to be White Zombie. I'm not sure. Some of the tracks are kind of good, though steeped in a decent amount of cheese. I have a soft spot for "Dancing Fool" and "Clean It Up," which are probably the weirdest tracks on here. The latter is totally incongruous with the rest of the album, an 8 minute noise freak-out with vomiting sounds and commands to 'Clean it up bitch.' Not very PC, but the most entertaining thing on the album. But yeah, if you really like White Zombie, give this a spin. It's not too bad, but it's nothing too special either.

C-

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Electriclarryland (1996)
This is the one you probably know if you don't know any of the others. It has "Pepper," their big hit, which is pretty good for what it is and the whole reason I first got into them when I was 13. I honestly haven't listened to this in years. It's mostly generic alterna-rock with enough weirdness to keep it vaguely interesting to people who don't know better. I was in love with this album when I was younger, so I feel a little bad shitting on it now, but it's extremely tame and lame in comparison to what they're capable of, so I have to be harsh. There's two cool tracks besides "Pepper," though: "My Brother's Wife" and "Let's Talk About Cars." I guess what sets these apart from the rest of the album is that they don't try to be normal rock tracks, which is where the rest of the album fails. So download those two tracks (add "Pepper" to taste) and skip the rest.

D+

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Weird Revolution (2001)
Oh how the mighty have fallen. There isn't a single thing about this that will have any worth to anyone, anywhere, ever. It's just downright depressing and I don't want to talk about it any more. Avoid at all costs!

VOID

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Humpty Dumpty LSD (2002)
After the myriad disappointments of the 90s, someone released this compilation of vintage unreleased tracks from the 80s. Lots of good stuff here, almost coming off like some lost album. There's a collaboration with Daniel Johnston here that's mighty interesting and a cover of the 13th Floor Elevators' "Earthquake," aligning the Butthole Surfers with other great Texas weirdos. Being an odds and ends comp, it's not exactly cohesive, and there's some rough parts, but all in all, it's a fun little treat that shows off some different sides to these ultimate acid casualties.

B+

Miscellaneous Tracks

There's some good compilation/covers/etc tracks worth downloading too: Boiled Dove, Flame Grape, Neee Neee, Good King Wencelus, Underdog, Hybrid, and Tiny Rubberband (with Moby! as unholy as that sounds, it actually works).

bmack86
04-18-2008, 11:36 AM
That's a good one.

mob roulette
04-18-2008, 12:44 PM
That's a good one.

Agreed. Also that version of Hurdy Gurdy Man might be my most favorite cover song ever. So good.

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