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roberto73
05-22-2007, 05:46 PM
So XTC and Eels it is. I'll follow with The Go-Betweens, Midnight Oil, and Teenage Fanclub if there seems to be any clamoring for them.

Yablonowitz
05-22-2007, 05:47 PM
aaaaand here come the flames.

also, yabs? if you give "nebraska" anything less than an A, i'm totally putting you on ignore. for reals. this of course from a man too lazy/busy to post one of these but still. it needed to be said.

Are you trying to coerce me?

Yablonowitz
05-22-2007, 05:50 PM
Also, Mob, don't forget:


Bruce is now primed to put out my three favorite “working class” Springsteen albums.

ragingdave
05-22-2007, 06:58 PM
Clamor.

:dumbo

thinnerair
05-23-2007, 07:20 AM
im really hoping someone will do a write up on Elton John.

TomAz
05-23-2007, 07:36 AM
http://www.deathonline.net/decomposition/images/250/beetle_larva.jpg

Yablonowitz
05-23-2007, 09:00 AM
Tom,

First go suck a fat one about the insight. I don't even know what you're talking about. I certainly provide more of it in the three albums I covered than you did. I went into far more detail on each album and provided more perspective than your gloss overs. So bite me.

Secondly, blow me for doing yours while I'm still working on mine. You got your Dylan one in and I didn't try to write up one of my own. I actually can't sit at my desk at work and type this shit up and when I get home I have crap to do. Plus, I'm re-listening to all of this for the first time in years. It's one thing to write a counter response, but you should have at least waited for me to finish.

And, again, show me where you provide insight that's superior to mine?

Someone independent - read my three reviews and then read tom's reviews of his first three albums and tell me if you think I provided less insight than Tom.

If this is some kind of blowback from my disagreement with your Dylan discography, than that's pretty sad. You're making me cry and kick over my chair here, punk.

I claimed it first.

ragingdave
05-23-2007, 09:05 AM
Tom's was far more insightful and complete.

:dumbo

Yablonowitz
05-23-2007, 09:08 AM
Tom's was far more insightful and complete.

:dumbo

I'm not done, douche. Thanks for your vote of confidence. Douche.

Calamity Jane
05-23-2007, 09:17 AM
Yablonowitz's writing eclipses TomAz's. TomAz writes overwrought, pretentious tripe.

TomAz
05-23-2007, 09:18 AM
Tom,

First go suck a fat one about the insight. I don't even know what you're talking about. I certainly provide more of it in the three albums I covered than you did. I went into far more detail on each album and provided more perspective than your gloss overs. So bite me.

Secondly, blow me for doing yours while I'm still working on mine. You got your Dylan one in and I didn't try to write up one of my own. I actually can't sit at my desk at work and type this shit up and when I get home I have crap to do. Plus, I'm re-listening to all of this for the first time in years. It's one thing to write a counter response, but you should have at least waited for me to finish.

And, again, show me where you provide insight that's superior to mine?

Someone independent - read my three reviews and then read tom's reviews of his first three albums and tell me if you think I provided less insight than Tom.

If this is some kind of blowback from my disagreement with your Dylan discography, than that's pretty sad. You're making me cry and kick over my chair here, punk.

I claimed it first.


ahahahahahhahahahaha, look at how mad you're getting!


i was just annoyed with the grade you gave BTR.

and I wrote mine up a while ago (middle of last week) thinking you would never get to it, but then I never got around to posting it myself.

Hannahrain
05-23-2007, 09:19 AM
http://www.jeffbots.com/rockem_sockem_robots.gif

Yablonowitz
05-23-2007, 09:40 AM
ahahahahahhahahahaha, look at how mad you're getting!


i was just annoyed with the grade you gave BTR.

and I wrote mine up a while ago (middle of last week) thinking you would never get to it, but then I never got around to posting it myself.

Oh, I'm mad alright. I claimed it first! You shouldn't have posted yours at all, punk! This is the ONLY artist I feel confident in covering....you've already done The Clash and some of Dylan.

Jesus, shouldn't you be traveling around some Asian country or something? Get out of your hotel. Catch some air. GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR.

I got insight into his next three albums coming out every fucking pore....I'm going to rape your ass with my insight, damn you!

TomAz
05-23-2007, 09:46 AM
i wasn't gonna post it. but then you went and fucked up the BTR review so I felt compelled. your take on 'Thunder Road' couldn't be more misguided.

nevertheless, i look forward to the rest of your 'insight'. just remember prolix is not the same thing, though.

edit just realized I completely forgot about Devils and Dust, so you're in the clear there, it's all yours big boy.

Yablonowitz
05-23-2007, 10:22 AM
i wasn't gonna post it. but then you went and fucked up the BTR review so I felt compelled. your take on 'Thunder Road' couldn't be more misguided.

nevertheless, i look forward to the rest of your 'insight'. just remember prolix is not the same thing, though.

edit just realized I completely forgot about Devils and Dust, so you're in the clear there, it's all yours big boy.

I'm not going to continue to fight with you, but you can also blow your prolix comment out your butt as well.

Also, I've already stated that I'm doing Asbury to The Rising. I haven't listened to Devils & Dust much.

I am going to be throwing in some commentary on bootlegs like "Down By the River" and "Another Side of Bruce Springsteen." Both of which you don't mention

sydaud
05-23-2007, 10:45 AM
So XTC and Eels it is. I'll follow with The Go-Betweens, Midnight Oil, and Teenage Fanclub if there seems to be any clamoring for them.


No one is going to clamor for Midnight Oil, dammit, unless I create a bunch of fake accounts.

TomAz
05-23-2007, 10:46 AM
I like Midnight Oil. well I mean I did back in the day.

sydaud
05-23-2007, 11:00 AM
I like Midnight Oil. well I mean I did back in the day.

...and that's the thing. Something is telling me that I missed out on a great band, that somehow they got lumped with the Alarm, Simple Minds and Big Country as 2nd rate U2's....I just need some verification I guess.

That being said, after CAN came so highly recommended in this thread, maybe I just need my faith restored. Everytime I went to listen to CAN, I just got tired/bored. I am obviously not smart enough for them.

roberto73
05-23-2007, 11:01 AM
Just so I don't feel like such a tease, here's the first few XTC albums. More to come.

White Music (1978): One of the smartest bands to emerge in the wake of The Clash and The Sex Pistols, XTC's clearest musical brethren are Magazine and Wire. Their debut owes a debt to the spirit of punk, but it skews more to the art-school side of things. The energy is manic and infectious, the guitars and keyboards in a frequently dissonant battle for supremacy, and while the result isn't always focused, it's definitely fun. XTC is probably the most hummable of the post-punk crowd, and White Music's catchiest song is "This Is Pop": a toe-tapping manifesto that indicates the direction to come. The album also features a truly bizarre version of Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower." Grade: B

Go 2 (1978): Released less than a year after White Music, this follow-up is a well-meaning, but ultimately botched set of songs. The quirkiness of their debut is still intact, but while that album had a wealth of melody complementing the chaos, Go 2 just sounds chaotic. You can admire the energy, but the not the tunes. Grade: C

Drums and Wires (1979): It's not Dylan going electric, but Drums and Wires is a major step forward from their previous two albums. The occasionally self-conscious loopiness of the first two albums has been largely jettisoned in favor of focused, immensely catchy songs. The emphasis this time is on jittery, nervy rhythm: the songs are spare and drum-heavy, and there's a palpable tension between the guitars of new addition Dave Gregory and vocalist/guitarist Andy Patridge. Partridge and Moulding prove themselves to be world-class songwriters on this album: "Making Plans for Nigel," "Life Begins at the Hop," "When You're Near Me I Have Difficulty," and "Reel by Reel" are all essential listening. Infectious, funny, and very British, Drums and Wires is a landmark post-punk album. Grade: A+

Black Sea (1980): Another classic. The band were on a roll by this time, and Black Sea sees them fully adopting the "Beatlesque" flavor that would dominate their later albums. Pure pop in the best sense of the term, Black Sea is an exceptionally strong set of songs, yet it also serves as a natural bridge between their punk beginnings and the burgeoning new wave movement. "Respectable Street," "Generals and Majors," "No Language in Our Lungs," and "Towers of London" are prime examples of Partidge and Moulding's exceptional songcraft, and this album stands, with their previous record, as one of the best of its era. (For my money, Black Sea isn't quite as good as Drums and Wires, but only in the way ice cream isn't quite as good as sex.) Grade: A

Next up: their 80's albums ...

roberto73
05-23-2007, 11:03 AM
...and that's the thing. Something is telling me that I missed out on a great band, that somehow they got lumped with the Alarm, Simple Minds and Big Country as 2nd rate U2's....I just need some verification I guess.

I'll go ahead and tackle Midnight Oil, too, when I get the chance. Like you, I think they got slighted, and I can't figure out why they weren't bigger than they were.

TomAz
05-23-2007, 11:05 AM
Midnight Oil >> those other bands you mentioned. although I liked Simple Minds.

I don't know if MO was really great though. They were very good. Try Diesel and Dust

mountmccabe
05-23-2007, 11:11 AM
That being said, after CAN came so highly recommended in this thread, maybe I just need my faith restored. Everytime I went to listen to CAN, I just got tired/bored. I am obviously not smart enough for them.

Most every artist here is going to come highly recommended. These guides are coming from people who know these artists, who've enjoyed them enough to extensively listen to their discographies.

Not every band is for everybody and it's not really a "smart" issue. It's more of a what are you looking for in music issue. Or rather what things.

Oh fucking yes. I just realized how I should do the LLTT one. I was getting frustrated trying to follow one minimalistic mellow folkie that gradually shifted to chamber pop with another... but that is an advantage that I can use advantageously.

KooKoo Banana Funtime
05-23-2007, 11:16 AM
...and that's the thing. Something is telling me that I missed out on a great band, that somehow they got lumped with the Alarm, Simple Minds and Big Country as 2nd rate U2's....I just need some verification I guess.


Simple Minds & Big Country did their own thing....


Alarm = def a 2nd rate U2...no question

KooKoo Banana Funtime
05-23-2007, 11:19 AM
if Oranges & Lemons gets anything less than an A+ i'm going to go Yabloistic

bmack86
05-23-2007, 11:26 AM
It should, because it's not an A+ album. A- in my books. Good shit, definitely not their best. That's either Skylarking or English Settlement.

breakjaw
05-23-2007, 11:29 AM
I enjoyed both of the Springsteen ones,but I have to disagree about Darkness,because it is perhaps my favorite album of his,along with Nebraska.

“Atlantic City” may be one of the most perfect songs ever written.
YES!

mob roulette
05-23-2007, 11:48 AM
i wasn't gonna post it. but then you went and fucked up the BTR review so I felt compelled. your take on 'Thunder Road' couldn't be more misguided.

told you so.

also,


"No Language in Our Lungs"


we got the "freaks and geeks" box set the other night, appropos of nothing. they used this song in one of the episodes. an astute choice, i must say.

also nice review so far, roberto. thanks.

sydaud
05-23-2007, 11:57 AM
Most every artist here is going to come highly recommended. These guides are coming from people who know these artists, who've enjoyed them enough to extensively listen to their discographies.

Not every band is for everybody and it's not really a "smart" issue. It's more of a what are you looking for in music issue. Or rather what things.

Oh fucking yes. I just realized how I should do the LLTT one. I was getting frustrated trying to follow one minimalistic mellow folkie that gradually shifted to chamber pop with another... but that is an advantage that I can use advantageously.

It was one of the few times I'd ever listen to music that I just "dumb" for not digging. And it wasn't that I thought it was bad, it's just that nothing grabbed me.

and yeah, I realize we're not reviewing bands we hate, THOUGH that might be a rather hysterical thread?!?! Because, face it, we were all familiar with bands that we no longer enjoy. I bet I could do a wonderful overview of Def Leppard or New Edition's discography...........

full on idle
05-23-2007, 11:58 AM
Bloc Party > Can

sydaud
05-23-2007, 11:59 AM
It should, because it's not an A+ album. A- in my books. Good shit, definitely not their best.

Agreed. I would go on, but it's going to be covered by review....

TomAz
05-23-2007, 12:00 PM
It should, because it's not an A+ album. A- in my books. Good shit, definitely not their best. That's either Skylarking or English Settlement.

I love English Settlement so much I think I'll begin weeping now.

sydaud
05-23-2007, 12:00 PM
Bloc Party > Can

Ok. Give me a single Bloc Party album (because, I know NOTHING about this band except they forgot the "K", ha) that you would recommend please.

KooKoo Banana Funtime
05-23-2007, 12:03 PM
Bloc Party > Can

Holy Retardary

did some fringe really type those words ?

PassiveTheory
05-23-2007, 12:03 PM
Anything moderately decent > Bloc Party

sydaud
05-23-2007, 12:12 PM
And in keeping with my diplomatic tone, I have enjoyed both the Bruce reviews (even though one continues to be truncated!!!)

IMO, Highway Patrolman is the greatest Springsteen song. I don't know what separates it from his others, but it gets me every time.

full on idle
05-23-2007, 12:16 PM
Step off biters, I'm fishing for Ragers.

Yablonowitz
05-23-2007, 12:18 PM
And in keeping with my diplomatic tone, I have enjoyed both the Bruce reviews (even though one continues to be truncated!!!)

IMO, Highway Patrolman is the greatest Springsteen song. I don't know what separates it from his others, but it gets me every time.

It continues to be truncated because I want to give it my best. I'm also re-discovering these albums and hearing them differently than I did when I was a political science student in college. Sorry. I will complete this task. Even though someone kind of PISSED on my head already.

TomAz
05-23-2007, 12:22 PM
And in keeping with my diplomatic tone, I have enjoyed both the Bruce reviews (even though one continues to be truncated!!!)

IMO, Highway Patrolman is the greatest Springsteen song. I don't know what separates it from his others, but it gets me every time.

really. better than State Trooper?

sydaud
05-23-2007, 12:22 PM
It continues to be truncated because I want to give it my best. I'm also re-discovering these albums and hearing them differently than I did when I was a political science student in college. Sorry. I will complete this task. Even though someone kind of PISSED on my head already.

I took forever to write my Miles discograph---I got so caught up in revisiting albums that I haven't listened to in years, so I somewhat know the feeling. And I did review some of them a lot differently (i.e. Bitches Brew, Jack Johnson) than I would have at 20.

sydaud
05-23-2007, 12:25 PM
really. better than State Trooper?


Yup, even better. It's like I know the song feels like a giant cliche, one step from a bad country song, but I can't help it.

Yablonowitz
05-23-2007, 12:25 PM
told you so.


Yeah, I wouldn't have minded an argument about that at all. I just got the major butt hurt from him cockblocking me with his full discography. Like he's fucking Professor of Springsteen Studies or something.

He called Dylan and The Clash. That's all fair. I argued with some of his points but I didn't write my own alternate discography because I was displeased that he didn't feel the same way I did about the music.

See. I'm still mad. GGGGRRRRRRRR, Tom. GRRRRRRRRRRR.

TomAz
05-23-2007, 12:27 PM
greg you claimed it then let it sit forever.

but fuck it, i'll delete it, sorry

Yablonowitz
05-23-2007, 12:30 PM
greg you claimed it then let it sit forever.

but fuck it, i'll delete it, sorry

I did a partial and said I was working on the rest of it. I don't have the time that I used to have for this stuff. I'm TRYING. GRRRRR.

You can repost your alterna-discography when I'm done.

sydaud
05-23-2007, 12:30 PM
greg you claimed it then let it sit forever.

but fuck it, i'll delete it, sorry

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO...don't do that....

KooKoo Banana Funtime
05-23-2007, 12:30 PM
http://message.axkickboxing.com/images/user_uploaded/edmund%20trebus/muppets-waldorf-statler-balkon-4001143.jpg

TomAZ is the one on the left, Blo=right

full on idle
05-23-2007, 12:32 PM
*giggle*

TomAz
05-23-2007, 12:32 PM
You can repost your alterna-discography when I'm done.

ok.

hawkingvsreeve
05-23-2007, 12:38 PM
Cursive

http://www.saddle-creek.com/europe/bands/cursive/images/cursive.jpg

A big part of the second wave emo music scene, Omaha, Nebraska's Cursive, along with groups like Bright Eyes and The Faint have been one of the flagship bands for the Saddle Creek record label.

(A selected) Disography in chronological order:



http://www.interpunk.com/itemimages2/31606.jpg

Such Blinding Stars For Starving Eyes

Released: 1997

This first album is a little rough. Tim Kashers vocals are very raw, but the Cursive sound is very much apparent. Angular guitars, big staccato hits and a lot of slow epic half time sections set the stage for later albums. The song quality on this one isn't nearly as good as later releases, so I really only reccommend it if you are a big fan.

5/10



http://www.artistdirect.com/Images/Sources/AMGCOVERS/music/cover200/dre200/e286/e28682xby0s.jpg

The Storms Of Early Summer: Semantics of Song

Released: 1998

After touring for their first record, Cursive broke up, and released this album. A year later the band got back together. While the vocals on this album remain a little raw like the first release, the music takes a big step forward. The songs are more diverse, more uptempo and sound like they are being played by a more confident band. Also the songs are a bit more cohesive, and lyric quality is stepped up a notch. This is a good record to come back to after The Ugly Organ and Domestica.

7/10



http://www.interpunk.com/itemimages2/98400.jpg

Domestica

Released: 2000

Domestica, a concept album written about Tim Kashers divorce in the style of a play, gathered a lot of attention and positive reviews from both critics and fans. This album is a sea of metaphors lyrically, but they are very good, and the music accompanying them is excellent. A warning though, the lyrics now seem a little dated, with lines like "this romance is bleeding," and "your tears are only alibis to prove you still feel. you only feel sorry for yourself," but in the context of the album they work really well, not to mention live. It becomes very powerful when you get an entire room of people singing these lyrics knowing what went into writing them. The guitars on the album are very crunchy, and they drew a lot of comparisons to Fugazi, which Kasher references in lyrics on a later release. Still, Domestica is not to be overlooked. I would say to start with The Ugly Organ first, only because if you are just getting into the band, Domestica can be a little abrasive at parts. A fun fact, unrelated to Cursive, Bjork was going to originally call Vespertine Domestica. I don't know why she changed the name, but there is a song called Domestica that appears on one of the singles from Vespertine. Anyway. Moving on.

9/10



http://www.interpunk.com/itemimages2/76837.jpg

Burst And Bloom

Released: 2001

A 5 song EP that introduces cello into the band's lineup, Burst And Bloom is probbaly my favorite thing that Cursive has put out. The songs are amazing, the lyrics are top notch, and the cello is the perfect add to their sound. Burst and Bloom is a lot like The Ugly Organ, just without the concept that a full album brings. The track Sink To The Beat is the one that addresses those claiming the band take a lot of their sound from Fugazi like I had mentioned earlier, and is played at the majority of their shows. This isn't the release to start with only because of it's limited length, but definately come back to it.

10/10



http://www.interpunk.com/itemimages2/82332.jpg

8 Teeth To Eat You

Released: 2002

This was a split that they did with the Japanese group Eastern Youth. Apparently they are good friends and tour with each other when one bands goes to the other's country. Anyway. I haven't heard the Eastern Youth songs, so I can't comment on them. As far as the Curisve ones, it sounds like Gretta has settled into the band nicely, as the cello is featured more than on Burst and Bloom. The highlight track on this split is Am I Not Yours?, another pained woeful realtionship song dealing with a cheating singnificant other. Whether or not this has anything to do with his previous marriage is unknown to me, but if you took out the cello, it seems right at home on Domestica. It's around this time, the transition between Domestica and The Ugly Organ, that Kashers vocals become a lot stronger. Less yelping, more singing. It's a welcome change.

8/10



http://www.interpunk.com/itemimages2/22620.jpg

The Ugly Organ

Released: 2003

If you are wanting to get into Cursive or just see what they are all about, this is the album that I would reccommend you start with. Another concept heavy release, the liner notes written as a stage play with character cues, The Ugly Organ revolves mainly around the Organist, one can only assume Kasher, and follows his post relationship troubles, both with the opposite sex and with the band's critics. Songs like Red Handed Sleight Of Hand and Art Is Hard address the music landscape at that time. Taken from Art Is Hard: Oh, a second verse! Well, color me fatigued. I'm hiding in the leaves in the CD jacket sleeves, tired of entertaining some double-dipped meaning. A soft serve analogy, this drunken angry slur in thirty-one flavors. You gotta' sink to swim, immerse yourself in rejection. Regurgitate some sorry tale about a boy who sells his love affairs. You gotta' fake the pain, you better make it sting, you're gonna' break a leg when you get on stage and they scream your name. "Oh, Cursive is so cool!"
Most of the album however, deal with the relationships, broken and/or failed. Lines like "And each album I'll get shit on a little more, 'Who's Tim's latest whore?" would get tiring if the music wasn't so damn good. And even when it's being layed on thick, it doesn't feel forced. The production on this album is excellent as well. The album closes with the epic 10 Minute track Staying Alive, featuring Conor Oberst, members of the Faint, Jenny Lewis and others in a choir section at the end of the song.

10/10



http://www.interpunk.com/itemimages2/112621.jpg

The Difference Between Houses And Homes: Lost Songs And Loose Ends

Released: 2005

This release is a collection of songs from 7 inchs put out by the band, as well as a split with the band Small Brown Bike. Also I think there is a song that was a Burst And Bloom B-side on here. Either way, this release has two good tracks. The rest are pretty rough. This didn't sell all that well, and I can see only really big fans getting into this one. Also around the time that this came out, Gretta left the band. :(

2/10



http://www.interpunk.com/itemimages2/131607.jpg

Happy Hollow

Released: 2006

I was interested to hear where Cursive would go after losing such a great part of the band. The cello. Well, she was replaced by a horn section, and it works really well. This record isn't as relationship heavy as the others, focusing more on religion. Music quality is right on par if not better than The Ugly Organ. After many listens I really grew to like this album, and would probably put it right behind Burst And Bloom as one of my favorite things they have put out. The live show for these songs is very cool, as the brass section that is heavily featured follows them on the road, in addition to a new cello player. This album got pretty good reviews, coming off of the crapfest that was Houses and Homes. Except from Pitchfork, of course. I would say it's ok to start with this one if you so chose, but I think the cello really completes the Cursive sound, so that's why I reccommed The Ugly Organ first. Do check this one out if you like what you hear on the other releases though. It's worth the time.

10/10




If you have questions or want specific song reccommendations, let me know.

mountmccabe
05-23-2007, 03:37 PM
Top notch, Brandon.

The only thing I could disagree on is that I might lean towards Domestica as a starting point because it is less wild, less busy. And the conceptualizations of the latter two albums are more aggressively realized making Domestica, in my mind a little easier to throw on and enjoy. Though maybe I'm not adequately putting myself in the shoes of someone who hasn't heard these discs. And abrasive isn't the sort of thing to turn me off.

And I wholeheartedly agree that the cello does wonders for their sound. And, just for the record, the cello here is not all long slow notes adding depth in quiet sections and weight near the end as in, for example, the cover of "Where Did You Sleep Last Night" from Nirvana's MTV Unplugged show. There's some of that but damn, you gotta hear the runs in "Some Redhanded Slight of Hand." So awesome.

roberto73
05-23-2007, 05:49 PM
The Hits Just Keep on Coming: XTC, Part 2

English Settlement (1982): Their third classic in a row, and the clearest indication yet of where the band was eventually headed. Known for being the last album the band toured behind (singer Partridge collapsed twice during the tour, later blaming intense stage fright and announcing they'd never tour again), English Settlement is more expansive, more intricate, more beautiful than anything the band had previously attempted. While the pop punch is still there in "Senses Working Overtime," "No Thugs in Our House," and "Down in the Cockpit," the band experiments with acoustic arrangements for the first time, and the songs as a whole are longer and more complex than their previous work. Some people look at English Settlement as a transitional album, moving the band from their post-punk/new wave roots to the acoustic, orchestral pop of their later albums. In any case, it's a winner. Grade: A

Mummer (1983): And then the comedown. Their weakest collection of songs since Go 2, it's hard not to blame this album on Partridge's breakdown. It's not exactly a bad album, but the spark and inspiration definitely seem to be missing, with "Love on a Farmboy's Wages" the only true standout track. The rest of the album follows a samey thread: mellow, acoustic rock that eventually fades into the background. Okay, but disappointing. Grade: C+

The Big Express (1984): Or, The Overproduced 80's Album. The Big Express is an odd collection of songs. Boasting some of their most exciting melodies since Black Sea ("All You Pretty Girls," "I Bought Myself a Liarbird," "You're the Wish You Are I Had"), this album recovers somewhat from the disappointing Mummer. But other songs feature huge, echoing drums, vocal distortion, and other studio manipulation that seems hugely out of place. It's dynamic, sure, but at times it also doesn't sound like XTC. Not a misstep; more like an experiment that doesn't quite pay off. Grade: B-

Skylarking (1986): Not just a return to form, Skylarking is where Partridge and Moulding stake their claim as two of the best British songwriters since Lennon and McCartney. Every song is a mini-classic, bursting with melody and invention. "Grass," "The Meeting Place," "That's Really Super, Supergirl," "Season Cycle," "Earn Enough for Us," "Big Day" and of course, "Dear God" are all beautiful examples of the possibilities available within the boundaries of "rock and roll." Aided and abetted by producer Todd Rundgren, Skylarking takes up the challenge issued by the best works of The Beatles, The Beach Boys, and The Kinks, and meets it in winning style. Their masterpiece. Grade: A+

Oranges and Lemons (1989): This is where I came in. Released when I was a sophomore in high school, this was the first XTC album I heard, and my affection for it knows no bounds. (Sidenote: the fact that I loved it so much while growing up in Cowtown, Ohio, explains as well as anything else why I didn't quite fit in with my peers.) Where Skylarking hinted at the psychedelia of the latter-day Beatles and Beach Boys, Oranges & Lemons jumps in with both feet. Still unabashedly poppy, Patridge and Moulding are in fine form – in fact, the first three songs ("Garden of Earthly Delights," "The Mayor of Simpleton," and "King for a Day") are as good as anything they've ever done, and Partridge's delicate closer, "Chalkhills and Children" wouldn't have been out of place on Skylarking. If there's a weakness, it's when the oddball psychedelia gets out of hand in the album's second half. "Hold Me My Daddy," "Across This Antheap," and "Pink Thing," while catchy, are self-consciously zany ("Hey everyone! Look how crazy I can be!") and sound a little forced next to the first half's agile pop. A drawback, but not enough to spoil what amounts to another triumph. Grade: A-

Next up: 90's eccentricity ...

sydaud
05-24-2007, 01:25 PM
Joy Division/New Order discography:

1. Unknown Pleasures (1979)---The band had issued a few e.p's/singles before releasing their first proper album in 1979, but whereas early Joy Division owed more to Wire or the first Damned album, Unknown Pleasures sets the band off on a path all their own. If you've never heard Ian Curtis sing, I really don't know how to describe it; the best I can come up with is a pained monotone. The "pain" part could be very well revisionist on my part, yet this is a seriously bleak collection of songs. Much of that has to do with how the album is mixed. The drums, guitars and bass all seem like the listener is hearing each part from a different room. To say the music has "space" is an understatement. Even early on Joy Division understood that in making atmospheric, tense music, what wasn't played was just as important as what was played.
One of the hallmarks of Joy Division is Peter Hook's bass playing. Hook often played the "lead" as evidenced on songs such as "Disorder" and the magnificant "She's Lost Control". Other highlights from the album include the full fury of loneliness from "Shadowplay", the isolation of "I Remember Nothing" and the dare I say 'rockin'' "Interzone". I'll say it like this: If you like Interpol, you're going to fucking love Joy Division. A

2. Closer (1980)---If you, the listener, approach Joy Division as a New Order fan, then this is probably the album that you'll like more (see "Isolation"). For those not in the know, after this album, lead singer Ian Curtis committed suicide and future generations of listenters scour over these lyrics looking for clues. Well, newsflash, lyrically speaking, Joy Division were one of the most bleak and lyrically cold bands of all time. The lyrics are no more uplifting on Unknown Pleasures. So, don't try to go all CSI on the lyrics and focus on the music which is as brilliant as it is varied.
Highlights....try all nine tracks. From the propulsive "A Means To An End", the rhythmicly drummed, guitar freaked-out "Atrocity Exhibition" to the elegiac "The Eternal" (a one-song soundtrack for your next rainy day) it is one of the best albums of the last 30 years and is absolutely essential in understanding the modern music movement. I just wouldn't put it on at your next kegger. A+

3. Still (1981)---Released after Curtis' death and no longer essential following subsequent releases, it does contain the last concert that Joy Division played as well as several outtakes and the superb "Something Must Break". For completists only. C

4. Substance (1988)---I normally do not like to include comps in reviews but Joy Division was released a slew of singles in their short existance and many of them are absolutely brilliant. From their punk days, "Warsaw" and "Leaders of Men" are both killer and songs like "Atmosphere", "Dead Souls", "Digital", "These Days" and the early thrash of "No Love Lost" are essential making this play like a 3rd Joy Division album, not a collection. And, oh yeah, this is where to find "Love Will Tear Us Apart", simply the best realization of the end of a relationship ever recorded. A+

New Order

5. Movement (1981) Guitarist Bernard Sumner took over vocals for the deceased Ian Curtis and attempted to sing like him on this first New Order album. That being said, the vocal sound somewhat forced and don't really mesh with the heavy electronic music on tracks like "Truth" and "Senses". "Dreams Never End" is a glimpse at what mid to late 80's New Order would sound like and it's the best track on the album. Elsewhere, the band eulogizes Curtis on "ICB" (Ian Curtis Buried) and attempt to recreate the "Joy Division" sound on "The Him". Considering what the band had been through, it is quite a respectable effort, but in the end, just falls short. B-

6. Power, Corruption and Lies (1983)---.....but oh what a difference having an album under their belts made. Widely considered their best studio effort, Sumner ditches the Curtis homage, the entire band seems to find its own, new voice as the music becomes way more upbeat and dance-ready. Nearly everthing works on this album (Leave Me Alone could have very well been left alone, however). The U.S. release contains two of the greatest songs the band ever wrote (Age of Consent, Blue Monday and the gorgeous "Your Silent Face") and once "5 8 6" gets going the band absolutely locks in, just be patient with it...Lyrically, Sumner is not close to Curtis in terms of imagery and depth, but the music doesn't call for it. A

7. Low-Life (1985)---Only personal history edges "Power" ahead of this 2nd masterpiece in the New Order catalog in my opinion, but this is electro-pop at it's finest. Whereas the songs on "Power" stretched out to allow the audience to fall in with the melody, this is insistent pop that demands the listener's attention. "Love Vigilantes" is Springsteen done New Order style, "This Time Of Night" demands to be played loud, "Sunrise" starts with a Joy Division-esque opening before surging into some of Sumner's most accusatory lyrics and this is the place to find the original versions of "The Perfect Kiss" and "Sub-Culture". A

8. Brotherhood (1986)---Opens with "Paradise" one of the great songs in the New Order canon, but it becomes apparent quickly that the band is in transition. The keyboards are pulled back and "As It Is When It Was" even includes an acoustic-guitar intro! Be that as it may, this album contains more "hits" than any other New Order studio album. Besides "Paradise", this is the place to find "Every Little Counts" (with the ridiculous botched lyrics in the beginning), "Angel Dust" and the mid-80's classic "Bizarre Love Triangle". Even with those crucial New Order tracks, the rest of the album seems to really drag and "Bizarre" is remixed so much better on their next release. I wouldn't be surprised if many people stated this is their favorite New Order album, but it shouldn't be...... B

9. Substance (1987)---Exhibit A as to why New Order was the greatest dance band of the 80's. If you're a New Order fan under the age of 30, there's a high probability that this was your introduction to the band. Remixes of previous album cuts (Shellshock, The Perfect Kiss, Bizarre Love Triange) and previous singles ("Confusion", "Theives Like Us"), there simply isn't a bad track to be found. Originally released as a double-album, the album flies by; it is one double LP that is entirely justified in it's length. Many artists like to include 1 new song to entice consumers. All the band did was give the public "True Faith", easily one of the best pieces they ever recorded (despite the silly video that accompanied it). The CD release contains 12 b-sides including "Procession" and "Hurt" which must be heard. This is 80's dance music that absolutely stands up 20 years later and it should be in every collection. A must-own. A+

10. Technique (1989)---For some stupid reason that I will never understand, I just did not like this album when it came out---I wanted "Substance Part 2", but I was young and dumb. "Fine Time" and "All The Time" open the cd up in fine fashion, the former something straight from the rave, the latter aided by a minor-key keyboard line that fits the song perfectly. "Round & Round", the album's lead-off single, works musically, but lyrically seems a elementary. My favorite track here is "Vanishing Point" with it's My life ain't no holiday proclamation. Not their best, but certainly not their worst. B+

11. Republic (1993)---It is here that you'll find the "Regret" which ranks with "Blue Monday" and "True Faith" as the greatest New Order singles. Then you'll find a bunch of songs from a band that seems to be going through the motions. And I think the band knows it too, for following this release, it took them 8 years to make another album. Simply put, if you like New Order, you'll like this album, but there are several other places to start. B-

12. Get Ready (2001)---After their extended hiatus, it was not known what kind of album the band would come back with. Instead of the dance, they brought the rocking, very much reminiscent of "Brotherhood" . The best songs are put up from: "Crystal" jumps from the speakers as does "60 Miles An Hour" and "Vicious Streak" is a very good mid-tempo song. Billy Corgan joins the band for "Turn My Way", but that doesn't really add or take anything away from a mediocre song. All in all, it was a welcomed return by the band, though it doesn't have anything nearly as catchy as one would hope. B

13. Waiting For The Sirens' Call (2005)---Boring, boring, boring.....it sounds like New Order and if that's all you need, then go for it. I advise everyone else to stay away. I cannot think of a single track that anyone needs to hear. D+

sydaud
05-30-2007, 07:36 PM
Oh hell no......I took the time to write this and not a single fucking person could offer up an opinion???

I refuse to let this thread die without a fight.

And are we not still waiting on someone to complete their Springsteen analysis?

mob roulette
05-30-2007, 07:49 PM
i liked power, corruption, and lies better than brotherhood simply because i enjoyed how they cleaved the two sides of new order in half. side a is more gutar based, side b more electro, yes? i mean, if memory serves.

brothehood has "elegia" though, the greatest joy division song ian curtis never wrote. simply beautiful. points granted here for naming the 80's movie it appeared in.

ps it's an easy one.

sydaud
05-30-2007, 07:55 PM
Pretty In Pink.

mob roulette
05-30-2007, 08:01 PM
ding.

Yablonowitz
06-04-2007, 01:03 PM
OK, this is the part where I shamefully admit I still haven't done any more on the Springsteen discography and ask that Tom please re-insert his that he did. I am also going to apologize for being a bitch to tom regarding this subject since I have failed at Springsteen discography as well as life. I'm sorry.

For what it's worth, here's my grade for the rest of his catalog:

Darkness on the Edge of Town - A-; love "Badlands," "Something In the Night", "Racing in the Street", "Promised Land," "Prove it All Night" and "Darkness on the Edge of Town"

The River - A - love the whole thing, a wonderful pastiche of stories ranging from the raucous to the bleak. It's like a Spoon River anthology, only everyone in the town is still alive. Except for that guy who got killed in a wreck on the highway.

Nebraska - A - Whaddya say about an album like this? "Nebraska" and "State Trooper," "Atlantic City," "My Father's House", and "Johnny 99" are perfect.

Born in the USA - B-

Tunnel of Love - B+

Human Touch - F/D-

Lucky Town - C+

The Ghost of Tom Joad - B

The Rising - C-

amyzzz
06-04-2007, 01:18 PM
That made me chuckle.

TomAz
06-04-2007, 01:29 PM
the moment has kind of passed.

jjphotos420
06-04-2007, 01:57 PM
Any recommendations on which Silversun Pickups album to buy first???

mountmccabe
06-04-2007, 02:02 PM
Silversun Pickups only have one full length, Carnavas, one EP, Pikul and a few singles.

I'd maybe lean twoards starting with the debut EP rather than the newer album but either would be fine, really. Both are good stuff, no matter what Gabe says.

Yablonowitz
06-04-2007, 02:58 PM
the moment has kind of passed.

Put it up and accept my fucking apology, you bitch.

TomAz
06-04-2007, 03:34 PM
Put it up and accept my fucking apology, you bitch.

hey now, don't go all psycho on me.

Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ (1972) This album is definitely a mixed bag and sounds pretty immature today. Springsteen was deep into is ‘hairy hipster’ stage and every character in every song has a stupid nickname: Crazy Janey, Hazy Davey, Ragamuffin Gunner, etc. Maybe it sounded hip then but it sounds silly today. Some of the music is damned good though: “Blinded By the Light”, “Lost in the Flood”, “It’s Hard to Be a Saint in the City”, and “Spirit in the Night” are worthwhile. But “Mary Queen of Arkansas” is among the worst songs he ever did. Grade: B-

The Wild, The Innocent, and the E Street Shuffle (1973). A definite improvement over the debut, this album is steeped in blues, jazz and soul. “4th of July, Asbury Park” and “Incident on 57th Street” are beautiful, luscious songs; “Kitty’s Back” and “Rosalita” are fun rockers; “Wild Bill’s Circus Story” is a cute but endearing runaway tale. There are times when I think this is Springsteen’s best album, but I know it’s really not, plus he’s still got that silly nickname thing going on. Grade: A-

Born to Run (1975) I can’t write objectively about this record, so subjective will have to do. One of about a half dozen albums (London Calling, OK Computer, etc) that changed the way I hear music. Springsteen made a few changes to the E Street Band prior to this album and so the sound is less jazzy and more soul-inspired rock, but what you’ll really notice is the wall-of-sound production. Clarence Clemons’ sax solo on “Jungleland” is the best I’ve ever heard. There’s also a quantum leap improvement in the lyrics, he sounds more mature and self-assured and less like a kid. Yeah he gets a bit overheated in spots (esp. on “Backstreets”) but he pulls it off. Some people think the image of “barefoot girls sitting on the hood of a Dodge, drinking warm beer in the soft summer rain” is corny, but I don’t. Tramps like us, baby. Grade: A+

Darkness on the Edge of Town (1978) Complete change of attitude, music, appearance, everything. Gone are the songs about young people trying to get out of north Jersey; gone are the glockenspiels, the wall of sound, most of the gorgeous piano. In their place are songs about blue collar workers (the same kids from the previous albums, grown up now?) with a spare, lean sound punctuated with hard guitar and loud driving drums. This album about 75% great and 25% of it sucks. “Candy’s Room”, “Racing in the Street”, and “The Promised Land” are all first rate; that part in “Candy’s Room” where he sings “she says baby if you wanna be wild, you got a lot to learn, close your eyes let them melt, let them fire, let them burn” still gives me goosebumps. And, “Badlands”, “Prove It All Night”, “Factory”, and the title track are pretty good too. But “Something in the Night” and “Streets of Fire” are so overwrought that they come across as unintended parodies. Grade: A- or B+, take your pick.

The River (1980). A double album, 20 songs all over the place, rock to rockabilly to country to Motown soul, most of these are pretty good, some less so. This album doesn’t have nearly the dramatic peaks of Born to Run or Darkness, and I think that’s by design. There are some good rockers here (“Two Hearts”, “Cadillac Ranch”) but the best moments are the quiet ones, on songs like “Independence Day” and “Point Blank” and especially “Stolen Car” (one of the best songs Springsteen’s written). The second half starts to wear out a bit, and this album would be better if it were trimmed down to 16 songs or so, but hey, that’s what iTunes is for. Grade: A-

Nebraska (1982). Springsteen recorded some rough takes for the E Street Band to work with in the studio. Things weren’t going well, and the band took a break for a few months. Meanwhile, he is carrying the cassette of roughs in his back pocket, listening to it to get arrangement ideas, when he decides he likes it as is. So that’s what we’ve got here, just Springsteen and an acoustic guitar and occasional very minimal overdubs, all recorded on his 4 track in his bedroom, never (initially) intended for the public to hear. What results is a stark, dark, ugly picture of the world: three of the first four songs feature murders (one out of desperation, one out of greed, and one out of just plain meanness), while in the fifth we never find out if the victim actually dies or not. This is not an album to listen to for fun, but the songs are amazing. Deep, deep shit. “Atlantic City” may be one of the most perfect songs every written. Grade: A

Born in the USA (1984) the big breakthrough pop album, the one that sold like Michael Jackson, the anti-Nebraska. Lots of good pop songs, you know them all already. Lots of meaningful lyrics, but a little too slick for my tastes. Grade: B+

Tunnel of Love (1987).Now he’s done being a working class hero and turns to writing love songs for his new wife whom he’ll divorce while touring to support this album. This album has a bunch of good songs (“Tougher Than the Rest”, “Tunnel of Love”, “Brilliant Disguise”, “Valentine’s Day”, and especially “One Step Up”) and nothing that’s bad or overwrought or any of the old criticisms. It’s pretty quiet, with just limited contributions from the E Street band (danger ahead!!) and it does have a few boring spots. Grade: A-

Human Touch (1992) He fired the E Streeters and hired a completely new backup band. This album only has two songs to recommend it: the title track and “I Wish I Were Blind”. Otherwise it’s not really awful, just forgettable. Plus this is the album where Springsteen decided to change his singing style, turning into more of a screamer. I guess he thought he was being soulful. Grade: C

Lucky Town (1992) released the same day as Human Touch, but recorded after, when Springsteen had a burst of creativity while waiting for the more-heavily-produced HT to be done. This album is better, though still not great, it’s not bad. “Better Days”, “If I Should Fall Behind”, and “My Beautiful Reward” are worth having, if you’re downloading. Grade: B-

The Ghost of Tom Joad (1995). This was supposed to be like Nebraska II, I guess, it’s folk music, but I can barely remember what’s on it. “Youngstown”, there’s one that’s pretty good. Otherwise it’s dull, dull, dull. Grade: D

Greatest Hits (1995). Normally I’d leave a compilation out of the review, but this album has 4 new songs on it, and they’re the best stuff he’d done in about a dozen years. Plus there’s “Streets of Philadelphia”, from the movie. Grade: B+. (grade for just “Secret Garden”, “Murder Incorporated”, “Blood Brothers” and “This Hard Land”, all previously unrealeased: A)

The Rising (2003) The much-acclaimed return of the E Street Band, this album got raves, and I’m not sure they’re fully justified. Full of songs that tie to 9/11 in some way, I think about half of them are notable, and only two or three are really outstanding. Grade: B

Devils & Dust (2005): this is The Ghost of Tom Joad Part II. Grade: D-

We Shall Overcome: The Songs of Pete Seeger (2006). Covers of folk songs, done raucous Pogues-style with a 15-piece band. This would have been a nice 4 song EP, not a 13 song full priced album. It’s not bad, it just gets kind of old before it’s done. Grade: C+

I should also mention Tracks, a 4-CD boxed set of alternate takes and unreleased songs, most of them from BITUSA and prior. Some of these are spectacularly good (“My Love Will Not Let You Down”, “Janey Don’t You Lose Heart”) which makes you wonder why they never saw the light of day til this. The full set is really only worth having if you’re a total fan.

And then there’s the live albums:

Live 1975-85 a 3 CD set of concerts spanning the 10 years when the E Street Band was at its peak. Really great. Includes the only ‘official’ version of him doing “Because The Night” which not many people know he co-wrote with Patti Smith. And actually he wrote most of it. Grade: A+

In Concert MTV Plugged (1993) was made following the HT/LT double bill, with the ‘new’ band. This was supposed to be part of the MTV ‘Unplugged’ series, but they did it with the full band and crossed out the U and the n. Features mostly songs from those albums, cuz he figured they needed promoting, cuz they sucked. Grade: D

Live in New York City (2001) was the return of the E Street Band singing all the old songs, and also capturing “American Skin (41 Shots)” that the NYPD hates so much (and one of the few live recordings I can remember where a rock singer tells the audience to be quiet). All in all this is pretty good, though 16 minutes of “Tenth Avenue Freeze Out” is too much. Grade: B

Hammersmith Odeon, London ’75 was just released a couple years ago with the 30th anniversary of Born to Run. A great look at the band from that era. Also available on concert DVD. Grade: A-

If you stumble across it definitely check out Live at Winterland 12/15/78, a bootleg, which IMO is one of the greatest live albums ever. Definite A+

Also, tomorrow is the release of Live in Dublin, recorded with the big 15 piece folk band in support of We Shall Overcome.

mountmccabe
06-04-2007, 04:38 PM
That was better in the old days before all the board corruption.

amyzzz
06-04-2007, 04:45 PM
All hail the underboob.

mob roulette
06-04-2007, 05:42 PM
nebraska is my favorite record of all time. that's the only reason i wanted you two to keep fighting. thank you both for paying your respects.

ragingdave
06-06-2007, 11:29 AM
Anyone interested in Dire Straits?

TomAz
06-06-2007, 11:43 AM
go for it Dave.

ragingdave
06-06-2007, 03:22 PM
Dire Straits on the way...

mountmccabe
06-06-2007, 03:26 PM
I'm actually gonna write the Elliott Smith one soon.

mountmccabe
06-06-2007, 10:02 PM
The thing is there's all this Elliott Smith. You don't really need me. Just get it. It's pretty easy to know what's up here. It goes from Elliott hiding from Heatmiser in his room on to him working in a big studio with Jon Brion on to things falling apart.

The first album wasn't done as an album; it was Elliott recording in his bedroom. This was when he was in the post-punk band Heatmiser. They were good too; Neil Gust and eventaully Sam Coomes were in that band. Elliott had been recording songs on his own for years but eventually they were heard by people that convinced him to release them on a tiny label so that's Roman Candle. This is around the time Heatmiser split so he had time to focus on his solo material and actually tour and then record more for Kill Rock Stars. There's Elliott Smith and then Either/Or, which had Sam Coomes and Janet Weiss in the backing band, the new info here being that there is was a backing band.

Then came "Miss Misery" in Good Will Hunting. And Conan. And the Oscars. And signing to DreamWorks. And SNL. With regards to the quality of the music it doesn't matter. With regards to the overall sound we're getting richer and fuller.

And XO with folks like Jon Brion helping orchestrate. We've moved to baroque pop now (from minimalist folk, which I think I failed to mention.) This continued after a fashion with Figure 8. Then there were more recordings and Elliott killed himself or at any rate died.

Then about a year later they released From A Basement on the Hill which is from the unreleased recording sessions of his last four years. Then two and a half years after that they released the New Moon double album which is b-sides and such from the Kill Rock Stars era.

Where should you start? Depends on what you're looking for right now, because, you see, you're going to collect them all. Plain fingerpicked acoustic accompaniment to near-whispered lyrics? Start with Roman Candle and move forward. Starting with the lush XO and moving back (and forth but slower) would be good too. If I was forced to pick a favorite it'd be Either/Or but seriously there's not a dud album here. Basement might not flow like an Elliott Smith album and goes places previously unimagined but the best tracks here are amongst the best songs of his career. New Moon doesn't flow much at all, really but it is a rich set of songs.

All of these albums have Elliott's soft and tender double-tracked vocals and rich melodic sense. I tell you, you're not going to go wrong here.

Also here are some lyrics because this, really, is why you should be here.


No Name #1 from Roman Candle: "well i wondered, what's the worst thing i could say? and i froze up and sighed, you remind me of someones daughter, i forgot her, i forgot her name ashamed, go home and live with your pain, leave alone, leave alone 'cos you know you don't belong"
St Ides Heaven from Elliott Smith: "high on amphetamines, the moon is a lightbulb breaking, it'll go around with anyone, but it won't come down for anyone"
Rose Parade from Either/Or: "the trumpet has obviously been drinking, because he's fucking up even the simplest lines, i'd say it's a sight that's quite worth seeing, it's just that everyone's interest is stronger than mine, and when they clean the street i'll be the only shit that's left behind."
Waltz #2 from XO: "tell mr. man with impossible plans to just leave me alone, in the place where i make no mistakes, in the place where i have what it takes, i'm never gonna know you now, but i'm gonna love you anyhow"
Junk Bond Trader from Figure 8: "the imitation picks you up like a habit, writing in the glow of the tv's static, taking out the trash to the man, give the people something they understand, a stickman flashing a fine line smile, junk bond trader trying to sell a sucker a style, rich man in a poor man's clothes, the permanent installment of the daily dose"
King's Crossing from From A Basement on a Hill: "it's christmas time, and the needles on the tree, a skinny santa is bringing something to me, his voice is overwhelming, but his speech is slurred, and i only understand every other word, open your parachute and grab your gun, falling down like an omen, a setting sun, read the part and return at five, it's a hell of a role if you can keep it alive"


Fucking hell what can I say?

mob roulette
06-07-2007, 08:08 AM
+5 for name checking "rose parade". easily one of his best.

roberto73
06-07-2007, 08:27 AM
Aw, geez. Seeing this thread again reminds I need to finish XTC, and I promised Eels and Midnight Oil, too.

devachan
06-07-2007, 06:48 PM
I need to read this later.

hawkingvsreeve
06-07-2007, 07:05 PM
Tom, I know nothing of Elvis Costello. Guide me.

bmack86
06-07-2007, 07:51 PM
Who should I do? Anybody wanna know about a band? If I don't know the band, I'll do the research, like I did with Elf Power. I've got all the time in the world right now. I finished finals and class today, and I've got nothing happening til I can get a job.

CuervoPH
06-07-2007, 08:44 PM
Nice job on Springsteen, Tom, and your comment on the live version of "Because the Night" reminds me of how surprised people would be when I told them Springsteen wrote "Blinded By The Light". They would only be familiar with the Manfred Mann version and would be surprised that it was a Springsteen tune, but those lyrics were so obviously from that phase of Springsteen's songwriting it wasn't funny. I also agree that Live '75-'85 is the best of his live releases so far, though the Live in NYC is worth it for "American Skin (41 Shots)" and also for the version of "Atlantic City" on there. Still, I love Live '75-'85 for "Thunder Road", "The River", and "Jersey Girl", in which Clarence Clemons turns the song into something transcendent.

And Roberto, can't wait to hear your take on XTC. I'm not nearly as familiar with them as I should be, having only listened to "Skylarking" and "Oranges and Lemons". However, "Mayor of Simpleton" to this day is one of the catchiest songs I've ever heard.

Hannahrain
06-07-2007, 09:02 PM
Page 1

#1 - Radiohead - swdshfsk - intro
#3 - David Bowie - Courtney - intro
#4 - Boredoms - bmack86 - full
#5 - Can - bmack86 - intro
#6 - Spiritualized - bmack86 - intro
#9 - Elvis Costello - TomAz - intro
#10 - the Wedding Present - roberto73 - intro
#12 - Tom waits - Slushmier - extended intro
#13 - Mogwai - swdshfsk - extended intro
#14 - Hanson - tessa|asset - extended intro
#15 - Guided by Voices - mountmccabe - intro
#23 - the Velvet Underground - PsyGuyRy - extended intro
#24 - Luna - york707 - intro with discog listed
#25 - Jonathan Richman - breakjaw - full

Page 2

#32 - The Dismemberment Plan - Tylerdurden31 - full
#33 - Bob Dylan - TomAz - extended intro
#36 - Talking Heads - bballarl - full
#37 - Pink Floyd - PsyGuyRy - very extended intro
#45 - Pearl Jam - Slushmier - full
#51, 53 & 56 - Fugazi - PotVsKtI - ranked list of albums

Page 3

#65 - the Beatles - TomAZ - full

Page 4

#101 - the Kinks (early period) - bmack86 - extended intro
#109 - Beethoven's 7th Symphony - mountmccabe - full (selected, incomplete)
#117 - the Cure - bmack86 - full
#118 - the Dandy Warhols - Hannahrain - full

Page 5

#124 - the Jesus and Mary Chain - mountmccabe - full
#131 - Yo La Tengo - Courtney - full
#132 - the Roots - Slushmier - full
#138 - Sonic Youth - bmack86 - full
#141 - the Rolling Stones (US albums) - sydaud - full
#146 - the White Stripes - bballarl - full

Page 6

#173 - Faith No More - thinnerair - full
#175 - Failure - thinnerair - full
#176 - Magazine - breakjaw - full

Page 7

#196 - Creed - bmack86 - full
#200 - Metallica - bmack86 - full
#202 - the Who - sydaud - full
#217 - Massive Attack - Thinnerair - Full
#219 - Elf Power - Bmack86 - Full
#225 - Genesis - Thinnerair - Intro
#232 - Bikini Kill - Mountmccabe - Full
#238 - Muse - Thinnerair -

Page 9

#241 - Big Black - Bmack86 - Full
#249 - The Arab Strap - Hannahrain - Intro
#253 - The Clash - TomAz - Full
#267 - Nick Cave - roberto73 - Full

Page 10

#299 - Jeff Buckley - PassiveTheory - Full

Page 12

#334 - Jawbox - Tylerdurden31 - Full
#338 - Hum - thinnerair - Full
#344 - REM - sydaud - Full

Page 13

#375 - Depeche Mode - Amyzzz - Extended Intro

Page 14

#395 - The Replacements - TomAz - Full
#402 - Spinal Tap - Breakjaw - Full
#405 - Cheech and Chong - Anita Bonghit - Discography
#416 - Pixies - Bmack86 - Full
#419 - Spiritualized - Bmack86 - Full

Page 15

#425 - Rush - MonsoonSeason - intro
#427 - The Orb - Desphrs - full
#446 - Miles Davis - sydaud - full

Page 16

#455 - Boards of Canada - desphrs - full
#463 - Blur - Slushmier - full
#474 - Serge Gainsbourg - bmack86 - intro
#477 - Beat Happening - bmack86 - full
#479 - Circle Jerks - york707 - full

Page 17

#504 - Joe Jackson - MsTekno - extended intro
#505 - Oasis - Stefinitely Maybe - full

Page 18

#518 - The Magnetic Fields - mountmccabe - full

Page 19

#562 - Wilco - mountmccabe, york707, and TomAz (compiled by Hannahrain) - full

Page 20

#573 - Spoon - sydaud - full
#580 - Decemberists - Hannahrain - full
#600 - Led Zeppelin - sydaud - full

Page 21

#616 - Minutemen - sydaud - full
#619 - Can - bmack86 - full (selected, incomplete)
#625 - PJ Harvey - bballarl - full

Page 22

#635 - Bjork - bmack86 - full
#649 - Cake - PassiveTheory - full
#650 - The Faint - hawkingvsreeve - full

Page 23

#672 - Death Cab For Cutie - hawkingvsreeve - full

Page 24

#720 - Leonard Cohen - mountmccabe - incomplete

Page 25

#735 - Bruce Springsteen - Yablonowitz - first installment
#738 - Arto Lindsay - ragingdave - Solo work only

Page 26

#757-755 TomAz vs Yablonowitz RE: Springsteen review.
#769 - XTC - Roberto73 - partial (to be continued)

Page 27

#798 - Cursive - Hawkingvsreeve - full
#800 - XTC (II) - Roberto73 - Continuation
#801 - Joy Division/New Order - sydaud - full
#806 - Springsteen - Yablonowitz - quick overview

Page 28

#812 - Springsteen (different) - TomAz - full
#820 - Elliott Smith - mountmccabe - full (vagueish)

mountmccabe
06-07-2007, 09:05 PM
I'll show you vagueish

Hannahrain
06-07-2007, 09:06 PM
I'll do a thing later that you will probably acknowledge. Maybe tomorrow or something.

CuervoPH
06-07-2007, 09:13 PM
That's what she said.

Hannahrain
06-07-2007, 09:15 PM
She may have. I dunno.

CuervoPH
06-07-2007, 09:23 PM
Thank you for the recap though. I know which pages to revisit now. I missed your Decembrists take. Colin Meloy was on my homo island. Isn't it about time for the homo/hetero island thread to be bumped?

TomAz
06-08-2007, 08:02 AM
Tom, I know nothing of Elvis Costello. Guide me.

seek the Hannah, and the Hannah shall set you free.

swdshfsk
06-08-2007, 08:46 AM
It's cool to see this thread take off the way it has. Thanks for contributing everyone...I feel so proud I just might go and eat a sandwich.

kreutz2112
06-08-2007, 09:00 AM
Hannah, thanks

kreutz2112
06-08-2007, 09:04 AM
I have not contributed yet. I have read every single post in this thread, since its birth. I will think of something to do.

Jenniehoo
06-17-2007, 06:23 PM
Link to Ben Folds Mix: http://www.yousendit.com/download/WFJVc2ZPYStYSHcwTVE9PQ (http://www.yousendit.com/download/WFJVc2ZPYStYSHcwTVE9PQ)

All the songs I discuss are on this mix. PLEASE DOWNLOAD AND LISTEN!


Gabe and I had a conversation yesterday about which band discographies we’d feel comfortable rating on this thread. While we were talking I realized that I wouldn’t feel fully comfortable discussing any artist or succession of albums that I hadn’t “grown with.” Meaning that the only true way I’d feel validated in discussing a band or artist’s progression is if I followed it with my life – if I listened to their latest album for an entire year and then waited for the next to be released. I got into both Regina Spektor and Rufus Wainwright in the past two years, but in doing so – I had to go through a backlog of good albums with each all at the same time. While I listened to each album as a whole, there’s something missing in the energy of going through three old albums at the same time. I can’t quantify the effects of any set of songs with certain events in my life. I can’t grow with the music in the same way that you grow and change with a group of friends or a period in your life.

Because I feel like that – it really narrows down the artists I feel comfortable moving through this thread with – there are only a few artists/bands that have managed to capture my attention for more than a song or a cd. I’ve really only followed the career of a handful. That’s why I’m going to do Ben Folds Five and parlay it into Ben Folds solo career. I feel like I was with him from the beginning – and I was 15. I’m 27 now and he’s still inspiring on a regular basis. So – I feel qualified to review his work. It also helps that I’m a piano player and, as a result, have a special affinity for Tori Amos and Ben Folds and most piano artists. I have stubby fingers and a lack of follow through – but 15 years of lessons make me at least understand the brilliance that comes with someone sitting down at a piano and understanding the instrument well enough to know the chords that work together – the keys they mean to hit and how each emotion goes along with each octave; whether they’ve been minor to indicate sadness or melancholy and major and uplifting chord progressions to fill you with joy.

Basically – I have to really reason with myself in order to feel entitled to review or critique any artist. I have to have an understanding of their talent and what it means to ME versus “I don’t like” or “I like.” I think the singers are owed that because they create art. The worst art critic is the one who knows the backlog of every movement and catalogue of paintings, but who’s never sat down with a brush and an easel to feel the frustration of not knowing how to make what they want to or recreate something that’s so perfect in their brain.

OK – after ALL that, here we go – Ben Folds (Five):

Ben Folds Five – Ben Folds Five - 1995
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41K45H20QTL._SS500_.jpg

Overview:

Their first cd – The group formed in 1994 and released this cd the following year. What is first evident is their heavy reliance on piano, sarcasm in songwriting, and jazz influence. There are unremarkable songs on this cd, which is interesting as most groups that have been together for a while (ie Weezer) have a bangarang first cd. These are the songs they’ve been working on and fine tuning for years. Since BFF had gotten together just a year earlier, and were just settling into many of Ben Folds idealistic and original song stylings – they don’t have their chops together as a proper band yet. That doesn’t remove the fun from this album, though – they leave in bits of audio with the band conversing before and after songs. The effect this creates is one of brotherhood and seems that they want to share how comfortable they are together as artists and in the studio – they don’t take it all too seriously.

Highlights:

The first BFF song I ever heard comes from this cd – Underground. It’s an interesting choice for a single. It’s fun and goofy – juxtaposed from other music in the mid-nineties dealing with grunge, hard rock, and the advent of girl and boy bands (Spice Girls, 98 degrees, etc.). What made me love this song was the joy and wacky nature of the music – it seemed like it was more suited for a modern day musical than pop charts.
Another standout here is “Philosophy” – with a lilting piano intro and the lyrics of joyful angst – BFF seemed to be making a statement of pride in going against the grain with the soul of their music. It wasn’t striving to be emotional or meaningful…it was just different. “So you can laugh all you want to – I’ve got my philosophy.” I recommend anyone that like Ben Folds at all pick up these two songs at least. “Julianne” is another interesting song on this album. It’s satire of a rock genre that blends into BFF’s testament good nature. The best part of this album is its sense of humor – about itself and of music in general.

Whatever and Ever, Amen (1997)

http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pjORVqehL._SS500_.jpg

Overview:

This is where the world started to notice this band. This album stands, on it’s own, as one of the best second efforts of a band I’ve ever heard to date. The band finally got their shit together and learned how to take the best out of all their talents. The jazz influence is more finely tuned here and honed into several outstanding songs (such as “Steven’s Last Night in Town”). Contrary to their previous album – this one manages to express both the robust sound of the band’s strengths as well as the simple, heart wrenching refrains that are just inspired (such as Evaporated). Overall, this is easily the best they would produce as a band.

Highlights:

It’s hard to choose. I think everyone should own this cd. The obvious highlight here is the brilliantly written and emoted “Brick” – with a perfect melody and sad, simple story. The irony for this song (for me, anyway) is that I always loved Brick – I would turn it up in the car and try to harmonize with the chorus (badly). I had heard the words, but the resonance of the lyrics never stuck to me until a couple years later when I personally got pregnant and had an abortion. But this isn’t about me. There are just so many songs out there about heartbreak and love and loss that relating to lyrics becomes trite. There aren’t a lot of songs abound about the confusion that comes with having to make decisions you aren’t old enough to make. That makes me a sucker for that song.
Other highlights include “Steven’s Last Night in Town.” This song is dramatically different from anything you’ve heard outside of a musical soundtrack. It’s “zany” and fun and the subject matter is so anti-contextual that it makes the whole song just funny. Every night is Steven’s last night in town. He’s charming and talks too much and tells the same stories. Set to a jazzy beat with a breakdown in the middle that creates visions of hoop skirts and musical numbers. Just really unique and completely fun.
Another highlight is the heartfelt and original “Smoke” – that Nick Hornby later called attention to in his novel “Songbook” – Hornby (author of film adapted books such as “High Fidelity” and “About a Boy”) called Smoke “lyrically perfect, clever and sad and neat…it’s also one of the very few songs that is thoughtful about the process of love, rather than the object or the subject. And it was a constant companion during the end (the long drawn-out end) of my marriage, and it made sense then, and it still makes sense now. You can’t ask much more of a song than that.”


Naked Baby Photos - Ben Folds Five - 1998
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/41N7EXJZHQL._SS500_.jpg

This is a compilation of songs that came mostly from the first and second albums. There are a couple new, mostly unremarkable songs in this collection with the real bonus being that at least half of the songs are live versions. And, if you’ve not seen Ben Folds Five or Ben Folds solo live – you’ve missed out. He has a creative energy that pulls you in and he instructs the audience to keep them engaged. He’ll plop out a random song he comes up with on the spot (much as Tori Amos does) and, along with his relatable humor, the whole experience is pretty enchanting.

I wouldn’t recommend this album to anyone but real BFF lovers – I didn’t buy it until years later.

The Unauthorized Biography of Reinhold Messner
http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/images/I/518s76D-vqL._SS500_.jpg

Overview:

Oh, God, I love this album. While Whatever and Ever, Amen is the touchstone of BFF’s talent, this album showed it moving in a more promising direction than it was ever fully able to take.

I get the feeling that Ben Folds was unwilling to make music his entire life. Because of that the band suffered, but not the music. He insisted that it be a subset of expression adjacent to his real life – to let off steam and express his experiences. This may have caused the downfall of the band. Plenty of bands go the opposite way, though – they immerse themselves into their successful bands to the point where they have nothing new to write songs about – taking themselves effectively out of the real world where all the inspiration comes from. Because Folds was unwilling to do this – his band fell apart to pursue more worthwhile dreams. His solo career, however, enabled him to have both sides of his cake – and I think his music is the better for it.

“Biography” doesn’t give us the sense of band that’s falling apart, however. It offers the zany fun of the past two albums with the maturity of realization that comes with artists put upon to create.

Highlights:

“Narcolespy” is the first song on the album and it’s energy and power is reminiscent of a Queen song. It’s overdramatically and lyrically sound. While it teeters the edge of brain of someone actually owning the disease and the confusion found within – it also expresses a weary artist that is warning a fan base that he may have had all he can physically take. And the effect it has on those he loves the most. “I know it seems that I don’t care – but something in me does, I swear – I don’t remember all last year – I left you awake to cry the tears while I was dreaming…” and it escalates into a key pounding refrain calling out for aid, “I’m NOT tired…save me….wake me up!” It seems impossible not to correlate this emotion with that of a band caught up in it all.

“Don’t Change Your Plans” follows this vein of “don’t give up on me” serenaded to the people in in his life that matter. And “Army” is another highlight that seems to graze along his past decisions and whether or not they were for the best.

I highly recommend this album.

“Rockin’ the Suburbs” – Ben Folds (solo) -2001
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51We7PXli6L._SS500_.jpg

Overview:

While Ben Folds was producing solo tracks during his time with Ben Folds Five, this was his first solo effort. Supported by his former band and creatively spurred by Folds alone, this is as much as any fan of BFF could ask for from the solo endeavor. While Yorke’s solo album came out last year with great success to all Radiohead fans, we found that it contained a certain continuity from track to track to lead people to believe that, “all The Eraser songs sound kind of the same.” Which, to a great extent, they do. If you like Radiohead and that style, however, that becomes okay. Rockin’ the Suburbs doesn’t all sound the same. It is, on it’s own, a cohesive and unparalleled delight – topping out artists like Dave Gahan, Jarvis Cocker, and Thom Yorke in solo efforts (in my eyes) because, hey, Ben Folds was the heart of BFF. He wrote the lyrics, designed the songs, orchestrated the synchronization – he was the heart of the band more than the other group efforts. As a result, we have something with all the power of a Ben Folds Five album with all the singular heart that one man alone can produce.

Highlights:

I love every song on this album. Every song. Though, if I were pressed to name highlights, I would have to go with “Not the Same,” which chronicles a friendship with someone that completely changed through finding Jesus (and is a real treat live). “Still Fighting It’ is an emotional explanation of adulthood and the realities found within – stated in such simple and heartfelt language that it’s hard to imagine it wouldn’t get underneath anyone’s skin.

Finally, “The Luckiest” closes out this cd, and it’s an anthem of true love beyond the parameters of boy meets girl. It somehow manages to convey - in its sentimental melody and simple lyrics – the miracle of finding a partner in life that will last with you through the next 30 to 40 years, which is more involved than the prerequisite love song of “boy meets girl, boy loses girl” – this is more “boy meets girl and boy and girl know they were meant to experience the totality of their lives hand in hand.” It’s overly sentimental and sappy, but god damn, it’s beautiful.

Songs for Silverman – Ben Folds (solo) – 2005
http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51P7CP1C2TL._SS500_.jpg

Overview:

This album seems to do what the former was expected to – in the vein of great frontmen producing an album that “all sounds the same” – I think, to be fair, this album could be stated as that. The songs are brilliant and sound – piano and lyric driven, full of melody, and aching with heart. However, they all do share these similar traits. Overall, I still think this is my favorite solo album of all time. It’s Ben Folds doing what he does best – living his life and telling us about it with a piano, his humor, and his voice.

Highlights:

“You to Thank” is a tongue in cheek look at marriage that seems to come from someone who, a few years ago, wrote “The Luckiest” – and is now REALIZING what that actual partnership implies. In and out, day after day, with this one person. It’s the reality of a lifetime with someone else and how, while you love them, Christ, a lifetime is a long time. It’s brilliant, funny, and understandable. This piano on this album is really second to none.

“Give Judy My Notice” reappears on this album – dedicated fans of Folds will recognize it from at least two other EP s – and it’s been remastered to have a guitar, easy Arizonan bluesy sound here. I’m not sure why went with that – as this is one of my favorite Folds songs when it’s just him, the sentiment, and the piano. If you like the album version of this song, I would go hunting for the more stripped down version that’s out there.

Finally, “Jesusland” sings the reality of the south in such a way that I feel like I’m driving up to the Appalachians to vacation with my parents at the age of 10 again. It’s delivered like you can see these things out the window of a moving car – and garners a feeling of helplessness, hypocrisy, and sadness about the bible belt – possibly from God/Jesus himself. The melody rolls like the hills in northern Georgia, and I can’t believe that’s anything but on purpose.

“Landed” is also one of my favorites on this album. “Trusted” is another moratorium on long term relationships and marriages and how knowing someone can really amount to not knowing them at all. “Late” is about Folds’ relationship with the late Elliott Smith and it’s achingly beautiful.

All in all, if you like Ben Folds style of music, I would recommend this album over Rockin’ the Suburbs. It has more heart.

Phew. That took forever. Thanks for reading!

bballarl
06-17-2007, 06:34 PM
Jesus H. Christ. That was in-depth, beyond my standards. Good work Hoo.

Jenniehoo
06-17-2007, 06:43 PM
Thanks. I'm rarely brief.

bballarl
06-17-2007, 09:59 PM
If you had found a cat that worked for that Ben Folds summary, you would win 1000 prizes.

TomAz
06-18-2007, 05:01 AM
That Ben Folds summary is awesome. Outstanding work.

and, I really like that 'grown with' concept you started out talking. that's why I only review old people.

roberto73
06-18-2007, 09:01 AM
Because even self-mutilation is more pleasant than grading end-of-course portfolios, I give you (finally) the entire XTC discography:

White Music (1978): One of the smartest bands to emerge in the wake of The Clash and The Sex Pistols, XTC's clearest musical brethren are Magazine and Wire. Their debut owes a debt to the spirit of punk, but it skews more to the art-school side of things. The energy is manic and infectious, the guitars and keyboards in a frequently dissonant battle for supremacy, and while the result isn't always focused, it's definitely fun. XTC is probably the most hummable of the post-punk crowd, and White Music's catchiest song is "This Is Pop": a toe-tapping manifesto that indicates the direction to come. The album also features a truly bizarre version of Dylan's "All Along the Watchtower." Grade: B

Go 2 (1978): Released less than a year after White Music, this follow-up is a well-meaning, but ultimately botched set of songs. The quirkiness of their debut is still intact, but while that album had a wealth of melody complementing the chaos, Go 2 just sounds chaotic. You can admire the energy, but the not the tunes. Grade: C

Drums and Wires (1979): It's not Dylan going electric, but Drums and Wires is a major step forward from their previous two albums. The occasionally self-conscious loopiness of the first two albums has been largely jettisoned in favor of focused, immensely catchy songs. The emphasis this time is on jittery, nervy rhythm: the songs are spare and drum-heavy, and there's a palpable tension between the guitars of new addition Dave Gregory and vocalist/guitarist Andy Patridge. Partridge and Moulding prove themselves to be world-class songwriters on this album: "Making Plans for Nigel," "Helicopter," "When You're Near Me I Have Difficulty," and "Reel by Reel" are all essential listening. Infectious, funny, and very British, Drums and Wires is a landmark post-punk album. Grade: A+

Black Sea (1980): Another classic. The band were on a roll by this time, and Black Sea sees them fully adopting the "Beatlesque" flavor that would dominate their later albums. Pure pop in the best sense of the term, Black Sea is an exceptionally strong set of songs, yet it also serves as a natural bridge between their punk beginnings and the burgeoning new wave movement. "Respectable Street," "Generals and Majors," "No Language in Our Lungs," and "Towers of London" are prime examples of Partridge and Moulding's exceptional songcraft, and this album stands, with their previous record, as one of the best of its era. (For my money, Black Sea isn't quite as good as Drums and Wires, but only in the way ice cream isn't quite as good as sex.) Grade: A

English Settlement (1982): Their third classic in a row, and the clearest indication yet of where the band was eventually headed. Known for being the last album the band toured behind (singer Partridge collapsed twice during the tour, later blaming intense stage fright and announcing they'd never tour again), English Settlement is more expansive, more intricate, more beautiful than anything the band had previously attempted. While the pop punch is still there in "Senses Working Overtime," "No Thugs in Our House," and "Down in the Cockpit," the band experiments with acoustic arrangements for the first time, and the songs as a whole are longer and more complex than their previous work. Some people look at English Settlement as a transitional album, moving the band from their post-punk/new wave roots to the acoustic, orchestral pop of their later albums. In any case, it's a winner. Grade: A

Mummer (1983): And then the comedown. Their weakest collection of songs since Go 2, it's hard not to blame this album on Partridge's breakdown. It's not exactly a bad album, but the spark and inspiration definitely seem to be missing, with "Love on a Farmboy's Wages" the only true standout track. The rest of the album follows a samey thread: mellow, acoustic rock that eventually fades into the background. Okay, but disappointing. Grade: C+

The Big Express (1984): Or, The Overproduced 80's Album. The Big Express is an odd collection of songs. Boasting some of their most exciting melodies since Black Sea ("All You Pretty Girls," "I Bought Myself a Liarbird," "You're the Wish You Are I Had"), this album recovers somewhat from the disappointing Mummer. But other songs feature huge, echoing drums, vocal distortion, and other studio manipulation that seems hugely out of place. It's dynamic, sure, but at times it also doesn't sound like XTC. Not a misstep; more like an experiment that doesn't quite pay off. Grade: B-

Skylarking (1986): Not just a return to form, Skylarking is where Partridge and Moulding stake their claim as two of the best British songwriters since Lennon and McCartney. Every song is a mini-classic, bursting with melody and invention. "Grass," "The Meeting Place," "That's Really Super, Supergirl," "Season Cycle," "Earn Enough for Us," "Big Day" and of course, "Dear God" are all beautiful examples of the possibilities available within the boundaries of "rock and roll." Aided and abetted by producer Todd Rundgren, Skylarking takes up the challenge issued by the best works of The Beatles, The Beach Boys, and The Kinks, and meets it in winning style. Their masterpiece. Grade: A+

Oranges and Lemons (1989): This is where I came in. Released when I was a sophomore in high school, this was the first XTC album I heard, and my affection for it knows no bounds. (Sidenote: the fact that I loved it so much while growing up in Cowtown, Ohio, explains as well as anything else why I didn't quite fit in with my peers.) Where Skylarking hinted at the psychedelia of the latter-day Beatles and Beach Boys, Oranges & Lemons jumps in with both feet. Still unabashedly poppy, Patridge and Moulding are in fine form – in fact, the first three songs ("Garden of Earthly Delights," "The Mayor of Simpleton," and "King for a Day") are as good as anything they've ever done, and Partridge's delicate closer, "Chalkhills and Children" wouldn't have been out of place on Skylarking. If there's a weakness, it's when the oddball psychedelia gets out of hand in the album's second half. "Hold Me My Daddy," "Across This Antheap," and "Pink Thing," while catchy, are self-consciously zany ("Hey everyone! Look how crazy I can be!") and sound a little forced next to the first half's agile pop. A drawback, but not enough to spoil what amounts to another triumph. Grade: A-

Nonsuch (1992): With their gift for melody polished to a high gloss, Moulding and Partridge offer up 17 pure pop gems that act as a final chapter in the unintentional trilogy that began with Skylarking. "The Ballad of Peter Pumpkinhead," "The Smartest Monkeys," "Omnibus," The Disappointed," "Books Are Burning," and an easy half dozen more could quickly become standards, if the band still played live. Strangely enough, the wealth of melody and the hour-plus running time of the album combine to weaken the overall effect. By the time the final song rolls around, the listener is approaching orchestral pop overload. As such, it doesn't quite scale the same heights as its two predecessors, but it still stands head and shoulders over most albums by other bands. Grade: B+

Apple Venus, Pt. 1 (1999): A lengthy hiatus would kill lesser bands (hi, Stone Roses), but the nine years off before Apple Venus, Pt. 1 (due to intraband squabbles and label troubles) doesn't appear to have diminished the band's ambition or talent. Not a rock album in any sense of the term, Apple Venus is a lush collection of songs that feels almost classical in mood and scope. With only two songs written by Colin Moulding, this could almost qualify as an Andy Partridge solo album. There are some uncharacteristically dark moments on display ("Your Dictionary," "I Can't Own Her"), and it's tempting to read into them the band's struggles during the rest of the 90's. Melody wins out, though, ("I'd Like That" and "Harvest Festival," for starters) and Apple Venus, Pt. 1, with its emphasis on the majestic and baroque, stands as a singular achievement in the band's long history. Grade: B+

Wasp Star (Apple Venus, Pt. 2) (2000): Recorded at the same time as the previous album, Wasp Star is the sound of XTC returning to its roots. The previous two albums, as successful as they were, often seemed like a band trying too hard; Wasp Star's collection of stripped-down pop songs, by contrast, hearkens back to their 80's albums and sounds like a band having fun for the first time in years. "Stupidly Happy" and "I'm the Man Who Murdered Love" wouldn't sound out of place on Black Sea; "Wounded Horse" could be a bluesy outtake from Oranges & Lemons; "You and the Clouds Will Still Be Beautiful" and "The Wheel and the Maypole" would slot in perfectly on English Settlement. This album doesn't seem to be a cynical retrenching or a lazy recreation of past glories; if anything, it's the sound of a band more recently known for labor and craft finally relaxing and getting loose. If this is the final album in their illustrious career, they've gone out on a high note. Grade: A-.

Also worth seeking out (especially if you're a fan) is Transistor Blast (1998), a four-disc set of BBC sessions and live cuts. The live stuff, especially, is a revelation. Dating from the band's late 70's/early 80's pre-stage fright years, it's fascinating to see what a ferocious live act they were, fairly bursting with energy and excitement. This isn't an essential purchase for everyone, but for the fan it's worth a listen to hear a band evolve before your ears.

Edit:
Here are a couple links to mixes of songs I reference in these reviews.
1978-1984: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=J5XSZ0IM
1986-2000: http://www.megaupload.com/?d=7SBODU5M

Track lists appear a few posts after this one.

Jenniehoo
06-18-2007, 09:44 AM
I added a link to a Ben Folds mix I made at the beginning of my review - please go back and check it out. Then you can mock me if you disagree with anything I said.

Free mocking! Check it out!

bug on your lip
06-18-2007, 11:05 AM
Oranges and Lemons (1989): This is where I came in. Released when I was a sophomore in high school, this was the first XTC album I heard, and my affection for it knows no bounds. (Sidenote: the fact that I loved it so much while growing up in Cowtown, Ohio, explains as well as anything else why I didn't quite fit in with my peers.)


mah life sounds very parrallel 2 yers....

altho mah peeps still look at me weird when i sing voraciously along to "That's Really Super, Supergirl"


STRONG REVIEW THO' ! GOod Work
what bands do yahs got in dah pipeline ?

xoxoxo
bug

roberto73
06-18-2007, 12:34 PM
mah life sounds very parrallel 2 yers....

altho mah peeps still look at me weird when i sing voraciously along to "That's Really Super, Supergirl"


STRONG REVIEW THO' ! GOod Work
what bands do yahs got in dah pipeline ?

xoxoxo
bug

I think I made the mistake of promising Eels, Midnight Oil, Teenage Fanclub, and The Go-Betweens to various people. Seeing as it took me three weeks-ish to get all of XTC up, I figure I'll be done sometime in September.

kreutz2112
06-18-2007, 12:45 PM
roberto your sig is the best...

roberto73
06-18-2007, 12:45 PM
Following Jennie's lead (or the lead of the person who came up with the idea if it wasn't her), I created a sampler of songs referenced in my XTC reviews. Because their discography is so extensive, the sampler is split in two. The links appear above, in post #842. Here are the track listings:

1978-1984:
This Is Pop
All Along the Watchtower
Making Plans for Nigel
Helicopter
When You're Near Me I Have Difficulty
Real by Reel
Respectable Street
Generals and Majors
No Language in Our Lungs
Ball and Chain
Senses Working Overtime
No Thugs in Our House
All You Pretty Girls
I Bought Myself a Liarbird
You're the Wish You Are I Had

1986-2000:
The Meeting Place
That's Really Super, Supergirl
Earn Enough for Us
Dear God
The Mayor of Simpleton
King for a Day
Chalkhills and Children
The Ballad of Peter Pumpkinhead
The Smartest Monkeys
The Disappointed
I'd Like That
Your Dictionary
Stupidly Happy
I'm the Man Who Murdered Love
You and the Clouds Will Still Be Beautiful

Enjoy. (And thanks, Jennie, for the inspiration.)

bug on your lip
06-18-2007, 01:02 PM
Following Jennie's lead (or the lead of the person who came up with the idea if it wasn't her), I created a sampler of songs referenced in my XTC reviews. Because their discography is so extensive, the sampler is split in two.


<3
<3
<3

TomAz
06-18-2007, 02:28 PM
I've downloaded the BFF and XTC mixes. I think this is a very cool enhancement to the reviews. I'd go back and do a Costello or Replacements mix or something if I thought anyone wanted one.

kreutz2112
06-18-2007, 02:44 PM
I've downloaded the BFF and XTC mixes. I think this is a very cool enhancement to the reviews. I'd go back and do a Costello or Replacements mix or something if I thought anyone wanted one.

I would want one Tom.

TomAz
06-18-2007, 02:44 PM
which? what?

kreutz2112
06-18-2007, 02:48 PM
which? what?

costello, replacements

sydaud
06-18-2007, 05:47 PM
Black Sea (1980): Another classic. The band were on a roll by this time, and Black Sea sees them fully adopting the "Beatlesque" flavor that would dominate their later albums. Pure pop in the best sense of the term, Black Sea is an exceptionally strong set of songs, yet it also serves as a natural bridge between their punk beginnings and the burgeoning new wave movement. "Respectable Street," "Generals and Majors," "No Language in Our Lungs," and "Towers of London" are prime examples of Partidge and Moulding's exceptional songcraft, and this album stands, with their previous record, as one of the best of its era. (For my money, Black Sea isn't quite as good as Drums and Wires, but only in the way ice cream isn't quite as good as sex.) Grade: A



Fantastic job sir!

My favorite XTC song (besides "That's Really Super, Supergirl") is "Love At First Sight" from this album.

mountmccabe
06-18-2007, 06:40 PM
I tried to dl the first XTC mix but megaupload says I have to wait 373 minutes so I am getting the BF(F) instead. For now.

What I mean is thanks, folks.

roberto73
06-18-2007, 07:08 PM
I tried to dl the first XTC mix but megaupload says I have to wait 373 minutes

Wow. That shouldn't be happening. Kreutz, did you have the same problem?

kreutz2112
06-18-2007, 07:13 PM
no, I got it fine.

mountmccabe
06-18-2007, 07:31 PM
Wow. That shouldn't be happening. Kreutz, did you have the same problem?

Oh, I'm sorry. There's no reason to think there's any problem at all with the upload.

Megaupload has time/bandwith limits for each downloader. I had recently gotten something exceedingly large from them thus I have to wait until tomorrow.

PassiveTheory
06-18-2007, 07:45 PM
Anybody do Echo and the Bunnymen yet?...

Or Arab Strap?

kreutz2112
06-18-2007, 07:47 PM
Anybody do Echo and the Bunnymen yet?...

Or Arab Strap?

Hannah made a summary. One page back.

bmack86
06-18-2007, 07:48 PM
Anybody do Echo and the Bunnymen yet?...

Or Arab Strap?

Looking before posting is a good way to not look stupid. Just sayin...

PassiveTheory
06-18-2007, 07:53 PM
It's far far too late for me to salvage any idea that I'm not stupid on this board, bmack, far too late...

If not Arab Strap then... Um... Can we get one for... Fuck... Zero 7? Or how about... The Eurythmics?

CuervoPH
06-18-2007, 07:58 PM
Thank you Roberto and Jennie for the XTC and BFF mixes respectively. Thank you also, Roberto, for your indepth XTC review. I had "Skylarking", "Oranges and Lemons", and "Nonsuch", but that was about it. I first heard them when "Dear God" came out, and only ended up getting those three. I will be revisiting them now.

roberto73
06-18-2007, 08:10 PM
Thank you Roberto and Jennie for the XTC and BFF mixes respectively. Thank you also, Roberto, for your indepth XTC review. I had "Skylarking", "Oranges and Lemons", and "Nonsuch", but that was about it. I first heard them when "Dear God" came out, and only ended up getting those three. I will be revisiting them now.

That's a pretty fantastic introduction you had, though. If you're in the mood for full albums, I'd backtrack and explore the three that I think constitute their first peak: Drums and Wires, Black Sea, and English Settlement.

bug on your lip
06-19-2007, 05:52 AM
The Go-Betweens

Pleez
Danks U

TomAz
06-19-2007, 08:18 AM
costello, replacements

Here's your Replacements mix (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=9IZE8CJT)

from Hootenanny:

Run It
Color Me Impressed
Take Me Down to the Hospital
Mr Whirly
Lovelines

from Let It Be:

I Will Dare
Androgynous
Black Diamond
Unsatisfied

from Tim:

Kiss Me on the Bus
Waitress in the Sky
Bastards of Young
Left of the Dial
Here Comes a Regular

from Pleased to Meet Me:

Alex Chilton
Red Red Wine
Skyway
Can't Hardly Wait

from Don't Tell a Soul:

Talent Show
They're Blind
Anywhere Is Better Than Here
Asking Me Lies

...

bug on your lip
06-19-2007, 08:22 AM
Asking Me Lies is currently mah favorite Mats track of all timez

good mix Tom

TomAz
06-19-2007, 08:27 AM
thanks. I had a hard time limiting it to 22 songs.

TomAz
06-19-2007, 08:58 AM
costello, replacements

Here's your Costello mix (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=I1WFIUC0). Like the Replacements mix, it's roughly in chronoogical order. Also, the mix is too long, 24 songs, but I keep thinking I left stuff off.

From My Aim Is True:

Alison
The Angels Wanna Wear My Red Shoes
I'm Not Angry
Watching the Detectives

From This Year's Model:

Pump It Up
(I Don't Want To Go To) Chelsea
Radio Radio

From Armed Forces:

Accidents Will Happen
Oliver's Army
Two Little Hitlers
(What's So Funny 'Bout) Peace Love & Understanding

From Get Happy!!:

The Imposter
Possession
Clowntime Is Over

From Almost Blue:

Good Year for the Roses

From Trust:

Clubland
Watch Your Step

From Imperial Bedroom:

Beyond Belief
Man Out of Time
Almost Blue
The Loved Ones

From Punch the Clock:

Every Day I Write the Book
Shipbuilding

From King of America:

Indoor Fireworks

...

breakjaw
06-19-2007, 09:26 AM
Thank you,Jennie,Tom and Roberto for the great mixes!I didn't know a whole lot about BFF,but I will now,and it's great to revisit XTC.Also Tom has saved me from a nightmare task(I was going to post an Elvis Costello mix,but it would be literally impossible for me to filter the songs I would want to include to only 20 or 24 or whatever).

roberto73
06-19-2007, 09:29 AM
The Go-Betweens

Pleez
Danks U

Patience, Grasshopper. I'll start on them as soon as I go back and listen to their early stuff. It's been a while.

TomAz
06-19-2007, 09:37 AM
I don't mean to overwhelm the thread with mixes..

BUT

last night in chat FOI asked me to do a Dylan mix. So here it is. It's a two-parter and cuts off at 1981. Yablo can make Part 3 to complete the picture.

also, I don't know how I left Mr. Tamborine Man off this. Oversight.


Dylan 1962-66 (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=AF90A7NH)

The Times They Are a-Changin' (from The Times They Are a-Changin')
Blowin' in the Wind (from The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan)
It Ain't Me Babe (from Another Side of Bob Dylan)

from Bringin' It All Back Home:
Subterranean Homesick Blues
Maggie's Farm
Bob Dylan's 115th Dream

from Highway 61 Revisited:
Like a Rolling Stone
Ballad of a Thin Man
Queen Jane Approximately

Positively 4th Street (single)

from Blonde on Blonde:
I Want You
Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again
Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowlands


Dylan 1967-81 (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=8SED5M8X)

from John Wesley Harding:
All Along the Watchtower
I'll Be Your Baby Tonight

from New Morning:
If Not For You
The Man in Me

from The Basement Tapes:
Tears of Rage
You Ain't Goin' Nowhere

Knockin' on Heaven's Door (from Pat Garret and Billy the Kid soundtrack)
I Shall Be Released (single)
Tangled Up in Blue (from Blood on the Tracks)
Hurricane (from Desire)
Gotta Serve Somebody (from Slow Train Comin')
Every Grain of Sand (from Shot of Love)

...

bug on your lip
06-19-2007, 09:41 AM
From This Year's Model:

Pump It Up
(I Don't Want To Go To) Chelsea
Radio Radio



daymmmm, i don't know much aboot ElvisC, but this looks like the album to get

bmack86
06-19-2007, 11:37 AM
Tom,
No Masters of War?
That is all,
Bryan

TomAz
06-19-2007, 11:53 AM
do you see Valarie? I knew I'd get criticized. told ya.

Bryan: I was trying to keep the mix to a manageable number of songs. No Masters of War, no Mr Tamborine Man, no Visions of Johanna, no Desolation Row, no Blind Wille McTell, no It's All Over Now Baby Blue, no It's All Right Ma, no Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll, no Idiot Wind, no If You See Her Say Hello, no Just Like a Woman, no Shelter From the Storm, no Don't Think Twice It's Alright, no Dear Landlord.... shall I go on?

edit: Also, there's no This Wheel's on Fire, no Lily Rosemary and the Jack of Hearts, no Absolutely Sweet Marie, no Million Dollar Bash, no Love Minus Zero/No Limit, no Highway 61 Revisited, no Isis, no Rainy Day Women..


but there IS Bob Dylan's 115th Dream, because I fucking love that song. I think it's my favorite. That or Positively 4th St.

bmack86
06-19-2007, 11:55 AM
Damn, those songs listed there would be a great 4th disc.

TomAz
06-19-2007, 12:34 PM
2nd link's up now

PassiveTheory
06-19-2007, 01:12 PM
I'll d/l the Costello mix when I get back from graduation.

TomAz
06-19-2007, 01:20 PM
no, passive, you'll download them all and you'll like them. got that?

J~$$$
06-19-2007, 01:22 PM
fuck that you'll LOVE them.

PS thanks Tom.

Hannahrain
06-19-2007, 03:29 PM
Dear Hannah

I.O.U. one [1] Dead Milkmen discography from a million years back. I think I will not do it, but I'm reminding myself in case I decide that I'm up to it.

Cordially, J$

Ok.

bmack86
06-19-2007, 03:48 PM
Animal Collective

Spirit They're Gone, Spirit They've Vanished (2000)-For all intents and purposes, this is an Avey Tare solo recording, but it does feature Panda Bear on percussion. This is Animal Collective caught in the poppier spectrum of their work. Lots of codeine-soaked vocals, swirling noises and excellent melodies. I've heard that these songs are all based on children's fairy tales; they certainly contain a level of whimsy that runs thru much of the best Animal Collective work. Less sonically dense than some of their other work, but this is a damn good collection of songs, and any fan of their work would not go wrong by hearing this. Grade: B+

Danse Manatee (2001)-The polar opposite of the first recording. This features Panda Bear, Avey Tare and Geologist, and is a noisy, freeform mess. There's some cool sounds on here, and sometimes things click in really impressive ways (for my money, Essplode is one of their better songs, and Runnin' the Round Ball is very interesting) but for the most part this one exists in a druggy haze that they don't seem to care to snap out of. Not great listening, but occasionally interesting. Grade: C-

Hollinndagain (2002)-Another formless, free floating piece, but this time it's not quite as mindless sounding. These were played live on their first tour with Black Dice, and they have some pretty cool sounds on here. It's definitely more akin to Danse Manatee, but a step up from those songs. You can listen to it, at least. Grade: B-

Campfire Songs (2003)-The first appearance of Deakin, and it can be considered the first album to have the whole Animal Collective (Geologist did the recording). This was recorded on the front porch of a cottage, and it sounds like what the title suggests; songs sung by friends in a rural, relaxed environment. These songs could be mistaken as folky endeavors, except for the fact that they retain the repetitive manner of the more experimental Animal Collective pieces. They bridge the gap between the first two albums, creating an impressive acoustic melange that'll leave you in a trance of bliss. Check it out if you can find it. Grade: A

Here Comes the Indian (2003)-Animal Collective proper on this one. All four members are playing, and this album sounds wildly different than all the predecessors. It's like they returned to Danse Manatee with some great ideas and a better understanding of how to reach them. The result is a swirl of noises and textures that occasionally focuses into some amazing melodies or rhythms. This has to be listened to as a piece, and will only work with a certain mindset, so I can't recommend it unconditionally, but, if you are in the mood, this one is a great piece of work that'll get under your skin and not leave. Grade: A-

Sung Tongs (2004)-Avey Tare and Panda Bear again, this time doing the acoustic thing. However, this is a definite step up from either of their pop based albums prior. The main difference here is that they're writing melodies that just don't quit. Leaf House and Who Could Win a Rabbit alone would have made this album, but the whole thing is a masterpiece of intricate vocal work and circular melodies and rhythms. More experimental than it lets on, this is probably the best place to start with Animal Collective. Genius. Grade: A

Feels (2005)-Prior to this one, I listened to these guys, but not with a great deal of regularity. This one is their straight up pop album, or as close to that as they've yet come. Grass, Purple Bottle, Did You See the Words and Loch Raven are some of the best Indie tracks that've surfaced this decade. Banshee Beat is in a league of its own for the sheer creative force. They continue with the melodies and harmonies explored on Sung Tongs, making them more dense and intricate, and the result is near perfection. Grade: A

Strawberry Jam (2007)-It reminds me of a continuation of the ideas from Feels, but even more focused. They have some of their best pop songwriting ever on here. For Reverend Green is just about my favorite AC song, and Peacebone is a fantastic way to start the proceedings. Grade: A

full on idle
06-19-2007, 04:30 PM
Tom - thanks for the Dylan mixes, eff teh haterz. I grabbed the first one and have been listening to it at work today, I'll get part II at home. I really love Ballad of a Thin Man, it's gorgeous.

J~$$$
06-20-2007, 07:55 AM
Ok.

OH SCHNAPS!!!!

roberto73
06-20-2007, 11:14 AM
The Go-Betweens
Formed in Brisbane, Australia in the late 70s, The Go-Betweens eventually became one of the great, unheralded bands of the 80s. The focal point of the band was always the singing/guitar-playing/songwriting duo of Robert Forster and Grant McLennan. They recorded six albums between 1981 and 1988, and then disbanded for a decade. Forster and McLennan reunited in 2000 and recorded three more albums before McLennan's untimely death in 2006.

Send Me a Lullaby (1981): Their only album I don't own, I've had a hell of a time tracking it down in digital form. Everything I've read about it sounds very similar to the frequent criticism of first albums recorded by bands that eventually become great: the potential is there, but they haven't found their voice yet.

Before Hollywood (1983): The promise latent in their debut came to fruition on their second album. Forster and McLennan write songs that are highly melodic but structurally intricate, with unusual shifts in tempo and unconventional progressions from verse to chorus. There's also a heavy post-punk influence on this album, with an emphasis on bass, ominous keyboard, and spiky guitar (as on the impressive opener "A Bad Debt Follows You"). The catchy melodies are often juxtaposed with an air of melancholy and nostalgia, marking out The Go-Betweens as a band with more on its mind than simply crafting memorable tunes. "Two Steps Step Out," with its jerky tempo and optimistic chorus, and the delicate, piano-flecked "Dusty in Here" are particular standouts, but the undisputed classic on this album is "Cattle and Cane," an acoustic/electric masterwork that single-handedly establishes the band as a force to be reckoned with. Grade: A-

Spring Hill Fair (1984): On the surface, Spring Hill Fair seems to have cast off some of the quirks that made Before Hollywood such a compelling listen. Sporting occasional string and brass accompaniment, it initially seems as though the band is going for conventional, middle-of-the-road pop. Repeated listens, though, reveal the same depths as its predecessor, only on a much broader palette. The chiming guitars are still at the forefront, and the McLennan-sung opener, "Bachelor Kisses," is a prime example of the melodic cleverness at work in the songwriting: the traditional-sounding arrangement is interrupted by a jarring break mid-song that mirrors a shift in the tone of the lyrics. The strongest tunes, though, are Forster's: "Draining the Pool for You" (a snide kiss-off by a maintenance man to the star he works for) and "Man O' Sand to Girl O' Sea" (an insistent and desperate song of lost love). An album that grows on you. Grade: B+

Liberty Belle and the Black Diamond Express (1986): A warmer record than their previous efforts, Liberty Belle sees the band striking a more realized balance between Forster's anxiety and McLennan's romanticism. This can be heard immediately in the album's first two songs: Forster's jaunty and urgent "Spring Rain" and McLennan's yearning "The Ghost and the Black Hat." Musically, this album has more in common with Before Hollywood – their old edge appears on several songs, most notably "In the Core of a Flame" – but the band continues to expand their sound, exploring unusual texture and instrumentation. This is a top-flight collection of songs that sees the band continuing to grow by leaps and bounds. Grade: A-

Tallulah (1987): Opening with McLennan's soaring "Right Here," Tallulah marks the point where The Go-Betweens wholeheartedly embrace the fuller sound hinted at in their last two albums. Jam-packed with beautiful, instantly memorable melodies, and released at the flashpoint where independent music was joining the mainstream, it's mind-boggling that this album didn't elevate the band to contender status. The gorgeous chorus of "You Tell Me"; the pulsing, organ-driven "Cut it Out"; "The House That Jack Kerouac Built," with its insistent tempo; the magesterial "I Just Get Caught Out" – this is an album of riches, to be savored again and again. Grade: A

16 Lovers Lane (1988): All roads, to use a lame pun, lead to 16 Lovers Lane. Lyrically somber but musically glorious, the album is an unofficial song cycle about love gone wrong, and features the strongest, most consistent songwriting Forster and McLennan ever commited to record. "Love Goes On!" is McLennan's melodically euphoric yet lyrically downbeat opener, Forster sings the bittersweet "Love Is a Sign," and "Streets of Your Town" is the closest the band ever got to a hit single. The album moves from strength to strength, seamlessly incorporating brass and strings to augment and flesh out the never-stronger guitars; if I were to attempt to list the album's best tracks, it would be easier to simply list all the songs on the album. 16 Lovers Lane ends with McLennan's devastating "Dive for Your Memory." The song proved to be the band's last recorded work for over a decade. Essential listening. Grade: A+

The Friends of Rachel Worth (2000): Forster and McLennan returned a dozen years later with this album. While it doesn't scale the heights of their earlier work, it's a worthy return, recorded, curiously enough, with the members of Sleater-Kinney. While the album features a handful of songs that wouldn't have sounded out of place on some of their earlier albums ("Magic in Here," "Spirit," and "Going Blind," especially), The Friends of Rachel Worth sounds like an album recorded by two old friends who haven't quite gotten used to working together again. Not a failure, but not an overwhelming success. Grade: B

Bright Yellow Bright Orange (2003): Altogether more satisfying than The Friends of Rachel Worth, this album sees Forster and McLennan more confident in their partnership, and the resulting songs are more worthy of inclusion to the Go-Betweens' canon. The early tension between the somber lyrics and the sprightly tunes is largely absent, but the songs are as melodic as ever; "Caroline and I" and "Poison in the Walls" are especially strong, and "Old Mexico" is the rare song where Forster and McLennan share vocal duties, the lush chorus an intriguing counterpoint to the staccato verses. Even though Bright Yellow Bright Orange doesn't break any new ground, Forster and McLennan now seem content to simply write some great pop songs. Grade: B+

Oceans Apart (2005): The death of McLennan in 2006 is all the sadder considering how strong The Go-Betweens' final album proved to be. Oceans Apart features Forster and McLennan's strongest collection of songs since 16 Lovers Lane, and seemed to promise that their career renaissance would continue unabated. Both writers offer up some of their best work: Forster gives us opening track "Here Comes a City" (perhaps the most insistent song in the band's career) and the poignant "Darlinghurst Nights," while McLennan's "Finding You" features one of his characteristically beautiful melodies. As strong as this album is, the net effect is one of loss. Listening to it now, it's hard not to mourn McLennan's passing, and wonder what the band would have done next. Grade: A

Both Forster and McLennan recorded several solo albums throughout the 90s. The best is McLennan's Horsebreaker Star (1995), a double album with nary a bad track.

And here's a link to a mix of songs referenced in my reviews, along with the track list:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=RRG9EGVO

The Go-Betweens
A Bad Debt Follows You
Two Steps Step Out
Cattle and Cane
Bachelor Kisses
Draining the Pool for You
Man o' Sand to Girl o' Sea
Spring Rain
In the Core of a Flame
Head Full of Steam
Right Here
You Tell Me
I Just Get Caught Out
The House That Jack Kerouac Built
Love Goes On!
Love Is a Sign
Streets of Your Town
Dive for Your Memory
Magic in Here
Spirit
Going Blind
Caroline and I
Poison in the Walls
Old Mexico
Here Comes a City
Finding You
Darlinghurst Nights

bug on your lip
06-20-2007, 11:24 AM
FUKKIN STARS ROBERTO !!!

AWESOME !

roberto73
06-20-2007, 07:14 PM
Glad you like. I was feeling ambitious this morning. Midnight Oil and Eels to come.

PassiveTheory
06-21-2007, 01:45 AM
I figure I'll do Tool because I have every one of their albums...

Opiate [EP] - 1992
http://aryianna0.tripod.com/cdimages/91985423.jpg

I got this 3rd amid my Tool collection (the order being Aenima, Lateralus, Opiate, Undertow, 10,000 Days), and I don't regret having it one bit. Despite the fact it isn't a full-length album, it could still serve as a proper introduction to those of whom you'd like to introduce to Tool. Again, the EP suffers because the thick production efforts (more glossy and seamless and what-not) isn't here as it is in Aenima and afterwards, however the band definitely knew what direction it was heading in; "Sweat", the lead off-track, deals with with the relationship of man and the concept of sex, "Hush" is a blatant "fuck you" to censorship, and the title-track (and "Opiate" is still, to this day, one of the greatest Tool songs ever) stand out as the true gems. The two live tracks would have done more good had they been recorded versions (and "Jerk-Off"'s guitar riff has always bothered me), however, as far as EPs go? I see nothing wrong with giving a new Tool fan this EP as their starting point...

Overall Rating: B- (like I said, some tracks are just not developed enough to have been widely released, and it's not a full-album either)

Undertow - 1993
http://www.personal.psu.edu/jjs5085/Music/Tool/CD-Undertow.jpg

I'll be honest and upfront... This is by far my least favorite Tool record. Despite the fact it showcases some of Maynard's most aggressive vocals (the snarls on "Intolerance" during the verse are as filled with spite and hatred as any other lyrics I have ever heard), the sludgy production just completely turns me off... However, that being said, it also has 2 very awesome Tool songs ("Prison Sex" and "Sober" [both delving further into Maynard's perception of religion, conflict, and the power and corruption it wields]) and continues to delve further into very deep, dark, tormented territory. The title-track and "Crawl Away" [a track that if you've ever gotten into a tangled relationship with a love one, ought to generally resonate with your sentiments] are also 2 gems that no Tool fan ought to be without, however, if you have the opportunity to download the singles of "Prison Sex", "Sober" and/or "Intolerance", I suggest you do so first, then come back later to download the whole album.

Overall Rating: B- (Again... 3 fantastic singles and 2 other great tracks, the rest aren't the greatest...)

Aenima - 1995
http://www.lyricallysquared.com/albums/aenima.jpg

Thankfully they saved their best material for their next album. This is the crowning achievement of the groups work, in my opinion, as well as the first Tool album I ever got into. Covering topics vast as desensitization ("Stinkfist"), martyrdom and hypocrisy ("Eulogy"), criticizing short-sighted fans who think they've sold out ("Hooker With A Penis"), abusive relationships/premature ejaculation ("Pushit") and everything else under the sun, this is quite simply put THE best Tool record ever made. Every single song aside from the 4 brief instrumentals are pure genius, and I believe this is a record that ought to belong in anyone's record collection.

Overall Rating: A (4 intermission tracks?... Give me a fucking break...)

Lateralus - 2003
http://bioinf.ucsd.edu/~ajoyce/img/lateralus.jpg

Well, it's incredibly hard to follow up a great record, especially a masterpiece of one like Aenima, so it's not surprising that the Tool boys next release wasn't as epic as their 1995 magnum opus. Lateralus has a terrific opener in "The Grudge" an 8 minute sprawling, angry-as-fuck track that's definitely one of the albums bright spots. Skip over the first interim track and next you have "The Patient", another song exploring the more personal themes on the album (Aenima, in my mind, was a more extroverted record, while Lateralus started the turn towards a more introverted tone in Maynard's lyrics for Tool) and is another very stellar track, but not a memorable one (unfortunately). Next up is "Schism", probably the most extroverted track on the album (seeing as it deals with the split in the Christian faith and what-not), and is probably the best track, if not the second best track, on the record. It's definitely got the best bass riff on the album, as well as some of Danny Carey's best drum work on the album (the bass drum part at 6:00 is epic), and it's definitely a stellar enough track to buy the entire album for (unfortunately, it's definitely not the track to pick to truly represent the album). "Parabol" and "Parabola" are a first for Tool, a pair of songs that come together to form a 9 minute story, one containing probably the most memorable guitar riff on the record. "Ticks and Leeches" has the best build of any track on the record, but its a tough track to swallow for folks just new to Tool (hence my suggestion for Aenima over Lateralus), but another bright spot on the record. A lot of people like the title track, but it's not one of my favourites, and unfortunately from there the album dips significantly with the triad of "Disposition", "Reflection" and "Triad", of which "Disposition" is a personal favorite but, for many, just one really LONG interim track. Also, I hate "Faaip de Opiad", so that's kinda why I don't favor the record that much.

Overall Rating: B+ (getting rid of the final track and the triad would do the record wonders)

10,000 Days - 2007
http://blogs.warwick.ac.uk/images/music/2006/07/12/tool-10000days.jpg

Ah, yes, the new record. Depending on your tastes you either love it or hate it, and I understand why one would hate it seeing as it's Tool's most introverted record yet (the title is an allusion to Maynard's mother's time living on this earth after suffering a crippling stroke) with the most extroverted track being the opener, the magnificent "Vicarious", a personal favorite that presents a duality in regards to humans' fascination with violence in the media and what-not, definitely worth buying the record for this track alone. "Vicarious" is followed by "Jambi", a track I initially didn't like but has grown on me. It's definitely a monster of a track (both the guitar and bass riffs are amazing), as well as a personal live favorite and most likely the manifestation of Maynard's feeling concerning his mother (aww... how cute). After "Jambi" the album takes a serious chill pill with the 2 part Wings for Marie saga; "Wings for Marie" and the title track. Unfortunately, I just never really liked this series of tracks, and I was kinda bored when I saw them do both parts, in sequence, live, so yes, it's a feasible down part of the album. Thankfully business picks right back up with "The Pot" which has one of the strangest combination opening bass riff and cold vocal that I've never heard (after a couple of listens you will be hooked), and definitely the 2nd or 3rd best track on the album. "Lipan Conjuring" and "Lost Keys" are another set of chill tracks that just, you know, miss the mark (for me at least) and contribute to the negativity surrounding the quality of the album. But again, Maynard and the boys do not disappoint for long, as they roar right back with the 11 minute epic "Rosetta Stoned" (another track with an apparent drug reference) another terrific showcase of how talented the boys behind Maynard are. "Intension" gets interesting around the 4:30 minute mark, but is otherwise forgettable. "Right In Two" is a very overlooked track, and the 4th best track on the album in my opinion, definitely worth a few listens, at the very least. Again, however, Tool decides to end it on a weird note with "Viginti Tres"... Oh well. Great record otherwise.

Overall Rating: B+ (a very hit/miss record for Tool... my problem being that there are two throwaway tracks between each good/great song on the record)

mountmccabe
06-24-2007, 01:13 PM
I have gotten/listened to the following albums as a result of this thread. I'm not claiming that my listening was exclusively because of this thread but this thread gets atleast partial credit. Also these weren't always the first choices or best reviewed but whatev. Also I'm only listening to one album per artist.

PJ Harvey - Dry
Jawbox - Grippe
Luna - Penthouse
Tom Waits - Rain Dogs
The Roots - Phrenology
Boredoms - Super Roots 7
Nick Cave - Henry's Dream
David Bowie - Diamond Dogs
Big Black - The Rich Man's 8-track
Bob Dylan - Bringing It All Back Home
Yo La Tengo - And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out

So specific thank yous to bballarl, bmack86, Courtney, roberto73, Slushmier, TomAz, Tylerdurden31, york707 and general thank yous to all all others that've contributed. I love this thread.

bmack86
06-24-2007, 01:21 PM
John, if you can hunt down the vinyl of Big Black-Atomizer, the sound quality is far superior. You can really hear Steve Albini's guitar ripping your flesh off.

mountmccabe
06-24-2007, 01:24 PM
John, if you can hunt down the vinyl of Big Black-Atomizer, the sound quality is far superior. You can really hear Steve Albini's guitar ripping your flesh off.

This is one of my new life goals.

bmack86
06-24-2007, 01:48 PM
So, I'm going thru my digital music collection, and making a list of all the artists I'd feel comfortable covering.
Edit: ones in bold have been requested

...And You Will Know Us By the Trail of Dead
AFI
Air
Apples in Stereo
At the Drive In
Basement Jaxx
Beastie Boys
The Beatles (I know, it's been done)
Beck
Belle and Sebastian
Black Flag
Blur
Booker T & MGs (partial)
Boris
Brian Eno
Bright Eyes
Butthole Surfers
The Byrds
Cocteau Twins
Coil
David Bowie
Deerhoof
Enon
Faust
Fugazi
Husker Du
Jesus and Mary Chain
The Jesus Lizard
The Kinks (nothing post Muswell Hillbillies)
Kraftwerk
Lightning Bolt
Minutemen
Mission of Burma
Modest Mouse
My Bloody Valentine (W/all the singles and EPs)
Neil Young (it'd take some time)
Nine Inch Nails
Of Montreal
Olivia Tremor Control/Circulatory System
Otis Redding
Peter Gabriel
R.E.M.
Rancid
White Zombie/Rob Zombie
Roxy Music (partial)
Scott Walker (partial)
Sepultura
Shellac
Six Organs of Admittance
Stereolab
This Heat
The Velvet Underground (with lots of bootlegs)

If you want any of these, let me know.

miscorrections
06-24-2007, 01:52 PM
would you cover boris? i have pink but i'd like to get a little information on the other albums.

bmack86
06-24-2007, 02:26 PM
Sure thing. I'll have that in about a day.

mountmccabe
06-24-2007, 02:30 PM
would you cover boris?


Sure thing. I'll have that in about a day.

What song are you going to do? If you're taking requests I want you to record "Anno Onya no Onryou"

miscorrections
06-24-2007, 02:30 PM
thanks a lot!

theburiedlife
06-24-2007, 02:34 PM
Hey Bmack, could you do Brian Eno or Peter Gabriel?

bmack86
06-24-2007, 02:34 PM
I'm gonna do Sun Baked Snow Cave. Because I can.

bmack86
06-24-2007, 02:35 PM
I can do both. And will

PassiveTheory
06-24-2007, 05:50 PM
If you find the time, do Air because, even though I own all their albums, I'd like to hear someone else's perspective...

Also, the next time I post here, it'll be the completion of my Tool review.

theburiedlife
06-24-2007, 06:50 PM
You better hurry Lee, and i better be satisfied.

PassiveTheory
06-24-2007, 07:00 PM
Oh you will be satisfied Andy...

White-spot-on-your-boxers satisfied...

TomAz
06-24-2007, 08:37 PM
I have gotten/listened to the following albums as a result of this thread. I'm not claiming that my listening was exclusively because of this thread but this thread gets atleast partial credit. Also these weren't always the first choices or best reviewed but whatev. Also I'm only listening to one album per artist.

PJ Harvey - Dry
Jawbox - Grippe
Luna - Penthouse
Tom Waits - Rain Dogs
The Roots - Phrenology
Boredoms - Super Roots 7
Nick Cave - Henry's Dream
David Bowie - Diamond Dogs
Big Black - The Rich Man's 8-track
Bob Dylan - Bringing It All Back Home
Yo La Tengo - And Then Nothing Turned Itself Inside-Out

So specific thank yous to bballarl, bmack86, Courtney, roberto73, Slushmier, TomAz, Tylerdurden31, york707 and general thank yous to all all others that've contributed. I love this thread.

I don't see London Calling on there, bucko.

mountmccabe
06-24-2007, 09:38 PM
I don't see London Calling on there, bucko.

I had some albums before this gig started, you know.

bmack86
07-02-2007, 12:31 AM
Arright, as per what I said, I'm starting my lists.

This'll take a while, because I need to go thru and relisten to some of these Boris albums, and I've got a job now, so not as much free time. Thus, I'll continue to add to this as I listen. Anyway, here goes.

1.Absolutego (1997)-Boris didn't start as the band you'd probably recognize from their more popular offerings, namely Pink. This album originally consisted of one track, labelled Absolutego. It's over an hour in length, and is essentially a drone piece, showing their obvious debt to Sunn O))) and Earth. There's tons of low end on it (get the Low Frequency release to really feel the kick) and it's slow and sludgy as hell. If you like drone pieces (they most certainly aren't for everyone) then you'll enjoy this. It's not their best drone work, but it's certainly interesting, and, for what it's worth, a damn good listen. Grade: B

2.Amplifier Worship (1998)-At first you might be able to confuse this with absolutego, but, about 3 minutes in, a metal scream tears through the drone. From here, the album goes on a steady trajectory, building from slow drones to a crazy metal peak at the start of Guruimizu (a track that almost sounds like prime era Soundgarden) and then receding back into the dronescapes. There are some amazing riffs on here, and the vocals, which alternate between metal screams and garagey vocal style, are more pronounced. There are stretches where the drones get old, but this one is, beat for beat, a killer step towards accessibility. Grade- B+

3.Black: Implication Flooding (1998)

4.Flood (2000)

5.Heavy Rocks (2002)

6.Megatone (2002)

7.Akuma No Uta (2003)

8.Feedbacker (2003)

9.Live Archive (2005)

10.Dronevil (2005)

11.Soundtrack from "Mabuta No Ura" (2005)

12.04092001 (2005)

13.Sun Baked Snow Cave (2005)

14.Pink (2006)

15.Vein (2006)

16.Rainbow (2006)

17.Altar (2006)

18.Walrus/Groon single (2007)

bballarl
07-02-2007, 12:33 AM
I love Boris. They rock in every which way, and everyone should listen to them.

bballarl
07-02-2007, 12:34 AM
PS Bryan if you need help let me know and I will assist you.

PassiveTheory
07-07-2007, 10:49 PM
Think anyone would dare take on Sigur Ros for me?

hangthedj112
07-07-2007, 11:02 PM
I'd put Rainbow + Pink by Boris a little bit higher on the list due to the fact they're slightly more accessible, then again, Boris isn't a band that revels in accessibility.

sydaud
07-07-2007, 11:50 PM
Ok....I started working on the discography below. If there is any interest, I will cover all 30+ albums of his that I have, but if not, readers will have to suffice with this. I am willing to do this, but not if no one is interested:

Johnny Cash With His Hot And Blue Guitar (1957)---Cash’s first Sun album (in fact, the first ever Sun LP) collects his early singles---Folsom Prison Blues, I Walk The Line, Cry Cry Cry and So Doggone Lonesome---along with a fantastic Hank Williams cover, “I Heard That Lonesome Whistle Blow”. Throw in a first rate Cash original, “Country Boy” along with covers of the standards “Rock Island Line” and “Wreck of the Old ‘97” this plays like a greatest hits collection, Volume 1. The reissue goes one further by including the early Cash classics “Hey! Porter” and “Get Rhythm”.
Elvis Presley gets his due for the sides he cut for Sun Records, but for my money, Cash’s Sun sides are better. Producer Sam Phillips keeps the Tennessee Two (Luther Perkins, guitar and Marshall Grant, bass) absolutely poppin’ throughout. Oh, and those drums you hear on the early Cash tracks. Those aren’t drums, That’s Cash on the guitar, emulating the sound of a train, chugging along. There simply isn’t a weak track to be found on this album. Yes, all these songs can be found on other comps, but as far as original releases go, this one is absolutely essential. A+

Johnny Cash Sings The Songs That Made Him Famous (1958)---Not quite, but as luck would have it these songs just further propelled him into the upper echelon of country music. Four of these songs had already hit the country charts during 56-57 but an incredible 5 more songs from this album hit the Country Top 5 after the albums release.
“I Walk The Line” is repeated from the first album. ‘Line’ is one of those songs that’s melody obscures some pretty deep lyrics. It’s a love song, to be sure, but it’s a love born of discipline and paranoia not of birds and butterflies. That it became Cash’s trademark song speaks to his phenomenal songwriting abilities (Cash is the only person in history to be elected to the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame, the Country Hall of Fame and the Rock ‘n Roll Hall of Fame). A

The Fabulous Johnny Cash (1959)---And just like that, Cash leaves Sun Records for Columbia (where he will stay until the mid 80’s) and records a very understated album. Understated in that outside of “Don’t Take Your Guns To Town”, “That’s Enough” (one of Cash’s great, upbeat gospel songs) and the mournful “I Miss Someone”, the album feels rather professional. It’s almost as if Columbia sanded off all the rough edges in the age-old attempt to sell more records. A prime example is another one of Cash’s train songs, “One More Ride”. Had this song been cut at Sun it surely would have been part of the established Cash canon of songs, but here it just feels like a walk-through. The reissue has 6 additional songs from the original, but aside from the fine Cash original “Walking The Blues”, there isn’t much that either adds or takes away from the album. B

Hyms By Johnny Cash (1959)---Ah, Johnny Cash and his concept albums... The first of numerous Cash albums that deal with a specific topic, you don’t necessarily need to be a fan of religious music to enjoy this album, yet being a Cash fan doesn’t mean that you’ll enjoy this album. The album opens with an upbeat Cash original (It Was Jesus) that chugs along as well as any of Cash’s secular hits. The rest of the album kind of rests in the mid-tempo area and most of the songs become indistinguishable.
The whole idea of Cash doing a straight-forward religious album seemed unnecessary as so many of his songs are overtly religious, but this observation is in hindsight. I would not recommend this to the casual Cash fan, but if you dig your Jesus with a little bass, this may be up your alley. B

mountmccabe
07-08-2007, 09:53 AM
I'd put Rainbow + Pink by Boris a little bit higher on the list due to the fact they're slightly more accessible, then again, Boris isn't a band that revels in accessibility.

That's not a ranked list; just a discography. Bryan isn't done.

Or maybe I'm wrong and Bryan's tastes re: Boris are very orderly.

bmack86
07-08-2007, 11:24 AM
That's not a ranked list; just a discography. Bryan isn't done.

Or maybe I'm wrong and Bryan's tastes re: Boris are very orderly.

That's true indeed. If you look at all the dates, it's arranged Chronologically. Der.

theburiedlife
07-08-2007, 12:04 PM
Lee you lied to me! I'll finish the Tool discography if you aren't!

PassiveTheory
07-08-2007, 12:44 PM
I just finished it...

Enjoy splooging yourself.

TomAz
07-08-2007, 05:23 PM
Ok....I started working on the discography below. If there is any interest, I will cover all 30+ albums of his that I have, but if not, readers will have to suffice with this. I am willing to do this, but not if no one is interested:



I would read it.

PassiveTheory
07-08-2007, 08:06 PM
So yeah...

I was thinking of doing either Coldplay or John Frusciante-years RHCP.

Which should I do?

CuervoPH
07-08-2007, 08:14 PM
Keep the Johnny Cash coming. I promise at least one reader in addition to Tom. I really need to do a more thorough visit of his earlier recordings.

roberto73
07-08-2007, 09:31 PM
I'd be interested in continued Johnny Cash write-ups, too.

And Passive, you might take a look at the post that started this thread for some parameters on which bands/artists to review/request. (Hint: They should have released at least five albums, thus necessitating a review guide.) Just a friendly suggestion.

PassiveTheory
07-08-2007, 11:25 PM
Well, I did just do Tool who, for all intents and purposes, have 5 record releases (1 EP and 4 LPs) but I see your point.

Actually, if that's what is expected of a review, I'd do the Frusciante years Chili Peppers since they fit the bill, I think (or it's close enough, like 4, as opposed to Coldplay's 3).

thinnerair
07-09-2007, 04:59 AM
Well, I did just do Tool who, for all intents and purposes, have 5 record releases (1 EP and 4 LPs) but I see your point.

Actually, if that's what is expected of a review, I'd do the Frusciante years Chili Peppers since they fit the bill, I think (or it's close enough, like 4, as opposed to Coldplay's 3).

I'd personally be more interested in reading up on Frusciante's solo work rather than Coldplay review. I really dont like RHCP all that much, mainly because I can't stand Anthony Kiedis and his vocals, but Frusciante is an excellent musician and I'd be curious to read up on his stuff. A Coldplay review would be easy.
They put out a great first record. They developed a great formula for a pop song. They multiplied that by 10 and recorded it and put it out as their second record. They then added swishy space sounds to that and cavity inducing inspirational lyrics and made that their 3rd record. The end.

TomAz
07-09-2007, 06:49 AM
Well, I did just do Tool who, for all intents and purposes, have 5 record releases (1 EP and 4 LPs) but I see your point.

Actually, if that's what is expected of a review, I'd do the Frusciante years Chili Peppers since they fit the bill, I think (or it's close enough, like 4, as opposed to Coldplay's 3).

If you do Coldplay I will mock you mercilessly.

breakjaw
07-09-2007, 07:39 AM
Make sure you include the Madonna covers

sydaud
07-09-2007, 04:15 PM
It'll take a few days, but I will knock out the Johnny Cash.

TomAz
07-10-2007, 06:19 AM
Make sure you include the Madonna covers

Coldplay covered Madonna?

breakjaw
07-10-2007, 07:50 AM
I'll vote for a mix full of Madonna covering Coldplay before I vote for some mix I've gotta straighten out on my own.
Oops,I guess I had it backwards.

TomAz
07-10-2007, 08:15 AM
I guess so.

thinnerair
07-31-2007, 09:03 AM
hey.
i was wondering if there is anyone on here that knows a bit about Black Sabbath and could do a guide to Sabbath. Just wondering.

J~$$$
07-31-2007, 09:28 AM
I would like to know about Sabbath too.

bug on your lip
07-31-2007, 09:31 AM
i'm still sloggin away at my Prince review

i also easily do the following:

The Church
The Cure
311
Big Audio Dynamite
12 Rods
Frank Black

J~$$$
07-31-2007, 09:37 AM
311 = D+ omahawillinstyleatcha!!!!

bug on your lip
07-31-2007, 09:41 AM
yeah the indie kids seem to not like 311....
but like i said before, i followed them since they were just a little band in Omaha....
at the time they had no genre & alot of bands ended up following their style..

now i think people seem to just pigeonhole them with Sugar Ray, Sublime, Limp Bizkit and that stuff.... which i don't like
but their last 2 or 3 albums sucking hasn't helped

J~$$$
07-31-2007, 09:43 AM
music and grassroots were fantastic albums and thats it.

disgustipated
07-31-2007, 09:53 AM
yup. I also liked how the best songs on most of their albims are tracks 3 and 11

bug on your lip
07-31-2007, 10:00 AM
yup. I also liked how the best songs on most of their albims are tracks 3 and 11


weird i had never heard of that one....

i know they are always fusing little codes into their stuff like saying "unity" at the 3:11 mark of songs & crap like that



edit**
no...doesn't work
you can make a case for the albums "Music" & "311", but tracks 3,11 are clearly not the best on "Grassroots" or "Transistor"

thinnerair
07-31-2007, 10:01 AM
i will say that 'Transistor' had some good moments. My sister is stupid for 311 so I hear about them all the time. I think they're awful, but they do put on an entertaining show, they call all play the shit out of their instruments, and they almost always bring out excellent supporting acts.

bug on your lip
07-31-2007, 10:05 AM
i will say that 'Transistor' had some good moments. My sister is stupid for 311 so I hear about them all the time. I think they're awful, but they do put on an entertaining show, they call all play the shit out of their instruments, and they almost always bring out excellent supporting acts.

NO SHIT !

they are touring with the English Beat !!

thinnerair
07-31-2007, 10:06 AM
NO SHIT !

they are touring with the English Beat !!

and Matisyahu.
I think they took De La Soul out a few years ago.
I take back what I said. I don't think they're awful.
I think they're cheesy and SA Martinez is horrendous.

bug on your lip
07-31-2007, 10:12 AM
Hexum can be reeeeeally cheesy

especially these last few years where they morphed into a "please play us on MTV TRL" band

thinnerair
07-31-2007, 10:17 AM
Amber is the color of your crappery

Mr.Nipples
07-31-2007, 11:37 AM
grassroots was the first cd i ever bought with my own money...

Wheres the beef?
07-31-2007, 11:38 AM
grassroots was the first cd i ever bought with my own money...

Green Jelly was the first CD I bought with my own money.

bug on your lip
07-31-2007, 11:40 AM
HOLY SHIT !
GREEN JELLY GETTING A SHOUT OUT ON THE CHELLA BOARD !!?!?!

+10

bmack86
07-31-2007, 04:56 PM
12Rods are tons o fun, but they don't have enough music to really warrant one of these. Gay? is great.

breakjaw
08-01-2007, 08:36 AM
Page 1
#1 - Radiohead - swdshfsk - intro
#3 - David Bowie - Courtney - intro
#4 - Boredoms - bmack86 - full
#5 - Can - bmack86 - intro
#6 - Spiritualized - bmack86 - intro
#9 - Elvis Costello - TomAz - intro
#10 - the Wedding Present - roberto73 - intro
#12 - Tom waits - Slushmier - extended intro
#13 - Mogwai - swdshfsk - extended intro
#14 - Hanson - tessa|asset - extended intro
#15 - Guided by Voices - mountmccabe - intro
#23 - the Velvet Underground - PsyGuyRy - extended intro
#24 - Luna - york707 - intro with discog listed
#25 - Jonathan Richman - breakjaw - full

Page 2
#32 - The Dismemberment Plan - Tylerdurden31 - full
#33 - Bob Dylan - TomAz - extended intro
#36 - Talking Heads - bballarl - full
#37 - Pink Floyd - PsyGuyRy - very extended intro
#45 - Pearl Jam - Slushmier - full
#51, 53 & 56 - Fugazi - PotVsKtI - ranked list of albums

Page 3
#65 - the Beatles - TomAZ - full

Page 4
#101 - the Kinks (early period) - bmack86 - extended intro
#109 - Beethoven's 7th Symphony - mountmccabe - full (selected, incomplete)
#117 - the Cure - bmack86 - full
#118 - the Dandy Warhols - Hannahrain - full

Page 5
#124 - the Jesus and Mary Chain - mountmccabe - full
#131 - Yo La Tengo - Courtney - full
#132 - the Roots - Slushmier - full
#138 - Sonic Youth - bmack86 - full
#141 - the Rolling Stones (US albums) - sydaud - full
#146 - the White Stripes - bballarl - full

Page 6
#173 - Faith No More - thinnerair - full
#175 - Failure - thinnerair - full
#176 - Magazine - breakjaw - full

Page 7
#196 - Creed - bmack86 - full
#200 - Metallica - bmack86 - full
#202 - the Who - sydaud - full
#217 - Massive Attack - Thinnerair - Full
#219 - Elf Power - Bmack86 - Full
#225 - Genesis - Thinnerair - Intro
#232 - Bikini Kill - Mountmccabe - Full
#238 - Muse - Thinnerair -

Page 9
#241 - Big Black - Bmack86 - Full
#249 - The Arab Strap - Hannahrain - Intro
#253 - The Clash - TomAz - Full
#267 - Nick Cave - roberto73 - Full

Page 10
#299 - Jeff Buckley - PassiveTheory - Full

Page 12
#334 - Jawbox - Tylerdurden31 - Full
#338 - Hum - thinnerair - Full
#344 - REM - sydaud - Full

Page 13
#375 - Depeche Mode - Amyzzz - Extended Intro

Page 14
#395 - The Replacements - TomAz - Full
#402 - Spinal Tap - Breakjaw - Full
#405 - Cheech and Chong - Anita Bonghit - Discography
#416 - Pixies - Bmack86 - Full
#419 - Spiritualized - Bmack86 - Full

Page 15
#425 - Rush - MonsoonSeason - intro
#427 - The Orb - Desphrs - full
#446 - Miles Davis - sydaud - full

Page 16
#455 - Boards of Canada - desphrs - full
#463 - Blur - Slushmier - full
#474 - Serge Gainsbourg - bmack86 - intro
#477 - Beat Happening - bmack86 - full
#479 - Circle Jerks - york707 - full

Page 17
#504 - Joe Jackson - MsTekno - extended intro
#505 - Oasis - Stefinitely Maybe - full

Page 18
#518 - The Magnetic Fields - mountmccabe - full

Page 19
#562 - Wilco - mountmccabe, york707, and TomAz (compiled by Hannahrain) - full

Page 20
#573 - Spoon - sydaud - full
#580 - Decemberists - Hannahrain - full
#600 - Led Zeppelin - sydaud - full

Page 21
#616 - Minutemen - sydaud - full
#619 - Can - bmack86 - full (selected, incomplete)
#625 - PJ Harvey - bballarl - full

Page 22
#635 - Bjork - bmack86 - full
#649 - Cake - PassiveTheory - full
#650 - The Faint - hawkingvsreeve - full

Page 23
#672 - Death Cab For Cutie - hawkingvsreeve - full

Page 24
#720 - Leonard Cohen - mountmccabe - incomplete

Page 25
#735 - Bruce Springsteen - Yablonowitz - first installment
#738 - Arto Lindsay - ragingdave - Solo work only

Page 26
#757-755 TomAz vs Yablonowitz RE: Springsteen review.
#769 - XTC - Roberto73 - partial (to be continued)

Page 27
#798 - Cursive - Hawkingvsreeve - full
#800 - XTC (II) - Roberto73 - Continuation
#801 - Joy Division/New Order - sydaud - full
#806 - Springsteen - Yablonowitz - quick overview

Page 28
#812 - Springsteen (different) - TomAz - full
#820 - Elliott Smith - mountmccabe - full
#837 - Ben Folds - Jenniehoo - full (with mix!)

Page 29
#842/847 XTC - roberto73 (w/mixes!)
#865 Replacements mix - TomAz
#868 Elvis Costello mix -TomAz

Page 30
#871 Bob Dylan mixes - TomAz
#881 Animal Collective - BMack86 (complete)
#884 The Go-Betweens - Roberto73 (complete w/mix!)
#887 Tool - Passive Theory (complete)

Page 31
#904 Boris - BMack86 (EDIT sorry Yablo not paying attention,INcomplete)
#909 Johnny Cash - Sydaud (1957-59)

mountmccabe
08-01-2007, 10:51 AM
Page 31
#904 Boris - BMack86 (complete)


You had me excited for a moment there but it's still just a discography with a review on one album.

:(

breakjaw
08-01-2007, 12:06 PM
John Lennon

OK first off I must profess my ignorance on the first 3 solo albums,none of which I've heard.In fact,I don't think I know anyone that's heard them.They are all supposed to be along the lines of Revolution 9.With more Yoko.

Unfinished Music No. 1 - Two Virgins
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/two-virgins-cover.jpg

Unfinished Music No. 2 - Life with the Lions
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/life-w-lions-cover.jpg

Wedding Album
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/wedding-album-cover.gif
here's an excerpt of a review of this I found on Bagism:

side A lasts approximately 30mns.Over the backsound of two hearts beating in unison, John & Yoko repeat their first names with a great variety of tones, from whispers to screams and everything in between.This may be something a loving couple does,albeit not on record. side B starts with "John,John, let's hope for peace" sung accapella by Yoko.Then comes a long and interesting interview held in Amsterdam, including a very short vesion of "good night" sung by John. Music this album may not be, but it certainly is history.
OK,after Lennon left The Beatles but before thay had officially "broken-up" (see Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Lennon) for an explanation of that whole mess)John put together the "Live Peace in Toronto" concert,which featured him with Eric Clapton,Klaus Voorman on bass and future Yes drummer Alan White:

Live Peace in Toronto
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/live-peace-toronto-cover.jpg
When this was an LP,it was very simple,just play Side 1.That's the side that has Blue Suede Shoes,Money,Dizzy Miss Lizzy,Yer Blues,Cold Turkey(before the single came out) and a real good version of Give Peace A Chance.The band is not real tight on this recording and the versions on here are kind of plodding.Side 2 is Yoko doing Don't Worry Kyoko and John John (Let's Hope For Peace).There's alot of feedback and stuff also.
Grade:C
Well,the next album is one of the most personal and compelling works of art ever recorded:

John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/plastic-ono-band-cover.jpg
It begins with a bell tolling mournfully and the heart-wrenching song Mother.It includes the classic Working Class Hero,which has been covered by nearly everyone lately,from Oasis to Bowie also Ozzy,Marilyn Manson,and Green Day (on American Idol!!?)
It also has Isolation,Love,and
God:"The dream is over,
What can I say?
The dream is over,
Yesterday,
I was dreamweaver,
But now I'm reborn,
I was the walrus,
But now I'm John,
And so dear friends,
You just have to carry on,
The dream is over."
These are amongst the greatest songs John wrote and it closes with another deeply sad song My Mummy's Dead. You have to say Yoko was OK since she had a part in inspiring and creating this masterpiece.
Grade:A+

OK,the next album is the one everyone's mom has:

Imagine
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/imagine-cover.jpg
It's not nearly as stark as the previous album,but no less brilliant.The title song,Crippled Inside,Jealous Guy,and Give Me Some Truth are fucking classics.It's got his attack on Paul How Do You Sleep? and the bouncy Oh Yoko!
Grade:Also A+

First and foremost,John Lennon was an artist,and he never just churned out crappy pop music the way some of his old Liverpool buddies seemed content to do.His next album was political as well,focusing on topics of the time,like the prison revolt at Attica,and the Women's Lib movement:

Some Time in New York City
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/sometime-nyc-cover.jpg
Here's a review from Bagism again,because I'm not as familiar with this record:

This album is one of the best examples of a man and woman being criticized for doing something unexpected. The lyrics by both and John and Yoko cohesive and poetic, and the music on the album shows strong roots in rock and roll with an avant-garde tinge. The songs on the album are all meaningful on some kind of level, whether it be political, such as "Woman is the ****** of the World" or "Angela," or spiritual such as "We're All Water." This type of direct, cause-related music is comparable to the later work of bands such as The Clash and Rage Against the Machine. But if you disagree with the politics (which I don't) you may have trouble enjoying some of the songs. However, to insult the album artistically because of this is ignorant. The songs are strong and well-written, regardless of whether or not everyone agrees with the politics, with often having solid instrumental sections such as the amazing sax part of "Woman is the ****** of the World." Additionally, the album has an avant-garde tinge, which could put some listeners to discomfort, but I personally believe there is a lot to get out of this album that make it worth listening to. In my honest opinion, this album is the prime example of a man being criticized and chastized by people claim to be fans, who often don't have any viable or unbiased sense of what is good music or art. In other words, a lot of people in ignorance, cling to the mantra, "If it ain't like the Beatles, fuck it" when it comes to John Lennon.
Grade:Not Graded

I've also never listened to this next album,although the title track is one of my favorite songs ever:

Mind Games
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/mind-games-cover.jpg
Grade:Not Graded

The next album was released when Yoko kicked John out of the Dakota and he had to go have fun in LA with Bowie doing lots of coke and flirting with heroin.A pretty good album was the result:

Walls and Bridges
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/walls-and-bridges-cover.jpg
A lot of people complained about this being over-produced,but I just think it reflects the time it was recorded in.I remember hearing Whatever Gets You Through The Night non-stop on the radio when I was a kid,and it wasn't bad.#9 Dream is a favorite,Steel And Glass is an interesting try at reggae,Nobody Loves You (When You're Down And Out) is a great song also.
Grade:B

There are times when the following recording is my favorite album by Lennon,actually there are about 4 that I consider his greatest and alternate(hint:they are the ones I gave A pluses to):

Rock 'N' Roll
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/rock-and-roll-cover.jpg
This is John doing all the early rock and roll songs better than the original artists did in most cases.Certainly his version of Stand By Me is a classic,and one he was even practicing during the Let It Be sessions.Be-Bop-A-Lula,Just Because,Ain't That A Shame,Peggy Sue,Bring It On Home To Me,Send Me Some Lovin' are all great.Perhaps the only misstep is attempting to make Do You Want To Dance a reggae song.
Grade:A+

OK the first John Lennon album I owned (on cassette) was this:

Shaved Fish
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/shaved-fish-cover.jpg
This is the "Greatest Hits" album and it has EVERYTHING you need on it.Give Peace A Chance,Cold Turkey,Instant Karma,as well the songs I previously mentioned.It has less Yoko than the others as well.It was the last album released by Lennon,before his 5 year retirement from music to be a full-time dad and husband.
Grade:A++

Everyone knows the rest of the story.John decided to come out of retirement,recorded a new album of really pretty and heartfelt songs,and some fuckhead from Hawaii ruined it all for everybody one night at the Dakota,just because he didn't have a life and we can all have guns if we want them.I think John might've even enjoyed playing at Coachella,who knows?(He'd be 66 now.):

Double Fantasy
http://www.bagism.com/img/albums/double-fantasy-cover.jpg
(Just Like)Starting Over,Beautiful Boy(Darling Boy),Watching The Wheels,Woman are all songs I actually get excited for when I hear them on the elevator.
Grade:A

I'm not going to cover all the posthumous releases,although some are great.Also here's a mix I made a long time ago:
http://www.lennon-chapman.com/images/john-lennon.jpg (http://www.megaupload.com/?d=VGKTP0BH)
Mother
(Just Like)Starting Over
Isolation
Working Class Hero
Cold Turkey
Instant Karma(We All Shine On)
How Do You Sleep?
Jealous Guy
Oh My Love
#9 Dream
Mind Games
Watching The Wheels
Beautiful Boy(Darling Boy)
Woman
Stand By Me
Nobody Told Me
Gimme Some Truth
Happy X-Mas(War Is Over)
God
Love
Imagine(take 1)

clarky123
08-01-2007, 02:32 PM
Eh it was tongue in cheek. :)

Cool, where the hell did that knowledge come from? I'm buying the lot....tommorrow!

bmack86
08-01-2007, 04:17 PM
Dammit, i need to finish Boris. Thanks for reminding me.

thinnerair
08-02-2007, 05:43 AM
black. sabbath. please.

J~$$$
08-03-2007, 08:33 AM
Hannah hates me because I still haven't done what I promised. Im a horrible person. I will get to it, I will.....

Hannahrain
08-03-2007, 08:54 AM
The check is in the mail.

Hannahrain
08-03-2007, 08:55 AM
I swear I didn't know she was a hooker.

J~$$$
08-03-2007, 08:58 AM
if only I had....if

My dad would always tell me "boy you got to ends....one you think with, the other you sit on.....don't get them confused."

breakjaw
08-13-2007, 12:51 PM
The Bumps.

mountmccabe
08-13-2007, 12:54 PM
I just listened to Masters of Reality. But I'm in no way qualified to do Black Sabbath.

Also I am sort of reminding myself that I might could add to, cut, paste and otherwise edit my notes on Jason Molina from the other thread.

breakjaw
08-13-2007, 12:56 PM
I watched The Osbournes a couple of times...

TomAz
08-13-2007, 12:58 PM
thank you for bumping this. Your Lennon write up is perfect.

breakjaw
08-13-2007, 01:06 PM
Unfortunately I could not identify it as NSFW due to naked Yoko photo.

TomAz
08-13-2007, 01:11 PM
a naked Yoko is Not Safe For Life.

TomAz
09-07-2007, 06:47 AM
with the LA concerts this weekend this is as good a time as any for a Lucinda Williams post.



http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/51JXP7BGQVL._AA240_.jpg

Ramblin' (1978) - In the late 70s Lucinda was part of the Houston folk scene at Anderson Fair which also included Townes Van Zandt, Nanci Griffith, Steve Earle, and Lyle Lovett. This first album, on Smithsonian/Folkways, is just a set of covers of blues and country songs. It's just Lucinda singing with her own acoustic guitar accompaniment. It's not very interesting, but it's not like it's unlistenable or anything. Grade: C+



http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/I/314JWWCS2DL._AA240_.jpg

Happy Woman Blues (1980) - also on Smithsonian/Folkways, with a full band this time. These are Lucinda originals, country rock and blues. There is barely a glimmer of the genius that would show itself later, and so this album doesn't register with most Lucinda fans. (Her singing voice was not all that great at this point either). Still, though, the album's not half bad -- even includes an early version of "I Lost It" which showed up later on Car Wheels. Grade: B-



http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/d5/Lucinda_williams_cover.jpg

Lucinda Williams (1988) - After the first two albums, an eight year hiatus. Lucinda moved to LA, took singing lessons (she wanted to sound like Joan Baez), married and divorced Long Ryders drummer Greg Sowders, and wound up forming a musical partnership with Gurf Morlix which would drive her next three albums. She signed to Rough Trade and recorded this set of songs remakable for their clarity, focus, and subtlety. It's still country, blues, rock, and everywhere in between, but it sounds fresh and original. She'd found her voice, and though commercial success was nowhere to be had, Mary-Chapin Carpenter turned "Passionate Kisses" into a mega-hit, and Tom Petty covered "Changed the Locks". On this album she displays her gift for concise storytelling and communicating emotion without any hint of stupid sentimentality. There are so many good songs on this record, it's about as close to a perfect singer-songwriter album as you could hope to find. Grade: A+



http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000001A3J.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Sweet Old World (1992) - a mostly downbeat album with songs about suicide and death, but told with such a light and gifted touch that it avoids sounding wretched and cloying as you might expect. And it includes "Pineola", my favorite Lucinda song ever. Grade: A-



http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B000007Q8J.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Car Wheels on a Gravel Road (1998) - finally Lucinda breaks through with a sort-of commercial hit, and it's every bit the masterpiece you've read it is. She really flaunts her genius for boiling complicated emotions to their bare essence in just a few phrases. The songwriting is brilliant, the arrangements great, the production first rate. Many of the songs are about her Southern childhood (her father, the poet Miller Williams, taught at various universities around the South) and this is where Lucinda fully develops her trademark use of placenames to evoke atmosphere. (sample song titles: "Greenville", "Lake Charles", and "Jackson"). But instead of the usual tired cliche' of using town names to get a cheer from the crowd, she rattles them off, one by one, giving a sense of restlessness, of being an outsider, of rootlessness in a region that prides itself on roots. The effect is quite powerful. Also, her singing on this album is fabulous.

(This album is also famous for how long it took to make. She recorded an entire version of the album, decided she didn't like it, ditched it for a while, hired Steve Earle to produce, and recorded it all over again. After months in the studio Earle thought it was done but Lucinda didn't so she fired him and hired E-Street Band pianist Roy Bittain to finish it up. Her guitarist, bandleader and arranger Gurf Morlix also left during the recording, supposedly out of frustration with the slow pace and Lucinda's perfectionism.) Grade: A+



http://www.quickshots.homepage.t-online.de/qs/qs-lwilliams-essence.jpg

Essence (2001) - this album surprised Lucinda fans with how downbeat and quiet it mostly is (and also that she got it done in only 3 years). In my opinion the music suffers with the loss of guitarist Morlix. The songwriting is still stellar, but the music is slow and even a bit slick, and the album strikes me as a bit lackluster. (Maybe it's just me, other fans of hers claim this is one of her best). Grade: B



http://lookingcloser.org/images/lucindawilliams.jpg

World Without Tears (2003) - another quick one, only two years in the making, and this time more of a band record. It feels hurried and rushed to me, but "Righteously" is damned sexy - and brilliant. Grade: B+



http://jl13.com/images/lucinda_williams_west.jpg

West (2007) - her latest which I have not heard yet.

Also there is Live at the Fillmore, from 2005, which is full of songs from World Without Tears.

Now, here's a mix which is heavy on the two A+ albums:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=TXO6L0BO

if you're curious but impatient, skip to track 4 to start.


1. Stop Breakin' Down (from Ramblin')
2. Lafeyette (Happy Woman Blues)
3. Happy Woman Blues (HWB)
4. I Just Wanted To See You So Bad (Lucinda Williams)
5. Big Red Sun Blues (LW)
6. Changed the Locks (LW)
7. Passionate Kisses (LW)
8. Crescent City (LW)
9. Side of the Road (LW)
10. Something About What Happens When We Talk (Sweet Old World)
11. Sweet Old World (SOW)
12. Pineola (SOW)
13. Lines Around Your Eyes (SOW)
14. Car Wheels on a Gravel Road (Car Wheels)
15. Metal Firecracker (Car Wheels)
16. Still I Long For Your Kiss (Car Wheels)
17. Joy (Car Wheels)
18. Jackson (Car Wheels)
19. Lonely Girls (Essence)
20. Get Right With God (Essence)
21. Righteously (World Without Tears)

have fun, kids.

breakjaw
09-07-2007, 07:45 AM
Excellent!Nice work,Tom!I'm getting the mix immediately.

TomAz
09-07-2007, 12:23 PM
hey breakjaw.. thanks.. but i'm curious. Is there any kind of music you don't like?

mountmccabe
09-07-2007, 12:52 PM
Yeah, I wanna know too.

PassiveTheory
09-07-2007, 01:31 PM
Would anyone feel underwhelmed if I did Portishead? I mean, I know it's only 3 albums, but I wouldn't mind.

breakjaw
09-07-2007, 02:02 PM
Stuff I don't like:
99 % of the shit on (terrestrial) radio
TOOL
Bob Seger
Dave Matthews Band
Most new country (Kenny Chesney et al)
Anyone that's ever been on American Idol except Sanjaya

canexplain
09-07-2007, 02:06 PM
Stuff I don't like:
99 % of the shit on (terrestrial) radio
TOOL
Bob Seger
Dave Matthews Band
Most new country (Kenny Chesney et al)
Anyone that's ever been on American Idol except Sanjaya

DMB :( cr****

mountmccabe
09-07-2007, 02:11 PM
Would anyone feel underwhelmed if I did Portishead? I mean, I know it's only 3 albums, but I wouldn't mind.

I would feel underwhelmed. Two albums of original material is a non-starter. I'd recommend waiting until the new one comes out, really.

Or if you want to fill it out by including the album Beth Gibbons did with Rustin' Man and Adrian Utley's solo album I'd find that more reasonable.

breakjaw
09-07-2007, 02:20 PM
DMB :( cr****

Sorry,Ron.It's just a personal thing with the voice and the whole thing with me.If I did like him I probably would like him a lot since he's so prolific and covers so many cool songs.

canexplain
09-07-2007, 02:37 PM
Sorry,Ron.It's just a personal thing with the voice and the whole thing with me.If I did like him I probably would like him a lot since he's so prolific and covers so many cool songs.

i am the same way about rap and hip hop .... i really dont care for it that much even though i know they are talented in their own way .... ron ****

TomAz
09-07-2007, 03:01 PM
careful ron..

breakjaw
09-07-2007, 03:07 PM
i am the same way about rap and hip hop .... i really dont care for it that much even though i know they are talented in their own way .... ron ****

I definitely can't get into hip-hop in a live setting,especially outside in the sun,but I appreciate it if it's good.One of the good things about this board is it points me in the direction of the good stuff,like the Coup and Ghostface Killah.FOI in particular has posted some really good stuff.

TomAz
09-07-2007, 03:15 PM
I definitely can't get into hip-hop in a live setting,especially outside in the sun

I'm the exact opposite. I enjoy it live a lot more than I seem to be able to otherwise. The partial sets of Brother Ali and Pharoah Monche I caught at Coachella this year were both outstanding. I even bought PM's cd because of the 4 songs or so of his I heard.

breakjaw
09-07-2007, 03:18 PM
One of the things about music that is interesting is how you perceive it versus how others do.When Jane's Addiction came out with Ritual De Lo Habitual,everybody I knew loved it and it was everywhere.I used to go this bar in Long Beach and they had the CD on the jukebox.When I started to put some coins in,the lady behind the bar said,"You can play anything you want,as long as it's not that fucking dog song."
Now whenever I hear "Been Caught Stealing" I think of it as "that fucking dog song" and don't like it as much.

breakjaw
09-17-2007, 02:19 AM
I'm bumping so people will still be able to get Tom's mixes...

breakjaw
09-17-2007, 02:50 AM
Bryan,if you do Pavement I'll post the mix.

bmack86
09-17-2007, 07:55 AM
God, i didn't know that no one had done pavement.

bmack86
09-17-2007, 08:17 AM
Pavement Discography

1.Slanted and Enchanted-This album is like the big bang for quite a bit of modern indie rock. Its influence can't be understated, despite the fact that, to date, it's not even sold 100,000 copies. However, unlike so many "influential" albums, this one is also a helluva good time to listen to. Summer Babe is one of the all time great opening tracks, and the songs ramble on from there. While Pavement had previously been compared heavily to the Fall (Mark E. Smith hated them because he said they were a cheap ripoff) by this release they had found their own sloppy, lackadaisical voice, and it's amazing how great it sounds. There's not a bad track on here, but songs like Trigger Cut, Zurich is Stained and In the Mouth a Desert redefined music for a new, decidedly more lazy generation. Slacker rock 101, and it feels so good.
Grade- A+

2.Westing (By Musket and Sextant)-This is a compilation of pre Slanted Pavement, and it sounds like it. They're much more angular, much less jangly, and bear a striking resemblance to Wire and The Fall at this point. The songs are good, but nothing on this one has ever really grabbed me in the way that the normal albums did. Still, it's one hell of a fun ride, and if you like post punk, this is a damn good encapsulation of that sound, as well as showing the early development of a great band. This is also the only other place to hear the drumming of Gary Young, as he was kicked out of the band during the Crooked Rain sessions because he was an insane, drug addled hippy that didn't gel with the rest of the band. Grade- B

3.Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain-When Pitchfork did their top 100 albums of the 90s, they opened their blurb about this album by saying that it would make most hipsters teary eyed and reminiscent. With good reason I say, as this was the Pavement album that reached the most people, and it's the one that, at least for me, kick-started my love. They reigned in their wild and wooly sounds for a tighter, more focused album that still retains their lazy charm. Silence Kit is second in their string of fantastic opening tracks, and this one is possibly even stronger than Slanted in terms of song craft. All the way thru Unfair, there is not a single note wasted or even a bum idea, and the second half of the album still carries the weight. 5-4=unity is a goofy homage to jazz with "weird" timing, and Range Life is one of those songs that we listened to as kids when the sun was setting on our suburban households, and we felt connected to something more. This does make me teary eyed, and you will love it. I guarantee. Grade- A+

4.Wowee Zowee-When this came out, it caused something of an uproar. Cut your Hair had done well, and people figured that Pavement had a chance to finally make it big by continuing with that formula. Instead, they went all over the place, recording what some refer to as the indie White Album, a wide ranging collection of songs that ties together into an insane and insanely enjoyable whole. This is definitely not the place to start with Pavement, and I wasn't even a fan for the first few listens, but it now sits atop the pile for me as their best work. It has all the range of the early albums and all the charm with the focused songwriting of the later two. Plus, We Dance and Rattled By the Rush is a near-legendary one/two opener. Live with this album for a while and you'll be happy you did. Pavement at their most risk taking, and the world is better for it. Grade- A+

5.Brighten the Corners-After three albums of constant change and redevelopment, this one sounded like a retreat. It went back to the formula of Crooked Rain, with polished sound (for them at least) and less experimental writing. It's the first Pavement album that doesn't explode with ideas, but that's not to fault it, because it is again full of great songs. While this is my least favorite of the five main albums, mostly due to the fact that the tracks sometimes blend together, it still has its charm, and, again, shows Pavement's knack for starting with a killer track; Stereo is fun, goofy and a great time. Not their best, possibly their worst, and better than 90% of indie rock out there. Grade- B

6.Terror Twilight- Here's the controversy. Some people called this essentially a Malkmus solo album, but it retains the Pavement feel that is missing from the three solos he's done so far. This one has been raising in my esteem greatly recently. It's a calmer album than what they had done before, and it shows that their song craft was still in full force even right at the end. Spit On a Stranger is in my top 5 Pavement songs, and Folk Jam and Cream of Gold are both fun tracks. Major Leagues is another all time great, and a fitting song to say goodbye to one of our favorite bands with. Malkmus solo has been great as well, but he has yet to reach the heights of this band. Who knows, maybe someday he will. Grade- A

downingthief
09-17-2007, 10:19 AM
Sweet. Nice work!

Mr.Nipples
09-17-2007, 10:26 AM
very nice...

bmack86
09-17-2007, 10:27 AM
Also, i'd recommend picking up the deluxe editions of Slanted, Crooked Rain and Wowee Zowee. The extra tracks are almost uniformly fantastic, and Slanted comes with a full live show to boot.

PassiveTheory
09-17-2007, 11:48 AM
I might just have to do that...

bmack86
09-17-2007, 01:09 PM
might? You have to do that. Get em used. They're great.

downingthief
09-17-2007, 01:17 PM
Bmack, were those re-mastered, etc? Or, just extended versions?

bmack86
09-17-2007, 01:23 PM
Remastered as well. With the Remaster of Wowee Zowee as well, if you bought a pre-order, they gave you a download of a live show Wowee Zowee era that was awesome.

breakjaw
09-17-2007, 01:46 PM
Here is the mix to go with BMack's excellent disocography
http://imageigloo.com/images/6667pavementcollection.JPG (http://coachella.com/forum/showpost.php?p=296576&postcount=753)

PassiveTheory
09-17-2007, 02:08 PM
Hmmm... breakjaw's mix or download Slanted... tough decisions.

I'd appreciate it if someone would do an Underworld one.

breakjaw
09-17-2007, 02:17 PM
Get Slanted.I might have under-represented it on the mix,because I listen to it so much and I did not want to neglect the others.BMack is right,the extras on all the sets are great,particularly on Slanted (all the John Peel stuff,etc.)

mountmccabe
09-17-2007, 02:51 PM
I'd appreciate it if someone would do an Underworld one.

I could do this one. It'll probably be a couple days. I need to relisten. Though since I'ven't fully committed I won't be too annoyed if someone swoops in and beats me to it.

bballarl
09-17-2007, 03:20 PM
Underworld:

Buy the anthology and if you don't like it you won't like them. Beacoup Fish is amazing, if you want an actual album.

The end.

mountmccabe
09-17-2007, 04:15 PM
That doesn't count as beating me to shit, you know.

Cause damn:
O5vQP_RFccY

bballarl
09-17-2007, 04:25 PM
Oh yeah, Underworld started as a new wave band that wasn't very good. As evidenced by the video John just posted.

wmgaretjax
10-16-2007, 10:41 PM
I'm on a Merzbow kick.

I'll do Merzbow.

Listen to Houjoue... Oh and... yeah... Merzbox.

rage patton
10-16-2007, 10:45 PM
That doesn't count as beating me to shit, you know.

Cause damn:
O5vQP_RFccY

Hahaha. Wow. THAT was Underworld? Do they still play any of that stuff live? Im guessing not...

bmack86
10-16-2007, 10:48 PM
I'm on a Merzbow kick.

I'll do Merzbow.

Listen to Houjoue... Oh and... yeah... Merzbox.

I'd be interested if you were able to do a real Merzbow. And, I just realized I never finished my Boris Reviews. I'll get back to that.

wmgaretjax
10-16-2007, 10:52 PM
I'd be interested if you were able to do a real Merzbow. And, I just realized I never finished my Boris Reviews. I'll get back to that.

if there is serious demand for it. I will do it.

comiddle
10-17-2007, 04:26 AM
My lazy contribution...
The Appleseed Cast - Deep Elm Records (1997 - 2003) / Tiger Style Records (2003 - )

The End of The Ring Wars
Sounds like Sunny Day Real Estate, but a solid debut nonetheless. This remains one of my favourite Appleseed Cast albums. It starts off strong with Marigold & Patchwork and then heads right into Antihero, a personal favourite. The most annoying thing about this album is the sudden appearance of a saxophone on Stars. Kills it for me. However they redeem themselves a couple of songs later with 16 Days. 7/10

Mare Vitalis
This album starts off a little more drone-ish and signals their descent into that enigmatic genre known as "post-rock", granted they're merely toeing the water at this point. Fishing The Sky is one of the stronger offerings on this album, but overall another solid release. 7/10

Low Level Owl Vol 1 & 2
This was my introduction to The Appleseed Cast. Great headphone albums if you ask me. The music is lush and the only word I can think of that accurately describes it is "landscape". It is The Appleseed Cast at their "post-rock" peak. This is my favourite Appleseed Cast release and is a fine place to start. The second volume is definately the stronger of the two. 8/10

Lost Songs
These songs were leftovers from The End of the Ring Wars. A slight departure from what they were doing at the time (circa Ring Wars) this album has strong "post-rock" influence on the emo sound they started out with. Perils Parts 1, 2 and 3 is great. Near perfect album. 9/10

Two Conversations
Fight Song, Ice Heavy Branches, Innocent Vigilant Ordinary. This is by far their strongest release. I love it. Every minute of it. I could listen to this album for days. A polished sound, I feel this is where the band finally hit their stride. A slight departure from the post-rock sound of the past couple releases. 10/10

Peregrine
Weak sauce guys, weak sauce. 4/10

C DUB YA
10-17-2007, 07:47 AM
1. Make sure you have at least 1 or 2 records from the following artists:

DAVID BOWIE (Hunky Dory, Ziggy Stardust, Low, Heroes, are some of my faves, all are must owns)

THE CLASH (must have London Calling, this is mandatory)

T REX (I'd go with Electric Warrior and the Slider, but T Rex has some great best of's if your looking to go that route)

PAVEMENT (a lot of the indie rock can be attached or influenced by some fo their stuff, go get Slanted and Enchanted and Crooked Rain Crooked Rain, both albums have had recent and amazing reissues with come with a bonus disc and LOADS of stuff)

JEFF BUCKLEY (Grace, basically it's his only proper full length, but this is a great record, although we are only going back to 1994)

THE SMITHS (Queen is Dead and Meat Is Murder, there is a reason this is the number one fantasy reunion for 99% of the people on this board)

THE CURE (a lot to choose from but I always go back to Disintegration and The Head on the Door, the Cure have also started to reissue their catalog with remastered discs and tons of bonus stuff)

BEACH BOYS (Pet Sounds, even if you don't dig the surfer sound, you need this one record, if for the song God Only Knows alone)

BOB DYLAN (Highway 61, Blood on the Tracks, jeez, to many to name here as well, but just get some early Dylan and you'll be fine)

TINDERSTICKS (I think this band's records were the most under-rated of the last 90's, get either of, or both, of the first tow, both are self titled by the way and usually referred to as Tindersticks I and Tindersticks II)

BIG STAR (#1 Record/Radio City, these two albums recorded in 1972 and 1974, have been called the missing link between the Rolling Stones circa Aftermath and the new wave, I agree)

ELVIS COSTELLO (This Year’s Model or Armed Forces, also recently reissued, Costello’s bilious lyrics on this benchmark of disgust and unrepentant rage are aimed primarily at the fairer sex, and he lands a dizzying array of verbal body blows, augmented by bludgeoning musical support from the uncredited and amzing band, The Attractions)

GANG OF FOUR (Entertainment! Throwing down the post-punk gauntlet, Gang of Four’s debut is a powder keg full of paradoxes: Chilly vocals and jagged shards of guitar keep you at a shivering distance, while Marxist lyrics and a deep-groovin’ rhythm section provoke both action and reaction. One of my all time faves)

JOY DIVSION (Unknown Pleasures and Closer - I love both, they also have a damn good collection out called Substance)

NEW ORDER (the pop/dance re-birth of Joy Division in the wake of Ian Curtis' suicide. New Order are great. I'd start with Low Life, Power Corruption and Lies, or Technique. Their really great double-disc best of is also titled Substance)

KRAFTWERK (Trans-Europe Express and Autobahn. The start of Kraftwerk’s reign as electronic visionaries. The Coachella show was one of the best in the history of the festival, imo. These records are a big time influence for many, many bands today)

THE KINKS (get the Ultimate Collection that came out a few years ago - its a double that highlights an amazing band throughout their career The Kinks are the crowning glory of garage rock, courtesy of Dave Davies’s blitzkrieg solo on “You Really Got Me.” Brother Ray was already a master of the wry and bittersweet, as found on Waterloo Sunset)

PIXIES (Kurt Cobain always praised them, and their recent sold out reunion tour has been a huge testament to what they put down on wax. I love Surfer Rosa and Doolittle the best, but you really can't go wrong apart from the spotty Tromp Le Monde)

ROXY MUSIC (Start with Avalon. The reconvened Roxy Music of the early ’80s were far removed from the art-school dilettantes of Brian Eno’s day. But their later music had its own languorous, sexy, exquisite melancholy. Beautiful stuff indeed, Street Life is a best of that spans their different styles of the 70's and 80's)

STONE ROSES (the self titled debut The Stone Roses, is one of my all time faves, brit rock/pop in all of it's glory, comes in a great deluxe edition)

MASSIVE ATTACK (Blue Lines. started to combine r n b with a new "trip-hop" and dub sound. Another must own)

AC/DC (Highway to Hell is the album that firmly cemented AC/DC’s trademark sound — grooving backbeats topped with heavy, play-in-a-day riffs — and original singer Bon Scott’s nihilism. Six months after its release, the frontman would be found dead in a car in London following a booze bender)

SONIC YOUTH (Daydream Nation. I like this one far more than anything they've done. The crucial transition for the still-insular New York outfit: the point at which melodies coalesce amid the primordial noise of the Lee Ranaldo/ Thurston Moore guitar assault, and sex shimmers in the shadows of Kim Gordon’s bass throb - Blender)

ROLLING STONES (get some sleezy rock era stones stuff. Stinky Fingers, Beggars Banquet, come to mind. You'd be doing yourself a favor with Tattoo You and Exile on Main Street as well)

Deviate_420
10-17-2007, 08:45 AM
Alright, I have a couple of requests. 1) The Smiths 2) Patti Smith 3) Turbonegro 4) Tom Waits

I am working on Kyuss/Qotsa and the Bouncing Souls

Lt. Dangel
10-17-2007, 08:51 AM
I'd like to see a Flaming Lips guide. Haven't listened to much pre Soft Bulletin, but am a huge fan of that album and everything since. Anybody got the skills to do these guys?

wmgaretjax
10-17-2007, 08:57 AM
Alright, I have a couple of requests. 1) The Smiths 2) Patti Smith 3) Turbonegro 4) Tom Waits

I am working on Kyuss/Qotsa and the Bouncing Souls

I'll work on Tom Waits.

bug on your lip
10-17-2007, 09:06 AM
I'll work on Tom Waits.

sounds like a DIRTY JOBS episode