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faxman75
06-05-2012, 03:35 PM
A live stream. This will not happen again our life.

http://sunearthday.gsfc.nasa.gov/webcasts/mtwilson/


Here is a "guide" for how to view outdoors that also includes a live video.

http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/06/05/12056397-venus-transit-a-last-minute-guide?lite

Mugwog
06-05-2012, 03:39 PM
GO GO FANTASTIFEST GLASSES
http://inspector-gadget.net/wp-content/gallery/inspector-gadgets-field-trip-screenshots/Gadget.jpg

HowToDisappear
06-05-2012, 03:45 PM
I've got my eclipse glasses --- right now it's just below the top right edge of the sun. Just a little bitty black dot. But I'll keep popping out every now and again to check it out.

Alchemy
06-05-2012, 03:58 PM
I was hoping this would be about civilian trips around Venus. I had my wallet and everything.

PlayaDelWes
06-05-2012, 04:05 PM
If you think about the abundance of once in a lifetime events throughout your life, they add up pretty quickly and become quite insignificant.

Alchemy
06-05-2012, 04:06 PM
Bowie at Coachella Events > Once in a Lifetime Events

amyzzz
06-05-2012, 04:31 PM
I was hoping this would be about civilian trips around Venus. I had my wallet and everything.Same. What a letdown.

HowToDisappear
06-05-2012, 04:43 PM
I think there is a dearth of astronomy nerds around here.

Mugwog
06-05-2012, 04:45 PM
"Pfft, space. It's just a bunch of shit out there we don't really know too much about...who cares"

jackstraw94086
06-05-2012, 04:46 PM
If you think about the abundance of once in a lifetime events throughout your life, they add up pretty quickly and become quite insignificant.

the idea that all "once in a lifetime events" are somehow interchangeable and thus can be aggregated and thought of as a common occurrence is incomprehensibly stupid. Even as an attempt to be cute.

jackstraw94086
06-05-2012, 04:52 PM
For those who have never contemplated the scale of the solar system, Venus is about 25 Million miles away from us right now and although it's about the size of our entire planet it appears a fraction of a pencil point against the sun right now, which is almost 4X further away.

It's not Venus that's impressive right now, it's the fucking sun. That fucking thing is HUGE. And as stars go it's fairly small.

marooko
06-05-2012, 04:57 PM
Whoa.

DJ Sin
06-05-2012, 04:58 PM
"There's a little black dot on the sun today"

jackstraw94086
06-05-2012, 05:29 PM
"There's a little black dot on the sun today"

I guess it should have been wearing sunscreen all these years.

theresalwaysone
06-05-2012, 05:46 PM
For those who have never contemplated the scale of the solar system, Venus is about 25 Million miles away from us right now and although it's about the size of our entire planet it appears a fraction of a pencil point against the sun right now, which is almost 4X further away.

It's not Venus that's impressive right now, it's the fucking sun. That fucking thing is HUGE. And as stars go it's fairly small.

Yeah...........


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7T1LO6nOUdw

HowToDisappear
06-05-2012, 08:16 PM
http://i723.photobucket.com/albums/ww234/howtodisappear_2009/transit.jpg

Courtesy of 1litro (shot until the clouds rolled in and the sun set)

marooko
06-05-2012, 08:43 PM
Awesome, Litro. Thank you both for sharing.

Geno_g
06-05-2012, 09:29 PM
Here's my photo, it was a projection from a telescope...
http://i843.photobucket.com/albums/zz360/genone-gdp/1338942595.jpg

TomAz
06-05-2012, 09:32 PM
the idea that all "once in a lifetime events" are somehow interchangeable and thus can be aggregated and thought of as a common occurrence is incomprehensibly stupid.

People are routinely impressed by statistical outliers and read into them meanings that they don't deserve, which is what I think Wes was getting at, and which (outside of this context) I think is worth thinking about. But the transit of Venus is no random outlier: it is regular, periodic, and predictable. It's just that period between events (in pairs every x hundred years) is longer than the human lifespan, and so people get excited about it. Which is fine I guess if you are into that sort of thing.

The better point is your second post, about how this event highlights the distortions in our everyday perceptions of the universe, and serves as a lesson that common sense (straightforward intuitive interpretation of experience) is not always the right answer.

frizzlefry
06-05-2012, 10:22 PM
I think celestial events are just hip now because of the solar eclipse, it's weird hearing so many people talk about it. That being said, I think the pictures alone gives us a little more perspective on just how big our sun is as someone already mentioned.

PlayaDelWes
06-05-2012, 10:32 PM
The day in which we learned the sun was big.

jackstraw94086
06-05-2012, 11:21 PM
People are routinely impressed by statistical outliers and read into them meanings that they don't deserve, which is what I think Wes was getting at, and which (outside of this context) I think is worth thinking about. But the transit of Venus is no random outlier: it is regular, periodic, and predictable. It's just that period between events (in pairs every x hundred years) is longer than the human lifespan, and so people get excited about it. Which is fine I guess if you are into that sort of thing.

The better point is your second post, about how this event highlights the distortions in our everyday perceptions of the universe, and serves as a lesson that common sense (straightforward intuitive interpretation of experience) is not always the right answer.

I don't think Wes' point was about very unlikely events, which is I think what you're getting at. You seem to be referring to "once in a lifetime" type of event because it's extremely unlikely to happen twice in a lifetime, and you're right, people without statistical training often make either the mistake of believing it too unlikely to ever occur naturally, or believing them more common than they are because they don't pay attention to all the times the event didn't happen. Statistics (QA/stochastics/game theory) was the core of my degree and somewhat of a hobby so I've spent lots of time thinking about stuff like that.

but I believe he had the context correct when he said "once in a lifetime" events, meaning certain to only happen once in a lifespan. And to declare any particular one of those things not special because there's lots of OTHER things that have happened or are coming up that wont happen again either, that's retarded.
As if eh, transit of venus isn't a big deal because I remember Haley's comet and 11/11/11 or whatever. Yes pretty much every day something happens that will never happen again. But to try and denegrate one particular event because of those other events is stupid, even as an attempt to be cute, which is what it seemed to be.

jackstraw94086
06-05-2012, 11:32 PM
I think celestial events are just hip now because of the solar eclipse, it's weird hearing so many people talk about it. That being said, I think the pictures alone gives us a little more perspective on just how big our sun is as someone already mentioned.

You are forgetting that the solar eclipse was only a local event, you only have this perspective because you were paying attention to californians. Most people in this country, and especially the world, didn't give a shit, just like you don't when it happens every few years somewhere else. This is different, it's visible to the whole world and many scientists all of the world traveled to ideal spots (like HI) to see this. This is actually a bigger deal than the eclipse, it's not piggybacking on it.


The day in which we learned the sun was big.

another failed attempt at cleverness. We get it. You're not into astronomy.

Mike Litoris
06-05-2012, 11:34 PM
"There's a little black dot on the sun today"

What I found crazy besides "the little black dot," was the other "black dots" on the sun, which were sunspots, which were the same around the same size as Venus, and consequently Earth. It really puts things into perspective as to how massive that giant flaming ball in the sky really is.

Geno_g
06-05-2012, 11:37 PM
Not visible to the whole world...
http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/7axtk2.fX5jAnlUb2RGLTQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9aW5zZXQ7aD01MTI7cT04NTt3PTM0Mw--/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/afp.com/photo_1338910571574-3-0.jpg

frizzlefry
06-06-2012, 12:07 AM
You are forgetting that the solar eclipse was only a local event, you only have this perspective because you were paying attention to californians. Most people in this country, and especially the world, didn't give a shit, just like you don't when it happens every few years somewhere else. This is different, it's visible to the whole world and many scientists all of the world traveled to ideal spots (like HI) to see this. This is actually a bigger deal than the eclipse, it's not piggybacking on it.



I should have said it's weird to literally hear[I] people [I]talk about it. I know it's a big event for anyone with a cursory interest in astronomy but I felt like the average Californian probably read about this event in a end note on an article about the Solar Eclipse. I really only knew about it because of an Email I got from my school.

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 12:15 AM
You're still only talking about the relatively small number of people that were near the path of the eclipse. The vast majority of people around the world who are interested in the transit of venus don't care or may not have even known about the local solar eclipse.

greghead
06-06-2012, 12:36 AM
My uncle is an astro physicist at the Ames Research Center and he had a pretty cool set up going with a sun filter and magnified eyepiece on his telescope. It was a very cool event. Dude has been waiting for this since he first heard about it when he was 10.

Geno_g
06-06-2012, 12:41 AM
It was a huge event at a college that I work by and they opened the observatory to the public; they had telescope projecting images, it was really cool...

marooko
06-06-2012, 08:07 AM
It's times like these when I'm annoyed about where I live. Sure I'm centrally located when it comes to full day events, but there wasn't shit around here to go watch this. Not that anyone was talking about anyway. Thank you internet.

TomAz
06-06-2012, 08:52 AM
Not visible to the whole world...

How bout that. You couldn't see it when it was night time. What a revelation.

mountmccabe
06-06-2012, 09:08 AM
The last one happened during the night in Arizona (and the rest of the Western US); I remember being disappointed.

But not disappointed enough to travel or anything.

Goatchella
06-06-2012, 09:12 AM
JACKstrawASS talks too mush

marooko
06-06-2012, 09:16 AM
Dark.

HowToDisappear
06-06-2012, 10:04 AM
That Wes and some others find no interest or wonder in this surprises me not at all. But I do find the need for sarcasm and dismissal disappointing.

TomAz
06-06-2012, 10:05 AM
insert sarcastic dismissal of HTDs post.

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 10:10 AM
your meta-sarcasm was totally useful here, Tom.

Geno_g
06-06-2012, 10:16 AM
This is different, it's visible to the whole world and many scientists all of the world traveled to ideal spots (like HI) to see this. This is actually a bigger deal than the eclipse, it's not piggybacking on it.



another failed attempt at cleverness. We get it. You're not into astronomy.

....


How bout that. You couldn't see it when it was night time. What a revelation.
O rly?

HowToDisappear
06-06-2012, 10:20 AM
THANKS,TOM!

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 10:43 AM
....


O rly?

did you even study your own pic? ya "the whole world" is a slight exaggeration but it's fucking visible to the majority of the land mass of the planet and an even more vast majority of the population. it's a nitpick.

and the context of that post was in comparison to the solar eclipse which cuts an extremely small relative path.

frizzlefry
06-06-2012, 10:46 AM
You're still only talking about the relatively small number of people that were near the path of the eclipse

Correct

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 10:50 AM
Correct

but even in the area that was exposed to eclipse hype I still reject your notion that this is somehow a bigger deal because of that.
This news was coming regardless.

You hang out with eclipsters.

Mugwog
06-06-2012, 11:11 AM
You hang out with eclipsters.

New name for people who don't like Coachella and prefer burning man/tribe events

RotationSlimWang
06-06-2012, 11:29 AM
the idea that all "once in a lifetime events" are somehow interchangeable and thus can be aggregated and thought of as a common occurrence is incomprehensibly stupid. Even as an attempt to be cute.

Disagree. The fact that something will only happen once in my lifetime does nothing to add any actual quantifiable value or import to my subjective experience. There are lots of things that only happened once in my lifetime that were utterly fucking boring and completely undeserving of note. Tell me why I should actually give a shit besides the unlikeliness of it.

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 11:35 AM
Disagree. The fact that something will only happen once in my lifetime does nothing to add any actual quantifiable value or import to my subjective experience. There are lots of things that only happened once in my lifetime that were utterly fucking boring and completely undeserving of note. Tell me why I should actually give a shit besides the unlikeliness of it.

Telling people that are into the transit of venus that it's not really that big a deal because some other one-time-only events that AREN'T the transit of venus happen too is outrageously stupid.


And this has nothing to do with unlikeliness. There is no probability involved here. We know for a fact that nobody on this planet will see this (at least while standing on this planet) for another century. If this particular event is undeserving of your notice then fine, but it's arrogance far beyone anyting I could achieve to assume that everyone has your interests. Most people probably couldn't give a fuck about most things you care about.

Geno_g
06-06-2012, 11:44 AM
I was pointing out your false exaggeration, you don't think that south america and some of Africa is not a big chuck of the population?

PlayaDelWes
06-06-2012, 11:45 AM
Are people really into the transit of venus? I only started seeing people around here start talking about it say, yesterday?

mountmccabe
06-06-2012, 11:45 AM
Agree. [to jackstraw's response to RSW]


Tell me why I should actually give a shit besides the unlikeliness of it.

This thread has had several appeals in that form.

Alchemy
06-06-2012, 11:56 AM
Are people really into the transit of venus? I only started seeing people around here start talking about it say, yesterday?

I'm more of a Mars man, myself.

mountmccabe
06-06-2012, 12:03 PM
Are people really into the transit of venus? I only started seeing people around here start talking about it say, yesterday?

There have been news stories about it for a while.

The 2004 Transit got coverage, too. Near all of the photos in the stories leading up to this one were from the last one. The previous one (late 1800s) of course didn't have video.

No one flew in a plane to see that one, either, since they hadn't been invented. There were certainly people that traveled to see this one, though.

Also Thomas Pynchon's 1997 novel Mason & Dixon (http://www.thomaspynchon.com/mason-dixon/extra/cape.html) has a long section about the titular people travelling to the Cape of Good Hope to view the Transit of Venus in the 1760s.


And, well [which I think is awesome]


My uncle is an astro physicist at the Ames Research Center and he had a pretty cool set up going with a sun filter and magnified eyepiece on his telescope. It was a very cool event. Dude has been waiting for this since he first heard about it when he was 10.

So yeah, some people really care.


I mean, really, Wes, this is how you sound:

Fan: Grizzly Bear has a new album coming out!
PlayaDelWes: Bands release albums all the time, this is dumb.
Fan: Man I have been waiting to hear more from them for years!
Fan: Yay! They were great when they played Coachella in 2010!
PlayaDelWes: I just heard about this band yesterday, do people really care about them?

Sure, people are interested in Grizzly Bear (and the Transit of Venus.) There are a few that are obsessed but you clearly don't have contact with them. But for most of us there are plenty of other things to talk about, etc.

marooko
06-06-2012, 12:05 PM
Too funny yous guys.

TomAz
06-06-2012, 12:08 PM
people that are into the transit of venus

http://www.universalastrologer.com/earthch.html


1987 ; August Harmonic convergence Sun emissions
1987, 11 November; Harmonic convergence. “illumination”, when the last measurement of the planetary “light” was taken. This was taken before any “spiritual/physics”changes were made. A spiritual window was opened, all on the planet agreed to receive deliveries of the new energy and have spiritual upgrades.

1988 new healing introduced; Peggy Dubro Emf Balancing technique

1989 Kryon linked up with channel Lee Caroll

1989 the Kryon magnetics “grid changing group” arrived on Earth, the start of the magnetic grid changes which would move the position of the Magnetic north pole. The pole wonders from this point until September 2002, when it becomes fixed into a new position, the Earths grid is tilted at a greater angle than before. The magnetics has changed the 30 degree Zodiac signs slightly, making Sagittarius-Gemini slightly larger.

1992, January 11th, Channel Solara spoke of 11/11, the energies of the 1987 harmonic convergence re-visited.

1993, 12 August, Eric pearl , was seeded with the new Earth frequencies, to distribute throughout the planet, re-connecting everyone back into the Universal grid and activating DNA coding,…[ ready for the Venus transit, whose activation is on the pineal gland.] Interestingly, the frequencies come through Erics natal Venus alignment.

2001, 9/11; a few minutes before 9.00am, Manhattan, US, The energy draw to zero, many gave their lives to bring about an energy balance. US declared war on a tribe.

2002, 11 September Earths Magnetic Grid shift completed

2003, 27 August, Mars closest to the Earth, the depowerment of countries and finances, which will come to pass in 2007/8

2003,October 28th;coronal mass ejections from the Sun pointed straight at Earth, the very first impulse of the Harmonic concordance.[the Sun being at an 11 year peak in its cycle]

2003, November 8th , The Harmonic concordance, the spiritual window of 1987 closed. Is the middle of a 25 year cycle [this is not a known astrological cycle, or planetary cycle, possibly an Earth cycle that we have yet to identify, starting 1991.5 and finishing 2015.5]

2004 8 June; The first Venus transit, where a spiritual window was opened, the transit lasted for 6-7 hours, its meaning was "Dispensation of Responsibility", it brings balance, love, harmony, releasing pain and suffering.

2004, 24 December; Tsunami, sacrifice led to Earth moving half a degree.

2008 New Jerusalem built in Israel. [New “peace” human consciousness]

2012, 6th June 2012, second Venus transit, where the spiritual window closes.

2012 New age, delivery of energy and measurement of Earths “illumination”.

2037 the next planetary measurement of Earths “illumination”.

RotationSlimWang
06-06-2012, 12:19 PM
Telling people that are into the transit of venus that it's not really that big a deal because some other one-time-only events that AREN'T the transit of venus happen too is outrageously stupid.


And this has nothing to do with unlikeliness. There is no probability involved here. We know for a fact that nobody on this planet will see this (at least while standing on this planet) for another century. If this particular event is undeserving of your notice then fine, but it's arrogance far beyone anyting I could achieve to assume that everyone has your interests. Most people probably couldn't give a fuck about most things you care about.

Back the fuck up with all your certainty about the cosmos, Jack. Whatever degree of "certainty" exists relies on the premise that some basic precepts of the universe and physics will remain unaltered, which is in no way a definite. It's an assumed continuation.

TomAz
06-06-2012, 12:25 PM
Yes, I understand the gravitational constant might change any minute now.

mountmccabe
06-06-2012, 12:32 PM
I should probably start planning my New Gravitational Constant party tonight!

mountmccabe
06-06-2012, 12:33 PM
Alternate joke: Type O Negative are gonna have to rerecord their song, huh.

Gravity!
Pushing slightly down on me!

greghead
06-06-2012, 12:39 PM
Are people really into the transit of venus? I only started seeing people around here start talking about it say, yesterday?

Yes. I've been waiting since I missed the last transit in 2004. Some of us really are into astronomy and planetary science.

EDIT: I saw several people wearing these shirts.

http://transitofvenusstore.bigcartel.com/products

In fact, I just ordered one.

Grandma
06-06-2012, 01:12 PM
I sat on the top of the house with a beer, a joint, and a welders mask and still didn't see shit

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 01:20 PM
I was pointing out your false exaggeration, you don't think that south america and some of Africa is not a big chuck of the population?

Are you going to nitpick until you get precise calculations? YES, I stand by this obvious fact. North America, Europe, Asia, (forgetting that this also includes the top of south america and east africa) is the majority of the land mass of the planet, and ONCE more, the vast majority of the population. There's lots of people in those other countries, but relatively small compared to the % of world population that could see this.
Do the math yourself if you're so desperate to pick away this. christ.

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 01:23 PM
Are people really into the transit of venus? I only started seeing people around here start talking about it say, yesterday?

you're being recklessly arrogant now. Go google this shit. Just because you've got up your ass doesn't mean the rest of the world can't hear what's outside your sphincter. You consort with people who don't happen to give a shit. hooray!

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 01:28 PM
Back the fuck up with all your certainty about the cosmos, Jack. Whatever degree of "certainty" exists relies on the premise that some basic precepts of the universe and physics will remain unaltered, which is in no way a definite. It's an assumed continuation.

really? you're going with this? The only thing that might affect the orbits of the planets at this point is if your head gets any denser.

But if you want to bet money on any particular prediction of Newton and Einstein's math with regard to planetary orbit bring it on.

nahuatldream
06-06-2012, 01:37 PM
Guys, guys, guys, the world is ending on 12/21/12, so let's not argue and just enjoy the last 6+months we have left.

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 01:38 PM
No one flew in a plane to see that one, either, since they hadn't been invented. There were certainly people that traveled to see this one, though.

Also Thomas Pynchon's 1997 novel Mason & Dixon (http://www.thomaspynchon.com/mason-dixon/extra/cape.html) has a long section about the titular people travelling to the Cape of Good Hope to view the Transit of Venus in the 1760s.


And, well [which I think is awesome]



Cpt James Cook got the crown to sponsor an expedition to half way around to world to largely unexplored territory just to observe this in 1768.

HowToDisappear
06-06-2012, 02:31 PM
The worldwide expeditions during the transits of 1761/69 were the basically the first example of global scientific collaboration. Edmund Halley created detailed plans for the observation of the transits, knowing he'd be long dead by the time they arrived. (Detailed observations/measurements of the transit's timing from points all over the earth were needed to make more precise calculations of the distance of the earth from the sun.) Later astronomers heeded the plan, and world powers dispatched their best astronomers and equipment to points all over the globe; it really was a massive undertaking. In the end, their calculations were pretty damn close.

frizzlefry
06-06-2012, 02:43 PM
but even in the area that was exposed to eclipse hype I still reject your notion that this is somehow a bigger deal because of that.
This news was coming regardless.

You hang out with eclipsters.

Well I guess I'll just have to go on living somehow. You're eclipsters line helps

frizzlefry
06-06-2012, 02:45 PM
The last several posts have been really informative, this thread delivered interesting shit

greghead
06-06-2012, 03:23 PM
The worldwide expeditions during the transits of 1761/69 were the basically the first example of global scientific collaboration. Edmund Halley created detailed plans for the observation of the transits, knowing he'd be long dead by the time they arrived. (Detailed observations/measurements of the transit's timing from points all over the earth were needed to make more precise calculations of the distance of the earth from the sun.) Later astronomers heeded the plan, and world powers dispatched their best astronomers and equipment to points all over the globe; it really was a massive undertaking. In the end, their calculations were pretty damn close.

Bingo.

"...Years must roll away, but then at length the splendid sight shall again greet our distant children's eyes."
-- Jeremiah Horrocks

HowToDisappear
06-06-2012, 03:40 PM
We were fortunate to be those distant children.

jackstraw94086
06-06-2012, 07:23 PM
again, that thing's about the size of Earth, and the sun is 4x further than that thing is. That mobile in your elementary school classroom was complete bullshit.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QX6BbP1wAIs&sns=fb