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SoulDischarge
02-04-2012, 08:45 PM
I don't give a fuck about where the best place to get creme brulee is or what famous musicians went to your elementary school or how the McDonald's used to be Uncle Ernie's Sno Cone Station. Let us know about the odd idiosyncrasies in your neighborhood that only someone who has lived there for a long time will know.

My neighborhood in Akron is called North Hill.

--There's a retarded guy named Marky who is more or less the local mascot of North Hill. He wanders around the neighborhood all the time, supports the all the local high school sports teams, will remember your personal information for the rest of your life after hearing it once, and goes around taking out people's trash bins on trash day.

--There's a very old man who drives around in an old beat up red pickup truck that has a 2D wooden jack-o-lantern decal tied to the grille 365 days a year.

--We call the strip of grass between the sidewalk and the curb a devil strip.

--There's a section of the Goodyear Tire plant called "The Proving Grounds."

--They recently built a fence on one of the bigger bridges in town (referred to as the Y bridge, due to its shape) because people would travel here from out of town to commit suicide off of it. http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/06/us/06akron.html

bmack86
02-05-2012, 12:59 AM
I live in Westlake (NOT Westlake Village), which is commonly called MacArthur Park, in Los Angeles.

-There is a lady who wanders the alley by my apartment every day feeding the stray cats. She has names for all of them and will yell the cat's name until it comes to get food. I've written songs incorporating her howlings. Her license plate is LizCatz.

-I live a block away from the original Tommy's Burger. I've seen more fights in that parking lot than I could ever care to count.

-Apparently my neighborhood is home to a number of historic houses. The only one I have any interest in finding is the one that, in the 70s and 80s, was known as Dangerhouse. Some of the guys from Origami, the local record store, told me they went looking for a place to rent and ran into the Dangerhouse (they were a label that released X, the Germs, and pretty much all the good pre-SST LA punk). The guys who run the label still live there, are in their 50s, and really wanted to set off bottle rockets to convince the dudes to move in. I need to find this place.

-Dexter and Sons of Anarchy frequently film on my block. Neither is set in LA.

kreutz2112
02-05-2012, 01:43 AM
Nope.

Mugwog
02-05-2012, 01:44 AM
I live in Los Angeles.

Nothing happens here.

Pixiessp
02-05-2012, 01:58 AM
I live in Santa Paula, Calif. It's small and farmlike. People walk their goats down my street. A good portion of the folk have no computers.
Myself and ballroomdancer22 are the coolest people in town. We have a museum called the Santa Paula Oil Museum. It once had a Hot Wheel exhibit.
We have an airport!! Sorry. Got a bit excited. Mostly Cessnas and those little Piper thingys.

tessalasset
02-05-2012, 03:27 AM
I live in Los Angeles.


omg me too! we must know all the same people!

tessalasset
02-05-2012, 03:44 AM
I live in Santa Monica, just west of Los Angeles but still "Los Angeles" to most people. My neighbor in my apartment complex is a touring rap musician but I've never cared enough to ask him about it. He has like three or four homies over every day, closes the blinds most of the time, and just smokes the fuck out. It just reeks out of their windows 24/7.

There's an abandoned house right next door to my apt that's totally run down. Door looks like it's been hacked with a machete, all the appliances/furniture still there I think, and random holes beaten into it that homeless people/drug dealers sneak through so they can sleep there. We don't want to call too much attention to it tho because 2/3 of that lot (essentially the house's front yard) is just wide open flat land, and we all use it as our personal parking lot since street parking is a bitch. The abandoned shack is pretty scary but not enough to make us compromise our parking. There's a big For Sale/condo plans sign up at the front but it's been there for about six years now. I am dreading the day they start building and I lose my wide open North/West view out my window.

About six blocks away, surrounded by random auto repair shops and nondescript boutique stores, is Playboy Studios West. I'm not sure what they do there cause it's a really small 1 floor office. You hardly even notice the sign out front.

I live about seven blocks away from St. John's Hospital where I was born, and where my grandpa, aunt, and grandma all died within the past four years.

A few blocks from me is a street called Centinela that runs north and south. On the west side of the street, you live in Santa Monica. On the east side, you live in Los Angeles. So kids who grow up across the street from each other aren't allowed to go to the same public schools and parents vote on totally different issues. It's weird. The west side of the street has many more resources available to it.

Leaf blowers are illegal here. Dani made me aware of the fact that I could actually report gardeners using leaf blowers and someone from the city would come out and give them a citation. While I was unemployed and at home during the day, I'd sneak pictures of them and email them in. I felt like such a curmudgeon, but I hate those things and I love that we can actually do something about them.

Even tho I'm almost at the very end of Santa Monica, about 30 blocks from the beach, on a clear day you can still see the water from my street. Makes me smile.

There's also a generic Christian church across the street from me and while I don't consider myself a religious person, I do feel safer knowing it's there.

mountmccabe
02-05-2012, 06:41 AM
I live in Hell's Kitchen, a neighborhood in Manhattan, a borough in New York City. I have lived here just over 7 months so I don't know any of the stuff old timers would know. I will look for some interesting things as I am about to go out and go to the bodega a few doors down to pick up breakfast sandwiches and coffee.

CuervoPH
02-05-2012, 07:14 AM
I live in Dover, PA, a town with a population of just over 2,000 people and thankfully containing not a single Wal-Mart. Idiosyncrasies abound, I'm sure, and I will watch for them, but I do like the fact that this town earned the ire of Pat Robertson because they voted out school board members who wanted intelligent design as part of the school curriculum. His response, "I'd like to say to the good citizens of Dover, if there is a disaster in your area, don't turn to God. You just rejected him from your city."

Dover, PA -- Come visit. Eat, fuel up, and reject God if you so choose.

Neighborhood Creep
02-05-2012, 09:01 AM
I live in Superior Wisconsin. It's the most NW part of our state and is on the tip of Lake Superior. Our winters are very cold and our summers are short.

We had the most bars per capita in America at one point and it's still argued that we do.

Our city gained national attention a few years ago due to one of our residents having an animal fetish that he couldn't control. Sicko
http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/crime/can-you-get-dear-dead-deer

There's really nothing that cool about Superior. I live next to Duluth MN and I could go on and on about what a fantastic city it is. On the other side of us is the country and state parks and such. Lake Superior provides a lot of beauty in our area. We have waterfalls all over the place, rivers to tube, kayak, canoe on. The fishing is top notch.
Superior does have a nice beach that we can use for 4 months out of the year if the weather is nice. We have had raves and all night ragers on it many times over the years as well.

fatbastard
02-05-2012, 11:37 AM
I live in old town Pasadena.

Every year a crap load of people come to watch the rose parade and/or the rose bowl. Most locals head for the hills that entire week.

The rose bowl is the place for locals on the weekends. You can see people from every persuasion hanging out and enjoying their weekend.

Back in the 70s, it was a really bad neighborhood. Lots of adult book stores, drug paraphernalia shops, and lots of hippies.

Julia Child’s childhood home is 5 blocks away.

Most restaurants in the area have some type of special on Mondays and Tuesdays for locals only. You only need to show your driver’s license.

I live on the grounds of a once very popular restaurant. I coincidentally ate at that restaurant after a Psychedelic Furs concert with the wife, who was my girlfriend at the time. Anytime a local asks where we live, we mention the restaurant and they know exactly where we live.

We also have a similar bridge named suicide bride by locals. There were at least 3 people who jumped off the bridge within the past 2 months.

There is a homeless man who sits on a lawn chair and rocks back and forth in front of the local CVS. When he’s not rocking back and forth, he’s nervously smoking a cigarette. When you get close to him, he will turn with a mean scowl and say very loudly, “DO YOU HAVE ANY SPARE CHANGE?”

We live near a hospital that has a landing pad. Anytime someone is air lifted, a helicopter flies over us, really close, on its way to the landing pad.

There's a park by that hospital that has cherry trees donated by Yoko Ono.

We live next to a gold line train station. You can hear the train’s arrival bell in the early morning and late evening when the windows are open.

marooko
02-05-2012, 11:52 AM
I think there's a halfway home across the street. I don't like it being there.

mmsk123
02-05-2012, 12:16 PM
Downtown Los Angeles. People either think it's shit, or it's "come a long way." It does always smell like piss that never goes away unless it's right after a rain. I love it here.

- If someone comes up to you to tell a story, no matter how detailed it sounds, in the end they will ask you for money.
- Do not enter intersections even 1 second early before the light turns green and there are no cars. You will get a $250 jaywalking ticket.
- There is an old guy who walks around with a pipe pushing a bunny in a stroller. He is pretty cool and will chat with you for a bit. This is him leading the St. Patricks day parade. (http://viewfromaloft.typepad.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/03/17/imgp5190.jpg)
- There is wide open, blatant drug dealing in the middle of the day at 5th and Broadway and nothing is ever done about it.
- After awhile, you will become less compassionate. I walk to and from work four times a day (lunch) and get asked for money at least three times a day. After seven years of this I just ignore them and don't feel anything.
- You will lose count of how many people you see pissing and shitting on the sidewalk in broad daylight.
- The Golden Gopher, Seven Grand, Broadway Bar, Las Perlas, Coles, Casey's, Caña Rum Bar, and The Varnish are all owned by the same guy. He's done alot for DT.
- If you hear a bus honking, that means it's going to run the red light and watch out.
- The best Manhattan is at Bottega Louie. The best macarons are at Paulette in the Little Tokyo mall.
- You can climb up to the top of City Hall on Thursdays. It's an amazing view but difficult to get up there.
- You can parking the yellow loading zones and green zones after 6pm through 7am Monday-Saturday and all day Sunday. This goes for all of L.A. but especially useful in downtown.

Courtney
02-05-2012, 12:16 PM
I live in an area of Honolulu called Makiki. It's between Waikiki, the University area and Downtown.

There is a dude who lives in my apartment complex named Garry who is a youth minister on Sundays but I'm pretty sure is otherwise unemployed. He lives with his elderly mother. He likes to sit on the front stoop and say hello to people as they are coming and going. I'm pretty sure he knows more about my intimate comings and going at all hours of the day and night than anyone else alive. He will wash your car for $3 per week. He has a Las Vegas mug outside his apartment door and people just leave the money there for him.

The park about three blocks from my apartment was recently populated by a tent city of homeless people who were kicked out of Waikiki during the mass cleansing that happened when lots of foreign leaders and dignitaries came to town for APEC (the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation conference). Since then, all those homeless people were kicked out of my park too and have moved on to another park about half a mile down the street. There are plenty of beds available in local shelters, but people prefer to camp out in tents because the weather is pleasant and it's much nicer than being crammed in beds in a communal living space with stinky people, theft, fights, etc.

There is a park across the street from my apartment with basketball courts and a playground where Micronesian families like to gather most nights. The young men will play basketball (shirts vs. skins), and the women will take the kids to play on the playground even though there is only one working swing now because the others are broken. On Friday nights, someone usually brings a boombox and they'll listen to popular Jawaiian (Hawaiian reggae) songs while cooking on portable grills. They are really friendly and sometimes I'll go over and cheer on one of the basketball games even though I'm the only white person and I don't speak Chamorro or Palauan.

We have three quite good local supermarkets within a four block radius, but everyone shops for everything at Costco on the other side of town, because it's so much cheaper.

There is a kick-ass private community library that is only open to Makiki residents and nobody knows about it because it's not part of the state library system. It has an odd mish-mash of romance novels, sci fi, and children's picture books. It's staffed entirely by volunteers, and only open on Wednesday and Saturday afternoons. There was a break-in several months ago, but besides the broken glass on the front door, nothing was damaged and only one thing was taken: the entire set of encyclopedias.

nathanfairchild
02-05-2012, 12:24 PM
I live in Waco, TX. I've been here almost 4 years now. It's a pretty terrible place. The only thing interesting to ever happen here was the rise of the Branch Davidian cult. They had a compound just on the outskirts of town. They didn't seem to be a suicide cult, but ATF got involved and they had a standoff which eventually left 100+ people dead when the compound caught on fire. Today there are still cult members out there, ad they've rebuilt everything on the grounds aside from the giant compound building.

casey
02-05-2012, 01:14 PM
I live in Mid-City, which is an area of Los Angeles. It's west of downtown, east of West LA and south of the Hollywood area.

-We have soft serve ice cream trucks instead of ice cream trucks that just serve popsicles
-We have loads of parrots hanging out in the palm trees.

...that's about it

tessalasset
02-05-2012, 02:12 PM
Is Miracle Mile considered Mid City or Mid City West?

menikmati
02-05-2012, 02:36 PM
My neighbor next to me thinks she is auditioning for American Idol. EVERY. FUCKING. NIGHT.

SoulDischarge
02-05-2012, 02:58 PM
We have a rap song about our neighborhood. Everyone under 30 knows the lyrics "A-K Rowdy Rowdy, north side, Summit County, some of y'all want to know about it . . ."

zvWAPZLMbXU

zircona1
02-05-2012, 03:03 PM
I live in Columbia, Missouri. It's a college town, home to the Mizzou Tigers (for those that follow college sports).

The city really comes alive when there's a big game in town, like last night our basketball team (ranked #5 in the nation) beat our arch rivals, the Kansas Jayhawks (ranked #8). ESPN's College Gameday was here yesterday morning as well. That's basically the only reason we ever make the national news - when our football and basketball teams do well.

I own a house and really like the location. It's a short drive to downtown and I-70 is like 2 minutes away. There's a park and a running trail close by. It's nice and quiet, mostly families live around here.

There are people who stand at stoplights near I-70 with cardboard signs asking for money.

Columbia is right in the middle of I-70 between St. Louis or Kansas City so if there's a concert I want to go to in either city it's a 2 hour drive. Driving through MO isn't as boring as driving through Kansas. Sometimes Columbia gets shows - past few years I've seen Bright Eyes, The Decemberists, Band of Horses, The Mountain Goats, Ted Leo and the Pharmacists, and Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings in town.

Every year there's the True/False film fest in March, where documentaries get shown at venues all over downtown and filmmakers/stars come and talk about their work. It's gotten extremely popular the last few years, passes go quickly.

There's also the Roots 'N Blues BBQ Fest that happens every fall, where there's live music outside in downtown Columbia and vendors set up selling BBQ and beer. Last year we had Taj Mahal, Los Lobos, Fitz and the Tantrums, Dr. Ralph Stanley, Mavis Staples, etc.

Alchemy
02-05-2012, 03:17 PM
I live in the Far East Side of El Paso, TX. The area is basically a bunch of suburbs that are expanding into the desert of nothingness that exists between El Paso and Austin/Dallas/San Antonio. Specifically, I live in a neighborhood called Americas, which is a bunch of middle class people and an enclosed section of upper class people.

There is an atmosphere of paranoia in Americas - among both the middle and upper class peoples. There are "neighborhood watch" groups, spontaneous speed bumps, and street lights that keep the neighborhood mostly illuminated at night. People peek at each other through their window blinds, and they pretend to work on their roofs so that they may survey the area. The interesting thing about the neighborhood is that the thing people seem to be paranoid of is not street gangs, the poor, or illegal immigrants, but the non-paranoid. Anybody walking on the sidewalk with an attitude of trust and confidence is a potential enemy to the established whatever-it-is-we-have-going-on-here. Any threats that enter the perimeter are not treated with violence or police or banishment; some neighbors will merely step out onto their lawns, in their pajamas, and cross their arms so that the invader will know that he or she is being watched at all times. Even the neighborhood children practice paranoia by shunning the ice cream truck, whenever it passes through, by shaking their heads from the house windows - ice cream trucks now only come into the neighborhood by mistake.

gaypalmsprings
02-05-2012, 05:49 PM
I live in Palm Springs, California. It's way gay.

Even the nearby dark green Holiday Inn is now the colorful Saguaro Inn.

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/4f2c3d5985216d23ea004eb5/PSP_Exterior_02.jpeg

We have windmills and sometimes snow on the mountains.

http://www.sshs57.com/photos/JPEGS/01Jan2005/Jan12/Snow32.jpg

People here are as old as dinosaurs.

http://www.palmspringslife.com/Palm-Springs-Life/September-1975/Theres-A-Dinosaur-In-My-Chrysanthemums/articlephoto.jpg

But mostly it is way gay!

http://blogpics.gayla4u.com/palm-springs-pride-2011-3.jpg

Sleepingrock
02-05-2012, 06:11 PM
I live in Coldstream, British Columbia. Some would argue that Coldstream is just an extension of Vernon, but we are our own municipality even though we just leech off of Vernon's services. It is a rural community, bording a provincial park and farmland for the most part. I live in a low key area, in between two school where I have both attended both a 4 minute walk away. The college is a 5 minute drive or 30 minute walk from my house. We also have a popular lake, Kalamalka Lake. We have a view of Middleton Mountain which is where the rich Coldstream folk live. Hockey players and Albertans like to own houses in this area. We don't have any "characters" in my neighbourhood since it is mostly children and baby boomers. Lonely Planet said not to visit Vernon since it is the least exciting part of the Okanagan Valley.

LetThereBeLight
02-05-2012, 06:27 PM
I live in Palm Springs, California. It's way gay.

Even the nearby dark green Holiday Inn is now the colorful Saguaro Inn.

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs/4f2c3d5985216d23ea004eb5/PSP_Exterior_02.jpeg

We have windmills and sometimes snow on the mountains.

http://www.sshs57.com/photos/JPEGS/01Jan2005/Jan12/Snow32.jpg

People here are as old as dinosaurs.

http://www.palmspringslife.com/Palm-Springs-Life/September-1975/Theres-A-Dinosaur-In-My-Chrysanthemums/articlephoto.jpg

But mostly it is way gay!

http://blogpics.gayla4u.com/palm-springs-pride-2011-3.jpg

Lol. Pretty accurate. I love gay people though so Palm Springs is awesome.

I'm in Bermuda Dunes (which is technically part of Indio).
It's very boring here.
During season, people flock here from out of town and make it impossible to get anywhere quickly. But our weather is so nice I can't blame them. For example, it was in the 70s today and the low tonight is supposed to be in the 40s. However, once it starts to warm up it clears out again, and then summer comes and it's ridiculously hot for three months.
If you don't golf or gamble, you run out of things to do around here very quickly.

HunterGather
02-05-2012, 06:53 PM
I live in Orlando. I can't really speak for everything but I can say the apartment complex I live in is nice.
But I always hear about robberies, hold ups, murders, kidnaps, etc. on the local news.
It's a bit unesettling because when they say where these things occur, it's like damn near close to me.
In any case, don't ever move to Florida. Srsly. Unless you want the heat and occasional lower temps.

I yearn to move to some place like Seattle or Vancouver for the weather alone.
My lease is up in a few months, so I got some decisions to make.

motionnn77
02-06-2012, 12:01 AM
I live in Santa Monica, just west of Los Angeles but still "Los Angeles" to most people. My neighbor in my apartment complex is a touring rap musician but I've never cared enough to ask him about it. He has like three or four homies over every day, closes the blinds most of the time, and just smokes the fuck out. It just reeks out of their windows 24/7.

There's an abandoned house right next door to my apt that's totally run down. Door looks like it's been hacked with a machete, all the appliances/furniture still there I think, and random holes beaten into it that homeless people/drug dealers sneak through so they can sleep there. We don't want to call too much attention to it tho because 2/3 of that lot (essentially the house's front yard) is just wide open flat land, and we all use it as our personal parking lot since street parking is a bitch. The abandoned shack is pretty scary but not enough to make us compromise our parking. There's a big For Sale/condo plans sign up at the front but it's been there for about six years now. I am dreading the day they start building and I lose my wide open North/West view out my window.

About six blocks away, surrounded by random auto repair shops and nondescript boutique stores, is Playboy Studios West. I'm not sure what they do there cause it's a really small 1 floor office. You hardly even notice the sign out front.

I live about seven blocks away from St. John's Hospital where I was born, and where my grandpa, aunt, and grandma all died within the past four years.

A few blocks from me is a street called Centinela that runs north and south. On the west side of the street, you live in Santa Monica. On the east side, you live in Los Angeles. So kids who grow up across the street from each other aren't allowed to go to the same public schools and parents vote on totally different issues. It's weird. The west side of the street has many more resources available to it.

Leaf blowers are illegal here. Dani made me aware of the fact that I could actually report gardeners using leaf blowers and someone from the city would come out and give them a citation. While I was unemployed and at home during the day, I'd sneak pictures of them and email them in. I felt like such a curmudgeon, but I hate those things and I love that we can actually do something about them.

Even tho I'm almost at the very end of Santa Monica, about 30 blocks from the beach, on a clear day you can still see the water from my street. Makes me smile.

There's also a generic Christian church across the street from me and while I don't consider myself a religious person, I do feel safer knowing it's there.

^

We are neighbors.

motionnn77
02-06-2012, 12:16 AM
I also live in Santa Monica. I live close to a triangle of three boundaries: Brentwood, Santa Monica and WLA.

There are trees on my block and in my driveway called Ficus trees. They grow ficus berries. They like to fall on my car and it looks like a bird had diarrhea and couldn't hold it.

I live in a pet friendly community. People know my cat by name and they let him chill at their houses and businesses within a two block radius. Some of the businesses that called me to let me know where he is: Petco, the lingerie store that used to be around the corner, and a place that repairs tennis rackets.

There are 3 Starbucks within walking distance of my place.

One of my neighbors broke a bench that was built into our building in our courtyard. She sat down and pulled her younger child in her lap. Then it broke. She looks like the mom in What's Eating Gilbert Grape.

Lots of people walk their dogs on my block. My cat beat the crap out of one of them.

rag and bone
02-06-2012, 12:46 PM
I live in Manhattan Beach, CA (specifically, the "downtown" area). There are a LOT of white people doing "white people" things. When asked, I tend to describe the environment as "sterile". It was once listed as one of the world's "sexiest" beaches by some show on the travel channel. I am one of the residents hurting that designation.

Many USC frat boy alumnis migrate here following graduation and pack the bars every Thursday-Saturday with their "bros" rocking out to the Scott Whyte band or some other awful cover band. There is one bar that I liked called Ercoles. Your choices for food are Sushi and overpriced but I mostly eat at Subway and regrettably Wahoo's at times (an overrated fish taco chain).

Every weekend the streets are filled with tourists, young mothers pushing their strollers together and women walking their miniature dogs. It makes it very difficult to do regular things like getting coffee.

The best thing about MB is its place in history as one of the host cities of the hardcore movement (although, it played a lesser role than many other South Bay cities). However, Black Flag did play one of their first shows at Polliwog Park and members of the Descendents attended local Mira Costa High School. The OC was also filmed there I guess? Unfortunately though, present day offers little resemblance to what I read about those days.

All cynicism aside, I really do enjoy the luxury of being able to walk to the beach and instantly enjoy a beautiful day in the best way possible. The weather is generally fantastic and while it's a bit hassle that any time I want to go to a show or anything it's at least a 30 minute drive I still appreciate relatively easy access to an abundance of activities.

EDIT: To fit better with SD's intention for this thread...

- The path along the beach is referred to as "the strand". No idea if this is either unique or well known information.
- The town is divided into several sections, including: "The Sand", "The Trees" and "The Hills". There's also an area called the "Poet's Section" between Mira Costa and PCH b/c the streets there are named for poets: Keats, Longfellow, Shelley, and Tennyson.
- There is a well-known homeless man who is very friendly and large. He has shaggy gray hair and a bushy beard. His giant belly is always hanging out the bottom of his t-shirt. It's not uncommon to see him socializing with the neighbors or run into him while swimming in the ocean. Sometimes, I envy him.
- There is a guy that works at Noah's Bagels most weekends that is the most unusually chipper person you'll ever come across in that line of work.
- Most weekend days (w/ good weather), a black gentlemen can be heard a mile away running down the beach in full sweats letting out an incredibly loud grunt with each stride. Everyone will stop whatever they're doing and watch as he runs by.

verveman77
02-06-2012, 12:57 PM
san diego NUFF SAID. greatest city on earth

chairmenmeow47
02-06-2012, 01:15 PM
my neighborhood is exceptionally boring compared to all of yours.

i live in a part of phoenix called ahwatukee. my complex faces nothing but reservation desert land. there are four churches within walking distance, but no retail establishments in walking distance. most everyone has pets. and it's the type of area where people smile and say hi when you exercise, and most everyone exercises. it's extremely clean. there are bunnies, desert squirrels, snakes, scorpions, and coyotes in the area. if you leave them alone, they leave you alone. the only interesting thing that has ever happened at my apartment was one time a car drove through the side of a garage and i saw the back half sticking out while i was returning for a walk. it wasn't there when i started the walk, so i feel like i just missed something awesome.

nosurprises12
02-06-2012, 01:17 PM
verveman77: missing the point entirely.

mountmccabe
02-06-2012, 02:19 PM
I live in Hell's Kitchen, a neighborhood in Manhattan, a borough in New York City. I have lived here just over 7 months so I don't know any of the stuff old timers would know. I will look for some interesting things as I am about to go out and go to the bodega a few doors down to pick up breakfast sandwiches and coffee.

This is Midtown West; we are West of Times Square. It's called Hell's Kitchen because it used to be rougher around here what with the Mob, the Westies and all that West Side Story shit. That has been more or less cleaned up and rents/etc. have risen to be at/above the Manhattan average because the location.

The Theater District and its Broadway shows are just a bit East of here (I can walk to where The Book of Mormon is in five minutes.) I am also quite close to Times Square, Port Authority Bus Terminal, Central Park (that is Northwest of me), Lincoln Center, Rockafeller Center, etc. (all within a 15 minute walk.) I am also within a 10 minute walk of Terminal 5, Roseland Ballroom and Radio City Music Hall.

Being near the Theater District means the area can get busy in the evenings but this also means that there are tons of restaurants around. They seem to get worse/more expensive/more generic as you get closer to Broadway/Times Square but there is fantastic Thai (many options,) Ethiopian, Mexican, New Orleans, you name it (almost) within 5 minutes of here.

I realize I am not really answering the question (as I noted I have only lived here 7 months) so I will talk about what I learned.

I always wanted to walk and take public transportation to work and now I am. The two main things that have surprised me about the walking is (a) how many smokers there are and how difficult it is to try and avoid them (especially when the weather conditions are such that you can see people's breath) and (b) SO MANY DOGS.

I don't know how people around here have giant dogs but I want to ask because, damn, that is for me. There is a lovely Rottweiler that almost always is carrying around a stuffed animal, the short fat trundling bulldog that almost always is carrying around a water bottle, a pair of Huskies near PABT and another pair up near me plus countless others.

The grocery store is at the other corner, though the bodega a few doors down and the liquor store next to that may have what I'd be looking for anyway.

DANCE MAGIC
02-06-2012, 02:35 PM
I live in Kirkland, Washington. It is a suburb just east of Seattle. I have lived here for about 2 years, and it is pretty disappointing. When I say that, what I really mean is that Seattle has been disappointing. It is known as a music town, but that's only because of the 90s grunge explosion that happened here, and that was like 20 years ago. Kurt Cobain wasn't even from Seattle, he was from Aberdeen. More importantly, most of the music venues here are terrible. I know that there are people on this board that would argue against me on that, but my opinion stands.

Musically, there are two bright shining lights that the city of Seattle can boast. Firstly, there is Sasquatch Festival. Sure, it's 2 hours east of here, but if that's all it takes to get to one of the top 3 outdoor venues in North America for a 4 Day music festival with a lineup that can compete with Coachella's, then that counts. Secondly, and maybe even more impressively, is Decibel Festival. dB Fest is amazing. All the venues here that usually suck get improved by the festival's sound guys and audio systems. They polish these places into temporary gems that make places like the Crocodile Club acceptable music venues. It's pretty great. The lineup is almost entirely electronic music, but within that, they're able to pull some extremely impressive names. (Amon Tobin's debut of ISAM. Starslinger's first US show ever.)

It does rain here a lot. Some people aren't into that. It doesn't really bother me, but it's a consideration. Also, there are a lot of bridges, and they're about to start charging tolls on them. But hey, we have good coffee.

PotVsKtl
02-06-2012, 02:37 PM
Why.

heyeric
02-06-2012, 03:30 PM
I live in Diamond Bar, California. We are a suburb 30 miles east of Los Angeles. I have lived here the majority of my 25 years in existence. We are home to the Air Quality Management District because of our central location. All new houses are built with wok kitchens and feng shui style living kept in mind. Our Ralph's recently closed down and a ZionMarketplace might be opening soon.

Oh ya, we have an official See's Candies store that just opened. Womp Womp! Diamond Bar is awesome. Snoop Dogg lives in "The Country" establishment too. I have spotted his uncle several times clearing out the 7/11 Wine Cooler. Some others on the board live in this lame duck city, anything else to share?

algunz
02-06-2012, 03:47 PM
I live in Tustin, California on Beneta Way. I live down the street from my junior high school. The guy across the street works for the LA Sheriff's department. Every fourth of July he brings a butt load of illegal fireworks home that he has confiscated from people's cars. He shoots them off until the cops show up. There has been at least 3 times where I have called the cops on him, because he and his fellow officers were getting wasted and blasting shitty music at 3am. He's a really nice guy though when he's not drunk. We are below the landing flight path into John Wayne airport and 3 of our immediate neighbors have died of cancer in the past 10 years that we have lived here. They had all lived in the neighborhood for the past 50 years, and they think the planes may have something to do with it. They talk about how in the 60's through 70's there used to be a fine layer of black dust on everything outside. Our neighbor two houses down lost their son-in-law in that terrible desert racing accident where the car flew into the crowd. We're moving soon to a house about 5 minutes away.

romanticizer
02-06-2012, 03:53 PM
I live in Kirkland, WA. It's 15 minutes or less directly across the floating bridge from Seattle.
The downtown is packed full of yuppies, obnoxiously wealthy teenagers, rich people driving luxury vehicles, Microsoft and Google employees.
My specific neighborhood in North Kirkland is mellow and suburban with a lot of stoners in their 30s.
I dated my next door neighbor once and otherwise, the most interesting thing that has happened is that my other next door neighbor (17 year old) is going through Meth withdrawals and causes racket constantly.

casey
02-06-2012, 03:56 PM
Is Miracle Mile considered Mid City or Mid City West?
Miracle Mile is Mid-City West. :)


I live in Kirkland, WA. It's 15 minutes or less directly across the floating bridge from Seattle.
The downtown is packed full of yuppies, obnoxiously wealthy teenagers, rich people driving luxury vehicles, Microsoft and Google employees.
My specific neighborhood in North Kirkland is mellow and suburban with a lot of stoners in their 30s.
I dated my next door neighbor once and otherwise, the most interesting thing that has happened is that my other next door neighbor (17 year old) is going through Meth withdrawals and causes racket constantly.
I know a couple of people from Kirkland.

BROKENDOLL
02-06-2012, 04:28 PM
While under the influence of drugs, a friend invited me for a weekend in the desert "near Palm Springs, California." That was almost 23 years ago and here I am, a full-time resident of Indio, California, home to the International Date Festival, The Tamale Festival, The Southwest Arts Festival, The International Film Festival, and of course the most notable... The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. It probably explains the reasoning behind, The City of Festivals title Indio holds. Well, that, and I'm sure that it sounds more appealing than say, "The City of Doom, located 3 miles south of the San Andreas Fault Line and 14 feet below sea level." To this day, I question my way of thinking regarding this matter...
I mean, how do you explain the 14 feet supposedly beneath the level of sea, when there's not a damn bit of sea to be seen? I sometimes wonder if we're merely ahead of the game in knowing that when that fault line decides it wants to stir shit up and shift, that we will indeed, be looking out over the ocean as it continues rising above our heads. I can still remember looking out the kitchen window to the south shortly after my arrival and asking Pete why the ugly brownish/grey mountains had this lush green strip of foliage, and his answer immediately induced a sense of denial in me.
By the time the drugs wore off, I had found myself established as a resident with either a job or boyfriend keeping me from leaving. And, after those 20 some years without ever experiencing much more than maybe a 5.0 earthquake, I've come to accept this place as home. Now, the only thing that causes me question is my sanity level that seems to change with the seasons... Seasons, meaning hot and cold. There is no in between with fall leaves falling, and thanks to the lack of rain, or supposed sea levels, we may have what we like to think of as Spring, but not really. Hot and Cold, that's it. I also remember knowing what a dry heat was years ago, but thanks to so many other crazy people choosing to reside in a place where it goes from a winter temp of say, 70*, we probably have the largest scale of golf courses per land area than anywhere else in the world... Grass needs to be watered in order to survive. I've learned that water from unnatural resources added to that dry heat, creates what is known as humidity. Luckily, it's not the humidity that say, the Southeast gets. I'm sure that would fucking kill me. But, to truly appreciate what that dry heat was at one time, one must live through a day where it's at 40% humidity and 110*... And many people here are way smarter than that to stick around... they know to get the fuck out of Dodge. But, come the time where their normal homebase begins to feel a chill, off they go, headed towards Indio and it's surrounding paradise of golf courses, ideal weather, and maybe 4 months of what they call perfect Winter weather. We call them snowbirds and you can spot one from a mile away. Madras shorts with socks and sandals. Hawaiian print shirts and walking shorts, with a fanny pack and camera. Totally different from the Desert Rats that are still waiting for their blood to thicken enough to remove their sweaters and hoodies if it's under 72*.
I will say that I know of one full-time resident in Indio that defies the weather we have, and you can see him almost daily walking all over Indio's streets. I doubt anyone even knows his name, but if you mention the guy in the wife-beater and jeans that just walks and walks and walks, most residents know of him. The guy even has a fanbase on facebook's site, "You know you're from Indio if..." He probably doesn't even know that, due to the fact that all he fucking does is walk. I myself find a certain sense of security in knowing that after 20 some years the guy still walks safely and hasn't been gangraped or shot. That tells me that maybe Indio is a safe place... Or, maybe because he doesn't actually move anything other than his legs while walking, that maybe Indio is afraid of Johnny Walker. (Pete's nickname for him.) And while I've never had any experience with much crime, other than that I brought upon myself years ago, Indio seems fairly safe and more family oriented. Of course, depending upon the family, there may be an excessive amount of gang crimes being committed against each other, and I'm sorry... still can't give you an answer or reasoning for that. I just figure that as long as they're shooting each other, they're not shooting at me. Remember, I should be more concerned about a future possibly spent living under 14 feet of water, or the thought of having the land I live on swallowing me into it's depths. And, if I ever thought about leaving this desert, which I occasionally do, it never fails...a festival comes around and there I am in the midst of it, less than a mile away from home, yet feeling as if I finally found my getaway to paradise... Yep, the Coachella Festival is the ticket of entrapment that keeps me in denial...

romanticizer
02-06-2012, 04:52 PM
I know a couple of people from Kirkland.

Wow. Kind of random. Do they work at Microsoft or Google?

ballroomdancer22
02-07-2012, 12:16 AM
I live in Santa Paula, Calif. It's small and farmlike. People walk their goats down my street. A good portion of the folk have no computers.
Myself and ballroomdancer22 are the coolest people in town. We have a museum called the Santa Paula Oil Museum. It once had a Hot Wheel exhibit.
We have an airport!! Sorry. Got a bit excited. Mostly Cessnas and those little Piper thingys.
I live in a small town 65 miles NW of L.A., population bout 30,000 known as Santa Paula, Ca.

This is a fact that Pixiesp and I are the last remaining cool people in our town, the other...Steve Mcqueen died long ago. Some random trivia I'd like to contribute concerning our little slice of heaven:

-Santa Paula was at one point considered "The Citrus Capital of the World" and that is why our big yearly local fair is refered to as "The Citrus Festival"
-My neighbors and childhood friends' grandfather is a local artist and he has contributed his work to various murals around town.
-My first job was at a supposedly haunted Victorian styled hotel named The Glen Tavern Inn est. in 1911 and still open for business to this day.
-Santa Paula is known for many films/commercials/tv shows that have been filmed around town...some notable titles being the 'Leave it to Beaver' film, 'Joe Dirt,' 'Mr. Woodcock,' the now defunct chidren's show 'Beetleborgs' but perhaps most famous for the original 'Carrie' who's house was burned down for the film and to this day remains an empty lot and is just around the corner from my house.
-Local legend states that on the outskirts of town in an abandoned dairy farm there is a half man half goat beast known as "The Billywack Monster" or "Chivo Man" depending on who you ask.
-I went to school and played recreational soccer with a guy who brutally murdered a couple while in their sleep during our Sophmore year of high school.
-Santa Paula and our neighboring rival city Fillmore hold the title of the oldest High School Footbal rivalry in California, both schools have played in over 100 yearly matchups.
-My avatar is compliments to a local street artist who happened to have spray painted that on a wall behind one of our local liquor store.

icedKeg
02-07-2012, 02:11 AM
I live in Los Angeles, but more specifically, I live in an area called Thai Town. It's a small neighborhood centered along Hollywood Blvd between Normandie Avenue and Western Avenue in East Hollywood. It's adjacent to Little Armenia and Los Feliz. I am within less than two miles of the Greek Theatre (Griffith Park), the Dresden Room, the whole Hollywood walk of fame and bull shit, The Music Box (RIP) and literally a hundred Thai restaurants. aaaaand my place is right across the street from Jumbo's Clown Room.

http://theazon.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/jumbo_s-clown-room.jpg?w=450

Jumbo's Clown Room is a tiny, dirty burlesque bar where old drunks and scuzzy drug buckets sleaze around during the day and hipster blipsters smoke cigarettes in front of at night. It's been around for over 40 years and has been famous for plus size, tattooed dancers and all sorts of odds and ends in the female stripper/dancer world. Courtney Love used to dance there in the 90s. The dancers don't get fully nude, but they have a pretty rad jukebox and it's not uncommon to see a lady dance to "Planet Telex" or Portishead. It's also not uncommon for me to end up there piss drunk at 1:00am.

http://www.amoeba.com/dynamic-images/blog/Eric_B/ThaiTown.jpg

I have lived in Thai Town for about two years now. It's a good thing that I like Thai Food because it literally smells like it everywhere. My favorite Thai restaurants are Sanamluang and Gitlada. Outside of Thailand, Thai Town in Los Angeles has the highest density of Thais in the world. There are approximately 80,000 Thais in Los Angeles, and most of them live here in Thai Town.

In April, they celebrate the Thai New Year and close down Hollywood Blvd for a few blocks. It's a great all day/night party with food and entertainment. I went last year and watched these 16 year old Thai kids play Radiohead's "Creep" from my apartment. I have video upon request.

There are also a lot of Armenians in my neighborhood. And Mexicans. I'm one of the few whiteys.
We have a Ralph's, lots of liquor stores, and tons of massage parlors. I've never been in one of them, but I hear they're alright.

stuporfly
02-07-2012, 02:55 AM
I live in Greenpoint, the northernmost neighborhood in Brooklyn.

- Though I suspect my numbers might be debunked by actual hard data, I believe the neighborhood is about half-hipster/half-Polish.

- Our landlady is a generally gruff woman, though on rare occasions she is either very sweet or very mean; there is no way of predicting either of the extremes, though she's always nice to my daughter and she actually hugged my girlfriend when we brought her a candle from Notre Dame in Paris last year. I heard a tenant from a building next door yell at our landlady last week and it freaked me out because I didn't think that was possible.

- Greenpoint is popular with film and television productions because of its varied architecture and apparent willingness by its residents to put up with the frequent loss of parking spots and the false pretense that the practice will somehow bolster the neighborhood's economy. There are several soundstages scattered throughout the neighborhood, and within a few blocks of my apartment shows like Royal Pains, Blue Bloods, Smash and The Good Wife are filmed. The exterior set for Boardwalk Empire is also located in Greenpoint.

- There's a fat little woman who slowly walks her shopping cart up our street once or twice a week. She has two tiny dogs who walk in circles around her while she makes her way along the sidewalk; they look like jittery satellites spinning around a tattered, tweed-covered globe.

- The Newtown Creek separates Greenpoint from Queens. In 1950, the creek was the site of what was then the worst oil spill in US history, with as much as 30 million gallons seeping into the groundwater; the environmental damage is still being felt today. There is also a (sometimes rumored) history of chemical spills and improper industrial practices in Greenpoint. A large sewage treatment facility is also nearby: The unique massive silver structures on the site have been dubbed "the Greenpoint shit onions."

- Franklin Street is quickly becoming Greenpoint's version of Bedford Avenue, Williamsburg's primary hipster thoroughfare. Franklin has one of New York City's best bookstores, Word, which hosts the writer's group I belong to and sponsors the Nerd Basketball League, with games played at the American Playground at the end of my block. Overrun by pricey hipster boutique shops with lame window displays, Franklin also has a great record store (Permanent Records), my favorite bar (The Pencil Factory) and one of the most irritating restaurants in the entire borough (Brooklyn Label, which was used in an episode of Rescue Me, though unfortunately was not burned to the ground).

- The combination of Eastern European cigarettes and dogshit on the sidewalks makes Greenpoint one of the brownest neighborhoods in all of Brooklyn.

stuporfly
02-07-2012, 03:08 AM
This is Midtown West; we are West of Times Square. It's called Hell's Kitchen because it used to be rougher around here what with the Mob, the Westies and all that West Side Story shit. That has been more or less cleaned up and rents/etc. have risen to be at/above the Manhattan average because the location.

The Theater District and its Broadway shows are just a bit East of here (I can walk to where The Book of Mormon is in five minutes.) I am also quite close to Times Square, Port Authority Bus Terminal, Central Park (that is Northwest of me), Lincoln Center, Rockafeller Center, etc. (all within a 15 minute walk.) I am also within a 10 minute walk of Terminal 5, Roseland Ballroom and Radio City Music Hall.

Being near the Theater District means the area can get busy in the evenings but this also means that there are tons of restaurants around. They seem to get worse/more expensive/more generic as you get closer to Broadway/Times Square but there is fantastic Thai (many options,) Ethiopian, Mexican, New Orleans, you name it (almost) within 5 minutes of here.

I realize I am not really answering the question (as I noted I have only lived here 7 months) so I will talk about what I learned.

I always wanted to walk and take public transportation to work and now I am. The two main things that have surprised me about the walking is (a) how many smokers there are and how difficult it is to try and avoid them (especially when the weather conditions are such that you can see people's breath) and (b) SO MANY DOGS.

I don't know how people around here have giant dogs but I want to ask because, damn, that is for me. There is a lovely Rottweiler that almost always is carrying around a stuffed animal, the short fat trundling bulldog that almost always is carrying around a water bottle, a pair of Huskies near PABT and another pair up near me plus countless others.

The grocery store is at the other corner, though the bodega a few doors down and the liquor store next to that may have what I'd be looking for anyway.

I may have already mentioned this, but one of my best friends used to live in Hell's Kitchen. I love the neighborhood, though the uptight white guy in me was probably happier about the influx of restaurants a decade ago than I would have let on at the time. It was far less hairy going to visit his apartment once the transition was really underway.

TomAz
02-07-2012, 06:08 AM
I live in Fountain Hills, Arizona, a suburb of Scottsdale which is itself a suburb of Phoenix. Though if you say that to snooty breast-implant surgeons in Scottsdale they will get all uppity about it.

Fountain Hills is very quiet, very dull, and very beautiful. The town is bordered by desert preserve to the north, reservation land to the east and south, and scottsdale to the west. Except there is a large mountain range ("the McDowells") separating FH from Scottsdale, so most of those people don't come over here too often. There are only two ways in to Fountain Hills - the Beeline Highway from Mesa and through the Pima-Maricopa reservation, or Shea Blvd from Scottsdale. Technically there is a third way, from the north through Rio Verde, but hardly any one ever takes that route because it is way out of the way for almost everyone.

Fountain Hills was originally established and developed by Robert P. McCullough. This is a guy who made his fortune selling chainsaws. He later also developed Lake Havasu City, Arizona, and bought the London Brdige and had it rebuilt there. He was a quirky dude. His gimmick in Fountain Hills was to build the World's Largest Fountain (hence the name). It's a big fountain but no longer the largest and so now it is called "World Famous Fountain". The fountain goes off at the top of the hour for a few minutes (longer in winter when the evaporation rate is not so high). On St Patrick's Day they turn the fountain green.

Fountain Hills has no airport, no movie theater, no mall, but several bars including an American Legion hall. There is a Target -- which was quite controversial at the time; people didn't want even a Target in our quiet little town. But it's way over on the edge of town so that's ok. No celebrities live here -- well that I know of at least. That is unless you consider Joe Arpaio, "American's Toughest Sherriff", a celebrity. Or Dan Bickley, a local newspaper columnist and sports talk radio host.

My neighbor has a Ron Paul sign in his yard.

Down the street from me is Golden Eagle Park, which is a very nice place with ballfields and tennis courts and a playground for the little kids. My dog likes for me to take her on walks in that park because she will almost always see a rabbit or two there. Seeing rabbits is one of her favorite things in life.

Next to the park is Fountain Hills High School, the "Falcons". My daughter is in the marching band there. They call themselves the Fighting Flock of Falcon Fury.

We have all sorts of animals in Fountain Hills, since we are sort of isolated and out in the desert. My yard teems with quail and doves and Gila woodpeckers and hummingbirds and cactus wrens. I have fake plastic owls up to scare off the ravens because they make a mess. In the winter we frequently get real owls on our roof; I have been woken early in the morning by their hoo-hoo. About 2-3 times a year I will see a roadrunner which is always a highlight. We also get bats, which are easy to find if you know when and how to look for them. Bats are really cool, I think. Sometimes they fly within a few feet of my head.

We also get scorpions which I hate. Various snakes, including an occasional rattlesnake, though really not very often. My house sits up on a hill overlooking an undeveloped wash; we used to see all sorts of animals in the wash. Coyotes, jackrabbits, even saw some muledeer once. I dont see the jackrabbits or deer anymore. Javalinas are a real problem (they get in the trash); I even had one in my garage once. You can't imagine how weird it is to find an 80 pound wild pig in your garage. I also see bobcats from time to time which is pretty cool. Last week while on a walk with the dog we had to change our route because of some young coyote pups playing next to a nearby street.

One of the nice things about Fountain Hills is that it is near north Scottsdale (and all the restaurants and stuff to do) without actually being in north Scottsdale. Another nice thing is that if I go to the grocery store or something I almost always run into someone I know.

Several years ago there was a ballot referendum about legally changing Fountain Hills' status from "Town" to "City". Apparently there were some advantages to be had if we incorporated as a city rather than as a town. The referendum failed by a lot. People like that it is the Town of Fountain Hills.

M Sparks
02-07-2012, 08:43 AM
Fountain Hills was originally established and developed by Robert P. McCullough. This is a guy who made his fortune selling chainsaws. He later also developed Lake Havasu City, Arizona, and bought the London Brdige and had it rebuilt there. He was a quirky dude.

I grew up in Lake Havasu, and the first time I went to Fountain Hills, it was eerie how similar they were design wise (though the residents could not be more different).

I think McCullough was just the money man. CV Wood is the guy who planned them both. He also designed the layout for Disneyland. I met and interviewed him when I was a kid for a school project on the history of the town.

guedita
02-07-2012, 09:45 AM
I recently moved to Santa Clara, which is a part of the "Silicon Valley." It is about 10 minutes from where I grew up and is actually right on the border of Sunnyvale, my home-town. My apartment complex is comprised mostly of Indian families. I don't have hard data, but my suspicions are that the men work in the "tech industry," being brought over from India. The wives stay at home and raise their young children and refuse to speak to me but perhaps that is because they don't speak English or aren't confident enough with the English that they do know. The wives in general are very frightened of my housemate's 14 pound miniature Sheltie. They cross the street or stand paralyzed with fear when my housemate walks him around the complex. The specific part of Santa Clara that I live in is on the border of "Little Korea," officially, and "Little Bombay," unofficially, so there are a lot of restaurants featuring these two cuisines, especially along El Camino, which is the main strip that runs through every city along the Bay Area Peninsula. There are an absurd amount of karaoke joints in my neighborhood, and even the dive bars in the town over (Sunnyvale, where I grew up), karaoke is featured almost every night of the week. There is a theater company in Sunnyvale, so many of the karaoke regulars do songs from musicals or, as a group, perform little "numbers." One guy wears a kilt and always sings "Sweet Transvestite" and picks out one person in the bar to gyrate to. There is a nightclub called "The Avalon" in my neighborhood that features live music, which I have learned is mostly hip-hop artists that I know nothing about. Sometimes Andre Nickatina is on the marquee. "The Avalon" used to be a Chuck E. Cheese and once my family went there on my brother's birthday and we got rear-ended on the way home by a woman who fell asleep at the wheel because she was going through a divorce and that's when I first thought about the fact that I wanted my parents to get a divorce, but not if it meant that they would be rear-ending people with their car. Also nearby is the Sunnyvale Golfland USA where I had a number of birthday parties. Our friends who are a married couple who also live in our complex are constantly trying to get my housemate and I to go play miniature golf with them there but I refuse to go because it might remind me of that one birthday party where I embarrassingly threw a fit because I did so poorly and my housemate refuses to go because all of the kids he teaches at high school work there and he doesn't want to see them. The only bar within walking distance, and it's still a bit of a walk because you have to go to everything in this fucking neighborhood by car, is called The Homestead Lounge and there is an old dude who just sits at the end of the bar and puts $40 into the jukebox so there is never any chance of you getting to hear the songs you'd like to here and their dart board is one of those horrific electronic dart boards and every man there is fascinated by the fact that I know how to throw darts. The bar has a fish tank and there are fish in the fish tank.

Goatchella
02-07-2012, 10:03 AM
I live in the mountains...don't come here. We don't like you and there is nothing to see or do.

PlayaDelWes
02-07-2012, 10:20 AM
Newbury Park, CA is a neighborhood in the city of Thousand Oaks of Ventura County. It is a suburb within a suburb. While driving north from LA on the 101, right before the drop down into Camarillo, perhaps you’ve seen that we have a Wendy’s on Wendy Drive.

Two separate local restaurants have been featured on Gordan Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares; each of which closed their doors permanently just months after the show aired. I was fortunate enough to eat at one of the “Grand Re-Openings”, but never appeared on the show. Nightmares aside, for a suburb, there are some pretty good food options in the area.

For the year 2011, we had the 3rd lowest crime rate in the nation (cities > 100K in population). Everyone who lives here is either < 18 or > 35 but < 60. People move here with kids or to have kids and once they go to college, the parents move on as well. There are lots of kids and thus there are more camps, sports, and community activities than I could ever imagine.

At the end of my street, there is a 9 mile trail down to a beach North of Malibu. The walk / ride back sucks. There are many more manageable hikes / rides throughout the neighborhood itself. It’s not unusual to see a peloton of 50 or so serious road-bikers passing through, many of whom appear to be sponsored by Amgen. Amgen and other bioscience companies have an enormous presence in Newbury Park.

The sports leagues here are gigantic. Every once in a while I play Ultimate Frisbee at a local park where they’ve been playing twice a week since the 70’s. Last night I attended parent’s night for the Newbury Park Track Club which formed 40+ years ago for 8-14 year-olds who compete against other Track Clubs in the Conejo Valley. There are 250 kids on this thing. Soccer is probably the largest youth sport in the neighborhood. With all these leagues, you’d think Newbury Park would be a launching point for professional athletes, but for some reason it isn’t. My guess is that it’s because they are overly organized and in-turn there are fewer pick-up games where the real talent has a chance to emerge.

If you are not into outdoor activities, volunteering for something, or spending time with kids, there’s not a lot else to do here. The closest venue is the Canyon Club in Agoura Hills which regularly features terrible washed up cover bands. So, our best option is escaping to LA or Santa Barbara.

The weather here is perfect. We see coyotes from time to time and some pretty awesome owls as well. At night, sky viewing is great and the only light pollution is from the moon. On the darkest nights, you can see the Milky Way galaxy stretching across the sky.

lt.roast.a.botch
02-07-2012, 11:32 PM
I recently moved to Santa Clara, which is a part of the "Silicon Valley." It is about 10 minutes from where I grew up and is actually right on the border of Sunnyvale, my home-town. My apartment complex is comprised mostly of Indian families. I don't have hard data, but my suspicions are that the men work in the "tech industry," being brought over from India. The wives stay at home and raise their young children and refuse to speak to me but perhaps that is because they don't speak English or aren't confident enough with the English that they do know. The wives in general are very frightened of my housemate's 14 pound miniature Sheltie. They cross the street or stand paralyzed with fear when my housemate walks him around the complex. The specific part of Santa Clara that I live in is on the border of "Little Korea," officially, and "Little Bombay," unofficially, so there are a lot of restaurants featuring these two cuisines, especially along El Camino, which is the main strip that runs through every city along the Bay Area Peninsula. There are an absurd amount of karaoke joints in my neighborhood, and even the dive bars in the town over (Sunnyvale, where I grew up), karaoke is featured almost every night of the week. There is a theater company in Sunnyvale, so many of the karaoke regulars do songs from musicals or, as a group, perform little "numbers." One guy wears a kilt and always sings "Sweet Transvestite" and picks out one person in the bar to gyrate to. There is a nightclub called "The Avalon" in my neighborhood that features live music, which I have learned is mostly hip-hop artists that I know nothing about. Sometimes Andre Nickatina is on the marquee. "The Avalon" used to be a Chuck E. Cheese and once my family went there on my brother's birthday and we got rear-ended on the way home by a woman who fell asleep at the wheel because she was going through a divorce and that's when I first thought about the fact that I wanted my parents to get a divorce, but not if it meant that they would be rear-ending people with their car. Also nearby is the Sunnyvale Golfland USA where I had a number of birthday parties. Our friends who are a married couple who also live in our complex are constantly trying to get my housemate and I to go play miniature golf with them there but I refuse to go because it might remind me of that one birthday party where I embarrassingly threw a fit because I did so poorly and my housemate refuses to go because all of the kids he teaches at high school work there and he doesn't want to see them. The only bar within walking distance, and it's still a bit of a walk because you have to go to everything in this fucking neighborhood by car, is called The Homestead Lounge and there is an old dude who just sits at the end of the bar and puts $40 into the jukebox so there is never any chance of you getting to hear the songs you'd like to here and their dart board is one of those horrific electronic dart boards and every man there is fascinated by the fact that I know how to throw darts. The bar has a fish tank and there are fish in the fish tank.

Wow you live around where I lived for graduate school. I never went into Homestead Lounge even though it was walking distance. I heard it had fully clothed dancers that pole danced. Is that true? Or was that a poor trick to get me to go there? Also, no one worthwhile played at the Avalon while I was there except for Cake and Souls of Mischief but tickets was $60 or something absurd like that. Viva Taqueria (formerly known as Jiminez) is probably my fondest memory. In conclusion, I'm sorry :)

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-07-2012, 11:45 PM
Sun Valley is a wonderful suburb in the San Fernando valley in Los Angeles, CA.

It is located directly north of both Burbank and North Hollywood. The southern part of it (where I live, just a stones throw form the Burbank airport and the San Fernando Road railroad track) is mainly industrial and home to many junkyards, a city dump, and the main depot for most of the city's food trucks.

The majority of the population is hispanic. There are at least 6 roosters on my block that all compete with each other at any hour of the day. Gates are always left open, so it is not uncommon to see pit bulls and chihuahuas wandering down the street.

There are no sidewalks, everything is pretty dumpy and dirty looking, so it feels pretty safe in that nobody from outside of the neighborhood has any reason to come in to steal anything. Every other house has a busted up car on blocks in their front yard. I live in the back house behind a house occupied by 3 dudes in metal bands, so our front yard is usually littered with coors light cans.

guedita
02-07-2012, 11:47 PM
Wow you live around where I lived for graduate school. I never went into Homestead Lounge even though it was walking distance. I heard it had fully clothed dancers that pole danced. Is that true? Or was that a poor trick to get me to go there? Also, no one worthwhile played at the Avalon while I was there except for Cake and Souls of Mischief but tickets was $60 or something absurd like that. Viva Taqueria (formerly known as Jiminez) is probably my fondest memory. In conclusion, I'm sorry :)

I think you're thinking of Sporty's Bikini Bar, which I have not yet been to.

lt.roast.a.botch
02-08-2012, 12:12 AM
Never heard of that place but that sounds like that is the one. Ha, the whole time I avoided Homestead Lounge place because the whole concept seemed so scummy based on its overall appearance. The concept seems more appealing as a bikini bar. How'd did I miss this?

bmack86
02-08-2012, 12:14 AM
Andrew, that is so ridiculous.

Davids81
02-08-2012, 10:43 AM
I recently moved to Santa Clara, which is a part of the "Silicon Valley." It is about 10 minutes from where I grew up and is actually right on the border of Sunnyvale, my home-town. My apartment complex is comprised mostly of Indian families. I don't have hard data, but my suspicions are that the men work in the "tech industry," being brought over from India. The wives stay at home and raise their young children and refuse to speak to me but perhaps that is because they don't speak English or aren't confident enough with the English that they do know. The wives in general are very frightened of my housemate's 14 pound miniature Sheltie. They cross the street or stand paralyzed with fear when my housemate walks him around the complex. The specific part of Santa Clara that I live in is on the border of "Little Korea," officially, and "Little Bombay," unofficially, so there are a lot of restaurants featuring these two cuisines, especially along El Camino, which is the main strip that runs through every city along the Bay Area Peninsula. There are an absurd amount of karaoke joints in my neighborhood, and even the dive bars in the town over (Sunnyvale, where I grew up), karaoke is featured almost every night of the week. There is a theater company in Sunnyvale, so many of the karaoke regulars do songs from musicals or, as a group, perform little "numbers." One guy wears a kilt and always sings "Sweet Transvestite" and picks out one person in the bar to gyrate to. There is a nightclub called "The Avalon" in my neighborhood that features live music, which I have learned is mostly hip-hop artists that I know nothing about. Sometimes Andre Nickatina is on the marquee. "The Avalon" used to be a Chuck E. Cheese and once my family went there on my brother's birthday and we got rear-ended on the way home by a woman who fell asleep at the wheel because she was going through a divorce and that's when I first thought about the fact that I wanted my parents to get a divorce, but not if it meant that they would be rear-ending people with their car. Also nearby is the Sunnyvale Golfland USA where I had a number of birthday parties. Our friends who are a married couple who also live in our complex are constantly trying to get my housemate and I to go play miniature golf with them there but I refuse to go because it might remind me of that one birthday party where I embarrassingly threw a fit because I did so poorly and my housemate refuses to go because all of the kids he teaches at high school work there and he doesn't want to see them. The only bar within walking distance, and it's still a bit of a walk because you have to go to everything in this fucking neighborhood by car, is called The Homestead Lounge and there is an old dude who just sits at the end of the bar and puts $40 into the jukebox so there is never any chance of you getting to hear the songs you'd like to here and their dart board is one of those horrific electronic dart boards and every man there is fascinated by the fact that I know how to throw darts. The bar has a fish tank and there are fish in the fish tank.

You live near where my older brother used to live. I went to that shitty bar once, but all I remember was old ass football helmets on the wall because I was already pretty drunk from drinking at this pizza place that's somewhere near there. I remember there is a pretty cool but expensive grocery store maybe in that same shopping center that I liked the name of. I can't think of what it is. I always thought having an "expressway" was something that only existed in cities like Chicago due to watching Adventures in Babysitting too many times.

PlayaDelWes
02-08-2012, 10:46 AM
It's pretty cool that people live near where other people used to live.

guedita
02-08-2012, 10:52 AM
It's pretty sad that there are so many of us out there who've experienced this unfortunately uninspiring and aesthetically abhorrent shitsack of a neighborhood.

amyzzz
02-08-2012, 11:00 AM
Cara, at least you don't have to look at cacti every 10 feet. My city is brown, brown, brown and full of cactus.

Davids81
02-08-2012, 11:15 AM
I live in Modesto, Ca. which is a pretty mediocre place to live. There are some really bright spots about living here, such as P. Wexford's Pub, Deva Cafe, Taco Trucks throughout the city, and a pretty cheap cost of living. I'm about an hours drive from Sacramento, the SF bay area, and Fresno. Guess which one sucks most. There is a bunch of roundabouts sprouting up everywhere around town and no one knows how to use them correctly. We have a really small downtown area that gets really crowded on weekend nights. We have a couple really great one-way streets that run through the downtown area with synchronized stoplights that you can usually hit just right. Unemployment rates in this area of California are truly terrible, and thus, crime is fairly prevalent. Violent crime is fairly low, but every meth addict in town will either steal your car, or strip your shit for salvageable metals. Helluva drug. Chandra Levy, Scott Peterson, George Lucas, Jeremy Renner, and Timothy Olyphant are our only real claims to fame, or infamy, dependent upon which story.

Grandma
02-08-2012, 11:25 AM
I live in santa clara california. Stop breathing my air cara.

tessalasset
02-12-2012, 02:03 AM
^

We are neighbors.

That's awesome! You on a college street too?

tessalasset
02-12-2012, 02:14 AM
There's an abandoned house right next door to my apt that's totally run down. Door looks like it's been hacked with a machete, all the appliances/furniture still there I think, and random holes beaten into it that homeless people/drug dealers sneak through so they can sleep there. We don't want to call too much attention to it tho because 2/3 of that lot (essentially the house's front yard) is just wide open flat land, and we all use it as our personal parking lot since street parking is a bitch. The abandoned shack is pretty scary but not enough to make us compromise our parking.

So, kinda crazy - literally two days after I posted this, I wake up to my roommate knocking on my door before leaving for work to tell me all the cars in the lot got towed overnight and she hoped mine wasn't one of them. Luckily I decided to park my car on the street the night before since it was raining and kind of muddy in the lot. Otherwise I would have been screwed. Here's the note they left on all the cars that night.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/421262_652675032656_81500275_33176808_1133288969_n .jpg

I wanted to write a note and post it on the door of the shack that maybe if you didn't completely abandon your property for over six years and actually gave a shit about your land, maybe we wouldn't park there.

bluemamba
02-12-2012, 03:07 AM
So fu king drunk. I'm out.

Stickjohn
02-12-2012, 12:20 PM
...There's an abandoned house right next door to my apt that's totally run down. Door looks like it's been hacked with a machete, all the appliances/furniture still there I think, and random holes beaten into it that homeless people/drug dealers sneak through so they can sleep there. We don't want to call too much attention to it tho because 2/3 of that lot (essentially the house's front yard) is just wide open flat land, and we all use it as our personal parking lot since street parking is a bitch.


^

We are neighbors.


So, kinda crazy - literally two days after I posted this, I wake up to my roommate knocking on my door before leaving for work to tell me all the cars in the lot got towed overnight ...

uh oh

SoulDischarge
02-12-2012, 12:53 PM
Please post photos of weird things in your towns. Signs, giant ugly sculptures, living human refuse, misguidedly named businesses, homes occupied by people with tragic decorating sense who see fit to expose their inner torment to the world at large via the external appearance of their domiciles.

BROKENDOLL
02-12-2012, 01:42 PM
Seeing as there were a series of quakes near the Salton Sea early this morning, I can rest assured that there will at least be a place left to call home if need be...
There's a business man here in Indio that has allowed the homeless to set up their own community behind his market, and because it can be seen from Indio Blvd. the City is now asking him to rid the property of these people. He's standing his ground due to the fact that this little community happens to sit upon tribal grounds and therefore, may be able to stay...The owner has gone so far as to put in a restroom and shower, along with a covered patio, and the tent city members have established rules, curfews, as well as a safe place to survive. And, while they may not be the fanciest of homes, when you consider what happened to those homeless in L.A. recently, they are a lot safer. The fact of the matter is, the Coachella Valley Rescue Mission is right down the street, and full, so these folks would actually be truly homeless if it weren't for this business man.


thttp://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w18/1BROKENDOLL/HOME%20SWEET%20HOME/FAMILY%20and%20FRIENDS/bildeNewTbl1SiteJ1Date20120201Categ-3.jpg
http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w18/1BROKENDOLL/HOME%20SWEET%20HOME/FAMILY%20and%20FRIENDS/bildeNewTbl1SiteJ1Date20120201Categ-2.jpg
http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w18/1BROKENDOLL/HOME%20SWEET%20HOME/FAMILY%20and%20FRIENDS/bildeNewTbl1SiteJ1Date20120201Categ-1.jpg
I'd like to think that with all the $$$ that Indio gains from hosting the Coachella Festival, that instead of throwing these people further down in life, that they'd perhaps help construct a more city friendly situation... I know that at the end of each Coachella, after everyone has left, leaving their tents behind, that it's the mission that picks the items up off the polo fields to be used by people in need... maybe you'll see your tent in these pics...and if these fucking quakes continue... you may see me...fuck.

BROKENDOLL
02-12-2012, 01:45 PM
Please post photos of weird things in your towns. Signs, giant ugly sculptures, living human refuse, misguidedly named businesses, homes occupied by people with tragic decorating sense who see fit to expose their inner torment to the world at large via the external appearance of their domiciles.

If I could step back to find some pics from when I first arrived in this desert and lived at THAT HOUSE, I could sweep up all awards in this thread...:rolleyes

roberto73
02-12-2012, 03:36 PM
I've lived in Kennesaw, GA, for two and a half years. It's twenty minutes north of Atlanta.

It is required by law for all heads of household to own a firearm, unless the head of household is a conscientious objector. I am currently in violation of this law.

In downtown Kennesaw there is a business dealing in Civil War paraphernalia called Wildman's that flies a Confederate flag and sports a sign by the door reading "White History Year." The store does online sales. Here is the store's offensive description of a meerschaum pipe:


Meerschaum Pipe- I have a number of “colored” folks who ask if we has any “Black Memorabilia”. Well we have a super one for you. This pipe with amber stem, nicely high yellowed with usage as does all meerschaums do with use. Excellent depiction of a ‘niglet’ head with kinky hair, large lips, and curved stem (the pipe not the subject). Nice velveteen lined leather, snap hinged case, some scuffing outside. Gold lettering inside. Cira 1920-1930’s, an unusual and novel addition to yo’ Black Memorabilia.

If you would like to shop at Wildman's, here's the link (for all your racist needs): http://www.wildmans-shop.com/

I run at a local park that sports a mile-long trail ringing its perimeter. Most afternoons there's a guy riding his bicycle on this trail. His bike has a basket, and in that basket is a radio playing patriotic tunes at full blast. This bike flies two flags. One is a Confederate flag. One is a U.S. flag. This seems contradictory to me.

In historical news, the town used to be called Big Shanty and the small mountain south of town is a National Park that was the site of a Civil War battle. It's the last battle Sherman lost before he began his devastating march to the sea. To be fair, he deserved to lose it because he was fighting up a mountain against entrenched Confederates in the dead of summer. Supposedly he got cocky, which led to him misjudging his chances of success. This strikes me as the military equivalent of U2 releasing Pop.

DirtyPistol
02-12-2012, 05:27 PM
I live in Kirkland, Washington. It is a suburb just east of Seattle. I have lived here for about 2 years, and it is pretty disappointing. When I say that, what I really mean is that Seattle has been disappointing. It is known as a music town, but that's only because of the 90s grunge explosion that happened here, and that was like 20 years ago. Kurt Cobain wasn't even from Seattle, he was from Aberdeen. More importantly, most of the music venues here are terrible. I know that there are people on this board that would argue against me on that, but my opinion stands.

Musically, there are two bright shining lights that the city of Seattle can boast. Firstly, there is Sasquatch Festival. Sure, it's 2 hours east of here, but if that's all it takes to get to one of the top 3 outdoor venues in North America for a 4 Day music festival with a lineup that can compete with Coachella's, then that counts. Secondly, and maybe even more impressively, is Decibel Festival. dB Fest is amazing. All the venues here that usually suck get improved by the festival's sound guys and audio systems. They polish these places into temporary gems that make places like the Crocodile Club acceptable music venues. It's pretty great. The lineup is almost entirely electronic music, but within that, they're able to pull some extremely impressive names. (Amon Tobin's debut of ISAM. Starslinger's first US show ever.)
Yup, you are really off holmes. By the "artists" you are bringing up I'm guessing that you are super into EDM. If that's your bag, then no Seattle is not the right music town for you. If you are into indie rock bands Seattle and the rest of the Pacific NorthWest have one of the most consistently great music scenes in the country. I like how you mentioned ONE of the early 90's "grunge" bands (Nirvana) as not being from Seattle. After starting out in Olympia Nirvana made themselves into what they were while living in Seattle. Why not mention Pearl Jam, Mother Love Bone, The Gits, Soundgarden, Melvins, Mudhoney, Screaming Trees. Nice Try...

The late 90's indie rock bands were also killer with Modest Mouse, Death Cab For Cutie (lame now), Pedro The Lion, Murder City Devils, 764-Hero, Zeke, Damien Jurado, Supersuckers, The Fastbacks, etc. As far as current local bands they are still going strong with countless bands to name here. You can check out fantastic live music any day of the week in Seattle. Seattle also has a few of the best indie labels in the county with Sub Pop, Barsuk, Suicide Squeeze, and less than an hour away K Records and until recently Kill Rock Stars.

Venues are pretty great as well, get out more or quit listening to blip bloop music that need a lazer light show to be decent. Move out of the boring suburbs and into the city and maybe you'll have better experiences. You named the Crocodile but the original Showbox has a great soundsystem. The Moore Theater, Tractor Tavern, Neumo's, Sunset Tavern, and the brand new Neptune Theater are all great. You also didn't name maybe one of the cheapest and most cutting edge music festivals in the country, the Capitol Hill Block Party. Take a look the lineup last year, it was stacked!

http://www.musicfestivaljunkies.com/us-festivals/capitol-hill-block-party/

rag and bone
02-13-2012, 04:15 PM
This is the advertised logo for a local scooter rental business that can be seen near/around my neighborhood.

http://i1228.photobucket.com/albums/ee460/everythingraindrops/Screenshot2012-02-13at41213PM.png

SoulDischarge
06-09-2013, 06:22 AM
This weekend is Founders Day, which is where hundreds upon hundreds of sober bikers come into town to celebrate the founding of AA. Which, as a cab driver, is kind of the shittiest convention ever.

ThatGirl
06-09-2013, 08:31 AM
I live in Calgary, and it's a about an hour away from the Rocky Mountains. There is a weather phenomenon we get here in the winter called a Chinook. Warm air comes from the west coast and over the mountains and settles over the city. It causes a cloud formation in the west that is very distinct. This warm air system can take our temperature from minus 20 C up to plus 10 or 12C in only a few hours. Everything melts really fast and gets slushy and you usually need to refill your washer fluid in your car at least once on this type of day. There is only one other place in the world that gets chinooks, someplace in New Zealand I think. It's a nice way to get a little break from the freezing temperatures.

Oh -and my community has a shitload of grow ops.

marooko
06-09-2013, 12:00 PM
pics?

ThatGirl
06-09-2013, 12:41 PM
http://s3.amazonaws.com/mrp-listings/9/1/9/29008919/ed04a8cf4996b15afcc3ae6612b03a5e.jpeg

This one is located on the block directly behind mine. There are two more on the street that were already cleaned up. Apparently they had 3 little kids living in here, and every bedroom and the basement was covered in mold and filth.

ThatGirl
06-09-2013, 12:46 PM
[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/ef/Chinook-arch-01.jpg
Here is what a particularly amazing Chinook arch looks like.

unit300021
06-09-2013, 09:26 PM
I currently live in Huntington Beach, CA. It has been given the nick name Surf City USA even though the surf really isn't all that good here. Every summer we hold the US Open of Surfing, and for the past few years they have turned it into an entire event, not just a surf contest. It also includes an inline skateboarding/bmx events, free concerts, and brings out all of the unwanted people by the masses. By unwanted people I mean people from the Riverside "909ers" area and the bros. Every fourth of July there is a parade that is the largest 4th of July parade on this side of the Mississippi, I've gone to it multiple times, it's just as boring as any other parade out there. On top of all the "bros" that we have we also have one of the higher population of Neo Nazi/Skin Heads in the country. There is also a homeless guy who rides his bike with his stuff everywhere. I've seen him at all parts of the city through out my life time. He is a very nice guy and every time I see I give him a wave and a smile which he replies back. Occasionally I will give him money if I have any on me. I don't know his real name because he has given a different name to every one who asked him so we just refer to as the "homeless bike guy."

footixy
06-10-2013, 06:20 AM
I hear ya unit, it's never a good thing when you're invaded by the IE

could you by chance take pic of "homeless bike guy" if possible? that would be quite the staple here

fetuspiniata
06-10-2013, 09:20 AM
I live in the neighborhood of Sunnyslope which is in Phoenix, Az. http://www.modernphoenix.net/images/sunnyslope/historical/sunnygateway.png http://www.gemland.com/images/phxmtns.jpg
The town was founded in 1911 and incorporated into the city of Phoenix in 1959. From the 70's to 90's the hell's angels had a chapter based out of Sunnyslope but they were pushed out and moved north as the city grew. Now we a predominantly Mexican neighborhood, every other business is a taqueria or yerberia. Los Reyes De La Torta is a Mexican sandwich shop that was featured on "Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives". I prefer to eat at the sonoran style Via De Los Santos. Instead of an ice cream truck we have a Mexican on a tricycle who sells ice cream and mangos out of a cooler. We are home to the greatest concentration of homeless shelters, halfway houses and mental health facilities in the state. Even though the Arizona Humane Society is based out of sunnyslope, we have countless stray cats and packs of stray dogs who roam the streets. While it is not the best neighborhood in Phoenix, I'm sure you could find much worse(south phoenix/maryvale).


My house is located south of "S" mountain.
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/538194_301314209936689_1010942907_n.jpg

North of Sunnyslope Highschool, whose mascot is the Vikings.
http://farm1.staticflickr.com/29/41753916_205b73defc.jpg
Sunnyslope has one of the better marching bands in the state and sometimes they march through the neighborhood.
http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/publicroads/12septoct/images/kar12.jpg
To the west there is a smaller mountain with a structure on top that has remained unfinished for years.
http://www.city-data.com/forum/attachments/phoenix-area/58101d1266245625-sunnyslope-question-img_2234cropsharpsize-1024x768.jpg
To the east we have John C. Lincoln Hospital.
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-PMwyfJB5WQg/TpEJ12L9itI/AAAAAAAABnU/fRRsu7Rmg2I/s1600/SAM_0049.JPG That yellow helicopter flies directly over my house on takeoffs and landings.

The neighborhood is home to some rather artsy people, we even have an annual art walk.(Note the viking in the painting)
https://fbcdn-sphotos-a-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/p480x480/563662_496511363747535_1646870409_n.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7031/6645265455_5e2bf16c83_z.jpg http://ts3.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4675944829421606&pid=1.7&w=250&h=173&c=7&rs=1 http://joeorman.shutterace.com/Bizarre/bizarre_sunnyslope100_0918.jpg http://joeorman.shutterace.com/Bizarre/bizarre_sunnyslope100_0933.jpg

unit300021
06-10-2013, 09:36 AM
could you by chance take pic of "homeless bike guy" if possible? that would be quite the staple here

If I can but I usually only see him when I'm driving and he is also riding his bike so by the time I would be able to get my phone out for a picture he would be to far gone.

timothyhockley
06-10-2013, 10:29 AM
I live in West LA, right near Century City. Not much to do here but theres some good local eateries ( Apple Pan) It's also awesome how I can ride the bus to Santa Monica and Westwood anytime I want. The community is mostly older rich white people, big houses, fancy cars. Not many people know about the area though.

frizzlefry
06-10-2013, 10:23 PM
I live in the Lodgepole Village in Sequoia National Park, located on the Marble Fork of the Kawhea River. Deer are a daily sight and black bears are common and couldn't care less about us most times. There are several trail heads from the village and campgrounds on the other side of the creek, some of which can even lead to Kings Canyon, the Pacific Crest Trail, and Mount Whitney. If you follow the Marble Fork east for several hundred feet you'll find the Ranger Pools, a secluded and clean pool in the creek with an overhanging rock, Lady Bugs travel along this fork by the thousands in Spring. The Village Market has a great selection of beer and sells all of the bottles individually at a surprisingly good price that normally turns into a cheap six pack of stellar microbrews. A huge pot farm was raided only a couple miles away from a nearby popular cave and only a dozen miles away from Lodgepole as the crow flies. Law Enforcement believe that more large farms are operating in the park. Check your sheets for spiders and scorpions in the summer.

swiftmaggot
06-11-2013, 07:40 AM
I live in Salt Lake City, UT near the downtown area, it's surprisingly beautiful here with tons of trees and foliage everyplace. I read that there is a city ordinance which dictates that there be at least one tree on each city block (10sq acres). One of my favorite aspects of Salt Lake is that you can be in the heart of the city surrounded by what pass for skyscrapers (24 floors) and if you head east for 10 minutes, you will be right on the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. One other interesting thing is that our state law prohibits any building from exceeding the State Capitol in height. We have a really excellent pedestrian population with tons of bike lanes and maintained sidewalks, some nights in the summer it's not uncommon to see upwards of fifty cyclists go by my place in an hour. The Twilight Summer Concert Series is another mainstay of SLC, we get tons of high-profile/excellent artists (Grizzly Bear, Flaming Lips, The National, Common, Big Boi, Modest Mouse) performing Thursday nights in Pioneer Park for only $5 per show. It's clean, has huge wide streets and is laid out on a grid coordinate system. I like it here.

footixy
06-11-2013, 08:24 AM
Fresno

Yea I said it and I live in this shithole

First off let's get the positive outta the way

1. Centrally located from everything
3hr from SoCal and Bay Area
2hrs from central coast and Sierra mountains
2. A very nice home will cost you under $200,000

That's about it, I know we are the breadbasket of agriculture but you'd be surprise to know we have a pathetic farmers market

I swear it seems like we are the biggest red dot in a very blue state

Our city counsils are the most ignorant pieces of worthless crap decade after decade that keep promising certain changes that end up in corrupt back room business deals
For example...we have a beautiful downtown that since the late 80's has been a ghost town
Gorgeous old theaters that are bought out by Christian churches
Our only museum shut down due to non Sufficient city funds
Downtown pretty much only serves little Mexican shops and bum refuge...since the late 80's ugh!
They tried to add a nice little ice rink during the winter but it reaked of piss all the time!
Our best little microbrew (full circle brewery)is literally next to "tent city"
Which is the haven for homeless

The city is soooo divided by classism it's disgusting
Everything north of the street "shaw" is considered great living...all the shopping and chain restaurants are located there along with the cookie cutter homes surrounded by gates and codes

Our weather
Desert heat between June-Mid sept
Very cold and foggy Nov-Feb

Our arts
Some of the best Oaxacan Mexican art...
No music scene (well there is one but very hard to get established) gotta literally drive 40mins to catch great shows in Visalia at the cellar door

Our sports
Triple a to the sf giants
IF you can stand going to minor league games in 100 degree heat at times
ALL Bulldogs ALL the time (state university)

Fuck it's depressing me typing this

Anyway

Why I live here
Have been very successful in family business therefore making it hard to leave

Sequoia national park AND Yosemite! Are just a short drive away. Outdoors are my paradise

mountmccabe
06-11-2013, 09:05 AM
I live in the neighborhood of Sunnyslope which is in Phoenix, Az.

My sister used to live in Sunnyslope; that was a great area. I loved Bomberos.

Azzah1977
06-11-2013, 09:13 AM
Vancouver, BC!!! A place where you can snowboard and go to the beach on the same day...:)

insbordnat
06-11-2013, 10:27 AM
I live in West LA, right near Century City. Not much to do here but theres some good local eateries ( Apple Pan) It's also awesome how I can ride the bus to Santa Monica and Westwood anytime I want. The community is mostly older rich white people, big houses, fancy cars. Not many people know about the area though.

Everybody from LA knows about West LA. Maybe recent transplants and tourists don't know the area, but the same could be said about many of the neighborhoods in NY, Chicago, or hell, even Phoenix (e.g. Sunnyslope).

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-11-2013, 10:36 AM
Uh, yeah, saying that people don't know about the area of West L.A. is pretty stupid. The Westside Pavilion and The landmark Theater are destinations, the Apple Pan is one of the most well-known diners in the entire city, Nuart Theater is a theater people drive from all over the place to go to because of their short run movies, and Sawtelle Blvd AKA Little Osaka is an extremely desirable and interesting place to hang out for the awesome noodle houses, art galleries, and Giant Robot, one of my favorite stores. I don't hang out there as much as I'd like because of the problem inherent to getting to the west side from downtown.

chbludevil
06-12-2013, 03:23 PM
I live in Santa Clara, California with my wife whom I've been with approaching 10 years and our sweet pug and kitty. We live in a quiet cul-de-sac near an elementary school in the back half of a duplex with a nice size private back yard and a garage. We have two orange trees and a lemon tree. I live across the street from a 92 year old Greek man named Tony who is a Pearl Harbor survivor that was born and raised in SF until he moved down here with his wife 60 odd years ago. Tony and I get along quite well and we enjoy each others company, I particularly enjoy the endless stories he has to tell. Tony's daughter owns our duplex and he is the de-facto gardener/handyman which sometimes scares my wife because often we see him standing on top of a ladder pruning trees or picking oranges. I'm not too worried because I know Tony and he's a tough son of a bitch.

I first moved down here in 2006 after living in Oakland since 2002. My wife is from Santa Clara and when we first met in 2003 she was living with and acting as her grandma's caretaker as she was in failing health. My wife is 1st generation Portuguese and Santa Clara has A HUGE Portuguese community. The Portuguese community down here is very tight knit and has adopted me as one of their own. Many times a year Santa Clara and the South Bay is home to Portuguese Festas where the Portuguese get together to drink and eat heartily as well as sing and dance the night away. For all involved it is just like being back home in Portugal.

When my wife's grandma passed in 2006 we decided to move in together. There were two big reasons I chose to move out of the East Bay, the first was I had developed some really bad habits and was making some very poor life choices whilst living in Oakland. Many people who know me, myself included can't believe I am still alive or not rotting in jail as I write this. The suburban nature of Santa Clara seemed like a nice place to refresh and restart. Secondly, the weather down here is typically 10 degrees warmer than the East Bay and sunny pretty much every day of the year. I love the weather down here. When I moved to the Bay Area from Ohio in 2002 I have to say I was pretty disappointed with the East Bay/SF weather, it never felt like 'California weather' to me.

I live one block away from a Taco Bell which is key when we don't have much time or $ to eat. I live two blocks away from a world renowned international swim center with an olympic size swimming pool. Within a 3 mile radius of our place there are 4 really peaceful and pretty city parks where I often go to work out, my wife and I play tennis, and where we used to take our pug for walks when he still had the ability to walk. Now whenever we take him to the park he just sits in his stroller and watches us hit the ball back and forth on the tennis court. I live two miles away from a couple of yuppie paradises, Valley Fair Mall and Santana Row, we go two both of these places often, because both these places allow us to eat meals with our pug in tow. I live walking distance to Santa Clara University and Buck Shaw Stadium where the Earthquakes play. This is nice because I enjoy walking to the stadium and attending soccer games. We live about a 10-15 minute drive from the Shark Tank where the San Jose Sharks play hockey. My wife and I are passionate Sharks fans and our love really blossomed when we first started dating because we used to attend many Sharks games a year together, that is when the prices were more reasonable.

Overall I enjoy living in Santa Clara, my life is comfortable and peaceful here and in the end thats all I really ask out of life.

fatbastard
06-12-2013, 03:46 PM
Pug photo?

chbludevil
06-12-2013, 03:52 PM
Pug photo?

http://www.coachella.com/forum/showthread.php?10055-The-Post-Pictures-of-Your-Pet-Thread!/page69

also

http://www.coachella.com/forum/showthread.php?10055-The-Post-Pictures-of-Your-Pet-Thread!/page64

fatbastard
06-12-2013, 03:58 PM
LOL. Thanks.

captncrzy
06-12-2013, 04:00 PM
My sister used to live in Sunnyslope; that was a great area. I loved Bomberos.

Well, and there's this:

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-0FonqNV3iJY/USQuTyZ2sYI/AAAAAAAA3W0/Na8v6C_bKQQ/w240-h180-p-o/2013-02-19

chbludevil
06-12-2013, 04:04 PM
LOL. Thanks.

You're welcome. :)

Mr. Dylanja
06-12-2013, 04:21 PM
Well, and there's this:

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-0FonqNV3iJY/USQuTyZ2sYI/AAAAAAAA3W0/Na8v6C_bKQQ/w240-h180-p-o/2013-02-19

Do you guys like this place? The huge, cheap margs are great, but I don't think that the food's good at all.

algunz
06-12-2013, 06:00 PM
I live in Tustin, California on Beneta Way. I live down the street from my junior high school. The guy across the street works for the LA Sheriff's department. Every fourth of July he brings a butt load of illegal fireworks home that he has confiscated from people's cars. He shoots them off until the cops show up. There has been at least 3 times where I have called the cops on him, because he and his fellow officers were getting wasted and blasting shitty music at 3am. He's a really nice guy though when he's not drunk. We are below the landing flight path into John Wayne airport and 3 of our immediate neighbors have died of cancer in the past 10 years that we have lived here. They had all lived in the neighborhood for the past 50 years, and they think the planes may have something to do with it. They talk about how in the 60's through 70's there used to be a fine layer of black dust on everything outside. Our neighbor two houses down lost their son-in-law in that terrible desert racing accident where the car flew into the crowd. We're moving soon to a house about 5 minutes away.

We moved to an area in the foothills where people pretend to be wealthy, and the elders complain about the street getting slurried.

TomAz
06-12-2013, 06:01 PM
NOBODY GIVES A SHIT

algunz
06-12-2013, 06:04 PM
"I care, Frank."

Hannahrain
06-12-2013, 06:15 PM
We moved to an area in the foothills where people pretend to be wealthy, and the elders complain about the street getting slurried.

...?

algunz
06-12-2013, 06:17 PM
That's what the tag on our door said and what everybody referred to it as.

TomAz
06-12-2013, 06:21 PM
In my town we call it getting shitfaced.

Hannahrain
06-12-2013, 06:28 PM
I live in Portland. Where, if the last ten minutes are any indication, it's apparently possible that in the 3.5 block stumble home from the "urban winery" I might acquire one of these (https://img3.etsystatic.com/014/1/8004649/il_fullxfull.450620187_2phq.jpg).

Disclaimer: that's not my photo, and as such is not an appropriate reference point to use in conjunction with the other clues herein to triangulate my whereabouts.

guedita
06-12-2013, 07:52 PM
A participant on the HGTV network show "House Hunters" referred to my current city disdainfully as "a place old people go to die." I lived in Sunnyvale for the first 18 years of my life. Also, there's a haunted Toys R Us here.

TomAz
06-12-2013, 08:34 PM
Irony: I got home tonight and there was a tag on my door saying they were going to slurry our road this week.

JustSteve
06-12-2013, 08:59 PM
It's the sealant they put over asphalt.

algunz
06-12-2013, 08:59 PM
Hahahaha. :lool

Sleepingrock
06-12-2013, 10:40 PM
My neighbourhood is where Greenpeace was formed and where David Suzuki lives. It was the counter culture/environmentalist hub in the 60s. Now it's plenty of yuppies. But I am too much of a square to live in the current cool parts of town.

algunz
06-12-2013, 11:13 PM
"Houses don't have memories."

SoulDischarge
06-27-2013, 08:47 AM
The guitarist from the Waitresses owns Jeffrey Dahmer's house and is trying to sell it. http://www.zillowblog.com/2012-08-16/akron-home-for-sale-contradicts-gruesome-connection-to-killer-jeffrey-dahmer/

stuporfly
07-02-2013, 06:03 AM
I live in Greenpoint, the northernmost neighborhood in Brooklyn.

- Though I suspect my numbers might be debunked by actual hard data, I believe the neighborhood is about half-hipster/half-Polish.

- Our landlady is a generally gruff woman, though on rare occasions she is either very sweet or very mean; there is no way of predicting either of the extremes, though she's always nice to my daughter and she actually hugged my girlfriend when we brought her a candle from Notre Dame in Paris last year. I heard a tenant from a building next door yell at our landlady last week and it freaked me out because I didn't think that was possible.

- Greenpoint is popular with film and television productions because of its varied architecture and apparent willingness by its residents to put up with the frequent loss of parking spots and the false pretense that the practice will somehow bolster the neighborhood's economy. There are several soundstages scattered throughout the neighborhood, and within a few blocks of my apartment shows like Royal Pains, Blue Bloods, Smash and The Good Wife are filmed. The exterior set for Boardwalk Empire is also located in Greenpoint.

- There's a fat little woman who slowly walks her shopping cart up our street once or twice a week. She has two tiny dogs who walk in circles around her while she makes her way along the sidewalk; they look like jittery satellites spinning around a tattered, tweed-covered globe.

- The Newtown Creek separates Greenpoint from Queens. In 1950, the creek was the site of what was then the worst oil spill in US history, with as much as 30 million gallons seeping into the groundwater; the environmental damage is still being felt today. There is also a (sometimes rumored) history of chemical spills and improper industrial practices in Greenpoint. A large sewage treatment facility is also nearby: The unique massive silver structures on the site have been dubbed "the Greenpoint shit onions."

- Franklin Street is quickly becoming Greenpoint's version of Bedford Avenue, Williamsburg's primary hipster thoroughfare. Franklin has one of New York City's best bookstores, Word, which hosts the writer's group I belong to and sponsors the Nerd Basketball League, with games played at the American Playground at the end of my block. Overrun by pricey hipster boutique shops with lame window displays, Franklin also has a great record store (Permanent Records), my favorite bar (The Pencil Factory) and one of the most irritating restaurants in the entire borough (Brooklyn Label, which was used in an episode of Rescue Me, though unfortunately was not burned to the ground).

- The combination of Eastern European cigarettes and dogshit on the sidewalks makes Greenpoint one of the brownest neighborhoods in all of Brooklyn.

I no longer live in Greenpoint. My fiancee and bought a place in Bedford-Stuyvesant, the Brooklyn neighborhood colloquially known as Bed-Stuy. One of my favorite movies was filmed several blocks from our home...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=muc7xqdHudI

Even closer was the location of another of my favorite movies...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epMduW5iaWA

Closer still - one block away - is the Bed-Stuy YMCA, which made news last month with this story (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/26/brandon-stanton-humans-of-new-york-photos-bed-stuy-ymca_n_3163298.html).

For well over a decade, Bed-Stuy has been increasingly gentrified, though it still retains much of its character. The hipster percentage isn't quite as high as it was in Greenpoint, though an influx of restaurants (including one - Do or Dine - opened by a Food Network celebrity chef) and bars shows it's on its way.

Bed-Stuy was the epicenter of some of the city's worst gang violence and racial strife in the '60s and '70s, and subsequently saw those issues diminish thanks to strong efforts from within the community.

Numerous musicians were born in or grew up in Bed-Stuy, including Jay-Z, Mos Def, and Ol' Dirty Bastard (the mural below is 1 1/2 blocks from my place.)

http://i43.tinypic.com/9jhno9.jpg

With the brownstones and community gardens, civic art projects and complex graffiti, independent bookstores and farmers markets, music of all styles, Bed-Stuy is a pretty cool place to live. Now if I can just get the otherwise excellent British pub to serve a decent cider I'll be all set.

(Also, we're further fulfilling the cliche by having a roof deck, so we need to have mountmccabe over for a cookout this summer.)

mountmccabe
07-02-2013, 09:14 AM
I live in Hell's Kitchen. It is named for a UK reality cooking program with Gordon Ramsey. He made eggs, everyone was happy. That show was named for a reality cooking program in New Zealand that didn't have Gordon Ramsey so no one outside of NZ ever watched it.

Hell's Kitchen is also called Clinton after George Clinton because we all like the funk.

Daredevil lives in Hell's Kitchen and thus the comic series is considered our instruction manual. Whenever someone moves in they are given a copy of the complete series (though many of the early issuses are reprints).

Back in the late 70s there was little demand for apartments in the area so our current landlord rented out to film crews so The Warriors was filmed in my building. I mean, not the subway scenes. Or the stuff at Coney Island. Just like, some apartment scenes. I don't know, I haven't seen the damned thing.

Hell's Kitchen was the base of the Westies. Mickey Spillane wouldn't let the Italian crime families work in HK and often kidnapped their people for ransoms. Then it got too rough and he moved to Queens and was murdered outside his apartment. Now his family owns a garish bar in HK called Mickey Spillane's. The neighborhood isn't as Irish as it used to be though.

Also someone got shot outside my apartment building yesterday morning.

I have lived here two years as right about now so I know all kinds of stuff like this.

mountmccabe
07-02-2013, 09:16 AM
(Also, we're further fulfilling the cliche by having a roof deck, so we need to have mountmccabe over for a cookout this summer.)

In.

algunz
07-02-2013, 09:41 AM
You've got some of your info a bit mixed up, mount.

We used to have some AWESOME parties in the kitchen. :D

VigoTheCarpathian
07-02-2013, 09:44 AM
Hey Gunz, are you guys gana be in the peninsula for the 4th? We should share a beer or four

stuporfly
07-02-2013, 09:54 AM
In.

Great! Let's chat at Monkey!

algunz
07-02-2013, 10:02 AM
Hey Gunz, are you guys gana be in the peninsula for the 4th? We should share a beer or four

I haven't been down there in years. At the moment, we have no plans for Thursday.

VigoTheCarpathian
07-02-2013, 10:08 AM
I know it's a pain to get down there but I think we're gana BBQ and so you guys should come down. I'll pm you when I know what's goin on for sure. No obligations of course

algunz
07-02-2013, 10:10 AM
About where on the peninsula would you be?

VigoTheCarpathian
07-02-2013, 10:15 AM
About 50th and seashore beachside

mountmccabe
07-02-2013, 10:22 AM
You've got some of your info a bit mixed up, mount.

No way.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-02-2013, 10:35 AM
You really need to do yourself a favor and watch The Warriors. it's such a treat.

algunz
07-02-2013, 10:40 AM
No way.

Way.

algunz
07-02-2013, 10:41 AM
About 50th and seashore beachside

That's in the heart of the shite.

VigoTheCarpathian
07-02-2013, 10:52 AM
This isn't 1988, Gunz. You throw the kids on the beach and ignore the animalhousery

guedita
07-02-2013, 10:57 AM
Gunz, are you sure you don't want to just light some fireworks in front of your house and then throw yourself on them instead of meeting and hanging out with Vigo?

PlayaDelWes
07-02-2013, 11:42 AM
Nailed it
America's Snobbiest Cities (http://www.travelandleisure.com/articles/americas-snobbiest-cities/)

No. 1 San Francisco
No. 2 New York City
No. 3 Boston
No. 4 Minneapolis/St. Paul
No. 5 (tie) Santa Fe, NM
No. 5 (tie) Seattle
No. 7 Chicago
No. 8 Providence, RI
No. 9 Washington, D.C.
No. 10 Charleston, SC
No. 11 Portland, OR

birdiearch
07-02-2013, 05:19 PM
^ San Francisco, yes. Every time I go I like it less and less.
I spent a year in DC (loved it!), so I think I'll disagree with you there.

I live in suburgatory. :(

VigoTheCarpathian
07-02-2013, 05:32 PM
Last time I was in frisco at the airport some 60 yo dude pulls up in a convertible and gets out with this attractive older blonde and this fucktard is wearing a letterman jacket or some bull shit like that and he starts making out with her and when she leaves for the terminal he looks at me and gives me two thumbs up and a smile and look like he's some kind of young person excited about life and his romance and the big game or some nonsense.

mountmccabe
07-02-2013, 06:12 PM
^ San Francisco, yes. Every time I go I like it less and less.
I spent a year in DC (loved it!), so I think I'll disagree with you there.

Playa didn't make that list. And it isn't "worst" or even "overrated" cities.

I turn my nose up at you.

guedita
07-02-2013, 06:54 PM
There's no airport in the city of San Francisco proper, you dumb twit, and only assholes call it Frisco.

unit300021
07-02-2013, 07:51 PM
There's no airport in the city of San Francisco proper, you dumb twit, and only assholes call it Frisco.

Agreed, first time I went up to visit my brother he yelled at me and told me to never refer to it as "Frisco" ever again. HE said if you don't refer to it as the full name then the only other acceptable name to refer it to it as is "The City." A side note if all goes according to plan I'll be living up there in the next couple of months.

guedita
07-02-2013, 07:56 PM
"San Fran" is also gross. What neighborhood are you moving into, unit?

nathanfairchild
07-02-2013, 08:06 PM
What does Santa Fe have to be snobby about?

getbetter
07-02-2013, 08:08 PM
What does Santa Fe have to be snobby about?

Well, they're greedy with their god damn delicious green chili peppers for one.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-02-2013, 08:13 PM
What does Santa Fe have to be snobby about?

They have this pretty sweet song

h2ycxixjLdo

unit300021
07-02-2013, 08:48 PM
"San Fran" is also gross. What neighborhood are you moving into, unit?

My brother lives in the inner sunset and I would stay with him and his fiance until I get my living situation sorted out. Ideally I would like to live in haight/lower haight area. Possibly even the Mission but not 100% sure. One thing I do know is that my sister lives in the marina and I wouldn't live there. It being more expensive aside, if I wanted to live in Orange County I would't plan to move up to the city to begin with.

algunz
07-02-2013, 09:26 PM
I tried to get out of The OC, but I met a great guy at a local dive bar. Sigh.

PlayaDelWes
07-02-2013, 09:43 PM
Last time we were in Frisco, a bloody homeless woman attacked my wife in a coffee shop.

Very snobby

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-02-2013, 09:44 PM
I'll bet she was really smug about it too

getbetter
07-02-2013, 10:04 PM
I bet she was wearing a monocle and some 5 star restaurant spaghetti stuck on her blouse..

bmack86
07-02-2013, 10:44 PM
Agreed, first time I went up to visit my brother he yelled at me and told me to never refer to it as "Frisco" ever again. HE said if you don't refer to it as the full name then the only other acceptable name to refer it to it as is "The City."

This has been and always will be one of the biggest strikes against San Francisco. I mean, sure, go full name if you want to, but getting pissed at people for coming up with lame shortenings of the name is, well, pretentious.

algunz
07-02-2013, 10:47 PM
Whenever someone says The City, I don't think of California.

guedita
07-02-2013, 11:34 PM
I mean, the case against San Franciscoans being extraordinarily pretentious is entirely valid, but the fact remains that no one that lives in the city really ever calls it "Frisco" or "San Fran," and I wouldn't say that people get pissed when people do so (unit's brother maybe being an exception), they just make it a point to be like, "Uh, yeah, no one says that here." The only people who say that are people who haven't ever lived there, or who live near There and like to pretend like they have some sort of ownership over the nearest metropolis to them. I would assume that residents of other cities would correct me if I continued to perpetuate a stupid nickname, like calling Minneapolis, "MINNIE-APP!" with some insane vigor.

Also, gunz, did you live in New York or something? What are you trying to tell us?

guedita
07-02-2013, 11:39 PM
Maybe "Minnie-APP!" is what they call it there, though, I have no idea. I mean, I abbreviate Los Angeles to a slurred "Lusanjjjj" anytime I'm there out of drunken necessity to cope with being there at all.

algunz
07-02-2013, 11:53 PM
Also, gunz, did you live in New York or something? What are you trying to tell us?

You don't even care. Why bother asking? :nono

guedita
07-02-2013, 11:55 PM
Are you operating under the assumption that anyone here cares?

VigoTheCarpathian
07-02-2013, 11:57 PM
None of this rambling makes any sense you dizzy bitch.

I stayed in tenderloin once and those bumbs and hookers are sissy bitches waiting to get PIMPED

unit300021
07-03-2013, 12:01 AM
(unit's brother maybe being an exception)

To be fair though my brother wouldn't bitch at some random person for saying "frisco" or "san fran". He might give a stare but wouldn't say anything to them. He was just an asshole to me about it because he is my older brother, and lets face it older brothers tend to be assholes to their younger brothers over stupid pointless shit like that because they can.

FEELS
07-03-2013, 12:44 AM
but the fact remains that no one that lives in the city really ever calls it "Frisco" or "San Fran,"


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y82xZv22klk

mountmccabe
07-03-2013, 05:51 AM
I mean, the case against San Franciscoans being extraordinarily pretentious is entirely valid, but the fact remains that no one that lives in the city really ever calls it "Frisco" or "San Fran," and I wouldn't say that people get pissed when people do so (unit's brother maybe being an exception), they just make it a point to be like, "Uh, yeah, no one says that here." The only people who say that are people who haven't ever lived there, or who live near There and like to pretend like they have some sort of ownership over the nearest metropolis to them. I would assume that residents of other cities would correct me if I continued to perpetuate a stupid nickname, like calling Minneapolis, "MINNIE-APP!" with some insane vigor.

"The City" only works when everyone knows you're talking about San Francisco. This isn't a knock on the Bay Area; it is used around the country to refer to the nearest important/big/relevant city for varying definitions of all those terms.

Of course you are mostly going to hear outsiders talking about San Fran that call it Frisco and Saffron and whatnot: they have to specify.

When folks who knows the city talk amongst themselves they can say Lower Haight or Glen Park and everyone will know what is meant. I bet that there are plenty of folks that live in 'cisco that refer to it by crazy nicknames but you don't hear it because (a) they're using these nicknames to outsiders and (b) you'd probably be annoyed by all their other habits too so you wouldn't be around them anyway.


Do Chicagoans get snobby about CHI-town? Do Bostonians get uppity about Beantown? Do Phoenicians get upset about The 'Nix? How do New Orleanians feel about Nawlins? How do St. Louisans feel about St. LOUIEEEEE!? These are not rhetorical questions, I don't actually know the answer. I generally thought "The 'Nix" was dumb but I didn't hear it enough because most people outside of Arizona don't have the sort of romanticization of Phoenix that you get with some of these other places.

guedita
07-03-2013, 08:21 AM
Do Chicagoans get snobby about CHI-town? Do Bostonians get uppity about Beantown? Do Phoenicians get upset about The 'Nix? How do New Orleanians feel about Nawlins? How do St. Louisans feel about St. LOUIEEEEE!? These are not rhetorical questions, I don't actually know the answer. I generally thought "The 'Nix" was dumb but I didn't hear it enough because most people outside of Arizona don't have the sort of romanticization of Phoenix that you get with some of these other places.

I wonder this too. "Nawlins," seems to me more like vernacular/slang and I can imagine that New Orleans residents call their city that. Boston seems to be full of 'roided up Sox fans that would happily, albeit aggressively, throw the term "Beantown" around. Phoenix residents have the excuse of actually having most of their brain melted from the heat, so calling their city something as dumb as the 'Nix is excusable.

I did actually hear groups of people chanting "CHI-TOWN!" in Detroit one year, but was unable to ascertain if they were actual Chicago city residents or suburbanites expressing a desire for a metropolitan identity.

birdiearch
07-03-2013, 08:53 AM
I tried to get out of The OC, but I met a great guy at a local dive bar. Sigh.

Ditto :/

PlayaDelWes
07-03-2013, 08:54 AM
That's Costa Mazaing for ya!