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Grandma
01-18-2012, 09:05 PM
I refuse to have my time wasted by the state without being compensated at least minimum wage to hear about other peoples fuck ups.


Your best and most foolproof jury duty excuses...go

koryp
01-18-2012, 09:09 PM
Make a crime. Felons are exempt.

wmgaretjax
01-18-2012, 09:10 PM
jury nullification/veto... you need to read up on it and be ready to be chewed out.

but if you ask me, it'd be more fun to get on a jury and then actually veto... but i never get selected.

gaypalmsprings
01-18-2012, 09:11 PM
I had 2 days of jury duty last week. Just do it!

Miroir Noir
01-18-2012, 09:19 PM
Jared is correct. The easiest, surest way to get out of jury duty is to tell the judge (or the attorneys if they are conducting the voir dire) that you can't follow the applicable standard of review as the court instructs you.

Grandma
01-18-2012, 09:23 PM
what if i tell them that serving on a jury is against my religion? I bought a dashiki at savers this afternoon and this may be my only chance to make use of it.

Geno_g
01-18-2012, 09:27 PM
Say you are a racist...

Miroir Noir
01-18-2012, 09:28 PM
http://youtu.be/94zkBGm1IoU

Grandma
01-18-2012, 09:37 PM
I can't be a convincing racist. I will crack up laughing and it'll all fall apart from there

nathanfairchild
01-18-2012, 09:38 PM
you could say that you are a stay at home parent and can't afford childcare.

koryp
01-18-2012, 09:39 PM
I can't be a convincing racist. I will crack up laughing and it'll all fall apart from there

Get a racist neck tattoo. You won't have to say shit.

Grandma
01-18-2012, 09:41 PM
you could say that you are a stay at home parent and can't afford childcare.

can i legally declare my cat a child?

nathanfairchild
01-18-2012, 09:42 PM
Get a racist neck tattoo. You won't have to say shit.

http://i42.tinypic.com/23p9p1.png

Mugwog
01-18-2012, 09:58 PM
Ever since I told them I was a felon in 03/04 I haven't had one request since.

Vasoline Groove
01-18-2012, 10:01 PM
Just tell them you have a bias on judgement when they ask you if you would be biased. I was in a jury selection for a case that the guy mugged a delivery driver. They asked me if I would have a bias and I told them I would because I used to deliver pizza (which was true but they never called me on it). So I didn't get selected. Just find something about the case that you can relate to and say your biased because of that.

Otherwise, enjoy the days off of work. In Atlanta they would give you a $35 per diem. Not minimum wage but it was better than a ham sandwich.

unit300021
01-18-2012, 10:27 PM
Just tell them you have a bias on judgement when they ask you if you would be biased. I was in a jury selection for a case that the guy mugged a delivery driver. They asked me if I would have a bias and I told them I would because I used to deliver pizza (which was true but they never called me on it). So I didn't get selected. Just find something about the case that you can relate to and say your biased because of that.

Bingo.

Or just present yourself as a smart person who can think for themselves and not easily convinced of things. Or if you are in a medical health profession that usually gets you off also. When they are selecting they usually look for people that are easily convinced of things to be on the jury.

marooko
01-19-2012, 07:08 AM
Don't be a pussy.

tigermilkboy
01-19-2012, 07:17 AM
Tourette's is the best bet. Claustrophobia is another.

I liked the idea of civic responsibility and serving on jury duty. I got sat on one, which took 12 days. As the jury was about to get the trial, the defendant plead guilty. The thing was, if he had gone to the verdict, he probably would have got off. Me and at least three others had him 'not guilty'.
Other than that the monetary compensation was pathetic.

MissingPerson
01-19-2012, 07:40 AM
I really enjoyed my jury experience, but I got a pretty juicy case.

Most of the folks on the panel cried off by either stating they knew the defendents or yelling Irish nationalist slogans.

faxman75
01-19-2012, 08:25 AM
I enjoyed my experience and found it interesting and it wasn't even a juicy case. It was a civil suit, a lady was suing the city and the police department for damages because a cop flipped his lights on and hit her in the intersection. The city offered her 120K (we found out after the trial). We the jury had to come up with a dollar amount if any to give her. We basically wrote a bunch of numbers on a board and voted. We gave her $130K. The problem for her is she would have received 120K had she just accepted the offer from the city, instead she has to split this award with her attorney and then on top of that pay legal fees. Taking it to trial was a big mistake on her part that cost her a ton of money. She was claiming she could no longer work etc. but her entire case was based on her word that she was in constant pain but all the doctors said there was no longer a specific injury from the accident to blame the pain on and you can't exactly quantify pain.

Goatchella
01-19-2012, 08:31 AM
I've never registered to vote, I've had one jury duty request in my life and I threw it away.
Im a ghost

captncrzy
01-19-2012, 09:16 AM
I was on an attempted murder jury for a gangbanger. It was fucking scary.

mmsk123
01-19-2012, 09:49 AM
I used to hate it but I got on a case that found this guy guilty for driving under the influence. He was taking medications or something and blacked out and ran into a couple of cars and a house and hit someone. He said he did not realize what they could do to him and all this stuff but we didn't believe him.

When we found him guilty he started bawling with his whole family. It was horrible. He got like a year in jail or something. At first I felt like shit but I got over it after awhile. It was a good experience.

dorkfish
01-19-2012, 10:00 AM
Last time my girlfriend was at jury selection, one guy interrupted the proceedings by saying "I'm sorry judge, but this is really really boring. I can't concentrate enough to be here, because I am so bored." He was excused, but told that he'd have to bring a doctor's note for ADHD the next time he was in the jurors' pool.

PotVsKtl
01-19-2012, 11:50 AM
Case: Police officer shot a suspect as he was fleeing, slaying him.
Words exiting my mouth: Rodney King

Quest complete.

tessalasset
01-19-2012, 12:27 PM
I got called to serve on a Grand Jury I believe for a people vs Toyota case for the priuses (prii?) speeding up on their own and murdering the people inside. I had to fill out a survey online and they're gonna let me know if I qualify. I kinda hope I do. Trial starts Feb 3.

amyzzz
01-19-2012, 12:42 PM
you could say that you are a stay at home parent and can't afford childcare.You could also say your girlfriend is hugely pregnant with your child and may give birth soon. That worked for my husband (it was true).

tigermilkboy
01-19-2012, 12:50 PM
I got called to serve on a Grand Jury I believe for a people vs Toyota case for the priuses (prii?) speeding up on their own and murdering the people inside. I had to fill out a survey online and they're gonna let me know if I qualify. I kinda hope I do. Trial starts Feb 3.

Might not say that when the actual trial drags on and starts fucking with Coachella or vacation plans. Hours and days can pass by with little happening.

HotHamWater
01-19-2012, 01:08 PM
I got called to serve on a Grand Jury I believe for a people vs Toyota case for the priuses (prii?) speeding up on their own and murdering the people inside. I had to fill out a survey online and they're gonna let me know if I qualify. I kinda hope I do. Trial starts Feb 3.

I'm confused. Why would they select a grand jury to just look at one case? Maybe I'm wrong, but I think a grand jury just decides if a case should go to trial and has the ability to add charges to the indictment. That usually doesn't take too long. I served on a grand jury for 3 months at the end of 2010. We probably saw 15 indictments per day.

More people should want to do jury duty. It's a cool way to learn a little about the legal system.

Highly Refined Pirate
01-19-2012, 01:59 PM
I served on a jury when I was 19 years old, it was an assault and battery case with the defendant being a black male and the victim a white female. Not a juicy case by any means but it was still a good experience for me.

TomAz
01-19-2012, 02:32 PM
I've served on two juries. In the more recent case I was actually the jury foreman. My opinions about the stupidity of humanity were emphatically confirmed by my experiences.

Case #1: African-American defendent arrested because cop thought he was stealing tires from a junkyard. Prosecuting attorney was obviously just out of the worst law school on the planet and had the public speaking ability of a below-average 13 year old. I thought there was a 50/50 chance that the accused actually did the crime. I also thought there was a 50/50 chance the cop was lying and actually lost track of the guy he was initially observing and just arrested the first black guy he could find. Reasonable doubt. Initial jury poll came back 10-2 Not Guilty. the 2 'guiltys' were both 35ish white men who had a bit of redneck to them. One reason they gave for voting guilty was "well, just look at the guy, you know he did it!". They didn't budge. The bailiff came in, asked how we were doing, we told him we hadn't reached a verdict. The bailiff said that's fine, it's 4:55, the court closes soon, you can just come back tomorrow to continue your deliberations. The two 'guiltys' immediately changed their vote and we were done that day.

Case #2: 50-something white guy had a few too many cocktails at the american legion hall and was pulled over for DUI. Cop saw him handle an intersection badly and pulled him over; guy blew a 0.13. Defense attorney tried to use an unreasonable stop defense but it was pretty flimsy. There were two charges: "impaired in the slightest degree" and "driving under the influence", which is the more serious charge. 6-person jury, we gathered and came to 'guilty' on DUI pretty quickly -- none of us really bought the defense's case. But we also had to consider the lesser charge, "impaired in the slightest degree" -- and we were 4-2 guilty there. the two holdouts were saying "well sometimes you can be drunk but not really impaired". It didn't really matter, the points and the penalty would all be based on the DUI conviction, but I wasn't going to let the jury vote not guilty on impaired -- it would have just been stupid. So we argued for another thirty minutes about how he surely must have been impaired, at least slightly, at 0.13 and since we'd all agreed the cop had acted reasonably in stopping him.

These were interesting experiences.

Miroir Noir
01-19-2012, 02:56 PM
Interesting. In Utah, the DUI statute allows a defendant to be convicted if a chemical test demonstrates that their BAC was above .08 or if other evidence demonstrates that they were too impaired to safely operate a motor vehicle. Having an alternative "impaired in the slightest degree" charge would be incredibly confusing for a lot of juries (as evidenced through your experience).

Interesting side note: when I tried DUI trials, we had to routinely bounce people out of jury pools who couldn't accept that it was not illegal to drink (something, at all) and drive without violating the DUI statute.

TomAz
01-19-2012, 03:01 PM
There's actually a 3rd level, too, more serious still: extreme DUI. If you are charged with extreme DUI you will also be charged with DUI and impaired in the slightest degree.

Miroir Noir
01-19-2012, 03:05 PM
That's true here, too. There are felony DUIs for three-time losers and for people who cause serious bodily injuries or deaths. There are also higher-level misdemeanor DUIs for people who have minor passengers or who cause non-serious bodily injuries. The regular DUI would be included as a lesser-included offense for the jury to consider in the event that they voted not guilty on the heightened offenses.

Also, "Extreme DUI" sounds like an ESPN 3 sporting event created by Robert Pollard.

vogina
01-19-2012, 03:11 PM
What if you never respond to it?

Miroir Noir
01-19-2012, 03:11 PM
A jury duty notice? You can be held in contempt of court.

SoccerRyot
01-19-2012, 03:48 PM
I have served twice.

First, I should mention that I did get selected and impaneled on a case that involved a Breaking and Entering charge. All of us Jurors showed up the first day and were waiting outside the courtroom, in the hallway, and then the Bailiff came and got us and escorted us to the Jury/Deliberation room. We had to wait there about 20 minutes because something new had happened and was being discussed out in the courtroom. Then we were informed that our Impaneled Jury was being dismissed, but that we would get full credit for serving. After signing out and getting our paperwork from the Jury Pool Room, a few of us were in the elevator heading down and the Defense Attorney got on, too. So someone asked him what had happened and he told us that new witnesses showed up that very day at the courthouse, but this info had not been disclosed, so that meant that the whole process had to start all over and that's why we were dismissed.

My first (full) case involved an under 21 guy who got drunk at a party that was getting out of hand, and when the cops showed up he got belligerent and the cops had to arrest him. Then this poor clown still didn't know to calm his shit down and got so crazy he ended up getting charged with assault on one of the officers. We found him guilty to the letter of the law. After the trial, the Prosecuting Attorney met us in the lobby and interviewed some of us about what we thought about the case and we asked her if she had any influence on what his sentence might be because some of us really felt for him.

I found the whole process fascinating and I knew I would be fine with serving again, if called.

The second time was a case that came from a stolen bicycle sting operation. We ended up with a Hung Jury on this one, but not for lack of trying to come up with a verdict.

I would say that thing that really bothered me about the process was the clowns trying to get out of Jury Duty. I understand not wanting to serve, but some of the excuses people tried using were ridiculous. One of the interview questions was (and I am paraphrasing): If someone has been arrested, does that mean that they are automatically guilty?

One bitch actually said, "Well they must be guilty of something. Why else would the police arrest them?" I remember my mouth opening in surprise over that response, and the lady next to me said, under her breath, "Is that bitch serious?" She did get excused by Defense Attorney later, but not before the female Judge gave her an Oh, really? look, and then grilled her fake ass with things like, "So you've never heard of the Rampart scandal? Where detectives lied and faked evidence and some innocent people ended up getting convicted of crimes they didn't commit?" Then it was all about backpeddling. She still looked like an asshole.

I understand not wanting to serve. And, yes, it can be legit hardship for some folks. But all I could think was, if I ever end up on trial for something, while the Jurors don't have to like me, at least be truthful. Dang. What happens if they give some half-assed excuse, but still end up on the Jury? Are they gonna be a jerk just because they don't want to do it and fuck some people's lives up?

motionnn77
01-19-2012, 11:22 PM
I've postponed my jury duty twice since Nov. 1st. So Jan. 31 is my day.

frizzlefry
01-19-2012, 11:49 PM
When I got a summons I sent a letter saying that I was a struggling student (a bit of a stretch) that couldn't afford the traveling expenses, (to be fair the case was to be held an hour away from me in fucking Riverside). That got me out of surprisingly.

weeklymix
01-19-2012, 11:53 PM
Have a family member write a note saying you moved. It's state level usually. Nobody cares.

bmack86
01-20-2012, 01:16 AM
I would love to be on a jury but I'll never be selected. The easiest way to get off is what Jared said: Jury nullification terrifies the judicial system such that they'll keep you away from all future proceedings. Prepare to be threatened by the judge if you mention it, but it is a real and very important tool in our system.

I'd never get selected, as I've worked too many anti-death penalty cases to ever be viewed as an unbiased/impartial juror in most cases. Unfortunate, as I'm a firm supporter of the jury system and feel I could only add to it.

bmack86
01-20-2012, 01:22 AM
And I'm jealous of you with jury experience. Tom's sound like they were on both ends of the spectrum, while SoccerRyot got a few experiences I would have really treasured.

For most people who post here (David, specially you). You are intelligent people. Jury duty is your way of helping to determine who in our society is fit to serve within it. Please help by doing your most effective job possible. A good jury can be the difference between sending a person to jail or keeping them from imprisonment. It's the best government roll we all get to fill, so please, take it seriously.

Pixiessp
01-20-2012, 01:40 AM
After years of getting out of jury duty, either by my group not getting called or very legitimate reasons, I finally served about 12 years ago.
I truly enjoyed it and was bummed when after just 3 days the case was dismissed. Going on at the same time was a case involving 2 skinheads
who were on trial for murdering a young girl because they found out she ratted on them about another killing. The people in that courtroom were some of
the scariest folk I've ever seen.

phonographer
01-20-2012, 02:45 AM
I'm self employed. So all I have to do is say I'm self employed.

cutterbutter
01-20-2012, 03:34 AM
I was asked to serve over the holiday break, but the second I mentioned I was a full time college student with my new semester approaching I was dismissed. I'd be interested in being on a jury if only for the life experience, though.

Bryan or someone, can you expand on jury nullification please? Whatever I just read makes no sense to me. An example of it being used would be great. And why does it "scare" the court that you have the knowledge of it?

ivankay
01-20-2012, 05:05 AM
i've been called to jury duty more than a few times. All times except one were spent in the waiting rooms passing the time. The one time i was in a pool to be interviewed was for a federal drug case. When the prosecutor asked if anyone had a problem convicting, i raised my hand. i told him i found the Drug War to be hypocritical and detrimental to our society and would not participate in the prosecution of the accused. i was immediately dismissed. As i was walking out i noticed a lot of dirty looks from a lot of people in the room. i get to go back to the jury waiting room in 3 weeks.

stuporfly
01-20-2012, 05:47 AM
I received a notice when I was just out of college, sat around reading a book for a few hours and was dismissed after they'd chosen their jury before ever getting to my number. A friend actually got a letter at the same time, and he'd toyed with a bunch of absurd options for trying to get out of it, none of which sounded plausible enough to actually work. He was also dismissed without ever making it beyond the waiting area.

I've since received another notice from a part of the country in which I no longer reside. I followed all appropriate steps when I moved, but for some reason it didn't reach whatever database they draw from for their jury pool. I had to fax them some utility bills and a copy of my driver's license to convince them I'd moved.

TheWatcher
01-20-2012, 06:56 AM
Getting out of being selected is easy enough. What I have a problem with is the one-day system they have now in California where they make you go waste a day there, and will basically take no excuses, no matter how valid, to avoid it. I've been called in 3 times under this system. The first time was in Compton, and they herded everyone in like cattle into a small lobby with about 8 elevators. There was no order there, just hope that you were close to an elevator when it opened and that you were stronger than the other people shoving their way in. Horrible. They next time, it was for Torrance, and they crammed over a hundred people into a small temporary building, and since there were *no excuses* accepted there was a man there who had a severe case of bronchitis or worse, who literally coughed constantly the entire day. I ended up sick because of this, and didn't fully recover for months. And I usually don't even catch colds. I didn't get my number selected either time, and went home. The last time my number got selected near the end of the day so I had to go back the next day. Toward the middle of the day I got called to be on the jury, and had to answer their questions. All I can say is that I answered honestly and the defense lawyer decided no, and I got to go home. I really don't like reliving old tragedies, so I hope I never get selected.

I know, duty as a citizen, but the system is so rigid and uncaring I can't see how they can have good results.

TomAz
01-20-2012, 08:25 AM
Jury duty is your way of helping to determine who in our society is fit to serve within it. Please help by doing your most effective job possible. A good jury can be the difference between sending a person to jail or keeping them from imprisonment. It's the best government roll we all get to fill, so please, take it seriously.

Totally agree. READ THIS PEOPLE.

nosurprises12
01-20-2012, 08:33 AM
I was asked to serve over the holiday break, but the second I mentioned I was a full time college student with my new semester approaching I was dismissed. I'd be interested in being on a jury if only for the life experience, though.

This happened to me as well. The one and only time I've been selected for a jury pool I told the judge I would be dropped from my classes if I did not show up, and he dismissed me.

EDIT - or there is always this option:
g2BsMSNfraQ

HotHamWater
01-20-2012, 09:18 AM
For most people who post here (David, specially you). You are intelligent people. Jury duty is your way of helping to determine who in our society is fit to serve within it. Please help by doing your most effective job possible. A good jury can be the difference between sending a person to jail or keeping them from imprisonment. It's the best government roll we all get to fill, so please, take it seriously.

Yes. Words of wisdom right here.

Miroir Noir
01-20-2012, 09:37 AM
I was asked to serve over the holiday break, but the second I mentioned I was a full time college student with my new semester approaching I was dismissed. I'd be interested in being on a jury if only for the life experience, though.

Bryan or someone, can you expand on jury nullification please? Whatever I just read makes no sense to me. An example of it being used would be great. And why does it "scare" the court that you have the knowledge of it?
Jury nullification is the process of a jury or individual jurors refusing to apply the law as it is instructed to them by the court. When a case goes to a jury, the judge gives the jurors formal instructions about what the law is. Among other things, these instructions include the legal standards that the jury is supposed to use when they weigh the evidence that they have just heard. The instructions also include the constitutional and statutory laws that the jury is supposed to use. Jurors are the "triers of fact" in any given case that they have heard, but they are NOT supposed to decide what law to apply to the case. Even if the juror substantively disagrees with the law, they are supposed to put their feelings aside and apply the law as the legislature wrote it and judges have interpreted it. An example of jury nullification would be a juror voting to acquit a defendant of prostitution charges because they personally believe prostitution should not be illegal, even if they have concluded beyond a reasonable doubt that the defendant committed all of the elements of prostitution.

tessalasset
01-20-2012, 10:49 AM
Yeah I just read the fine print on my summons and now I'm nervous. It says A Federal Grand Jury determines probable cause. Its term of service is 12 months (investigatory) or 6 months (accusatory). In contrast, a trial jury is asked to render a verdict and is on call for two weeks. Fuck. I should have postponed til after Coachella. I seriously could end up serving on a jury for an entire year?!?

Miroir Noir
01-20-2012, 10:59 AM
You'll probably have regular meetings, but you won't be working forty hours a week doing grand jury business. And you can probably get out for things like Coachella; federal grand juries have a maximum of 23 members, but only 16 are required for a quorum at any given meeting. For more info see this (http://www.uscourts.gov/Viewer.aspx?doc=/uscourts/FederalCourts/Jury/grandhandbook2007.pdf)and this (http://library.findlaw.com/2008/May/1/247197.html).

Bus McRider
01-20-2012, 11:16 AM
Yeah I just read the fine print on my summons and now I'm nervous. It says A Federal Grand Jury determines probable cause. Its term of service is 12 months (investigatory) or 6 months (accusatory). In contrast, a trial jury is asked to render a verdict and is on call for two weeks. Fuck. I should have postponed til after Coachella. I seriously could end up serving on a jury for an entire year?!?

Do your duty, citizen!

But yeah, I would hope that's not the case. That sucks.

tessalasset
01-20-2012, 11:21 AM
Fascinating. I like that we're able to personally question the witnesses.

tessalasset
01-20-2012, 11:23 AM
My coworker has a J.D. and says it's easier to get out of Grand Jury than trial jury. You just tell them how many paid jury duty days your work offers and tell them financial hardship. However I've already filled out my questionnaire last week and said I have no excuses. I presume I'm going to have to be called in and then explain it to them there in person?

amyzzz
01-20-2012, 11:25 AM
I went to a jury summons in 2009 and told them I wanted all drugs to be legal and was dismissed. They have not called me back yet!

Miroir Noir
01-20-2012, 11:27 AM
When you go in, I would tell them about preexisting vacation and other life commitments that you have, and I think they will find ways to work around your schedule.

tessalasset
01-20-2012, 11:33 AM
My ultimate goal is to not be picked, despite how cool it sounds.

ghostpunk
01-20-2012, 11:33 AM
Jury duty isn't that bad. I just sat there listening to music for a couple hours, then i was picked for a jury and sat next Haley Joel Osment for the rest of the day during voir dire. True story, bros.

chairmenmeow47
01-20-2012, 11:40 AM
we get regular pay for jury duty; no limits. i would love to do jury duty. i only have received one request, but when i called the night before, it was cancelled. i can understand financial hardship being a reason not to partake, but i echo what bryan said. i know i'd want smart people on my jury.

Alchemy
01-20-2012, 12:42 PM
I've been called for jury duty like four times, but I've always been a student (and one of them was when I was living in New York). I'll probably be going to school again in about a year, so this is my chance to be a juror. I wouldn't really look forward to it, only because we have to go to downtown El Paso, and that's a horrible place. I also hear the building is a horrible place. I think it would be interesting to do it though.

EDIT: Oh, and for Grandma, if I had to get out of jury duty, and I wasn't in school (because sometimes they ask for a transcript), I would over-exaggerate my anxiety of dealing with people into straight-out agoraphobia. I would tell the judge that I feel very scared being there as it is, and that I really don't want to be near other people, because I'm afraid that they'll attack me or that I'll do something wrong.

Cdubby
01-20-2012, 12:58 PM
I'm currently on my lunch break from my jury duty. Murder trial. My second time I've been selected, first was a restraining order violation. Needless to say, much more serious and time consuming this time around.

To answer Grandma's question, just tell them you hold a bias and feel you can't be fair for whatever bullshit reason, judge will probably be annoyed but you'll be gone. Saw about 20 people do that during selection.

fatbastard
01-22-2012, 06:40 AM
I no longer work on orange county and keep forgetting to call and let them know. I love jury duty. I normally take a grocery bag full of papers and organize/discard the entire bag during my term.

Suffacated
01-22-2012, 09:31 AM
Years ago, having the shitz while you are at the court house worked for me. You just get up about every 5-10 minutes and tell the judge or whoever that you are about to soil yourself and head off to the bathroom. Don't ask to go, just go and after about 4 rounds of this they excused me and sent me on my way. But a fine outstanding citizen like you grandma.....just get it over with and stop being such a fucking pussy.

algunz
01-22-2012, 09:50 AM
I have in the past said that I have no trust in most cops and little faith in the judicial system. I have always been dismissed.

PlayaDelWes
02-28-2013, 12:56 PM
I reported to Jury Duty on Tuesday and filled out a lengthy questionnaire for what would be a 3+ week Murder Trial of a loser who beat his adult sister to death in Fillmore. We were asked to return today for Jury Selection. Out of 120+ possible Jurors, I was one of 15 they immediately dismissed based on the questionnaire. A trial like this would have been interesting, but 3 weeks is quite a commitment.

I don’t think there was any way to eliminate one’s self in the first half of the questionnaire, which was all fact-based (Job, Marriage Status, Children, Education, etc…). I did mention that we adopted out kids through the county court system and that their birth families had a history of drugs and violence.

The next quarter of the questionnaire was who you knew in the courts, law enforcement, and various agencies. I stated that a lot of my friends were layers and many of them work for the DA in LA, Santa Maria, and Northern California.

The final part, I felt was the opportunity to stand out, as it was focused on ability to cast judgment based on the rules of the court. I stated that “No”, I wouldn’t be able to ignore that the defendant didn’t take the witness stand and I also stated that in these tough budget times, I’m pretty sure the DA’s office would only push slam-dunk cases through the courts.

If questioned in person and in the courtroom, I was prepared to come off as a prosecutor’s fantasy and the defense’s worst nightmare, but it looks like that approach on the questionnaire was enough.

bmack86
02-28-2013, 03:08 PM
There is lots of subtle info in the first half that a defense attorney would look towards. For example, the fact that you're a married male who has adopted two children would suggest that you have more empathy and would likely make you more viable for defense.

The No answer immediately had you disqualified. They know you're educated enough to have read the question and understood it, and it'd be illegal to empanel a juror with that view. SOmetimes they'll still take a person who answers that way to the voir dire just to see if they actually do hold that view, but usually you'd just get tossed.

vulcandeathgrip
03-01-2013, 04:29 AM
My recent jury duty was one of the most eye opening and educational life experiences I have ever had.

gaypalmsprings
03-01-2013, 04:31 AM
I have "Jury Duty" in May. I've never been selected to serve on a jury. I show up & they say "thanks for coming, but you are not needed."

Zafocaine
03-01-2013, 05:45 AM
I might have actually showed up for my first jury duty appointment years ago, if I hadn't gotten wasted and puked on my "badge" the night before. Divine intervention? I haven't officially received a jury duty notice since ;)

Tikiman
03-01-2013, 08:51 AM
Tell them your father was a judge and molested you as a child. That'll do it.

wmgaretjax
03-01-2013, 09:12 AM
I stated that “No”, I wouldn’t be able to ignore that the defendant didn’t take the witness stand


Do you honestly feel this way?

canexplain
03-01-2013, 09:13 AM
Last time I had to show up, I was so fucking hung over I was 45 minutes late. I then couldn't fill out any of the forms because I was shaking so badly. I had to have someone there to fill it out for me and then I signed it. Want to know why I am trying to quit drinking? Ha, 2 months today ......... cr****

RotationSlimWang
03-01-2013, 09:14 AM
Do you honestly feel this way?

I found this curious myself.

PlayaDelWes
03-01-2013, 09:23 AM
Do you honestly feel this way?
No, I am familiar with and fully respect court proceedings. And I wouldn’t have even thought about it had they not put it on the questionnaire. I answered the question in an ambiguous tone more along the lines of “what is noticed is impossible to be unnoticed” hoping it’d be interpreted as a ‘no’.