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vogina
01-06-2012, 12:53 PM
If you didn't know, now you do.

Companies trying to control the internet.

Here’s the list of companies against SOPA:

Disqus
AOL
eBay
Facebook
foursquare
Google
GrooveShark
Kickstarter
Mozilla
PayPal
Wikipedia
Reddit
Square
The Huffington Post
Craigslist
LinkedIn
OpenDNS
Tumblr
Twitter
Yahoo
Zynga

And here’s the list of SOPA supporters

ABC
BMI
CBS
Comcast/NBCUniversal
Disney Publishing Worldwide, Inc.
EMI Music Publishing
Entertainment Software Association
ESPN
Major League Baseball
Marvel Entertainment, LLC
MasterCard Worldwide
Motion Picture Association of America
National Cable & Telecommunications Association
National Football League
News Corporation
Random House
Scholastic, Inc.
Sony/ATV Music Publishing
Sony Music Entertainment
Time Warner
Universal Music
Universal Music Publishing Group
Viacom
Visa Inc.
Warner Music Group

16 minutes long, but you have to watch this.
v/dq6HjKHxoQA?version=3&hl=sv_SE

faxman75
01-06-2012, 12:57 PM
That guy is a lunatic. I don't think he helps the argument.

vogina
01-06-2012, 12:58 PM
That guy is a lunatic. I don't think he helps the argument.

If none of that was true, you need to school me because it was convincing. Although I am against S.O.P.A, but do you have links or videos to more info on it?

heart cooks brain
01-06-2012, 01:00 PM
internet companies: against

companies losing money because of the internet: for

whodathunk

amyzzz
01-06-2012, 01:01 PM
I think GoDaddy was a supporter, then retracted.

vogina
01-06-2012, 01:04 PM
I think GoDaddy was a supporter, then retracted.

Yeah, there have been a few on both sides. Flopping around like mad!

faxman75
01-06-2012, 01:06 PM
If none of that was true, you need to school me because it was convincing. Although I am against S.O.P.A, but do you have links or videos to more info on it?

I am against S.O.P.A. and I am not disputing everything he said. I said he's a lunatic and doesn't help the cause. His rant about how all of this is just going to go away now that he has made this (already known information) public, is what makes him a lunatic.

vogina
01-06-2012, 01:12 PM
I am against S.O.P.A. and I am not disputing everything he said. I said he's a lunatic and doesn't help the cause. His rant about how all of this is just going to go away now that he has made this (already known information) public, is what makes him a lunatic.

The internet is a powerful platform. Didn't you know? Heyooooo! Zing!

Hahahah.

But yeah, I sort of agree. He is a bit loony, but his 16minute video felt like 5 minutes, and I absorbed a lot of it. So, it worked for me.



& then i took one to the knee

TomAz
01-06-2012, 01:15 PM
http://imgs.sfgate.com/c/pictures/2006/07/02/pk_pirates02_ho.jpg

PassiveTheory
01-06-2012, 03:35 PM
Doesn't matter. This will pass and the American public will blink and not give a shit.

nathanfairchild
01-06-2012, 03:49 PM
http://whatscookingamerica.net/CynthiaPineda/Sopapillas/Sopapillas1.JPG

vogina
01-18-2012, 12:40 AM
Bump.

Phenomena
01-18-2012, 03:33 AM
Good, glad someone brought this up pre message board 2.0.

summerkid
01-18-2012, 09:54 AM
I just want to point out that Republican leadership like Issa and Cantor are big reasons why SOPA won't reach the House floor for a vote. So take that Fuck the Republican Party thread.

vogina
01-18-2012, 11:25 AM
I just want to point out that Republican leadership like Issa and Cantor are big reasons why SOPA won't reach the House floor for a vote. So take that Fuck the Republican Party thread.

You forgot the American people, and people of around the World. Take that Fuck The Republican Party thread.

PotVsKtl
01-18-2012, 11:32 AM
Issa and Cantor get one thing right out of an avalanche of horrific legislation, the Republican party is no longer detestable. Moving on to bemoaning the temporary delay of Keystone. 200 million jobs! Obama is a socialist!

mountmccabe
01-18-2012, 02:04 PM
Good, glad someone brought this up pre message board 2.0.

If we're counting this as a new generation - and that seems unreasonable considering all user accounts and posts are still here - then this is at least 3.0. And following that thinking I would be open to arguments call this 4.0 or 5.0, too.

It seems far more reasonable to call the board that debuted 2004 or so to be 1.0, the new server after the big migration of late 2006/early 2007 (which required new user accounts and meant we were starting with an empty board) to be 2.0. How big of a deal was it to split Non-Coachella Discussion? What about the subforae? What I'm saying is this probably could be considered 2.1-2.5, depending.

menikmati
01-18-2012, 02:06 PM
Considering it was a big V-Bulletin upgrade...I'd vote for 2.1 or so.

tessalasset
01-18-2012, 02:16 PM
John wasn't there a board before ours? I'd consider the 2004 board V2.

RedHotSgtPeppers
01-18-2012, 02:18 PM
thechive.com and questionablecontent.net are against SOPA and are demonstrating it with a blackout as well.

mountmccabe
01-18-2012, 07:58 PM
John wasn't there a board before ours? I'd consider the 2004 board V2.

There was at least one if not two. I posted on one in 2003, maybe 2002. But those could be beta versions; they were quite different in form and did not last very long.

But, yeah, the 2004 could be 2.0 which'd put us at 3.1, 3.2 or even 4.0.

obzen
01-18-2012, 08:34 PM
I just want to point out that Republican leadership like Issa and Cantor are big reasons why SOPA won't reach the House floor for a vote. So take that Fuck the Republican Party thread.

lul, couldn't let it go.

bobchella
01-19-2012, 12:00 PM
SOPA/PIPA legislation will affect this message board!

TomAz
01-19-2012, 01:37 PM
David Pogue is a smart guy with a lot of sense (usually).

http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/19/put-down-the-pitchforks-on-sopa/?ref=personaltechemail&nl=technology&emc=cta1


January 19, 2012, 12:50 pm
Put Down the Pitchforks on SOPA


By now, you’ve probably heard of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the Protect I.P. Act (PIPA). These are anti-piracy bills that had been making their way through the House and Senate, respectively.

You might have been made aware of these proposed bills Wednesday, when Wikipedia and other Web sites “went dark” in protest. (Google covered up its logo with a big black rectangle, as though censored.)

I've been watching these doings with fascination. One reason: it’s the first time so many big Web sites have banded together for a political action. (Jenna Wortham in The New York Times offers a great analysis of this sea change here.)

But I’ve also been a little alarmed. Of the millions joining in outraged protests, I’ll bet that only a few have actually read the proposed bills. Everyone else is, no doubt, swept away by the Web sites’ shock language. These bills, say the opponents, will allow Hollywood to censor free speech, kill innovation, and “fatally damage the free and open Internet,” as Wikipedia put it. Light the torches! Grab the pitchforks!

In a perverse stroke of curiosity, I thought maybe I’d actually study these bills.

Nobody’s disputing that these bills have been put together by the entertainment industries — movies, TV, music. The bills are intended to address their chronic frustration: that most of the piracy sites, which make movies, TV, music and book files available free, are overseas. Even though they get more visits than Google or Wikipedia, American laws can’t touch them.

The SOPA and PIPA bills would try to shut down these overseas piracy sites by exerting leverage on companies here in the United States, where they do have jurisdiction.

For example, they’d force American service providers to block the domain names (for example, “piracy.com”) of overseas piracy sites. They’d allow the government to sue American sites like Google and Facebook, and even blogs, to remove links to the piracy sites. And they’d give the government the right to cut off the piracy sites’ funding; they could force forcing American payment companies (like PayPal) and advertisers to cut off the foreign accounts.

The outrage reminds me of the controversy over global warming. Yes, there are climate-change deniers. But nobody seems to notice that they’re in two totally different camps, making totally different arguments. Some people deny that there’s been any climate change at all. Others acknowledge the climate change, but deny that people have anything to do with it. These two categories of people actually aren’t on the same side at all.

In SOPA’s case, too, there are two groups. Some people are O.K. with the goals of the bills, acknowledging that software piracy is out of control; they object only to the bills’ approaches. If the entertainment industry’s legal arm gets out of control, they say, they could deem almost anything to be a piracy site. YouTube could be one, because lots of videos include bits of TV shows and copyrighted music. Facebook could be one, because people often link to copyrighted videos and songs. Google and Bing would be responsible for removing every link to a questionable Web site. Just a gigantic headache.

But there’s another group of people with a different agenda: They don’t even agree with the bills’ purpose. They don’t want their free movies taken away. A good number of them believe that free music and movies are their natural-born rights. They don’t want the big evil government taking away their free fun.

For the record, I think the movie companies have approached the digital age with almost slack-jawed idiocy. The rules for watching online movies from authorized sites are absurd (24 hours to finish the movie? Have they never heard of bedtime?). And there are plenty of movies, even big ones, that you can’t rent or stream online at all. (The original “Star Wars” trilogy, the first three “Indiana Jones” movies, and hundreds of others.)

It should occur to these movie studios that if you don’t give people a legal way to buy what they want, they’ll find another way to get it.

At the same time, what the piracy sites are doing doesn’t seem quite fair, either. Yes, it’s a quirk of the Internet that you can duplicate something infinitely and distribute it at no cost. But that doesn’t make it O.K. to shoplift, especially when the stolen goods are for sale at a reasonable price from legitimate sources. Yes, even if the company you’re robbing is huge, profitable and led by idiots.

In this case, the solution is to work on the language of the bills to rule out the sorts of abuses that the big Web sites fear. (And to fix the other minor point, which is that the bills won’t work. For example, they’d make American Internet companies block your access to domain names like “piracy.com,” but you’d still be able to get to them by typing their underlying numerical Internet addresses, like 197.12.34.56. In other words, anybody with any modicum of technical skills would easily sidestep the barriers.)

As it turns out, that’s exactly what’s happening. Dozens of Congressman, and the White House itself, have dropped support of the bills; their sponsors are considering big changes to the proposals. (They might look, for starters, at the suggestions in Wednesday’s Times editorial: “The legislation could be further amended to narrow the definition of criminality and clarify that it is only aimed at foreign sites. And it could tighten guarantees of due process. Private parties must first get a court order to block business with a Web site they deem infringing on their copyrights.”)

In other words, the protests were effective. There’s no chance that the bills will become law in their current forms.

But it was a sloppy success; the scare language used by some of the Web sites was just as flawed as the Congressional language that they opposed. (I actually have sympathy—just a tiny bit—for the music business’s frustration. It was put nicely by Cary Sherman, chief executive of the Recoding Industry Association of America: “It’s very difficult to counter the misinformation when the disseminators also own the platform.”)

Finally, not enough people have acknowledged that the opposition was arguing two totally different different points—the “you’re going about it the wrong way” group and the “we want our illegal movies!” group.

In the new world of Internet versus government, the system worked; the people spoke, government listened, and that’s good. But let’s do it responsibly, people. Both sides have an obligation to do the right thing.

mountmccabe
01-19-2012, 02:02 PM
That seems like a very silly thing to point out. There was a such a backlash because people from so many different viewpoints were bothered by the legislation.

The "read the bill" bit is also kind of ridiculous, as is his dismissal of the concerns of the bill's opponents... especially since the future he maps out is all about addressing those concerns.

bobert
01-19-2012, 02:04 PM
I love it when some condescending twat reduces an enormously complex issue to a one page column. I wouldn't trust most of our elected officials to successfully perform a basic Google search without the help of their staff, let alone write legislation on something they don't understand. I think it's absurd to suggest that people supported the protests because they were protecting their ability to download music and movies for free. Anyone who thought that legislation was an actual threat to piracy are probably the same people that thought shutting down Napster would preserve the $16 CD.

TomAz
01-19-2012, 02:06 PM
ohhh look how mad you're getting

guedita
01-19-2012, 02:13 PM
Did bobert even....read the column?

bobert
01-19-2012, 02:14 PM
ohhh look how mad you're getting

What's your take on these bills, Tom? Your a smart guy with a lot sense (usually.)

guedita
01-19-2012, 02:14 PM
Tom, make sure that your "take" IS AT LEAST FIVE PAGES LONG.

bobert
01-19-2012, 02:15 PM
Did bobert even....read the column?

Yes. In a perverse stroke of curiosity, I actually studied the column.

faxman75
01-19-2012, 02:17 PM
After a Department of Justice-executed raid today on the file sharing site Megaupload, hackers aligned with the online collective Anonymous have shut down the websites for both the DoJ and Universal Music Group, the largest record company in America.
Both universalmusic.com and justice.gov went down on Thursday afternoon, less than hours after it was revealed that Megaupload had been brought down by federal authorities and four people linked to the site, all outside of America, were arrested and charged with a conspiracy related to copyright infringement.
“It was in retaliation for Megaupload, as was the concurrent attack on Justice.gov,” Anonymous operative Barrett Brown tells RT on Thursday afternoon.
Brown adds that “more is coming” and Anonymous-aligned hacktivists are pursuing a joint effort with others to “ damage campaign raising abilities of remaining Democrats who support SOPA.”

jackstraw94086
01-19-2012, 02:40 PM
http://projects.propublica.org/sopa/

http://a5.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/407119_10150538513569445_13320939444_8607462_16509 71380_n.jpg

TomAz
01-19-2012, 03:12 PM
What's your take on these bills, Tom? Your a smart guy with a lot sense (usually.)

I have no problem with trying to stop outright piracy. Having the MPAA etc write the legislation doesn't seem like a smart way to handle an important, complex, technical, and nuanced issue though. Convene an independent panel of experts, have them study the issue and make recommendations. Panel should be balanced and include smart IT people, smart privacy rights lawyers, smart trademark lawyers, etc. Notice the absence of politicians, lobbyists, and other stupid people on my panel.

PotVsKtl
01-19-2012, 03:26 PM
How do we deal with the fact that the internet is not sovereign US territory?

bobert
01-19-2012, 03:26 PM
I have no problem with trying to stop outright piracy. Having the MPAA etc write the legislation doesn't seem like a smart way to handle an important, complex, technical, and nuanced issue though. Convene an independent panel of experts, have them study the issue and make recommendations. Panel should be balanced and include smart IT people, smart privacy rights lawyers, smart trademark lawyers, etc. Notice the absence of politicians, lobbyists, and other stupid people on my panel.

This is an extremely reasonable plan that I would support for all major legislation. I'm glad you didn't take my little rant as a personal attack, which it wasn't meant to be.

TomAz
01-19-2012, 03:29 PM
How do we deal with the fact that the internet is not sovereign US territory?

Neither was Panama.

wmgaretjax
01-19-2012, 03:33 PM
How do we deal with the fact that the internet is not sovereign US territory?

really bad analogue analogies.

jackstraw94086
01-19-2012, 03:35 PM
would you like to rephrase that into a sensible question?

PotVsKtl
01-19-2012, 03:36 PM
YW4FobvZSiI

wmgaretjax
01-19-2012, 03:37 PM
(Not the Whole Band)

Mau5 Boyz
01-20-2012, 09:17 AM
Iz dontz knowz iz thinkz pipaz iz hotz katez middletonz sisterz andz puttingz sopaz onz herz iz evenz hotterz

Dogvolta
01-20-2012, 10:17 AM
Iz dontz knowz iz thinkz pipaz iz hotz katez middletonz sisterz andz puttingz sopaz onz herz iz evenz hotterz

SOPA needs to go after posts like this. then the internet would be a better place for us all.

RedHotSgtPeppers
01-20-2012, 06:40 PM
Sweet victory. Sweet sweet victory.

CONGRESS TOSSES PIPA AND SOPA
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204301404577172703397383034.html?m od=googlenews_wsj


Leaders of the Internet movement that turned little-noticed antipiracy legislation into a national cause proclaimed victory Friday after congressional backers abandoned their bills.

Congressional backers of online antipiracy legislation called off their efforts Friday following a storm of opposition by Internet companies, effectively killing the bills in their current form. Peter Landers has details on Lunch Break.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nevada) called off a Tuesday vote and Rep. Lamar Smith (R., Texas) said he was canceling plans to have the House Judiciary Committee take up the Stop Online Piracy Act.

Craigslist Inc. founder Craig Newmark, who had been rallying the digerati against the legislation, called the move "a serious grassroots victory for democracy." He said champions of the Internet now need to "turn that success into a tipping point which restores the American vision of honest self-government."

The bills, which backers said would have helped U.S. authorities crack down on foreign websites involved in the piracy of copyrighted movies and music, turned into a test of the ability of websites like Wikipedia and Craigslist to rally users for a cause.

They succeeded: Millions of people signed online petitions, lawmakers were flooded with emails, and congressional leaders who just days ago were pledging to press ahead were forced into a hasty retreat.

Sen. Jerry Moran (R., Kan.) said in an interview he was besieged with comments this week as he made the rounds of Rotary and Lions Clubs in his state. "This was a topic that was raised in every circumstance," he said. "It was a new segment of Kansans who got engaged."

The senator had taken an early stance against the legislation, influenced in part by leading opponent Google Inc. which is building a high-speed broadband network in Kansas City, Mo., and Kansas City, Kan.

Still uncertain was whether the legislation could be revived in a new form. Supporters said they weren't giving up.

"There is no reason that the legitimate issues raised by many about this bill cannot be resolved," Mr. Reid said. "Counterfeiting and piracy cost the American economy billions of dollars and thousands of jobs each year."

Wikipedia, which gave the movement perhaps its biggest publicity boost by going dark Wednesday, put a note on its home page telling users it expected the fight to continue: "Thank you for protecting Wikipedia. We're not done yet."

The legislation—known in the Senate as the Protect IP Act—would have let the Justice Department seek a court order requiring U.S. Internet providers to block access to foreign pirate websites. Websites such as Wikipedia, Facebook and Twitter said that would chill free expression and single out for punishment websites that hadn't knowingly posted infringing content.

Rep. Smith accused the critics of fear-mongering and said law-abiding sites would have no problem operating under the new rules. But he was too late to stop the tide of opposition, which reflected broader skepticism by Internet users about regulation emanating from Washington. Some critics likened the antipiracy bills to the "Great Wall of China" that Beijing uses to police Internet content.

The NetCoalition, which has represented technology companies including Google, Yahoo Inc., and Amazon.com Inc. in the battle, said it commended Congress "on recognizing the serious collateral damage this bill could inflict on the Internet."

The coalition, echoing statements by Facebook and other opponents, said it was willing to cooperate on new antipiracy legislation, but that would probably look significantly different from the bills congressional leaders dropped Friday. "We remain committed to working with Congress to address the problem of piracy without compromising innovation and free expression," NetCoalition said.

The legislation had unanimous support last year in the Senate Judiciary Committee, led by Chairman Pat Leahy (D., Vt.). He called Friday for a quick debate on changes. Otherwise, "more time will pass with jobs lost and economies hurt by foreign criminals who are stealing American intellectual property," he said. "I hope other members of Congress won't simply stand on hollow promises to find a way to eliminate online theft."

The derailing of the legislation is a blow to the Motion Picture Association of America, the trade group for Hollywood studios that had aligned with U.S. Chamber of Commerce and labor unions to drum up support.

"As a consequence of failing to act, there will continue to be a safe haven for foreign thieves; American jobs will continue to be lost; and consumers will continue to be exposed to fraudulent and dangerous products," Chris Dodd, the former senator and MPAA's chairman, said in a statement.

stinkbutt
01-22-2012, 11:21 PM
Is this ACTA as serious as people are making it out to be or are my fb friends just really paranoid?

Phenomena
01-22-2012, 11:45 PM
Just read up on it. Sounds pretty shady almost overtly bureaucratic and impossible to manage.

wmgaretjax
01-23-2012, 07:36 AM
Is this ACTA as serious as people are making it out to be or are my fb friends just really paranoid?

It's serious... these kind of under the table international agreements are limited in scope pretty severely and often end up being meaningless, but it is definitely possible that it could have a serious negative impact. It's probably more scary for folks in other countries... especially European ones where these kinds of treaties have been shown to take effect in a meaningful way.

If you look at other intellectual property related treaties we've been a part of (like WIPO, although it's not entirely analogous)... typically other legislation is required in order to bring us into compliance with the treaty. This legislation will necessarily be more transparent, although it will have an initial boost in momentum as a result of the treaty.

TomAz
01-23-2012, 10:46 AM
http://www.siliconrepublic.com/new-media/item/25449-forget-sopa-europe-is/


Forget SOPA, Europe is about to ratify its bigger brother ACTA
23.01.2012


Just as the SOPA and PIPA debate winds down in the US, the European Union is later this week set to work on ratifying a global intellectual property enforcement treaty: the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement.

European countries, including Ireland, will later this week join the US, Australia, Korea, New Zealand, Mexico, Jordan, Morocco, Singapore, the United Arab Emirates and Canada in supporting ACTA.

According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), ostensibly the agreement deals primarily with counterfeit physical goods, such as medicine.

However, it will in actual fact have broader scope and in particular will deal with new tools targeting "internet distribution and information technology."

Last week, hundreds of major websites in the US - including Wikipedia, WordPress, Boing Boing, Craigslist and Reddit - protested the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) bill and its sister Protect Intellectual Property Act (PIPA). Millions of web users took to social media to join the protests.

The protests, which included petitions and letters to politicians, succeeded in swaying the White House and members of the US Senate to withdraw support for the controversial bills.

One of the reasons ACTA is arousing suspicion and concern is so little is actually known about it.

According to the EFF, it contains several features that raise concerns for consumers' privacy and civil liberties, as well as legitimate commerce, innovation and the free flow of information.

ACTA, it argues, also limits developing countries' ability to choose policy options that best suit their domestic priorities and levels of economic development.

Why is ACTA so mysterious?
The EFF said: "ACTA is being negotiated by a select group of industrialised countries outside of existing international multilateral venues for creating new IP norms, such as the World Intellectual Property Organisation and the World Trade Organisation.

“Both civil society and developing countries are intentionally being excluded from these negotiations. While the existing international fora provide (at least to some extent) room for a range of views to be heard and addressed, no such checks and balances will influence the outcome of the ACTA negotiations," the EFF warns.

Few countries that are about to ratify the agreement, including Ireland, have provided information to the public about the ACTA negotiations.

A document seen by the EFF, a sort of discussion paper, reveals that rightsholders are asking for new legal regimes to "encourage ISPs to co-operate with rights holders in the removal of infringing material." In Ireland, the Government is within days about to pass a statutory instrument that may give rights holders, such as music labels and movie studios, the right to seek injunctions against ISPs concerning illegal downloading on their networks.

The EFF says that rights holder groups that support the creation of ACTA have also called for mandatory network-level filtering by ISPs and three strikes-style graduated response practices.

The EFF warns that the kind of filtering methods ACTA may usher in may include deep packet inspection of citizens' internet communications, raising considerable concerns for civil liberties, privacy rights and internet innovation.

wmgaretjax
01-23-2012, 11:11 AM
the scariest parts of acta are the portions that are most likely to pass... the gmo/food/drug IP provisions in particular have far reaching implications. those lobbies are a bit more powerful than hollywood...