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faxman75
09-21-2011, 03:30 PM
His execution time has passed. Another last minute plea to the Supreme Court on the grounds that his defense has another appeal coming up the pipe.

Troy Davis.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/sep/22/troy-davis-execution-delayed

algunz
09-21-2011, 03:33 PM
Put me on your list, but I have no problem with the death penalty.

A woman got killed by my work when a tree fell on her car.

Sucks, but life goes on.

marooko
09-21-2011, 03:35 PM
I was reading about this the other day. Pretty crazy situation.

faxman75
09-21-2011, 03:37 PM
Put me on your list, but I have no problem with the death penalty.

A woman got killed by my work when a tree fell on her car.

Sucks, but life goes on.

I don't understand what this means. This is about Troy Davis, not the death penalty overall.

A tree fell on her car....umm are you in the right thread?

amyzzz
09-21-2011, 03:40 PM
Did Ron take over gunz's computer today?

guedita
09-21-2011, 03:43 PM
Put me on your list, but I have no problem with the death penalty.

A woman got killed by my work when a tree fell on her car.

Sucks, but life goes on.

Oh. Had there been really strong evidence that the woman in the car wasn't actually in the car at all? Like zero physical evidence that she was ever in the car? And seven people then pointed her out as being in the car? Later to recant their claims and admit that they initially said that they were in her car because of intense police pressure? Did someone else--the very first person to label her as being in the car to police-- later actually confess to being in the car? And then did the tree just decide to fall on her anyway?

Sucks, but life goes on, right?

marooko
09-21-2011, 03:45 PM
We should be concerned about life going on or not if they reschedule for late next year. Otherwise, yes, it goes on.

algunz
09-21-2011, 03:45 PM
I just can't jump on the bandwagon when it comes to this stuff. I know you won't find my logic, few people have when it comes to this point, but I just have accepted the fact that people are lost along the way. Maybe it's murder, cancer, accident etc, but at least with the death penalty we as a society have a bit of a chance to really punish the bad ones. Yes, I recognize the system is flawed and inconsistent, but so is death.

marooko
09-21-2011, 03:46 PM
How's this guy gonna feel if they let him off?

http://www.socialistparty.net/images/stories/mumia.jpg

Miroir Noir
09-21-2011, 03:46 PM
Hoping against hope that the right wingers on SCOTUS can stop this travesty. In any event, I thought I'd share a particularly apt comment from Albert Camus on this issue:


Could not justice concede to the criminal the same weakness in which society finds a sort of permanent extenuating circumstance for itself? Can the jury decently say: "If I kill you by mistake, you will forgive me when you consider the weaknesses of our common nature. But I am condemning you to death without considering those weaknesses or that nature"? There is a solidarity of ill men in error and aberration. Must that solidarity operate for the tribunal and be denied the accused? No, and if justice has any meaning in this world, it means nothing but the recognition of that solidarity; it cannot, by its very essence, divorce itself from compassion.

TomAz
09-21-2011, 03:47 PM
A woman got killed by my work when a tree fell on her car.

Sucks, but life goes on.

This doesn't make any sense at all.


This is about Troy Davis, not the death penalty overall.

Nor does this. None of us can speak knowedgably about Troy Davis, other than to parrot what we've read. We don't know the facts of his case, we don't know the rationale behind the state's position, we don't know shit, really. So all this is nothing but a proxy debate about the death penalty. It's not about Troy Davis.

faxman75
09-21-2011, 03:47 PM
What? So you've come to terms with the fact that people are killed by mistake. So, when it actually happens you don't give a fuck? Cold...

guedita
09-21-2011, 03:48 PM
This doesn't make any sense at all.



Nor does this. None of us can speak knowedgably about Troy Davis, other than to parrot what we've read. We don't know the facts of his case, we don't know the rationale behind the state's position, we don't know shit, really. So all this is nothing but a proxy debate about the death penalty. It's not about Troy Davis.

We don't know the facts of his case?

marooko
09-21-2011, 03:49 PM
Fax was at the trial and interviewed some of the people.

And I have the Mumia court transcript. Really, I do. I keep it with my bible, just in case I want to actually read it one day and form my own opinion.

TomAz
09-21-2011, 03:49 PM
Well, all I've read are news articles.

faxman75
09-21-2011, 03:50 PM
Nor does this. None of us can speak knowedgably about Troy Davis, other than to parrot what we've read. We don't know the facts of his case, we don't know the rationale behind the state's position, we don't know shit, really. So all this is nothing but a proxy debate about the death penalty. It's not about Troy Davis.

I didn't know it would be a debate actually. I thought it was more of a lets follow the story and see what develops. Sure there would be parroting but we do know the facts of the case. The system and the multiple appeals along the way have been interesting to say the least but I wasn't looking for a death penalty debate. Surely we can go that route but I just meant for this to be a real-time discussion.

guedita
09-21-2011, 03:51 PM
Well, all I've read are news articles.

Well in that case, we don't know the facts about anything in the world that weren't immediately present for. C'mon.

marooko
09-21-2011, 03:53 PM
He read Fox news articles, cut him some slack.

algunz
09-21-2011, 03:54 PM
This doesn't make any sense at all.
.

Why?

Death doesn't make any sense. People take their life daily. People are killed daily. Why does one life take more precedence over another? Why would the loss of Troy Davis represent more than the many people I have lost? Somehow he got caught up in a load of shit. What happened to make that happen? Who made that happen? I have no answers, so I resign myself to the powers that be.

TomAz
09-21-2011, 03:57 PM
This is a legal case in which only one side has been presented. As far as I can tell.

I don't support the death penalty at all, which is the only basis I have for thinking the guy should not be killed. I have no idea of Troy Davis actually killed the cop or not. I'm not gonna get on that righteous indignation train just yet.

marooko
09-21-2011, 03:57 PM
Somebody is fucking danked.

TomAz
09-21-2011, 03:58 PM
Why?

Death doesn't make any sense. People take their life daily. People are killed daily. Why does one life take more precedence over another? Why would the loss of Troy Davis represent more than the many people I have lost? Somehow he got caught up in a load of shit. What happened to make that happen? Who made that happen? I have no answers, so I resign myself to the powers that be.

You are saying there is no moral difference between dying and killing. I say that there is.

fatbastard
09-21-2011, 04:02 PM
12:43AM

algunz
09-21-2011, 04:04 PM
There is a moral difference, but in the long run it doesn't mean shit. We have too many people on this fucking planet, too many people in the system. I won't shed a tear if some random guy was executed. I know this will put rage in some of y'alls hearts, but when it comes to this one, I am comfortable with the "chips fall where they may."

marooko
09-21-2011, 04:06 PM
Kinda like that tree?

algunz
09-21-2011, 04:07 PM
EXACTLY!

JustSteve
09-21-2011, 04:12 PM
Put me on your list, but I have no problem with the death penalty.

A woman got killed by my work when a tree fell on her car.

Sucks, but life goes on.

did you see them chopping down the 100 or so eucalyptus trees along irvine ave. today? so sad, that street and the look of it has been a part of my life since birth. looks so barren now. although, it will be nice not having to worry about a tree falling on us, i guess. the 2 hippies there in tye dye protesting with barely visible "save the trees" signs written in pencil was pretty funny, though.

/threadjack

RageAgainstTheAoki
09-21-2011, 04:15 PM
There is a moral difference, but in the long run it doesn't mean shit. We have too many people on this fucking planet, too many people in the system. I won't shed a tear if some random guy was executed. I know this will put rage in some of y'alls hearts, but when it comes to this one, I am comfortable with the "chips fall where they may."

Jesus Christ. It's the brotherhood of man in here!

algunz
09-21-2011, 04:21 PM
Yes, I wanted to run and give those two a big hug and kiss.

Is a tree worth more than a human life? I know that is the next question that will come. No, it's not. But, nor is one life more than another. A woman admits to killing her newborns and gets let free. Why is her life more valuable? It's not. It's not about value. It's about fucking cards. We are all dealt a few (right, Steve- dealt the CF card or others of us dealt the mental health card) and some we deal ourselves. We only have so much power, but I'm comfortable with having a system that is at least trying to find the right and wrong. Especially with modern technology.

algunz
09-21-2011, 04:22 PM
Jesus Christ. It's the brotherhood of man in here!

This is the one thing I stand on the right on, and I will stand firm.

Miroir Noir
09-21-2011, 04:23 PM
algunz, the difference with the death penalty is that it is the one homicide that is unequivocally carried out by the state on behalf of society; it genuinely implicates all of us in a fundamental way that other homicides -- even when viewed at the broadest, most sociological levels of abstraction -- simply do not.

JustSteve
09-21-2011, 04:28 PM
Yes, I wanted to run and give those two a big hug and kiss.

Is a tree worth more than a human life? I know that is the next question that will come. No, it's not.

to be fair, it has been reported that the roots of the trees were damaged when the gutters along the road were installed. if true then they had to go, especially with winter coming.

algunz
09-21-2011, 04:28 PM
Miroir, I understand that, but I have no issue with that. There needs to be some system that throws the stones at another for doing wrong. We, as a society, could not survive if there was no system of punishment. I recognize that lives have been lost as a result of misinformation or skewed facts, but I also recognize that too many lives have been lost at the hands of evil and terror.

algunz
09-21-2011, 04:29 PM
to be fair, it has been reported that the roots of the trees were damaged when the gutters along the road were installed. if true then they had to go, especially with winter coming.

So lives are lost and life moves on.

JustSteve
09-21-2011, 04:32 PM
mr. ivankay posted this on facebook a couple days ago and it is a really good read...

http://salt.claretianpubs.org/issues/deathp/prejean.html

JustSteve
09-21-2011, 04:33 PM
So lives are lost and life moves on.

i just don't want those lives lost to be mine or my kids, haha. i was right there where it happened just a couple hours before the tree fell. it really was just her time, i guess.

algunz
09-21-2011, 04:35 PM
I know. It's so weird, because I have sat at that intersection so many times over the past 30 years.

stinkbutt
09-21-2011, 05:23 PM
There is a moral difference, but in the long run it doesn't mean shit. We have too many people on this fucking planet, too many people in the system. I won't shed a tear if some random guy was executed. I know this will put rage in some of y'alls hearts, but when it comes to this one, I am comfortable with the "chips fall where they may."


You're right. We should also stop any and all medical research too. I mean God created cancer, AIDS, and all disease as population control, right?

guedita
09-21-2011, 05:29 PM
I find really hard to believe that if someone you were related to or very close to was sentenced to die you would have that same sort of "shit happens, take it for what it is, someone's gotta pay to keep some sense of balance" attitude, gunz. Regardless of the guilt of that person.

guedita
09-21-2011, 05:33 PM
This is a legal case in which only one side has been presented. As far as I can tell.



This also confuses me. There are clearly two sides here. The one side is the original conviction and sentencing--which is documented and has been presented. The other side is....the entire argument against the original conviction. Right?

marooko
09-21-2011, 05:46 PM
You're right. We should also stop any and all medical research too. I mean God created cancer, AIDS, and all disease as population control, right?

Well that's just stupid, every knows it was the republicans that created that stuff.

SoulDischarge
09-21-2011, 05:47 PM
Alright, aside from the fact that you're saying one life doesn't matter, which pretty much means no life matters, which means that absolutely nothing at all matters, in which case we should all stop trying and just kill ourselves now. Aside from the fact that a lost life in this situation can actually be prevented (y'know, temporarily, anyway), making it less random than some force of nature accident. Aside from just about every other existential dilemma this position brings up, we have this:


but at least with the death penalty we as a society have a bit of a chance to really punish the bad ones.

Which fundamentally says sacrificing the innocent is an acceptable price to pay for punishing the guilty. But what is the difference between a lone man killing an innocent person and an entire jury? Are all of the people who involved in wrongly killing an innocent under the pretense of justice absolved from guilt in a way a single murderer is not, even though the net outcome is the same, a person has been killed? This is fucking baffling.

MissingPerson
09-21-2011, 05:51 PM
Miroir, I understand that, but I have no issue with that. There needs to be some system that throws the stones at another for doing wrong. We, as a society, could not survive if there was no system of punishment. I recognize that lives have been lost as a result of misinformation or skewed facts, but I also recognize that too many lives have been lost at the hands of evil and terror.

Too many already, and another one will be too many again.

The death penalty is useless as a deterrant and the stats show it. It's abhorrently cruel in practice, and inconsistent in application and the stats show that too. The only function it serves is to provide a kind of token human sacrifice to the politics of the day.

wmgaretjax
09-21-2011, 06:34 PM
Supreme Court just denied the stay of execution. Barbarism prevails.

Miroir Noir
09-21-2011, 06:38 PM
Unless SCOTUS was going to rule the death penalty unconstitutional, there wasn't much they could do given the limits of federal jurisdiction. It's sad, but his guilt or innocence doesn't matter to the Supreme Court.

MissingPerson
09-21-2011, 06:40 PM
Fucking disgusting.

Gribbz
09-21-2011, 06:50 PM
Appalling and disgraceful. I hate how the death penalty is so erratically applied.

RageAgainstTheAoki
09-21-2011, 06:52 PM
Unless SCOTUS was going to rule the death penalty unconstitutional, there wasn't much they could do given the limits of federal jurisdiction. It's sad, but his guilt or innocence doesn't matter to the Supreme Court.


Sad news indeed but, yeah, probably not unexpected. The court had already heard prior pleas from him and then put the onus on his defense to prove his innocence in lower courts. I wonder if he was well represented at those post-conviction hearings.

malcolmjamalawesome
09-21-2011, 06:58 PM
NTSA

malcolmjamalawesome
09-21-2011, 07:36 PM
but also, gunz is arguing with the same logic as the kids getting their SAT essays graded by cara

shermanoaksyo
09-21-2011, 07:43 PM
The Supreme Court: the one reason it's still important to re-elect the President, even if he's a bought-and-paid-for toady for bankers and generals.

fetuspiniata
09-21-2011, 07:43 PM
the rain has started

Miroir Noir
09-21-2011, 08:11 PM
The Supreme Court: the one reason it's still important to re-elect the President, even if he's a bought-and-paid-for toady for bankers and generals.

Absolutely. I can't think of any reason more important. The liberals are down 4-5, and the most likely next retiree is Ginsburg, the court's most liberal member.

Scalia and Kennedy are both 76 and one or more may both bail if a Republican gets elected.

woogie846
09-21-2011, 08:43 PM
Miroir, I understand that, but I have no issue with that. There needs to be some system that throws the stones at another for doing wrong. We, as a society, could not survive if there was no system of punishment. I recognize that lives have been lost as a result of misinformation or skewed facts, but I also recognize that too many lives have been lost at the hands of evil and terror.

The only reason for the installment of a death penalty should be to defer people from committing violent crimes, and clearly that isn't working. The idea that a sovereign power can take away a fundamental human right is fucking scary.

marooko
09-21-2011, 08:52 PM
Do away with all penalties. The deterrent aspect hasn't been working for ages. Prisons don't do a good job at rehabilitation, and I'd honestly argue that they aren't setup for that. Lets do away with them as well.

tessalasset
09-21-2011, 09:12 PM
This is a legal case in which only one side has been presented. As far as I can tell.

I don't support the death penalty at all, which is the only basis I have for thinking the guy should not be killed. I have no idea of Troy Davis actually killed the cop or not. I'm not gonna get on that righteous indignation train just yet.

While I have always been against the death penalty, I was under the impression it was only used when the person was convicted without so much as a shred of doubt. I obviously don't understand how our justice system works. When jurors and eyewitnesses are all changing their minds? That right there should have put a stop to it.

guedita
09-21-2011, 09:15 PM
It's a legal lynching in a southern state.

nathanfairchild
09-21-2011, 09:18 PM
i know it varies case to case, but what are the differences in costs to life in prison without parole and using the death penalty? seeing as the death penalty doesn't really work as a deterrent, isn't it kind of a waste of money?

Hannahrain
09-21-2011, 09:23 PM
I do believe in the death penalty, but I believe in it essentially as an opt-out for life in prison. The official sentence ideally manifested under my belief would be either/or, and you're given the opportunity to choose execution or be incarcerated until expiry. If I ran the zoo.

guedita
09-21-2011, 09:23 PM
i know it varies case to case, but what are the differences in costs to life in prison without parole and using the death penalty? seeing as the death penalty doesn't really work as a deterrent, isn't it kind of a waste of money?

Here are some CA stats: http://www.deathpenalty.org/article.php?id=42

fatbastard
09-21-2011, 09:39 PM
11:08PM

marooko
09-21-2011, 09:58 PM
It's a legal lynching in a southern state.

hahahahaha. Wow.

PlayaDelWes
09-21-2011, 09:58 PM
Here are some CA stats: http://www.deathpenalty.org/article.php?id=42
A larger numerator would make those cost-per #'s look a lot better.

sonofhal
09-21-2011, 10:07 PM
Pro War, Pro Death Penalty, Pro Life. USA! USA!

SoulDischarge
09-21-2011, 10:07 PM
The Idiot was one of the most significant catalysts for how I think about the death penalty. http://www.3waystolive.com/2008/06/dostoyevsky-on-capital-punishment.html

bmack86
09-21-2011, 10:35 PM
While I have always been against the death penalty, I was under the impression it was only used when the person was convicted without so much as a shred of doubt. I obviously don't understand how our justice system works. When jurors and eyewitnesses are all changing their minds? That right there should have put a stop to it.

Not without a shred, but just beyond a reasonable doubt. Eyewitness testimony is inherently unreliable because the memory isn't a perfect camera, and especially in high stress situations involving people of different races, eyewitness IDs are frequently flawed.

And the Supreme Court really should have acted the first time the Davis case was on their docket. They were fully aware that, if they returned the case to the Georgia courts, they were going to affirm their prior decision, because that court doesn't want to admit error or look weak. The recantation evidence, plus the fact that one of two witnesses who didn't react was among the suspects and had nearly as much circumstantial evidence linking him to the killing, raises a reasonable doubt in my mind.

tessalasset
09-21-2011, 11:35 PM
Ahg6qcgoay4

SoulDischarge
09-22-2011, 04:40 AM
The comment section for this article is a heartwarming romp http://news.yahoo.com/ga-executes-davis-supporters-claim-injustice-031409578.html

Somewhat Damaged
09-22-2011, 06:44 AM
I think the death penalty is useful in cases where there is absolutely no doubt as to the person's guilt and they've demonstrated that their continued existence would pose a threat to other people, even if those other people would only be prison guards or other inmates. I don't see anything wrong with someone like Ted Bundy or John Wayne Gacy having been executed. But I do agree that there is a lot of fallibility with the whole process and as such, the death penalty shouldn't be employed as routinely as it is and the burden of proof should include DNA or videographic evidence, along with confessions, since the reliability of eyewitness testimony has been proven to be suspect.

algunz
09-22-2011, 06:53 AM
but also, gunz is arguing with the same logic as the kids getting their SAT essays graded by cara

So you can give me an A+. :)

faxman75
09-22-2011, 06:59 AM
The witnesses and what they said during his first trial in 1991 and their new story in 2010

http://www.ajc.com/news/then-and-now-witnesses-556214.html

Darrell “D.D.” Collins
Trial: He testified that he had told police he had seen Davis shoot at a car at a pool party on the evening before Officer Mark Allen MacPhail was shot and killed. At the same time, Collins said he had been pressured by police “to say what they wanted to hear.”

Wednesday: “I was scared,” he said, adding that police threatened to charge him as an accessory. “That’s what they wanted me to say. I thought that was the only way I could get out of it.”

Dorothy Ferrell
Trial: She pointed out Davis as the shooter, saying she saw the killing from the balcony of the Thunderbird Inn across from the parking lot where the shooting occurred. “After the police officer fell, when he fired the first shot, he went up to him and he shot him again,” she testified. “Well, I’m real sure, positive sure, that that is him, and you know, it’s not a mistaken identity.”

Wednesday: Ferrell was on the witness list provided by Davis' legal team to the court but they did not call her to the stand.

Kevin McQueen
Trial: He testified that while he and Davis were both detained at the Chatham County Jail, Davis told him he shot and killed MacPhail because the officer saw him and recognized him. “Yeah, he said he did, 'cause I used to know him off the streets also,” McQueen testified.

Wednesday: “There’s no truth to it,” he said. “The man did not tell me he shot anybody, period."

Jeffrey Sapp
Trial: He testified that two nights after the killing, Davis told him he killed MacPhail. “Say a cop came running out and told him to freeze, and he say he froze, and the cop reached for his gun and he say he shot him,” Sapp said, recounting his conversation with Davis. “Troy shot the cop.”

Wednesday: “I was so scared I told them anything they wanted to hear,” he testified, saying he gave false testimony because irate police officers pressured him on what to say and he was worried he'd be charged for dealing drugs if he didn't.

Antoine Williams
Trial: He pointed out Davis as MacPhail’s killer, saying he saw the shooting from inside his car in the Burger King parking lot. “He shot him once, he fell down, then he shot him about three more times,” he told the jury.

Wednesday: He said he could not recognize the shooter because once the shots were fired he ducked. “I was in my car ducking and peeking," he testified, adding it was hard to see anything because it was dark and his car had three shades of limousine tint on the windshields.

nathanfairchild
09-22-2011, 07:00 AM
The comment section for this article is a heartwarming romp http://news.yahoo.com/ga-executes-davis-supporters-claim-injustice-031409578.html

the comments section on yahoo articles make me lose my faith in humanity.

faxman75
09-22-2011, 07:09 AM
So with no physical evidence the case relied almost entirely on the testimony of those witnesses yet the State courts didn't find the changed testimony to be enough to raise reasonable doubt...

Justice.

stinkbutt
09-22-2011, 07:11 AM
As an American, I feel ashamed today

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 07:19 AM
It comes down to a committing a simple "2 wrongs" falacy in my mind; you can't murder someone because they murdered someone. Murder is wrong.

This is beside all the (valid) arguments that its a racist policy, an expensive policy, a poor deterent, and irreversible.

marooko
09-22-2011, 07:51 AM
Racist policy? Legal lynching? This is amazing.

canexplain
09-22-2011, 08:06 AM
I thought the younger generation was going to be a lot smarter and kinder than mine. There I go thinking again ...............cr****

marooko
09-22-2011, 08:12 AM
Your generation is still running the show in large part.

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 08:17 AM
Racist policy? Legal lynching? This is amazing.


Does race factor into how death sentences are handed out? According to David R. Dow, a professor at the University of Houston Law Center, there's no doubt. He makes several good points to back up his argument in a New York Times op-ed.

Dow cites a study that examined more than 2,000 Georgia murders beginning in 1972. Researchers found that black defendants were 1.7 times more likely to receive the death penalty than white defendants and that murderers of white victims were 4.3 times more likely to be sentenced to death than those who killed blacks, Dow stressed.

Evidently, Georgia's not unique. Across the U.S., blacks and whites are murdered at about the same rate, but 80 percent of those sentenced to death for committing murder killed white people, Dow pointed out. Texas, the state that leads the nation in executions, has put 470 convicts to death since 1976, more than a third of the U.S. total of 1,257. Despite this disproportionately high number of executions, only two white Texans have been put to death for killing blacks. One of those prisoners executed killed both a black person and a white person during the same incident. That makes it unclear if he would've been sentenced to death for killing an African American alone.



http://racerelations.about.com/b/2011/07/11/is-the-death-penalty-racist.htm

PlayaDelWes
09-22-2011, 08:23 AM
Someone doesn't understand what policy means.

canexplain
09-22-2011, 08:27 AM
Your generation is still running the show in large part.
I am getting so old according to the wonderful internet.

Average age CEO 57
over half of all Senators and congress people are younger than myself

Of course the average age of everyone to die is going up too so that screws the old way of thinking. Is the new 40 now 30, the new 50 40, etc.. So no, my generation is not "in large" in charge ..... cr****

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 08:30 AM
This is the one thing I stand on the right on, and I will stand firm.

I'm standing firm on my position of being a god damn idiot! I don't care about legal facts because death is random! Shoot me in my cunt!

marooko
09-22-2011, 08:31 AM
http://racerelations.about.com/b/2011/07/11/is-the-death-penalty-racist.htm

I'm gonna assume they took everything about each trial in to account. You're absolutely correct, a racist policy it is.

Guess you're older than I thought, Ron.

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 08:34 AM
Someone doesn't understand what policy means.

*sigh*

The implementation of this policy is racist. Whatever. Are you a fucking lawyer?

marooko
09-22-2011, 08:36 AM
hahahahahahaha!

I'm really enjoying this thread.

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 08:38 AM
I'm gonna assume they took everything about each trial in to account.

Its a statistical average of 2000 cases. You don't need to take each circumstance into account... the probability that the black guys just "all really deserved it" is negligible.

I'll go out on a limb though and assume statistics are beyond your, er... capacity.

canexplain
09-22-2011, 08:42 AM
I'm gonna assume they took everything about each trial in to account. You're absolutely correct, a racist policy it is.

Guess you're older than I thought, Ron.

Yea 5 months or so and I retire. That is going to be so weird not working. I have worked pretty much full time for over 50 years ... yikes that sort of sucks eh ............cr****

marooko
09-22-2011, 08:45 AM
47.3% of all statistics are made up on the spot

65% of statistics are made up on the spot

48.9% of all statistics are made up on the spot

90% of Statistics Made up on the Spot

87% of statistics are made up on the spot

85% of Statistics Are Made Up On The Spot

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 08:46 AM
Still the stupidest piece of shit on the planet.

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 08:47 AM
Have you ever been reprimanded for trying to insert a catheter into a house plant?

marooko
09-22-2011, 08:49 AM
Still the stupidest piece of shit on the planet.

And you can't get enough. :pulse

hangthedj112
09-22-2011, 08:51 AM
http://www.indecisionforever.com/files/2011/09/AnnCoulter400Tweet11.jpg

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 08:54 AM
So with no physical evidence the case relied almost entirely on the testimony of those witnesses yet the State courts didn't find the changed testimony to be enough to raise reasonable doubt...

Justice.

I haven't read much about the case but this part really upsets me. And on International Peace Day.

I oppose all death penalty even the white supremacist who was also put to death yesterday. I don't know the exact fact but aren't we the only Westernized nation with that form of punishment still intact?

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 09:00 AM
http://www.indecisionforever.com/files/2011/09/AnnCoulter400Tweet11.jpg

Going up and down her Twitter page made me disgusted. I totally forgot she existed until today.

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 09:02 AM
I don't know the exact fact but aren't we the only Westernized nation with that form of punishment still intact?

That depends. Would you consider Belarus westernized? Otherwise, yes.

More tellingly, the only countries to execute more people than the US in 2010 were China, North Korea, Iran and Yemen.

nathanfairchild
09-22-2011, 09:24 AM
I haven't read much about the case but this part really upsets me. And on International Peace Day.

I oppose all death penalty even the white supremacist who was also put to death yesterday. I don't know the exact fact but aren't we the only Westernized nation with that form of punishment still intact?

I feel generally the same way, although I was thrilled when they put down Timothy McVeigh. I know it should all be looked at the same, but when a monster can murder 168 innocent people because he's mad at the government, he really doesn't deserve to live. I might be biased on that case though since it happened in my city.

Yablonowitz
09-22-2011, 09:32 AM
I think the death penalty is useful in cases where there is absolutely no doubt as to the person's guilt and they've demonstrated that their continued existence would pose a threat to other people...

Huh? There are a lot of people in prison who pose threats to other people.

Yablonowitz
09-22-2011, 09:33 AM
I feel generally the same way, although I was thrilled when they put down Timothy McVeigh. I know it should all be looked at the same, but when a monster can murder 168 innocent people because he's mad at the government, he really doesn't deserve to live. I might be biased on that case though since it happened in my city.

Killing him made him a marytr to right wing freaks. Dying old in prison is the inglorious end he deserved.

guedita
09-22-2011, 09:36 AM
Killing him made him a marytr to right wing freaks. Dying old in prison is the inglorious end he deserved.

Well said.

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 09:41 AM
I feel generally the same way, although I was thrilled when they put down Timothy McVeigh. I know it should all be looked at the same, but when a monster can murder 168 innocent people because he's mad at the government, he really doesn't deserve to live. I might be biased on that case though since it happened in my city.

Just out of curiosity, did you feel a sense of peace when he was put to death? A relief? I'm not trying to come at you as I have never had no one close to me murdered and one person associated with murdered so I don't know how the pain felt. I just want to know what the grieving families feels once the person is murdered. Even if my mother was killed in front of me I don't see how seeing the person who did it get lethally injected can make me sleep better at night. But again I haven't gone through it so I just don't know.

nathanfairchild
09-22-2011, 09:51 AM
it didn't make the pain any less, but seeing interviews with him and seeing how unapologetic he was for what he did was infuriating. when he was put down it felt like in some way the score was even for what he did. i'm not saying that that is the right thing morally, but it did feel better. his accomplice Terry Nichols received the punishment that Yablonowitz mentioned (at the supermax in colorado i believe), and that felt like it was a just punishment, so i guess there is no right answer in this because both punishments felt like they were punishing enough.

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 09:53 AM
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_4irVuZamOhA/S-xOp62QNMI/AAAAAAAABdw/cSpLLt4qaWU/s1600/Superman+prison.jpg

nathanfairchild
09-22-2011, 09:54 AM
yeah yeah my damn phone autocorrected supermax

captncrzy
09-22-2011, 10:18 AM
The death penalty is very obviously unfairly applied and misused state-by-state. It's clearly a barbaric, religious right-wing "eye for an eye" philosophy. The deterrence levels of it are still being debated to this day. And at the same time, it's not unusual for murderers to be released after a portion of their sentence has been served to kill again. The entire fucking system is broken. Not just the death penalty piece of it.

marooko
09-22-2011, 10:20 AM
Now that we've pointed out all the flaws, anyone have any ideas to improve the "system"?

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 10:22 AM
Well one thought that has been echoed is to abolish the death penalty.

captncrzy
09-22-2011, 10:25 AM
Evacuate Manhattan and make it one big survival of the fittest-style prison.

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 10:28 AM
Legalize it.

marooko
09-22-2011, 10:28 AM
You r piss infested city is already working on that one.



Evacuate Manhattan and make it one big survival of the fittest-style prison.

I vote for SF.

Miroir Noir
09-22-2011, 10:33 AM
Now that we've pointed out all the flaws, anyone have any ideas to improve the "system"?

Here's an interesting story (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1749684) on that very line of thought.

marooko
09-22-2011, 10:52 AM
I enjoyed the listen. Though I feel it brings up more questions than it does answers.

TomAz
09-22-2011, 11:02 AM
It's clearly a barbaric, religious right-wing "eye for an eye" philosophy.

There are people like that, yes. But plenty of atheists also support the death penalty. Your explanation is overly simplistic in a poorly-conceived attempt at propaganda.

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 11:19 AM
Any individual who came of age in America is wrestling with traditional Christian values, whether they prescribe to a Christian god or any higher power at all.

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 11:24 AM
I think the discussion should not be over whether they "deserve it" as retribution, but rather over whether or not the death penalty benefits society as a whole. I can't see any valid arguments in that context. So the "eye for an eye" statement makes sense to me (though as Tom says, you don't necessarily need to thump bibles to believe in retribution).

nathanfairchild
09-22-2011, 11:27 AM
i don't think it benefits society at all, but for some segments of the population knowing that the punishment of the death penalty is out there brings a strange sort of comfort.

guedita
09-22-2011, 11:31 AM
How....Texan of you.

captncrzy
09-22-2011, 11:44 AM
There are people like that, yes. But plenty of atheists also support the death penalty. Your explanation is overly simplistic in a poorly-conceived attempt at propaganda.


Any individual who came of age in America is wrestling with traditional Christian values, whether they prescribe to a Christian god or any higher power at all.

No need. Pot explained it for me...and better than I could.


Reasonably interesting website with stats, etc.: http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/home

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 11:53 AM
i don't think it benefits society at all, but for some segments of the population knowing that the punishment of the death penalty is out there brings a strange sort of comfort.

Really?

You think there's a person out there who is gonna murder someone and says "Wait a minute, not trying to get the death penalty let me put the gun down"

and that same person would go

"Pshhh life in prison isn't so bad...BOOM!""

edit: Just re-read your post. Nevermind. So you're saying regular non crime committing citizens feel comfortable knowing there's harsh penalties out there for criminals? That's kinda self explanatory. I'd feel safer leaving an iPhone and wallet on my desk in my class while I went to the bathroom if I knew stealing would lead to a death penalty.

marooko
09-22-2011, 11:56 AM
Considering murderers usually reason, absolutely.

I think he meant a portion not committing the crimes. Knowing that if someone does, they may get put to death brings them a sense of comfort.

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 12:00 PM
Considering murderers usually reason, absolutely.


Then why is our murder rate so high?

Mugwog
09-22-2011, 12:01 PM
Dont forget to like this on facebook, it shows you care

TomAz
09-22-2011, 12:12 PM
Any individual who came of age in America is wrestling with traditional Christian values, whether they prescribe to a Christian god or any higher power at all.

Which means, then, that the anti-death penalty activists are also reflecting traditional Christian values?

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 12:13 PM
Which means, then, that the anti-death penalty activists are also reflecting traditional Christian values?

Thou Shall Not Kill.

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 12:14 PM
The Bible is a funny book. I got to read it one of these days. My neighbor before she passed away read it 4 times. Little old Puerto Rican lady could quote it at the drop of a dime. I never told her I wasn't a believer cause it would have broke her heart

guedita
09-22-2011, 12:15 PM
Are those Kanye West lyrics or something.

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 12:15 PM
i don't think it benefits society at all, but for some segments of the population knowing that the punishment of the death penalty is out there brings a strange sort of comfort.

Is "it makes some people feel better" a sufficient argument for state-sanctioned murder?

TomAz
09-22-2011, 12:19 PM
No need. Pot explained it for me...and better than I could.


I agree with his premise, but I don't see how it justifies your position.

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 12:24 PM
Are those Kanye West lyrics or something.

Don't say you will........unless you will.......HEY HEY HEY HEEEEEY

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 12:25 PM
Which means, then, that the anti-death penalty activists are also reflecting traditional Christian values?

They're reflecting their own warped internalization of the diaphanous diaphragm flexing down on us all.

nathanfairchild
09-22-2011, 12:26 PM
Is "it makes some people feel better" a sufficient argument for state-sanctioned murder?

i don't think it it is. i'm just saying, especially in my part of the country, a lot of people feel better knowing that the "ultimate" punishment is available to criminals.

captncrzy
09-22-2011, 12:29 PM
I agree with his premise, but I don't see how it justifies your position.

% of Catholics and Protestants that support the death penalty are in the 70's and 80's. % of Athiests are in the 50's.
It's not the sole driving factor, but the "eye for an eye" biblical references are deeply embedded in our history. European puritans brought over capital punishment practices on the Mayflower.

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 12:33 PM
i don't think it it is. i'm just saying, especially in my part of the country, a lot of people feel better knowing that the "ultimate" punishment is available to criminals.

This is why I don't trust a place that pronounces "Whataburger" "Waterburger" :nono

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 12:42 PM
Whataburger is a Texas institution. We get to pronounce it however we damn well please.

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 12:43 PM
They make good burgers

marooko
09-22-2011, 12:45 PM
Then why is our murder rate so high?

I was suggesting people who murder aren't thinking about the consequences. Think of all the things you've done that were wrong (based on your own morals), or against the law; did you think about the consequences every time, most of the time, some of time? When you committed the act, you probably didn't think about it at all.

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 12:48 PM
% of Catholics and Protestants that support the death penalty are in the 70's and 80's. % of Athiests are in the 50's.
It's not the sole driving factor, but the "eye for an eye" biblical references are deeply embedded in our history. European puritans brought over capital punishment practices on the Mayflower.

To paraphrase Stephen Colbert, Catholics have a vested interest in defending the death penalty. Without it, their religion wouldn't even exist!

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 12:49 PM
I was suggesting people who murder aren't thinking about the consequences. Think of all the things you've done that were wrong (based on your own morals), or against the law; did you think about the consequences every time, most of the time, some of time? When you committed the act, you probably didn't think about it at all.

So wait were you being sarcastic?

Cause you said "Considering murderers usually reason, absolutely."
Now you're saying "When you committed the act, you probably didn't think about it at all."

That's the point I was getting at when I interpreted his post wrong. My theory was the guy who puts his gun down because he's afraid of the death penalty isn't going to pick it up when the worst he can get is life. They are not thinking about the consequences when doing it.

JebusLives
09-22-2011, 12:56 PM
Marooko posts are extremely difficult to interpret because sarcasm can easily come across as moronicism, and vice versa.

guedita
09-22-2011, 12:56 PM
Dont forget to like this on facebook, it shows you care

You're kind of being a dipshit here, and with what you posted about this in the FB thread. Many people talking about it on facebook maybe haven't devoted a lot of their time in the last ten years actively working to stop Troy Davis's execution, sure. Maybe many of the people twittering and facebooking about it haven't ever even given pause to think about the death penalty until now. People have to start somewhere when it comes to establishing opinions about the society that they live in. In this very thread you see people working through their own positions on the issue through discussion and debate. It's nothing but a good thing if people are buzzing about it on social media, because hopefully it is igniting discussion amongst a generation that ultimately could change the judicial system as it is.

marooko
09-22-2011, 12:57 PM
I agree, they're not thinking about it. I was being sarcastic. But I think he was suggesting a portion of law abiding citizens get comfort knowing a murderer can be put to death, not that a murderer will reconsider knowing the consequences.

Just assume mormonism, Jebus.

WhyTheLongFace
09-22-2011, 01:09 PM
Yeah I hate that snark side comments about Facebook and Twitter.

Impulse activism > Apathy

faxman75
09-22-2011, 01:15 PM
A quick related plug. I just got this email at work and i'm giving them a few bucks for the cause.


For the first time ever, the Arizona Justice Project is among the agencies to which you can contribute as part of the County’s Combined Charitable Campaign. Since 1998, The Justice Project has been helping to overturn -- and prevent -- wrongful convictions in the State of Arizona. The Justice Project examines claims of innocence and manifest injustice, and provides legal representation for inmates believed to have been failed by the criminal justice system. The Justice Project also works for policy reform, to strengthen the criminal justice system and minimize the likelihood that wrongful convictions will occur in the first place.

http://www.azjusticeproject.org/

The reason the justice project and similar projects like this are necessary is because the system is broken and clients aren't always recieving the best representation. A good movie about this system is called "Conviction". She now works for a similar organization on the east coast and speaks around the country. When I say she, I mean Betty Waters. I saw her at the APDA conference this year. Inspiring story with a sad ending that wasn't included in the movie.

ByTheWay,
09-22-2011, 01:49 PM
The DEATH PENALTY IS A BROKEN SYSTEM BECAUSE THE GOVERNMENT IS A BROKEN SYSTEM!!!!!!

Im all for the death penalty but only if its 100% sure that a person is guilty of a crime which in my eyes should be MURDER,CHILD MOLESTATION, and throw in RAPE too. None of this 20 yrs waitng on death row. Do it sooner, give every prisoner one appeal and if they are found guilty again off to the death bed. If there is any chance a jury is not 100% sure and only has circumstantial evidence then NO DEATH PENALTY should be handed down on a defendant.

BTW, they should bring back hanging for the truly sick people in this world that rape,molest, or murder someone in a brutal way

Miroir Noir
09-22-2011, 01:53 PM
Even if we were to accept the points made in your first two (admittedly deeply stupid) paragraphs, what possible reason would there be to re-institute hangings?

marooko
09-22-2011, 01:56 PM
BTW, they should bring back hanging for the truly sick people in this world that rape,molest, or murder someone in a brutal way

There are about 2-3 states that still hang. New York hung someone in the mid-late 90's. They build brand new gallows just for him. :). You essentially get to choose if a state has more than one method available.

Yablonowitz
09-22-2011, 02:03 PM
The DEATH PENALTY IS A BROKEN SYSTEM BECAUSE THE GOVERNMENT IS A BROKEN SYSTEM!!!!!!

Im all for the death penalty but only if its 100% sure that a person is guilty of a crime which in my eyes should be MURDER,CHILD MOLESTATION, and throw in RAPE too. None of this 20 yrs waitng on death row. Do it sooner, give every prisoner one appeal and if they are found guilty again off to the death bed. If there is any chance a jury is not 100% sure and only has circumstantial evidence then NO DEATH PENALTY should be handed down on a defendant.

BTW, they should bring back hanging for the truly sick people in this world that rape,molest, or murder someone in a brutal way

Please don't offer opinions on how the criminal justice system should work if you don't understand how it currently works.

ByTheWay,
09-22-2011, 02:07 PM
Even if we were to accept the points made in your first two (admittedly deeply stupid) paragraphs, what possible reason would there be to re-institute hangings?

If anyone raped or molested my wife or child i'd off them myself so I guess it doesn't matter. If you don't feel those type of emotions in that situation then that is you and in my opinion makes you a twisted person from a twisted state (UTAH) if that is where your from!




There are about 2-3 states that still hang. New York hung someone in the mid-late 90's. They build brand new gallows just for him. :). You essentially get to choose if a state has more than one method available.


Yes it should be up to the states I agree.

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 02:08 PM
If anyone raped or molested my wife or child i'd off them myself so I guess it doesn't matter. If you don't feel those type of emotions in that situation then that is you and in my opinion makes you a twisted person from a twisted state (UTAH) if that is where your from!.

Poetry.

guedita
09-22-2011, 02:08 PM
Ugh.

marooko
09-22-2011, 02:12 PM
Yes it should be up to the states I agree.

You're reading it wrong.

Miroir Noir
09-22-2011, 02:13 PM
If someone raped or molested my girlfriend or son, I would be far more focused on helping them put the pieces of their life back together than I would on murdering the assailants.

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 02:14 PM
Shut your god damn mouth you Mormon scumfuck. You're state is twizted!

ByTheWay,
09-22-2011, 02:15 PM
Please don't offer opinions on how the criminal justice system should work if you don't understand how it currently works.

Huh im not saying I understand it with a degree in law or anything just giving my humble opinion stupid or not I dont care. Why would I want to understand it anyways the criminal system has shown itself it doesnt work throughout history I did say I don't think anyone should be killed unless a jury knows 100% that a person is guilty I feel that has happened many times in the past is all.

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 02:15 PM
If anyone rapes my wife and child it's going to be me and no bones about it.

PotVsKtl
09-22-2011, 02:15 PM
Huh im not saying I understand it with a degree in law or anything just giving my humble opinion stupid or not I dont care. Why would I want to understand it anyways the criminal system has shown itself it doesnt work throughout history I did say I don't think anyone should be killed unless a jury knows 100% that a person is guilty I feel that has happened many times in the past is all.

Can you restate this in the form of a haiku?

J~$$$$
09-22-2011, 02:18 PM
If anyone rapes my wife and child it's going to be me and no bones about it.

he said bone.

TomAz
09-22-2011, 02:21 PM
that guy has gotta be a parody alias. 7 posts?

Miroir Noir
09-22-2011, 02:22 PM
Shut your god damn mouth you Mormon scumfuck. You're state is twizted!

The irony is that he would actually love Utah, where we still make the firing squad available to pre-2003 death row inmates who elect to use it, and where the firing squad itself was originally justified as a secular version of a half-baked, quasi-official Mormon theory of "blood atonement."

Yablonowitz
09-22-2011, 02:22 PM
Huh im not saying I understand it with a degree in law or anything just giving my humble opinion stupid or not I dont care. Why would I want to understand it anyways the criminal system has shown itself it doesnt work throughout history I did say I don't think anyone should be killed unless a jury knows 100% that a person is guilty I feel that has happened many times in the past is all.

I like that you said you don't think anyone should be killed unless a jury knows 100% that a person is guilty I feel that has happened many times in the past is all.

Yablonowitz
09-22-2011, 02:23 PM
that guy has gotta be a parody alias. 7 posts?

I don't want that to be true. This kind of gold is rare.

TomAz
09-22-2011, 02:37 PM
The following story is 100% true. It's really neither here nor there other than, to me, it puts a real face on hypotheticals.

In college I was friends with a girl named Cindy. Not close friends, but the kind where we'd give each other a hug when we saw each other. I knew her boyfriend John (they later got engaged) and was especially good friends with John's sister Gretchen. As these things go, after college I sort of drifted away from these folks. But I knew them, they were friends of a sort.

A few years after I graduated, Cindy was kidnapped at gunpoint in her apartment complex by a group of three young men. She was driven out of the city (in her car) out to a field in the country, where the three men raped her. At one point she apparently tried to escape by running through the field, but fell. One of the men caught her and, while she was there on her hands and knees, exhausted, he shot her in the head, execution-style.

The men were arrested a while later. The shooter was convicted of capital punishment, the other two pled down to lesser charges but still got long sentences. There was virtually no doubt that the shooter did it: he confessed to the police after they found Cindy's personal belongings, including a class ring, in his car. The other young men, one of whom was the shooter's brother, told consistent stories of what happened.

11 years later, the killer was executed in Hunstville.

I do not see how executing the killer solved anything. Cindy is still dead and there are still rapists and murderers running around. All it did, really, is make the State of Texas a killer, just like John Kennedy Barefield.

Miroir Noir
09-22-2011, 02:41 PM
A point made all the more clear by this postscript (http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/Arrest-in-fatal-shooting-of-man-tied-to-student-s-1749739.php).

MissingPerson
09-22-2011, 02:43 PM
I don't know the exact fact but aren't we the only Westernized nation with that form of punishment still intact?

Pretty much, although it's worth noting that abolishing the death penalty is considered a "core value" of the EU, so a state that hopes to join the Union must ditch it first.

captncrzy
09-22-2011, 02:52 PM
Houston police on Monday arrested a woman in the Sept. 13 shooting death of a man who had been linked to the brutal slaying of a Rice University student more than 20 years ago.

Brenda Fay Nelson, 50, is charged with murder in the fatal shooting of Perry Joshua Barefield, 52, as he sat in a car parked along the 14000 block of Mary Kay Lane in south Houston, authorities said. How Nelson knew Barefield could not be determined.

In April 1986, Perry Barefield, his brother John Kennedy Barefield and another man grabbed architecture student Cindy Renee Rounsaville, 25, at gunpoint as she walked to her car in an apartment parking lot.

They forced Rounsaville, the daughter of a Tulsa, Okla., orthopedic surgeon, to withdraw all the money she could from an automatic teller machine then drove to a remote area near the Fort Bend County line where she was sexually assaulted, police said.

“Then they took her out and executed her. They shot her in the back of the head,“ said Jim Peacock, who prosecuted the case in 1986.

The woman's partially clothed body was found in a field the next day. Police said her attackers burned her car, which was found nearby.

“It was just a real tragic thing,” said Peacock, now in private practice. “They (her parents) were destroyed by what happened to her.”

John Kennedy Barefield, 22 at the time, was arrested the next month on an unrelated case. He confessed after police found Rounsaville's Rice University class ring and the murder weapon, a .22-caliber pistol, in his possession.

Perry Barefield later surrendered after he learned that police were searching for him.

Brother executed

John Kennedy Barefield was convicted of capital murder and sentenced to death. He was executed by lethal injection 1997.

Perry Barefield did not share his brother's fate. In a 1987 plea bargain, he was sentenced to 45 years in prison for aggravated robbery.

“He was not the shooter,” said Houston attorney Will Outlaw, who defended Perry Barefield during the trial.

Outlaw last saw his former client two or three years ago when he was released from prison.

“He came by to thank me for ‘saving his life' as he put it,” Outlaw said Monday.

In their short visit, Barefield appeared to have begun to put his life back on track, Outlaw said.

“He seemed to be doing well. He had a full-time job,” Outlaw said. “It didn't appear to me that he was on drugs.”

Outlaw said he heard from Barefield only once or twice since the post-prison visit.

The motive for Perry Barefield's slaying wasn't known Monday. The Houston police detectives assigned to the case couldn't be reached for comment.

When he first learned that Barefield had been shot to death, Outlaw said he imagined it might have been the result of something like a drug deal gone bad.

“I was wondering if he was hanging around with the wrong crowd again,” he said.

What I find most disgusting about this is that he was given a 45 year sentence in 1987 (on a plea for aggravated robbery, no less) and served less than 20 for it.

ByTheWay,
09-22-2011, 04:02 PM
Im gonna go all Sam Kinison on your ass bitches.




that guy has gotta be a parody alias. 7 posts?

AhhhhhAHHHHHHHHH ....Well (crazy giggle) wellll... I didn't know you wanted to get involved in the discussion Mr. Helper!








If anyone rapes my wife and child it's going to be me and no bones about it.

"Good answer...Good answer...I like the way you think...Im gonna be watching ya"


Fj5k6toS7i8&feature=related

J~$$$$
09-22-2011, 04:45 PM
Brokendoll.

MissingPerson
09-22-2011, 04:46 PM
Second.

guedita
09-22-2011, 06:15 PM
Yup.

wmgaretjax
09-23-2011, 03:06 PM
hahahahaha. Wow.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/05/22/us-usa-execution-idUSN2250765020080522

JebusLives
09-23-2011, 03:10 PM
Just to play devil's advocate, the parole board cited "profound remorse" as a reason, and Troy Davis never tried that route.

guedita
09-23-2011, 03:17 PM
Well let's all think about the amusing hypothetical situation in which the Georgia Board of Paroles and Pardons spares a black man who pleads sincere remorse for killing a police officer the death sentence.

marooko
09-23-2011, 03:58 PM
http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/05/22/us-usa-execution-idUSN2250765020080522


Just to play devil's advocate, the parole board cited "profound remorse" as a reason, and Troy Davis never tried that route.


"David (Crowe) takes full responsibility for his crime and experiences profound remorse,"

Apparently he knew what to do.

Also, every definition I can find, including the one in my dictionary here at home contains in some form:
without legal sanction

faxman75
10-05-2011, 12:19 PM
Just sad...

http://news.yahoo.com/ga-records-show-troy-davis-final-death-row-145718585.html

ATLANTA (AP) — After a long day of emotional goodbyes, Troy Davis knelt in his prison cell and began to pray 15 minutes before he was scheduled to die. Then, a guard spotted him doing something a bit more unexpected: He was sleeping.

Documents obtained by The Associated Press provide a glimpse into the last moments of Davis' life before he was executed Sept. 21 for the murder of an off-duty Savannah officer in 1989. At one point, Davis vowed to fast and refused several prison meals, but as the night dragged on he asked for food. And as his 7 p.m. scheduled execution came and went, guards caught Davis taking an hour-long nap.

Davis' execution for the murder of Mark MacPhail was the center of an international outcry from supporters who said he was the victim of mistaken identity. Prosecutors and MacPhail's family said they were certain Davis was guilty and that justice was served.

The documents were obtained through an Open Records request. Prison officials also provided an audio recording and transcript of his last words, which he used to again proclaim his innocence and urge his supporters to "continue to fight this fight."

Davis was notified of the execution date on Sept. 7, and a day later he was asked to make a last meal request. He scrawled a response in big letters: "None. Will Be Fasting!"

Prison logs show Davis awoke the day of his execution and refused his breakfast tray. He stayed in bed until about 7:50 a.m. when he was strip-searched and escorted to the shower. The first of his 28 visitors soon began to file in.

Davis turned down his lunch at noon and, after the last visitor left about six hours later, refused to eat an early dinner, requesting only the grape drink on the tray. Guards spotted him praying around 6:45 p.m., and by 7 p.m., when his execution was scheduled to begin, he was napping.

He awoke an hour later, called his attorney for an update on the status of his last-minute court appeals and asked the guards to bring in some food. He spent the next few hours on and off the phone with his lawyer awaiting news on his fate.

He likely heard that the Supreme Court denied his request for a last-minute stay shortly before guards came into the room at 10:28. A few minutes later, he was strapped to the gurney and execution witnesses started filing in. It was over at 11:08, when authorities pronounced him dead and cleared the death chamber.

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fatbastard
10-05-2011, 03:39 PM
I won't even say it, but you know what I want to do.

marooko
10-05-2011, 03:56 PM
Why don't we have a thread like this for everyone on death row....wait, I mean every black guy on death row...oh wait.....everyone on death row?