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View Full Version : Happy DADT Repeal Day!



HandBanana
09-19-2011, 10:50 PM
Days like today give me a little bit of hope that maybe not everything is going to complete shit and that progress is still possible.


Immediately following the repeat of Don't Ask Don't Tell, a previously-closeted gay soldier stationed in Germany calls his father to come out of the closet.

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marooko
09-19-2011, 10:56 PM
You're gay. So what?

Alchemy
09-19-2011, 10:59 PM
I thought this had already happened months ago?

nathanfairchild
09-19-2011, 11:04 PM
it's official from the military at 12:01

Miroir Noir
09-19-2011, 11:06 PM
Long story short: Congress passed the law to repeal it months ago, but left the military to write the regulations to do it. There was a lengthy review process, etc. etc.

Alchemy
09-19-2011, 11:09 PM
I see. What a silly world.

sbessiso
09-19-2011, 11:13 PM
Oh he's hot

stinkbutt
09-19-2011, 11:14 PM
Stupid

HandBanana
09-19-2011, 11:14 PM
jcSkz_PO-os

HandBanana
09-19-2011, 11:15 PM
Furthermore....

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Miroir Noir
09-19-2011, 11:17 PM
Congress often punts on regulatory authority to the executive branch, but in this case it was incredibly silly. It was done to inoculate repeal against cheap political attacks that it would imperil the military's mission during war time, that it was being crammed down the military's throat (no pun intended), and that it would harm esprit de corps. The proponents of repeal essentially said "instead of just writing the law to end this silly policy, we'll require the Department of Defense to end this silly policy, but only after they go through a silly process in order to examine a bunch of imaginary problems."

RageAgainstTheAoki
09-19-2011, 11:28 PM
Good day to be an American. :)

The view count on that video must be off because my facebook feed just lit up with at least a dozen people posting it. His dad sounds like a sweetheart.

Grandma
09-20-2011, 12:12 AM
Good!

mountmccabe
09-21-2011, 10:00 AM
Congress often punts on regulatory authority to the executive branch, but in this case it was incredibly silly. It was done to inoculate repeal against cheap political attacks that it would imperil the military's mission during war time, that it was being crammed down the military's throat (no pun intended), and that it would harm esprit de corps. The proponents of repeal essentially said "instead of just writing the law to end this silly policy, we'll require the Department of Defense to end this silly policy, but only after they go through a silly process in order to examine a bunch of imaginary problems."

No, it was done so that the military could have time to decide how they were going to accomplish this. The military is a gigantic bureaucracy that is very serious about discipline and regulations; it isn't just "stop discharging people that are out/were outed/etc."

There's nothing silly about it; if there is going to be a millitary with the size and capabilities that we have it is going to take time for such changes to be accomplished.

mountmccabe
09-21-2011, 10:00 AM
But, yes, YAY!

Miroir Noir
09-21-2011, 10:18 AM
No, it was done so that the military could have time to decide how they were going to accomplish this. The military is a gigantic bureaucracy that is very serious about discipline and regulations; it isn't just "stop discharging people that are out/were outed/etc."

There's nothing silly about it; if there is going to be a millitary with the size and capabilities that we have it is going to take time for such changes to be accomplished.

No, sorry, it was political, not administrative. "Stop kicking out openly gay people" isn't a tough policy to implement.

MissingPerson
09-21-2011, 10:28 AM
No, sorry, it was political, not administrative. "Stop kicking out openly gay people" isn't a tough policy to implement.

With respect to my beloved American chums, yours is a notoriously litigious country and personnel spaces in military facilities are generally divided along the lines of presumed sexual orientation. So while I'm absolutely delighted to see the end of DADT, I can understand why the prospect of repealing it might have looked a bit daunting for reasons other than homophobia.

Courtney
09-21-2011, 10:29 AM
Oh he's hot

All the cutest ones. I tell you.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2011, 10:42 AM
No, sorry, it was political, not administrative. "Stop kicking out openly gay people" isn't a tough policy to implement.

You're being an idiot. You don't just wave a big gay wand and end DADT. Policies take time to work out in the real world, and the military was given time to work it out. They had to train hundreds of thousands of troops. They had to train recruiters. They had to alter documentation. Etc. Etc.

Miroir Noir
09-21-2011, 10:48 AM
Even then, they had a three month implementation lag time after the DOD certified that all of the training was done . . . and of course, repeal came after 1) a federal court had already overturned the policy (and the military had already stopped enforcing it for a time earlier), and 2) the DOD had already done an exhaustive administrative review during the first two years of the Obama Administration.

The delay was political cover.

RageAgainstTheAoki
09-21-2011, 10:49 AM
No, it was done so that the military could have time to decide how they were going to accomplish this. The military is a gigantic bureaucracy that is very serious about discipline and regulations; it isn't just "stop discharging people that are out/were outed/etc."

There's nothing silly about it; if there is going to be a millitary with the size and capabilities that we have it is going to take time for such changes to be accomplished.


^ THIS. I have a lot of social activist-y friends who were outraged that it took several months for the repeal to go into effect. No doubt it was overdue, but I actually thought this was a pretty sensible approach for such a massive bureaucracy. It was also politically smart, as building these requirements into the repeal law probably helped gain the votes of the few Republicans and Blue Dog Dems.