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algunz
10-09-2010, 05:52 PM
I am scared of the dark.

Sleepingrock
10-09-2010, 06:55 PM
temporarily fatal head injury..

How can something be temporarily fatal??

Or did he die for a few seconds?

BROKENDOLL
10-09-2010, 07:04 PM
How can something be temporarily fatal??

Or did he die for a few seconds?
Checkout the board "kidlet" calling out Missing Person! LOL Of course, you can probably ask any drama queen and they'll have explanations. Any that I've ever known have survived several major life threatening events and managed to survive...

MissingPerson
10-10-2010, 08:38 AM
The latter answer, btw - he died and was revived a number of times on the way to the hospital.

PlayaDelWes
10-10-2010, 08:42 AM
near fatal vs. temporarily fatal peoples

TomAz
10-10-2010, 08:51 AM
I agree except with the French, even the ones in Montreal C. Geez even come close to saying the word wrong and they ignore you. I think everywhere else I have been, it's like you say.

This is not my experience with the French at all. Even in Paris, I have found them to be almost uniformly friendly and helpful when I can't get a word out right.

obzen
10-10-2010, 09:32 AM
Today is 10/10/10.

Sleepingrock
10-10-2010, 03:18 PM
When is the secret santa thread started??

meowlouder
10-10-2010, 04:14 PM
When is the secret santa thread started??

Santa doesn't exist

Gribbz
10-10-2010, 04:16 PM
Santa doesn't exist

Gasp.

marooko
10-10-2010, 04:17 PM
http://i896.photobucket.com/albums/ac163/samburgler/tv/SNICKERS.gif

This commercial makes me completely uncomfortable. Especially when it caresses the ladies face. Way fucking weird.


When is the secret santa thread started??

When it gets started.

weeklymix
10-10-2010, 04:21 PM
Santa doesn't exist

He exists in the hearts of those willing to participate in the Secret Santa exchange, Scroogelouder.

MissingPerson
10-10-2010, 04:32 PM
http://i896.photobucket.com/albums/ac163/samburgler/tv/SNICKERS.gif

This has been weirding me out for a bit now, so I had to go look it up because they don't show that ad here.

I'm sorry I did now, the ending makes it lame.

marooko
10-10-2010, 05:07 PM
This has been weirding me out for a bit now, so I had to go look it up because they don't show that ad here.

I'm sorry I did now, the ending makes it lame.

If the kids didn't show themselves, it would have been completely horrific from start to finish. I can just see them touching her face and it's freaking me out right now.

They didn't even need to use kids and a mask.
http://filmgordon.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/jocelyn-4.jpg

HunterGather
10-11-2010, 02:09 PM
So i just got home with my McDonalds and I had ordered a crispy ranch BLT.
I did NOT order PLAIN, yet it says so on my receipt.

Do I let it slide, or should I call/go back and have this be an episode of When Keeping It Real Goes Wrong? :D

...

:mad:

marooko
10-11-2010, 02:43 PM
:puke

Call them, your next meal may be free.

amyzzz
10-11-2010, 02:44 PM
I'm not doing Secret Santa this year, so anyone who wants to do it, have at it.

meowlouder
10-11-2010, 02:50 PM
He exists in the hearts of those willing to participate in the Secret Santa exchange, Scroogelouder.

If for some reason one of my teeth were to fall out, will one of the boardies plant money under my pillow?

Gribbz
10-11-2010, 02:55 PM
If for some reason one of my teeth were to fall out, will one of the boardies plant money under my pillow?

Now you're just being ridiculous.

BROKENDOLL
10-11-2010, 03:08 PM
If for some reason one of my teeth were to fall out, will one of the boardies plant money under my pillow?
If it were to fall out without damaging the root, or having any faults, cracks or cavities, I'm sure someone would do that as long as they got to keep the tooth as their own. Then you have to watch for the scalpers...Slimy bastards will try reselling them to some poor unsuspecting old person who doesn't have dental insurance or some shit.

Courtney
10-11-2010, 03:17 PM
I'm at the local hare krishna restaurant for lunch, and the table behind me is talking loudly of juicer brands, yoga poses that are good for auto fellatio, the ethics of goat cheese, and recipes for raw breads. Please remind me to never, ever eat in at this restaurant again.

HunterGather
10-11-2010, 03:29 PM
So David Arquette and Courntey Cox are seperated.
I don't like it. If they can't make it, who can?

And with Scream 4 coming soon...

http://backseatcuddler.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/david-arquette-courteney-cox-split-3-7-07.jpg

miscorrections
10-11-2010, 03:31 PM
There are only two fingers on my left hand that are free from injury. I'm trying to figure out what the odds are of those being hurt within the next day or so.

marooko
10-11-2010, 03:36 PM
I'm glad we're on to a new page so I don't have to look at that thing anymore.

MissingPerson
10-11-2010, 03:37 PM
I was just showing that thing to somebody else.

HunterGather
10-11-2010, 04:08 PM
http://i896.photobucket.com/albums/ac163/samburgler/tv/SNICKERS.gif

this thing?

I.F.A.
10-11-2010, 04:14 PM
So David Arquette and Courntey Cox are seperated.
I don't like it. If they can't make it, who can?

And with Scream 4 coming soon...


Say it ain't so?

Oh, lord... it's true. I suggest that it be named "Suckfest 2011". Leave the trilogies alone!


Scream 4 is an upcoming slasher film and fourth installment in the Scream series. It was directed by Wes Craven and written by Kevin Williamson, writer of Scream and Scream 2, and co-writer of Scream 3. It stars an ensemble cast of David Arquette, Neve Campbell, Courteney Cox, Emma Roberts, Hayden Panettiere, Rory Culkin, Nico Tortorella and Erik Knudsen. Campbell, Arquette and Cox are the only returning main cast members from the previous films.

amyzzz
10-11-2010, 04:15 PM
That lady's face reminds me of Hannah's clown face cup (that was part of her contest).

marooko
10-11-2010, 06:03 PM
Why did you do that?

HunterGather
10-11-2010, 06:12 PM
the commercial is so creepy. Its like she's in some abandoned grocery store. I'd freak right the fuck out if I saw that thing in real life.

http://i52.tinypic.com/33wpems.png

marooko
10-12-2010, 08:11 AM
So my dog goes on a vomiting spree yesterday. 3 times on the carpet, none on the tile and about 3-4 times outside. The last time was outside, there was a pair of socks involved.

HunterGather
10-12-2010, 01:36 PM
e-i7rz9CsIM

TomAz
10-12-2010, 02:43 PM
this had better not be a hoax. it seems pretty fucking cool.

y6ZMscMp8UM

yes 7 minutes long, worth it.

amyzzz
10-12-2010, 02:54 PM
Coolest dad ever.

Alchemy
10-12-2010, 03:05 PM
I hope he sends his son into space next. But really, I don't mean that he should send his son into the attic and then let a balloon loose. I mean, send that boy into space, wrapped in insulin, carrying an iPhone and an HD camera, and put a parachute on him.

sbconnection
10-12-2010, 03:09 PM
http://www.youtube.com/user/VeniaminShowsInc?feature=pyv&ad=4227749074&kw=crazy&gclid=CN2esa-rzqQCFQUmbAodJmHxYA#p/u/0/Yh-ChvdoyKQ

What the F is this?!?!?

weeklymix
10-12-2010, 03:11 PM
I'll bet it's real.

Edit: The space balloon.

TomAz
10-12-2010, 03:19 PM
In a Takeout Container, a Trek to the Stratosphere
By SAM GROBART
Luke Geissbühler has raised the bar in the cool-dad competition.

In August, Mr. Geissbühler, a 40-year-old director and cinematographer, tethered a video camera to a weather balloon and sent both more than 100,000 feet into the stratosphere. The camera safely returned to the ground with the help of a small parachute.

The entire trip took about 90 minutes, but a seven-minute account of the voyage, posted on the video-sharing site Vimeo, has become a viral success, garnering more than one million views since it was first uploaded on Sept. 19. The breathtaking video, with its NASA-like views of the Earth’s curves, has made Mr. Geissbühler the latest in a long line of scrappy, do-it-yourself geek heroes. (It can be seen at www.brooklynspaceprogram.org/BSP/Space_Balloon.html.)

The instigator for this particular space program was Mr. Geissbühler’s 7-year-old son, Max, who had made more than a few requests for a handmade spacecraft.

“Our creative process works this way: he asks for the impossible,” Mr. Geissbühler said, “and then I have to tell him why it’s impossible. And then I start to question that. And then I start to investigate that.”

Mr. Geissbühler had already been exposed to the world of weather-balloon enthusiasts who record their flights, thanks to research he had done for a feature film. Intrigued by the possibilities afforded by a growing array of inexpensive personal technology devices, he set out to make his own aircraft, the beginning of an eight-month research and development program in the Geissbühlers’ apartment in Park Slope, Brooklyn.

While being a cinematographer does bring with it a degree of technical skill, Mr. Geissbühler also had help from his brother, Phillip, who is a physicist in Boston.

“I’d ask him questions,” Mr. Geissbühler said, “and he’d come back with more complicated answers to my questions.”

The two worked out issues regarding wind, temperature and the predicted behavior of their aircraft.

The materials used to make the capsule were decidedly off-the-shelf. A Thai-food takeout container served as the fuselage. Spray-on insulation was applied inside the container, and chemical hand-warming packets were inserted to protect the camera and tracking device from sub-zero temperatures.

The recording device used was a GoPro Hero, a small digital video camera that costs less than $300 and is often used in sporting and outdoor pursuits. Also included was a friend’s iPhone, loaded with the free GPS-tracking app InstaMapper, which served as a homing beacon so the capsule could be retrieved after landing.

Building something designed to climb above the cruising altitudes of commercial aircraft, which generally fly between 30,000 and 40,000 feet, also meant that the Geissbühlers’ craft had to adhere to Federal Aviation Administration standards for weather balloons. That meant a payload of less than 4 pounds (in this case, it was a pound and a half), specific density restrictions and an extremely high degree of breakability in case the balloon or capsule came into contact with an aircraft.

Mr. Geissbühler also wanted to launch the balloon far from densely populated areas and heavy air traffic. The town of Newburgh, N.Y., seemed to fit the bill. (Mr. Geissbühler realized only after the fact that Newburgh is home to Stewart International Airport and an Air National Guard base.) Newburgh also had an added benefit.

“There was a party store in town that had a lot of helium,” Mr. Geissbühler said.

With the help of some friends, the Geissbühlers released the balloon in a park in Newburgh at 3 p.m. on a cloudy August day. It climbed at a rate of 25 feet per second, or 17 miles per hour. After 70 minutes, the balloon reached an altitude of around 100,000 feet, at which height the camera was capturing the curvature of the earth and the darkness of the upper atmosphere. Because of the reduced air pressure, the balloon expanded to its maximum diameter of 19 feet and then burst. The camera fell back to Earth at speeds that at times exceeded 150 miles per hour, even with the parachute extended.

The capsule landed in a tree 30 miles north of where it started. It was recovered by the Geissbühlers, who found everything intact.

Mr. Geissbühler said he was surprised by the tremendous response his video has generated.

“I guess people feel really empowered if they can send a takeout container to space,” he said.

Not only has he been praised for his ingenuity, but several commenters on the video site have commended him as a model parent.

“My son and I have always been tinkering, building things,” Mr. Geissbühler said. “He doesn’t know that’s not normal.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/12/science/space/12weather.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=balloon&st=cse

GeezrRckr
10-12-2010, 03:37 PM
awesome...thanks!

HunterGather
10-12-2010, 04:08 PM
http://www.youtube.com/user/VeniaminShowsInc?feature=pyv&ad=4227749074&kw=crazy&gclid=CN2esa-rzqQCFQUmbAodJmHxYA#p/u/0/Yh-ChvdoyKQ

What the F is this?!?!?

Yh-ChvdoyKQ

omg that's awesome!

obzen
10-12-2010, 04:14 PM
After being there for nearly 70 days, 33 Chilean miners are about to be rescued from an excavation site some 2,500 ft. within a mountain using a half-ton, steel pod attached to an cable.

It's never been done before.

TomAz
10-12-2010, 04:33 PM
what happened to the 33rd?

obzen
10-12-2010, 04:35 PM
I can dig that.

PlayaDelWes
10-12-2010, 04:46 PM
Meanwhile, on the 101...

Band members arrested after blocking 101 Freeway for performance (http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2010/10/band-members-arrested-after-blocking-101-freeway-for-performance.html)


http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6a00d8341c630a53ef01348823b1de970c-pi
Officials said a band blocked the 101 Freeway in Hollywood on Tuesday morning for an impromptu concert that jammed traffic and tested the patience of commuters.

In what is believed to be an effort at promotion, authorities said that members of a band called Imperial Stars blocked all but one lane of the southbound 101 with a large truck advertising the band. The group has a song called "Traffic Jam 101."

Witnesses said they saw members of the band singing and playing instruments on top of the truck.

The California Highway Patrol reported that three people were under arrest, and officials were trying to get all lanes of the southbound 101 open again. The traffic backup extended into the San Fernando Valley.

The driver of the truck fled in another vehicle and took the keys to the vehicle with him, the CHP said.

Sarah Faden, a spokeswoman for the Los Angeles Police Department, said the three suspects were "creating some type of havoc" on the freeway.

The Imperial Stars are a self-described "hard core hip hop band" from Orange County whose latest song is "Traffic Jam 101." On its website, the band pledges that all the money earned from the song will be going to Homeless Children America. The website features the same truck used during the impromptu concert Tuesday morning.

The band has played at the Viper Room and House of Blues.

-- Richard Winton and Andrew Blankstein

Gribbz
10-12-2010, 05:03 PM
So, I just picked up my ticket for The National/Owen Pallett. There was probably about 200 tech9 fans in line at the venue for tonight's show. I forgot they're all essentially juggalos.

Still-ill
10-12-2010, 05:07 PM
The band has played at the Viper Room and House of Blues.

hahaha

BROKENDOLL
10-12-2010, 05:37 PM
http://www.youtube.com/user/VeniaminShowsInc?feature=pyv&ad=4227749074&kw=crazy&gclid=CN2esa-rzqQCFQUmbAodJmHxYA#p/u/0/Yh-ChvdoyKQ

What the F is this?!?!?
A cool Coachella Art exibit, I'd say. Or, maybe the tunnel maze from a few years ago has come to life? Either way, I can picture that cruising the campgrounds next year...

MissingPerson
10-12-2010, 06:41 PM
Paul O'Grady is better known as acerbic Lilipudlian drag queen Lily Savage:

g6sJhxPx-pM


And the Human Slinky is a terrifying chemical experiment gone dreadfully awry.

weeklymix
10-13-2010, 02:36 PM
Do those of you with an iPhone or Android-based phone have any difficulty posting to this board?

I don't have either device. I'm just curious.

I.F.A.
10-13-2010, 02:38 PM
I have no problem posting on my Android, it's just a little annoying so I don't usually bother.

Hannahrain
10-13-2010, 02:40 PM
It's difficult to re-read what you've written if it extends beyond the visible text input, but other than that I haven't had any real problems. (iPhone.)

miscorrections
10-13-2010, 02:50 PM
No problems with the iPhone, is much more aesthetically pleasing in landscape than in portrait.

faxman75
10-13-2010, 02:54 PM
No problems at all with my Droid.

Courtney
10-13-2010, 03:01 PM
I have an iPhone, and I find that all the scrolling is annoying, and also threads with photos take forever to load. I imagine these would be problems on most small devices.

miscorrections
10-13-2010, 03:06 PM
Photo threads load very quickly for me, perhaps there's some other issue?

amyzzz
10-13-2010, 03:15 PM
Pics and gifs take a while to load.

weeklymix
10-13-2010, 06:41 PM
Download speed for images, animated gifs specifically, would definitely depend on whether you were connected via WiFi or 3G.

My main point in asking is about interface / posting issues. I was wondering if there was anything that could be done or suggestions to better the posting process on any message board when you're not on a full computer system.

Edit: If any of you watched the Delaware Senate Debate, I feel like this is a fine place where we could discuss just how fucking hilarious it was.

obzen
10-13-2010, 07:02 PM
I didn't watch it, but I'm sure I'll see the excerpts from it in tomorrow's media cycle on MSNBC.


Lakers preseason game is on.

weeklymix
10-13-2010, 07:23 PM
God, it was amazing. Search 'Christine' in Twitter if you want to see how the majority of the country is reacting to it.

bballarl
10-13-2010, 07:53 PM
McSweeney's is the best.

http://www.mcsweeneys.net/links/monologues/15comicsans.html

miscorrections
10-13-2010, 08:26 PM
Definitely just extracted a couch from the dumpster out front of our building to put on the balcony.

boarderwoozel3
10-13-2010, 10:04 PM
God, it was amazing. Search 'Christine' in Twitter if you want to see how the majority of the country is reacting to it.

The China segment made for the best train wreck viewing.

cormaic
10-13-2010, 10:04 PM
http://www.foddy.net/Athletics.html


I've been playing this for half an hour and I haven't broken ten meters

obzen
10-13-2010, 11:08 PM
O'Donnell:

"When we were fighting the Soviets over there in Afghanistan in the '80s and '90s, we did not finish the job"

Russian forces left Afghanistan early on in 89.


Just her mien is suspect; eyesballs darting around with the seemingly perpetual, forced smile. She's fake, she's a puppet pandering to the fringe à la Michele Bachmann and Sarah Palin.

weeklymix
10-13-2010, 11:30 PM
O'Donnell:
Russian forces left Afghanistan early on in 89.


We (as in the United States) also weren't the ones doing the fighting. I'm sure she just watched Charlie Wilson's War recently and thinks she is a history buff.

At first I was really mad, now I think it's hysterical. NY Gubernatorial Debate please.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
10-14-2010, 12:10 AM
We (as in the United States) also weren't the ones doing the fighting. I'm sure she just watched Charlie Wilson's War recently and thinks she is a history buff.

At first I was really mad, now I think it's hysterical. NY Gubernatorial Debate please.

Even watching that movie would tell you that we did not do any fighting over there.

Anyway, I want to fuck a witch.

obzen
10-14-2010, 04:57 AM
G9kZkaVFl0U

TomAz
10-14-2010, 08:30 AM
This article is like 3 years old, but I just heard the story today. Interesting stuff. Yes it's very long.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/04/AR2007040401721.html


Pearls Before Breakfast

Can one of the nation's great musicians cut through the fog of a D.C. rush hour? Let's find out.

By Gene Weingarten
Washington Post Staff Writer
Sunday, April 8, 2007



HE EMERGED FROM THE METRO AT THE L'ENFANT PLAZA STATION AND POSITIONED HIMSELF AGAINST A WALL BESIDE A TRASH BASKET. By most measures, he was nondescript: a youngish white man in jeans, a long-sleeved T-shirt and a Washington Nationals baseball cap. From a small case, he removed a violin. Placing the open case at his feet, he shrewdly threw in a few dollars and pocket change as seed money, swiveled it to face pedestrian traffic, and began to play.

It was 7:51 a.m. on Friday, January 12, the middle of the morning rush hour. In the next 43 minutes, as the violinist performed six classical pieces, 1,097 people passed by. Almost all of them were on the way to work, which meant, for almost all of them, a government job. L'Enfant Plaza is at the nucleus of federal Washington, and these were mostly mid-level bureaucrats with those indeterminate, oddly fungible titles: policy analyst, project manager, budget officer, specialist, facilitator, consultant.

Each passerby had a quick choice to make, one familiar to commuters in any urban area where the occasional street performer is part of the cityscape: Do you stop and listen? Do you hurry past with a blend of guilt and irritation, aware of your cupidity but annoyed by the unbidden demand on your time and your wallet? Do you throw in a buck, just to be polite? Does your decision change if he's really bad? What if he's really good? Do you have time for beauty? Shouldn't you? What's the moral mathematics of the moment?

On that Friday in January, those private questions would be answered in an unusually public way. No one knew it, but the fiddler standing against a bare wall outside the Metro in an indoor arcade at the top of the escalators was one of the finest classical musicians in the world, playing some of the most elegant music ever written on one of the most valuable violins ever made. His performance was arranged by The Washington Post as an experiment in context, perception and priorities -- as well as an unblinking assessment of public taste: In a banal setting at an inconvenient time, would beauty transcend?

The musician did not play popular tunes whose familiarity alone might have drawn interest. That was not the test. These were masterpieces that have endured for centuries on their brilliance alone, soaring music befitting the grandeur of cathedrals and concert halls.

The acoustics proved surprisingly kind. Though the arcade is of utilitarian design, a buffer between the Metro escalator and the outdoors, it somehow caught the sound and bounced it back round and resonant. The violin is an instrument that is said to be much like the human voice, and in this musician's masterly hands, it sobbed and laughed and sang -- ecstatic, sorrowful, importuning, adoring, flirtatious, castigating, playful, romancing, merry, triumphal, sumptuous.

So, what do you think happened?

HANG ON, WE'LL GET YOU SOME EXPERT HELP.

Leonard Slatkin, music director of the National Symphony Orchestra, was asked the same question. What did he think would occur, hypothetically, if one of the world's great violinists had performed incognito before a traveling rush-hour audience of 1,000-odd people?

"Let's assume," Slatkin said, "that he is not recognized and just taken for granted as a street musician . . . Still, I don't think that if he's really good, he's going to go unnoticed. He'd get a larger audience in Europe . . . but, okay, out of 1,000 people, my guess is there might be 35 or 40 who will recognize the quality for what it is. Maybe 75 to 100 will stop and spend some time listening."

So, a crowd would gather?

"Oh, yes."

And how much will he make?

"About $150."

Thanks, Maestro. As it happens, this is not hypothetical. It really happened.

"How'd I do?"

We'll tell you in a minute.

"Well, who was the musician?"

Joshua Bell.

"NO!!!"

A onetime child prodigy, at 39 Joshua Bell has arrived as an internationally acclaimed virtuoso. Three days before he appeared at the Metro station, Bell had filled the house at Boston's stately Symphony Hall, where merely pretty good seats went for $100. Two weeks later, at the Music Center at Strathmore, in North Bethesda, he would play to a standing-room-only audience so respectful of his artistry that they stifled their coughs until the silence between movements. But on that Friday in January, Joshua Bell was just another mendicant, competing for the attention of busy people on their way to work.

Bell was first pitched this idea shortly before Christmas, over coffee at a sandwich shop on Capitol Hill. A New Yorker, he was in town to perform at the Library of Congress and to visit the library's vaults to examine an unusual treasure: an 18th-century violin that once belonged to the great Austrian-born virtuoso and composer Fritz Kreisler. The curators invited Bell to play it; good sound, still.

"Here's what I'm thinking," Bell confided, as he sipped his coffee. "I'm thinking that I could do a tour where I'd play Kreisler's music . . ."

He smiled.

". . . on Kreisler's violin."

It was a snazzy, sequined idea -- part inspiration and part gimmick -- and it was typical of Bell, who has unapologetically embraced showmanship even as his concert career has become more and more august. He's soloed with the finest orchestras here and abroad, but he's also appeared on "Sesame Street," done late-night talk TV and performed in feature films. That was Bell playing the soundtrack on the 1998 movie "The Red Violin." (He body-doubled, too, playing to a naked Greta Scacchi.) As composer John Corigliano accepted the Oscar for Best Original Dramatic Score, he credited Bell, who, he said, "plays like a god."

When Bell was asked if he'd be willing to don street clothes and perform at rush hour, he said:

"Uh, a stunt?"

Well, yes. A stunt. Would he think it . . . unseemly?

Bell drained his cup.

"Sounds like fun," he said.

Bell's a heartthrob. Tall and handsome, he's got a Donny Osmond-like dose of the cutes, and, onstage, cute elides into hott. When he performs, he is usually the only man under the lights who is not in white tie and tails -- he walks out to a standing O, looking like Zorro, in black pants and an untucked black dress shirt, shirttail dangling. That cute Beatles-style mop top is also a strategic asset: Because his technique is full of body -- athletic and passionate -- he's almost dancing with the instrument, and his hair flies.

He's single and straight, a fact not lost on some of his fans. In Boston, as he performed Max Bruch's dour Violin Concerto in G Minor, the very few young women in the audience nearly disappeared in the deep sea of silver heads. But seemingly every single one of them -- a distillate of the young and pretty -- coalesced at the stage door after the performance, seeking an autograph. It's like that always, with Bell.

Bell's been accepting over-the-top accolades since puberty: Interview magazine once said his playing "does nothing less than tell human beings why they bother to live." He's learned to field these things graciously, with a bashful duck of the head and a modified "pshaw."

For this incognito performance, Bell had only one condition for participating. The event had been described to him as a test of whether, in an incongruous context, ordinary people would recognize genius. His condition: "I'm not comfortable if you call this genius." "Genius" is an overused word, he said: It can be applied to some of the composers whose work he plays, but not to him. His skills are largely interpretive, he said, and to imply otherwise would be unseemly and inaccurate.

It was an interesting request, and under the circumstances, one that will be honored. The word will not again appear in this article.

It would be breaking no rules, however, to note that the term in question, particularly as applied in the field of music, refers to a congenital brilliance -- an elite, innate, preternatural ability that manifests itself early, and often in dramatic fashion.

One biographically intriguing fact about Bell is that he got his first music lessons when he was a 4-year-old in Bloomington, Ind. His parents, both psychologists, decided formal training might be a good idea after they saw that their son had strung rubber bands across his dresser drawers and was replicating classical tunes by ear, moving drawers in and out to vary the pitch.

TO GET TO THE METRO FROM HIS HOTEL, a distance of three blocks, Bell took a taxi. He's neither lame nor lazy: He did it for his violin.

Bell always performs on the same instrument, and he ruled out using another for this gig. Called the Gibson ex Huberman, it was handcrafted in 1713 by Antonio Stradivari during the Italian master's "golden period," toward the end of his career, when he had access to the finest spruce, maple and willow, and when his technique had been refined to perfection.

"Our knowledge of acoustics is still incomplete," Bell said, "but he, he just . . . knew."

Bell doesn't mention Stradivari by name. Just "he." When the violinist shows his Strad to people, he holds the instrument gingerly by its neck, resting it on a knee. "He made this to perfect thickness at all parts," Bell says, pivoting it. "If you shaved off a millimeter of wood at any point, it would totally imbalance the sound." No violins sound as wonderful as Strads from the 1710s, still.

The front of Bell's violin is in nearly perfect condition, with a deep, rich grain and luster. The back is a mess, its dark reddish finish bleeding away into a flatter, lighter shade and finally, in one section, to bare wood.

"This has never been refinished," Bell said. "That's his original varnish. People attribute aspects of the sound to the varnish. Each maker had his own secret formula." Stradivari is thought to have made his from an ingeniously balanced cocktail of honey, egg whites and gum arabic from sub-Saharan trees.

Like the instrument in "The Red Violin," this one has a past filled with mystery and malice. Twice, it was stolen from its illustrious prior owner, the Polish virtuoso Bronislaw Huberman. The first time, in 1919, it disappeared from Huberman's hotel room in Vienna but was quickly returned. The second time, nearly 20 years later, it was pinched from his dressing room in Carnegie Hall. He never got it back. It was not until 1985 that the thief -- a minor New York violinist -- made a deathbed confession to his wife, and produced the instrument.

Bell bought it a few years ago. He had to sell his own Strad and borrow much of the rest. The price tag was reported to be about $3.5 million.

All of which is a long explanation for why, in the early morning chill of a day in January, Josh Bell took a three-block cab ride to the Orange Line, and rode one stop to L'Enfant.

AS METRO STATIONS GO, L'ENFANT PLAZA IS MORE PLEBEIAN THAN MOST. Even before you arrive, it gets no respect. Metro conductors never seem to get it right: "Leh-fahn." "Layfont." "El'phant."

At the top of the escalators are a shoeshine stand and a busy kiosk that sells newspapers, lottery tickets and a wallfull of magazines with titles such as Mammazons and Girls of Barely Legal. The skin mags move, but it's that lottery ticket dispenser that stays the busiest, with customers queuing up for Daily 6 lotto and Powerball and the ultimate suckers' bait, those pamphlets that sell random number combinations purporting to be "hot." They sell briskly. There's also a quick-check machine to slide in your lotto ticket, post-drawing, to see if you've won. Beneath it is a forlorn pile of crumpled slips.

On Friday, January 12, the people waiting in the lottery line looking for a long shot would get a lucky break -- a free, close-up ticket to a concert by one of the world's most famous musicians -- but only if they were of a mind to take note.

Bell decided to begin with "Chaconne" from Johann Sebastian Bach's Partita No. 2 in D Minor. Bell calls it "not just one of the greatest pieces of music ever written, but one of the greatest achievements of any man in history. It's a spiritually powerful piece, emotionally powerful, structurally perfect. Plus, it was written for a solo violin, so I won't be cheating with some half-assed version."

Bell didn't say it, but Bach's "Chaconne" is also considered one of the most difficult violin pieces to master. Many try; few succeed. It's exhaustingly long -- 14 minutes -- and consists entirely of a single, succinct musical progression repeated in dozens of variations to create a dauntingly complex architecture of sound. Composed around 1720, on the eve of the European Enlightenment, it is said to be a celebration of the breadth of human possibility.

If Bell's encomium to "Chaconne" seems overly effusive, consider this from the 19th-century composer Johannes Brahms, in a letter to Clara Schumann: "On one stave, for a small instrument, the man writes a whole world of the deepest thoughts and most powerful feelings. If I imagined that I could have created, even conceived the piece, I am quite certain that the excess of excitement and earth-shattering experience would have driven me out of my mind."

So, that's the piece Bell started with.

He'd clearly meant it when he promised not to cheap out this performance: He played with acrobatic enthusiasm, his body leaning into the music and arching on tiptoes at the high notes. The sound was nearly symphonic, carrying to all parts of the homely arcade as the pedestrian traffic filed past.

Three minutes went by before something happened. Sixty-three people had already passed when, finally, there was a breakthrough of sorts. A middle-age man altered his gait for a split second, turning his head to notice that there seemed to be some guy playing music. Yes, the man kept walking, but it was something.

A half-minute later, Bell got his first donation. A woman threw in a buck and scooted off. It was not until six minutes into the performance that someone actually stood against a wall, and listened.

Things never got much better. In the three-quarters of an hour that Joshua Bell played, seven people stopped what they were doing to hang around and take in the performance, at least for a minute. Twenty-seven gave money, most of them on the run -- for a total of $32 and change. That leaves the 1,070 people who hurried by, oblivious, many only three feet away, few even turning to look.

No, Mr. Slatkin, there was never a crowd, not even for a second.

It was all videotaped by a hidden camera. You can play the recording once or 15 times, and it never gets any easier to watch. Try speeding it up, and it becomes one of those herky-jerky World War I-era silent newsreels. The people scurry by in comical little hops and starts, cups of coffee in their hands, cellphones at their ears, ID tags slapping at their bellies, a grim danse macabre to indifference, inertia and the dingy, gray rush of modernity.

Even at this accelerated pace, though, the fiddler's movements remain fluid and graceful; he seems so apart from his audience -- unseen, unheard, otherworldly -- that you find yourself thinking that he's not really there. A ghost.

Only then do you see it: He is the one who is real. They are the ghosts.

IF A GREAT MUSICIAN PLAYS GREAT MUSIC BUT NO ONE HEARS . . . WAS HE REALLY ANY GOOD?

It's an old epistemological debate, older, actually, than the koan about the tree in the forest. Plato weighed in on it, and philosophers for two millennia afterward: What is beauty? Is it a measurable fact (Gottfried Leibniz), or merely an opinion (David Hume), or is it a little of each, colored by the immediate state of mind of the observer (Immanuel Kant)?

We'll go with Kant, because he's obviously right, and because he brings us pretty directly to Joshua Bell, sitting there in a hotel restaurant, picking at his breakfast, wryly trying to figure out what the hell had just happened back there at the Metro.

"At the beginning," Bell says, "I was just concentrating on playing the music. I wasn't really watching what was happening around me . . ."

Playing the violin looks all-consuming, mentally and physically, but Bell says that for him the mechanics of it are partly second nature, cemented by practice and muscle memory: It's like a juggler, he says, who can keep those balls in play while interacting with a crowd. What he's mostly thinking about as he plays, Bell says, is capturing emotion as a narrative: "When you play a violin piece, you are a storyteller, and you're telling a story."

With "Chaconne," the opening is filled with a building sense of awe. That kept him busy for a while. Eventually, though, he began to steal a sidelong glance.

"It was a strange feeling, that people were actually, ah . . ."

The word doesn't come easily.

". . . ignoring me."

Bell is laughing. It's at himself.

"At a music hall, I'll get upset if someone coughs or if someone's cellphone goes off. But here, my expectations quickly diminished. I started to appreciate any acknowledgment, even a slight glance up. I was oddly grateful when someone threw in a dollar instead of change." This is from a man whose talents can command $1,000 a minute.

Before he began, Bell hadn't known what to expect. What he does know is that, for some reason, he was nervous.

"It wasn't exactly stage fright, but there were butterflies," he says. "I was stressing a little."

Bell has played, literally, before crowned heads of Europe. Why the anxiety at the Washington Metro?

"When you play for ticket-holders," Bell explains, "you are already validated. I have no sense that I need to be accepted. I'm already accepted. Here, there was this thought: What if they don't like me? What if they resent my presence . . ."

He was, in short, art without a frame. Which, it turns out, may have a lot to do with what happened -- or, more precisely, what didn't happen -- on January 12.

MARK LEITHAUSER HAS HELD IN HIS HANDS MORE GREAT WORKS OF ART THAN ANY KING OR POPE OR MEDICI EVER DID. A senior curator at the National Gallery, he oversees the framing of the paintings. Leithauser thinks he has some idea of what happened at that Metro station.

"Let's say I took one of our more abstract masterpieces, say an Ellsworth Kelly, and removed it from its frame, marched it down the 52 steps that people walk up to get to the National Gallery, past the giant columns, and brought it into a restaurant. It's a $5 million painting. And it's one of those restaurants where there are pieces of original art for sale, by some industrious kids from the Corcoran School, and I hang that Kelly on the wall with a price tag of $150. No one is going to notice it. An art curator might look up and say: 'Hey, that looks a little like an Ellsworth Kelly. Please pass the salt.'"

Leithauser's point is that we shouldn't be too ready to label the Metro passersby unsophisticated boobs. Context matters.

Kant said the same thing. He took beauty seriously: In his Critique of Aesthetic Judgment, Kant argued that one's ability to appreciate beauty is related to one's ability to make moral judgments. But there was a caveat. Paul Guyer of the University of Pennsylvania, one of America's most prominent Kantian scholars, says the 18th-century German philosopher felt that to properly appreciate beauty, the viewing conditions must be optimal.

"Optimal," Guyer said, "doesn't mean heading to work, focusing on your report to the boss, maybe your shoes don't fit right."

So, if Kant had been at the Metro watching as Joshua Bell play to a thousand unimpressed passersby?

"He would have inferred about them," Guyer said, "absolutely nothing."

And that's that.

Except it isn't. To really understand what happened, you have to rewind that video and play it back from the beginning, from the moment Bell's bow first touched the strings.

White guy, khakis, leather jacket, briefcase. Early 30s. John David Mortensen is on the final leg of his daily bus-to-Metro commute from Reston. He's heading up the escalator. It's a long ride -- 1 minute and 15 seconds if you don't walk. So, like most everyone who passes Bell this day, Mortensen gets a good earful of music before he has his first look at the musician. Like most of them, he notes that it sounds pretty good. But like very few of them, when he gets to the top, he doesn't race past as though Bell were some nuisance to be avoided. Mortensen is that first person to stop, that guy at the six-minute mark.

It's not that he has nothing else to do. He's a project manager for an international program at the Department of Energy; on this day, Mortensen has to participate in a monthly budget exercise, not the most exciting part of his job: "You review the past month's expenditures," he says, "forecast spending for the next month, if you have X dollars, where will it go, that sort of thing."

On the video, you can see Mortensen get off the escalator and look around. He locates the violinist, stops, walks away but then is drawn back. He checks the time on his cellphone -- he's three minutes early for work -- then settles against a wall to listen.

Mortensen doesn't know classical music at all; classic rock is as close as he comes. But there's something about what he's hearing that he really likes.

As it happens, he's arrived at the moment that Bell slides into the second section of "Chaconne." ("It's the point," Bell says, "where it moves from a darker, minor key into a major key. There's a religious, exalted feeling to it.") The violinist's bow begins to dance; the music becomes upbeat, playful, theatrical, big.

Mortensen doesn't know about major or minor keys: "Whatever it was," he says, "it made me feel at peace."

So, for the first time in his life, Mortensen lingers to listen to a street musician. He stays his allotted three minutes as 94 more people pass briskly by. When he leaves to help plan contingency budgets for the Department of Energy, there's another first. For the first time in his life, not quite knowing what had just happened but sensing it was special, John David Mortensen gives a street musician money.

THERE ARE SIX MOMENTS IN THE VIDEO THAT BELL FINDS PARTICULARLY PAINFUL TO RELIVE: "The awkward times," he calls them. It's what happens right after each piece ends: nothing. The music stops. The same people who hadn't noticed him playing don't notice that he has finished. No applause, no acknowledgment. So Bell just saws out a small, nervous chord -- the embarrassed musician's equivalent of, "Er, okay, moving right along . . ." -- and begins the next piece.

After "Chaconne," it is Franz Schubert's "Ave Maria," which surprised some music critics when it debuted in 1825: Schubert seldom showed religious feeling in his compositions, yet "Ave Maria" is a breathtaking work of adoration of the Virgin Mary. What was with the sudden piety? Schubert dryly answered: "I think this is due to the fact that I never forced devotion in myself and never compose hymns or prayers of that kind unless it overcomes me unawares; but then it is usually the right and true devotion." This musical prayer became among the most familiar and enduring religious pieces in history.

A couple of minutes into it, something revealing happens. A woman and her preschooler emerge from the escalator. The woman is walking briskly and, therefore, so is the child. She's got his hand.

"I had a time crunch," recalls Sheron Parker, an IT director for a federal agency. "I had an 8:30 training class, and first I had to rush Evvie off to his teacher, then rush back to work, then to the training facility in the basement."

Evvie is her son, Evan. Evan is 3.

You can see Evan clearly on the video. He's the cute black kid in the parka who keeps twisting around to look at Joshua Bell, as he is being propelled toward the door.

"There was a musician," Parker says, "and my son was intrigued. He wanted to pull over and listen, but I was rushed for time."

So Parker does what she has to do. She deftly moves her body between Evan's and Bell's, cutting off her son's line of sight. As they exit the arcade, Evan can still be seen craning to look. When Parker is told what she walked out on, she laughs.

"Evan is very smart!"

The poet Billy Collins once laughingly observed that all babies are born with a knowledge of poetry, because the lub-dub of the mother's heart is in iambic meter. Then, Collins said, life slowly starts to choke the poetry out of us. It may be true with music, too.

There was no ethnic or demographic pattern to distinguish the people who stayed to watch Bell, or the ones who gave money, from that vast majority who hurried on past, unheeding. Whites, blacks and Asians, young and old, men and women, were represented in all three groups. But the behavior of one demographic remained absolutely consistent. Every single time a child walked past, he or she tried to stop and watch. And every single time, a parent scooted the kid away.

IF THERE WAS ONE PERSON ON THAT DAY WHO WAS TOO BUSY TO PAY ATTENTION TO THE VIOLINIST, it was George Tindley. Tindley wasn't hurrying to get to work. He was at work.

The glass doors through which most people exit the L'Enfant station lead into an indoor shopping mall, from which there are exits to the street and elevators to office buildings. The first store in the mall is an Au Bon Pain, the croissant and coffee shop where Tindley, in his 40s, works in a white uniform busing the tables, restocking the salt and pepper packets, taking out the garbage. Tindley labors under the watchful eye of his bosses, and he's supposed to be hopping, and he was.

But every minute or so, as though drawn by something not entirely within his control, Tindley would walk to the very edge of the Au Bon Pain property, keeping his toes inside the line, still on the job. Then he'd lean forward, as far out into the hallway as he could, watching the fiddler on the other side of the glass doors. The foot traffic was steady, so the doors were usually open. The sound came through pretty well.

"You could tell in one second that this guy was good, that he was clearly a professional," Tindley says. He plays the guitar, loves the sound of strings, and has no respect for a certain kind of musician.

"Most people, they play music; they don't feel it," Tindley says. "Well, that man was feeling it. That man was moving. Moving into the sound."

A hundred feet away, across the arcade, was the lottery line, sometimes five or six people long. They had a much better view of Bell than Tindley did, if they had just turned around. But no one did. Not in the entire 43 minutes. They just shuffled forward toward that machine spitting out numbers. Eyes on the prize.

J.T. Tillman was in that line. A computer specialist for the Department of Housing and Urban Development, he remembers every single number he played that day -- 10 of them, $2 apiece, for a total of $20. He doesn't recall what the violinist was playing, though. He says it sounded like generic classical music, the kind the ship's band was playing in "Titanic," before the iceberg.

"I didn't think nothing of it," Tillman says, "just a guy trying to make a couple of bucks." Tillman would have given him one or two, he said, but he spent all his cash on lotto.

When he is told that he stiffed one of the best musicians in the world, he laughs.

"Is he ever going to play around here again?"

"Yeah, but you're going to have to pay a lot to hear him."

"Damn."

Tillman didn't win the lottery, either.

BELL ENDS "AVE MARIA" TO ANOTHER THUNDEROUS SILENCE, plays Manuel Ponce's sentimental "Estrellita," then a piece by Jules Massenet, and then begins a Bach gavotte, a joyful, frolicsome, lyrical dance. It's got an Old World delicacy to it; you can imagine it entertaining bewigged dancers at a Versailles ball, or -- in a lute, fiddle and fife version -- the boot-kicking peasants of a Pieter Bruegel painting.

Watching the video weeks later, Bell finds himself mystified by one thing only. He understands why he's not drawing a crowd, in the rush of a morning workday. But: "I'm surprised at the number of people who don't pay attention at all, as if I'm invisible. Because, you know what? I'm makin' a lot of noise!"

He is. You don't need to know music at all to appreciate the simple fact that there's a guy there, playing a violin that's throwing out a whole bucket of sound; at times, Bell's bowing is so intricate that you seem to be hearing two instruments playing in harmony. So those head-forward, quick-stepping passersby are a remarkable phenomenon.

Bell wonders whether their inattention may be deliberate: If you don't take visible note of the musician, you don't have to feel guilty about not forking over money; you're not complicit in a rip-off.

It may be true, but no one gave that explanation. People just said they were busy, had other things on their mind. Some who were on cellphones spoke louder as they passed Bell, to compete with that infernal racket.

And then there was Calvin Myint. Myint works for the General Services Administration. He got to the top of the escalator, turned right and headed out a door to the street. A few hours later, he had no memory that there had been a musician anywhere in sight.

"Where was he, in relation to me?"

"About four feet away."

"Oh."

There's nothing wrong with Myint's hearing. He had buds in his ear. He was listening to his iPod.

For many of us, the explosion in technology has perversely limited, not expanded, our exposure to new experiences. Increasingly, we get our news from sources that think as we already do. And with iPods, we hear what we already know; we program our own playlists.

The song that Calvin Myint was listening to was "Just Like Heaven," by the British rock band The Cure. It's a terrific song, actually. The meaning is a little opaque, and the Web is filled with earnest efforts to deconstruct it. Many are far-fetched, but some are right on point: It's about a tragic emotional disconnect. A man has found the woman of his dreams but can't express the depth of his feeling for her until she's gone. It's about failing to see the beauty of what's plainly in front of your eyes.

"YES, I SAW THE VIOLINIST," Jackie Hessian says, "but nothing about him struck me as much of anything."

You couldn't tell that by watching her. Hessian was one of those people who gave Bell a long, hard look before walking on. It turns out that she wasn't noticing the music at all.

"I really didn't hear that much," she said. "I was just trying to figure out what he was doing there, how does this work for him, can he make much money, would it be better to start with some money in the case, or for it to be empty, so people feel sorry for you? I was analyzing it financially."

What do you do, Jackie?

"I'm a lawyer in labor relations with the United States Postal Service. I just negotiated a national contract."

THE BEST SEATS IN THE HOUSE WERE UPHOLSTERED. In the balcony, more or less. On that day, for $5, you'd get a lot more than just a nice shine on your shoes.

Only one person occupied one of those seats when Bell played. Terence Holmes is a consultant for the Department of Transportation, and he liked the music just fine, but it was really about a shoeshine: "My father told me never to wear a suit with your shoes not cleaned and shined."

Holmes wears suits often, so he is up in that perch a lot, and he's got a good relationship with the shoeshine lady. Holmes is a good tipper and a good talker, which is a skill that came in handy that day. The shoeshine lady was upset about something, and the music got her more upset. She complained, Holmes said, that the music was too loud, and he tried to calm her down.

Edna Souza is from Brazil. She's been shining shoes at L'Enfant Plaza for six years, and she's had her fill of street musicians there; when they play, she can't hear her customers, and that's bad for business. So she fights.

Souza points to the dividing line between the Metro property, at the top of the escalator, and the arcade, which is under control of the management company that runs the mall. Sometimes, Souza says, a musician will stand on the Metro side, sometimes on the mall side. Either way, she's got him. On her speed dial, she has phone numbers for both the mall cops and the Metro cops. The musicians seldom last long.

What about Joshua Bell?

He was too loud, too, Souza says. Then she looks down at her rag, sniffs. She hates to say anything positive about these damned musicians, but: "He was pretty good, that guy. It was the first time I didn't call the police."

Souza was surprised to learn he was a famous musician, but not that people rushed blindly by him. That, she said, was predictable. "If something like this happened in Brazil, everyone would stand around to see. Not here."

Souza nods sourly toward a spot near the top of the escalator: "Couple of years ago, a homeless guy died right there. He just lay down there and died. The police came, an ambulance came, and no one even stopped to see or slowed down to look.

"People walk up the escalator, they look straight ahead. Mind your own business, eyes forward. Everyone is stressed. Do you know what I mean?"

What is this life if, full of care,

We have no time to stand and stare.

-- from "Leisure," by W.H. Davies

Let's say Kant is right. Let's accept that we can't look at what happened on January 12 and make any judgment whatever about people's sophistication or their ability to appreciate beauty. But what about their ability to appreciate life?

We're busy. Americans have been busy, as a people, since at least 1831, when a young French sociologist named Alexis de Tocqueville visited the States and found himself impressed, bemused and slightly dismayed at the degree to which people were driven, to the exclusion of everything else, by hard work and the accumulation of wealth.

Not much has changed. Pop in a DVD of "Koyaanisqatsi," the wordless, darkly brilliant, avant-garde 1982 film about the frenetic speed of modern life. Backed by the minimalist music of Philip Glass, director Godfrey Reggio takes film clips of Americans going about their daily business, but speeds them up until they resemble assembly-line machines, robots marching lockstep to nowhere. Now look at the video from L'Enfant Plaza, in fast-forward. The Philip Glass soundtrack fits it perfectly.

"Koyaanisqatsi" is a Hopi word. It means "life out of balance."

In his 2003 book, Timeless Beauty: In the Arts and Everyday Life, British author John Lane writes about the loss of the appreciation for beauty in the modern world. The experiment at L'Enfant Plaza may be symptomatic of that, he said -- not because people didn't have the capacity to understand beauty, but because it was irrelevant to them.

"This is about having the wrong priorities," Lane said.

If we can't take the time out of our lives to stay a moment and listen to one of the best musicians on Earth play some of the best music ever written; if the surge of modern life so overpowers us that we are deaf and blind to something like that -- then what else are we missing?

That's what the Welsh poet W.H. Davies meant in 1911 when he published those two lines that begin this section. They made him famous. The thought was simple, even primitive, but somehow no one had put it quite that way before.

Of course, Davies had an advantage -- an advantage of perception. He wasn't a tradesman or a laborer or a bureaucrat or a consultant or a policy analyst or a labor lawyer or a program manager. He was a hobo.

THE CULTURAL HERO OF THE DAY ARRIVED AT L'ENFANT PLAZA PRETTY LATE, in the unprepossessing figure of one John Picarello, a smallish man with a baldish head.

Picarello hit the top of the escalator just after Bell began his final piece, a reprise of "Chaconne." In the video, you see Picarello stop dead in his tracks, locate the source of the music, and then retreat to the other end of the arcade. He takes up a position past the shoeshine stand, across from that lottery line, and he will not budge for the next nine minutes.

Like all the passersby interviewed for this article, Picarello was stopped by a reporter after he left the building, and was asked for his phone number. Like everyone, he was told only that this was to be an article about commuting. When he was called later in the day, like everyone else, he was first asked if anything unusual had happened to him on his trip into work. Of the more than 40 people contacted, Picarello was the only one who immediately mentioned the violinist.

"There was a musician playing at the top of the escalator at L'Enfant Plaza."

Haven't you seen musicians there before?

"Not like this one."

What do you mean?

"This was a superb violinist. I've never heard anyone of that caliber. He was technically proficient, with very good phrasing. He had a good fiddle, too, with a big, lush sound. I walked a distance away, to hear him. I didn't want to be intrusive on his space."

Really?

"Really. It was that kind of experience. It was a treat, just a brilliant, incredible way to start the day."

Picarello knows classical music. He is a fan of Joshua Bell but didn't recognize him; he hadn't seen a recent photo, and besides, for most of the time Picarello was pretty far away. But he knew this was not a run-of-the-mill guy out there, performing. On the video, you can see Picarello look around him now and then, almost bewildered.

"Yeah, other people just were not getting it. It just wasn't registering. That was baffling to me."

When Picarello was growing up in New York, he studied violin seriously, intending to be a concert musician. But he gave it up at 18, when he decided he'd never be good enough to make it pay. Life does that to you sometimes. Sometimes, you have to do the prudent thing. So he went into another line of work. He's a supervisor at the U.S. Postal Service. Doesn't play the violin much, anymore.

When he left, Picarello says, "I humbly threw in $5." It was humble: You can actually see that on the video. Picarello walks up, barely looking at Bell, and tosses in the money. Then, as if embarrassed, he quickly walks away from the man he once wanted to be.

Does he have regrets about how things worked out?

The postal supervisor considers this.

"No. If you love something but choose not to do it professionally, it's not a waste. Because, you know, you still have it. You have it forever."

BELL THINKS HE DID HIS BEST WORK OF THE DAY IN THOSE FINAL FEW MINUTES, in the second "Chaconne." And that also was the first time more than one person at a time was listening. As Picarello stood in the back, Janice Olu arrived and took up a position a few feet away from Bell. Olu, a public trust officer with HUD, also played the violin as a kid. She didn't know the name of the piece she was hearing, but she knew the man playing it has a gift.

Olu was on a coffee break and stayed as long as she dared. As she turned to go, she whispered to the stranger next to her, "I really don't want to leave." The stranger standing next to her happened to be working for The Washington Post.

In preparing for this event, editors at The Post Magazine discussed how to deal with likely outcomes. The most widely held assumption was that there could well be a problem with crowd control: In a demographic as sophisticated as Washington, the thinking went, several people would surely recognize Bell. Nervous "what-if" scenarios abounded. As people gathered, what if others stopped just to see what the attraction was? Word would spread through the crowd. Cameras would flash. More people flock to the scene; rush-hour pedestrian traffic backs up; tempers flare; the National Guard is called; tear gas, rubber bullets, etc.

As it happens, exactly one person recognized Bell, and she didn't arrive until near the very end. For Stacy Furukawa, a demographer at the Commerce Department, there was no doubt. She doesn't know much about classical music, but she had been in the audience three weeks earlier, at Bell's free concert at the Library of Congress. And here he was, the international virtuoso, sawing away, begging for money. She had no idea what the heck was going on, but whatever it was, she wasn't about to miss it.

Furukawa positioned herself 10 feet away from Bell, front row, center. She had a huge grin on her face. The grin, and Furukawa, remained planted in that spot until the end.

"It was the most astonishing thing I've ever seen in Washington," Furukawa says. "Joshua Bell was standing there playing at rush hour, and people were not stopping, and not even looking, and some were flipping quarters at him! Quarters! I wouldn't do that to anybody. I was thinking, Omigosh, what kind of a city do I live in that this could happen?"

When it was over, Furukawa introduced herself to Bell, and tossed in a twenty. Not counting that -- it was tainted by recognition -- the final haul for his 43 minutes of playing was $32.17. Yes, some people gave pennies.

"Actually," Bell said with a laugh, "that's not so bad, considering. That's 40 bucks an hour. I could make an okay living doing this, and I wouldn't have to pay an agent."

These days, at L'Enfant Plaza, lotto ticket sales remain brisk. Musicians still show up from time to time, and they still tick off Edna Souza. Joshua Bell's latest album, "The Voice of the Violin," has received the usual critical acclaim. ("Delicate urgency." "Masterful intimacy." "Unfailingly exquisite." "A musical summit." ". . . will make your heart thump and weep at the same time.")

Bell headed off on a concert tour of European capitals. But he is back in the States this week. He has to be. On Tuesday, he will be accepting the Avery Fisher prize, recognizing the Flop of L'Enfant Plaza as the best classical musician in America.

Emily Shroder, Rachel Manteuffel, John W. Poole and Magazine Editor Tom Shroder contributed to this report. Gene Weingarten, a Magazine staff writer, can be reached at weingarten@washpost.com. He will be fielding questions and comments about this article Monday at 1 p.m.

canexplain
10-14-2010, 08:36 AM
Let's all quote Tom's last post.

Still-ill
10-14-2010, 09:52 AM
Grow up

canexplain
10-14-2010, 10:48 AM
Grow up
I was grown up before you were even that proverbial “gleam”.

I like these lyrics:

On the floating, shapeless oceans
I did all my best to smile
til your singing eyes and fingers
drew me loving into your eyes.

And you sang "Sail to me, sail to me;
Let me enfold you."

Here I am, here I am waiting to hold you.
Did I dream you dreamed about me?
Were you here when I was full sail?

Now my foolish boat is leaning, broken love lost on your rocks.
For you sang, "Touch me not, touch me not, come back tomorrow."
Oh my heart, oh my heart shies from the sorrow.
I'm as puzzled as a newborn child.
I'm as riddled as the tide.
Should I stand amid the breakers?
Or shall I lie with death my bride?

Hear me sing: "Swim to me, swim to me, let me enfold you."
"Here I am. Here I am, waiting to hold you."

BROKENDOLL
10-14-2010, 11:18 AM
Let's all quote Tom's last post.
I bet it was a test. You know, to see just how many of us would actually take the time to read it all. Tom's usually a good poster. He's a natural with his sarcasm, his insults, and his picking on you, Ron. But, would he be able to draw attention to a long and lengthy article enough to keep passersby intrigued? I read the whole thing and now feel compelled to give him my 2 cents worth for making me feel like a fucking guinea pig, that's for sure!

I.F.A.
10-14-2010, 11:22 AM
Because I'm super happy with how this turned out, and feel like bragging, I'm posting this here. It's part of a collaborative video project that I've been working on with my friend Eric. My original drawings were in black and white, he colored and animated them.

TouqHIf4eCU

BROKENDOLL
10-14-2010, 11:24 AM
I was grown up before you were even that proverbial “gleam”.

I like these lyrics:

On the floating, shapeless oceans
I did all my best to smile
til your singing eyes and fingers
drew me loving into your eyes.

And you sang "Sail to me, sail to me;
Let me enfold you."

Here I am, here I am waiting to hold you.
Did I dream you dreamed about me?
Were you here when I was full sail?

Now my foolish boat is leaning, broken love lost on your rocks.
For you sang, "Touch me not, touch me not, come back tomorrow."
Oh my heart, oh my heart shies from the sorrow.
I'm as puzzled as a newborn child.
I'm as riddled as the tide.
Should I stand amid the breakers?
Or shall I lie with death my bride?

Hear me sing: "Swim to me, swim to me, let me enfold you."
"Here I am. Here I am, waiting to hold you."
I'd like to dedicate this lovely piece to JebusLives...:pulse:pulse:pulse:pulse

TomAz
10-14-2010, 11:38 AM
Let's all quote Tom's last post.

You realize this would not have the effect you are hoping it would have, don't you?

faxman75
10-14-2010, 11:53 AM
Wait, what the fuck?

http://www.idahostatesman.com/2010/10/14/1378948/former-teacher-pleads-guilty-over.html


BOISE, Idaho — A former teacher at a Meridian middle school has pleaded guilty in federal court to possessing obscene cartoons depicting child sexual abuse.

Thirty-three-year-old Steven Kutzner pleaded guilty in Boise's U.S. District Court on Wednesday to possession of obscene visual representations of the sexual abuse of children. Prosecutors with the U.S. Attorney's office say investigators found 70 cartoon images of youthful animated characters - including characters from the TV show, "The Simpsons" - engaged in sexually explicit conduct.
Kutzner, who was a teacher at Lake Hazel Middle School in Meridian, resigned in 2009 after agents served a search warrant at his home.

He faces up to 10 years in a federal prison when he is sentenced on Jan. 5.

chairmenmeow47
10-14-2010, 11:58 AM
i want to know what happened in tom's article, but i really need to get back to work. did he make any money? how many people stopped?

BROKENDOLL
10-14-2010, 12:36 PM
I just want to know if my cartoons would be considered obscene?

TomAz
10-14-2010, 12:40 PM
i want to know what happened in tom's article, but i really need to get back to work. did he make any money? how many people stopped?

not much - $32. hardly anybody stopped.

koryp
10-14-2010, 12:47 PM
I just want to know if my cartoons would be considered obscene?

As obscene as their creator;)

chairmenmeow47
10-14-2010, 12:50 PM
not much - $32. hardly anybody stopped.

how funny, but at the same time, i know i don't have time to stop to listen to music on the street. i wish i did!

canexplain
10-14-2010, 12:59 PM
10 cents to anyone who knows the first person that can tell me who wrote those lyrics and sang it first. (except TomAz).

koryp
10-14-2010, 01:04 PM
10 cents to anyone who knows the first person that can tell me who wrote those lyrics and sang it first. (except TomAz).

What?, huh? I was just passing by this thread on my way to another. I'm late for a budget meeting. Someone posted lyrics? In the thread? I didn't notice.

miscorrections
10-14-2010, 01:13 PM
I know ten cents seems like a lot of money to you old-timers but it's basically useless these days.

TomAz
10-14-2010, 01:20 PM
for the record I have no idea what song those lyrics are for and don't feel like googling it

canexplain
10-14-2010, 01:24 PM
I know ten cents seems like a lot of money to you old-timers but it's basically useless these days.

I only use real silver dimes so they are worth more. It's Tim Buckley Tom, just sort of thought you would know off hand. I didn't know but it has been done about 10 times that I could find and it has just been done by Bryan Ferry, most or Roxy, david gilmore, a bunch of really cool people.

TomAz
10-14-2010, 01:32 PM
I always get Tim Buckley and Tim Hardin confused.

koryp
10-14-2010, 01:35 PM
You forgot to mention his writing partner Mr. Beckett. ASCAP attorneys will be arriving shortly to sort this out.

TallGuyCM
10-14-2010, 02:31 PM
I left 3 of my most often-worn shirts hanging in a hotel room closet in Berkeley and I just called and they don't have them in the lost and found. :(

BROKENDOLL
10-14-2010, 02:44 PM
I left 3 of my most often-worn shirts hanging in a hotel room closet in Berkeley and I just called and they don't have them in the lost and found. :(
Maybe they're still in the closet?

BROKENDOLL
10-14-2010, 02:47 PM
As obscene as their creator;)
Let's be glad those moments come and go then because even I'll admit I can be a little bit warped in my artistry...lol

TallGuyCM
10-14-2010, 02:49 PM
Maybe they're still in the closet?

I'm hoping so. I'm gonna call back in a week or so just in case they still are and get turned in.

locachica73
10-14-2010, 02:58 PM
The cleaning ladies grab that shit, sorry man. My daughter left her stuffed scooby do in a hotel once and I called within an hour and it was gone. She wouldn't sleep for a week till I ordered her a new one online and passed it off as the old one.

SoulDischarge
10-14-2010, 04:06 PM
I know ten cents seems like a lot of money to you old-timers but it's basically useless these days.

That's what you'd think. We offer $0.10 refunds when customers re-use their bags and they have to option to donate them to a local charity. About a third of a time they refuse.

HunterGather
10-14-2010, 05:16 PM
http://29.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_la97amhKfh1qa4w2fo1_400.gif

Werq it.

BROKENDOLL
10-14-2010, 06:01 PM
http://29.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_la97amhKfh1qa4w2fo1_400.gif

Werq it.
This is Pooh Bear's idea of Left Brain/Right Brain gif. Seriously, I think it changes up after about 45 sec. in... lol

faxman75
10-15-2010, 12:24 AM
So i'm watching this video on the ufo sighting over new york the whole time thinking wtf, those are just balloons, then the end of the story comes and we learn they were just balloons. How does this shit become news?

http://news.yahoo.com/video/us-15749625/abc-news-cameras-capture-ufo-hovering-over-nyc-22452609

canexplain
10-15-2010, 07:39 AM
I had such a vivid dream last night that I signed onto this board and it was all sorts of rainbow colors.

koryp
10-15-2010, 08:23 AM
I had such a vivid dream last night that I signed onto this board and it was all sorts of rainbow colors.

Was that before or after the new avatar pic was taken? In other words, result or inspiration?

malcolmjamalawesome
10-15-2010, 08:25 AM
So i'm watching this video on the ufo sighting over new york the whole time thinking wtf, those are just balloons, then the end of the story comes and we learn they were just balloons. How does this shit become news?

http://news.yahoo.com/video/us-15749625/abc-news-cameras-capture-ufo-hovering-over-nyc-22452609

That teacher has some nice tittays

koryp
10-15-2010, 08:32 AM
That teacher has some nice tittays

She looks a little like Heidi Fleiss.

guedita
10-15-2010, 09:22 AM
Is it time for the headilner and subheadliner hurt/heal game to start?

canexplain
10-15-2010, 09:29 AM
Was that before or after the new avatar pic was taken? In other words, result or inspiration?

I didn't think anyone could even figure out what that avitar was ...

koryp
10-15-2010, 09:34 AM
I didn't think anyone could even figure out what that avitar was ...

The fine value of a misspent youth.

canexplain
10-15-2010, 09:40 AM
The fine value of a misspent youth.

You or me :) or both I suppose.

canexplain
10-15-2010, 09:41 AM
Dani, if you give me my own name, I will come to the fest this year. Like she cares hummmmmmmmmm.

TomAz
10-15-2010, 09:55 AM
The way you get a name is you PM Dani and request it.

canexplain
10-15-2010, 09:56 AM
The way you get a name is you PM Dani and request it.

oh tnx, after all these years maybe she might give me a name. do we pick our own or she assigns one?

TomAz
10-15-2010, 10:01 AM
You pick your own. Or you can have someone here suggest one for you. In my case it stemmed from a post I made and someone replied that it would make a good board nickname thing. So I PM'd Dani with it.

Dani does not accept requests from others unless she knows the person is cool with it. If I PM her and say "make ron's nickname Racist Hatemonger" she would tell me no. I know this firsthand.

malcolmjamalawesome
10-15-2010, 10:03 AM
The NINJNA generation

malcolmjamalawesome
10-15-2010, 10:06 AM
Ha ha Dane Cook's brother hates him, too.

http://www.cnn.com/2010/SHOWBIZ/celebrity.news.gossip/10/14/dane.cook.brother.jailed.ppl/index.html?hpt=T2


The half brother of Dane Cook was sentenced to five to six years in prison Wednesday for embezzling millions of dollars from the actor and comedian while working as his business manager.
Darryl McCauley, 45, pleaded guilty to 27 counts of larceny over $250, three counts of forgery, embezzlement and other charges, reports the Boston Globe. At one point, McCauley wrote out a check for $3 million to himself from Cook's account.
McCauley served as Cook's business manager from the early 1990s until December 2008. He began siphoning Cook's funds into his personal accounts beginning in 2004.
The former corrections officer must serve another 10 years of probation after his release from jail. He must also make restitution to Cook, 38.
McCauley and Cook had the same mother, Donna Cook, who died in 2006. The actor has not commented on McCauley's sentence.

malcolmjamalawesome
10-15-2010, 10:14 AM
I just discovered Hipster Runoff.

canexplain
10-15-2010, 10:35 AM
The NINJNA generation

I thought someone would catch that wayyyyyy before now although I haven't been posting much.

malcolmjamalawesome
10-15-2010, 10:37 AM
I thought someone would catch that wayyyyyy before now although I haven't been posting much.

You mean like me catching it last month, you dumb bastard?


Ron, shouldn't that be the NINJNA generation?


God damn it you suck so hard. Do you wake up and go "Fuck I'm old AND retarded?" And then bang your head against the wall?

Still-ill
10-15-2010, 10:41 AM
I thought someone would catch that wayyyyyy before now although I haven't been posting much.

Your avatar... it's...

algunz
10-15-2010, 10:42 AM
MJA, why must we be so harsh? Is there a history I'm not aware of? Or just general frustration?

malcolmjamalawesome
10-15-2010, 10:43 AM
THE NUMBERZZZZ

algunz
10-15-2010, 10:45 AM
The numbers are haunting, but the birds tell more.

faxman75
10-15-2010, 11:01 AM
http://www.cagle.com/news/MarletteMemorial/images/Marlette3.gif

canexplain
10-15-2010, 11:49 AM
MJA, why must we be so harsh? Is there a history I'm not aware of? Or just general frustration?

I go with B teacher. It's a bit like the school yard. The bullies pick on someone till one day he turns around and confronts them and they run like little babies. Awwwww it's so easy.

obzen
10-15-2010, 11:52 AM
lol

BROKENDOLL
10-15-2010, 01:09 PM
I go with B teacher. It's a bit like the school yard. The bullies pick on someone till one day he turns around and confronts them and they run like little babies. Awwwww it's so easy.

Or, like the Ethiopian looking guy on the beach that always got sand kicked in his face, so he went home and popped a tab or two, then returned to the beach all musclebound?

http://i296.photobucket.com/albums/mm177/Schindler55/Revenge_Of_The_Nerds_4_R1-cdcovers_.jpg

miscorrections
10-15-2010, 01:25 PM
I go with B teacher. It's a bit like the school yard. The bullies pick on someone till one day he turns around and confronts them and they run like little babies. Awwwww it's so easy.

It's ok, Rip Van. Just go back to sleep.

canexplain
10-15-2010, 01:45 PM
It's ok, Rip Van. Just go back to sleep.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j211/canexplain/rvw.jpg

TomAz
10-15-2010, 01:47 PM
Ethiopian looking?

BROKENDOLL
10-15-2010, 07:24 PM
Ethiopian looking?
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y231/ashizzle117/ethiopian.jpg
Clearly you can see the guy has a white beard, Tom. (Work with me on this...) Ron says he's been losing a lot of weight lately dieting. All that excess skin condensed could easily be confused with that of this gentleman, don't you think? The beard totally threw me off!
http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a312/nadidy/ethiopian.bmp


Once again, I fall guilty of posting without any thought process used whatsoever. fuck.

hawkingvsreeve
10-15-2010, 08:11 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v686/hawkingvsreeve/bduhoh.jpg



Got bored.

Pixiessp
10-15-2010, 11:06 PM
I was grown up before you were even that proverbial “gleam”.

I like these lyrics:

On the floating, shapeless oceans
I did all my best to smile
til your singing eyes and fingers
drew me loving into your eyes.

And you sang "Sail to me, sail to me;
Let me enfold you."

Here I am, here I am waiting to hold you.
Did I dream you dreamed about me?
Were you here when I was full sail?

Now my foolish boat is leaning, broken love lost on your rocks.
For you sang, "Touch me not, touch me not, come back tomorrow."
Oh my heart, oh my heart shies from the sorrow.
I'm as puzzled as a newborn child.
I'm as riddled as the tide.
Should I stand amid the breakers?
Or shall I lie with death my bride?

Hear me sing: "Swim to me, swim to me, let me enfold you."
"Here I am. Here I am, waiting to hold you."

Oh my god! That's Song to the Siren. I just realized that.
I love This Mortal Coil's version. And I do mean LOVE.

weeklymix
10-15-2010, 11:44 PM
God fucking dammit is Ron's avatar a picture of his mouth?

obzen
10-15-2010, 11:48 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v686/hawkingvsreeve/bduhoh.jpg


lulz

sbconnection
10-17-2010, 01:03 AM
Because I'm super happy with how this turned out, and feel like bragging, I'm posting this here. It's part of a collaborative video project that I've been working on with my friend Eric. My original drawings were in black and white, he colored and animated them.

TouqHIf4eCU

Does this make anyone else feel like doing a bunch of dirty rolls and touching their own titties?

sbconnection
10-17-2010, 01:05 AM
Top 10 Concert Tour Designs Of All Time!!!

Stumbled across this, thought it was interesting if no one else has seen this yet, its a shame Radiohead never made it on this list, I'd take them over U2 any and every day of the week.

http://livedesignonline.com/projects/top-concert-designs/

BROKENDOLL
10-17-2010, 02:11 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v686/hawkingvsreeve/bduhoh.jpg



Got bored.
I'm honored to have been a huge factor in your amusement on a Friday night, Brandon.


lulz
Don't laugh Obzen...I could very well be the next Kenado.

roberto73
10-17-2010, 05:24 AM
It's Decorative Gourd Season, Motherfuckers
by Colin Nissan, courtesy of McSweeneys.net (www.mcsweeneys.net)

I don't know about you, but I can't wait to get my hands on some fucking gourds and arrange them in a horn-shaped basket on my dining room table. That shit is going to look so seasonal. I'm about to head up to the attic right now to find that wicker fucker, dust it off, and jam it with an insanely ornate assortment of shellacked vegetables. When my guests come over it's gonna be like, BLAMMO! Check out my shellacked decorative vegetables, assholes. Guess what season it is—fucking fall. There's a nip in the air and my house is full of mutant fucking squash.

I may even throw some multi-colored leaves into the mix, all haphazard like a crisp October breeze just blew through and fucked that shit up. Then I'm going to get to work on making a beautiful fucking gourd necklace for myself. People are going to be like, "Aren't those gourds straining your neck?" And I'm just going to thread another gourd onto my necklace without breaking their gaze and quietly reply, "It's fall, fuckfaces. You're either ready to reap this freaky-assed harvest or you're not."

Carving orange pumpkins sounds like a pretty fitting way to ring in the season. You know what else does? Performing an all-gourd reenactment of an episode of Diff'rent Strokes—specifically the one when Arnold and Dudley experience a disturbing brush with sexual molestation. Well, this shit just got real, didn't it? Felonies and gourds have one very important commonality: they're both extremely fucking real. Sorry if that's upsetting, but I'm not doing you any favors by shielding you from this anymore.

The next thing I'm going to do is carve one of the longer gourds into a perfect replica of the Mayflower as a shout-out to our Pilgrim forefathers. Then I'm going to do lines of blow off its hull with a hooker. Why? Because it's not summer, it's not winter, and it's not spring. Grab a calendar and pull your fucking heads out of your asses; it's fall, fuckers.

Have you ever been in an Italian deli with salamis hanging from their ceiling? Well then you're going to fucking love my house. Just look where you're walking or you'll get KO'd by the gauntlet of misshapen, zucchini-descendant bastards swinging from above. And when you do, you're going to hear a very loud, very stereotypical Italian laugh coming from me. Consider yourself warned.

For now, all I plan to do is to throw on a flannel shirt, some tattered overalls, and a floppy fucking hat and stand in the middle of a cornfield for a few days. The first crow that tries to land on me is going to get his avian ass bitch-slapped all the way back to summer.

Welcome to autumn, fuckheads!

JebusLives
10-17-2010, 11:50 AM
My friend's cousin appears to be dating Zach Galifianakis.

MissingPerson
10-18-2010, 05:11 AM
Have we got a snappy word for when somebody votes in every single poll they can find out of the blue? And if not, can we have one?

canexplain
10-18-2010, 06:20 AM
God fucking dammit is Ron's avatar a picture of his mouth?

No. Google acid wiki and that's what I came up with anyway.

koryp
10-18-2010, 07:41 AM
Have we got a snappy word for when somebody votes in every single poll they can find out of the blue? And if not, can we have one?

How about poll troll? It's got a catchy ring to it as well as a derogatory double entendre.

MissingPerson
10-18-2010, 07:45 AM
I'm cool with that. Everybody else? Everybody cool with that?

If only there were some convenient way to register everyone's verdict on the idea and aggregate the overall consensus.

koryp
10-18-2010, 08:18 AM
I'm cool with that. Everybody else? Everybody cool with that?

If only there were some convenient way to register everyone's verdict on the idea and aggregate the overall consensus.

As you have wished, so it has been done (http://coachella.com/forum/showthread.php?t=42801)

downingthief
10-18-2010, 08:56 AM
Coming down from one of the best weekends I have had in a long time. You all should be jealous. :)

canexplain
10-18-2010, 10:21 AM
Coming down from one of the best weekends I have had in a long time. You all should be jealous. :)

But the down side is you are still in Az.

amyzzz
10-18-2010, 10:47 AM
It's Decorative Gourd Season, Motherfuckers
by Colin Nissan, courtesy of McSweeneys.net (www.mcsweeneys.net)....

My kids and I just painted some butternut squashes to look like ghosts this weekend, and I put them on the front porch this morning. Actually, the ghosts look more like Pokemon characters.

downingthief
10-18-2010, 10:55 AM
But the down side is you are still in Az.

Considering that this past weekend was spent here in AZ, I think not. :)

TomAz
10-18-2010, 11:08 AM
But the down side is you are still in Az.

You are like a cross between brokendoll and cousin itt.

BROKENDOLL
10-18-2010, 03:05 PM
You are like a cross between brokendoll and cousin itt.
Oh, stop. You're just jealous because you don't have hair, Tom.

MissingPerson
10-19-2010, 10:50 AM
http://thedailyedge.thejournal.ie/kangaroo-may-be-dead-after-disco-ordeal-2010-10/


GARDAI AND THE DSPCA are probing claims that a kangaroo died after being set loose at a 30th birthday party held at the Clarion Hotel in Liffey Valley in Dublin at the weekend.

The Irish Daily Star reports that the kangaroo was presented as a 30th birthday gift to a man who was holding his celebrations at the hotel, while the theme tune to Skippy the Bush Kangaroo blasted out on the hotel’s speakers.

The animal was reportedly terrified by the ordeal.

The Clarion’s managers told the newspaper that the “baby kangaroo” had been smuggled into the hotel.

Sometime during the night this box made its way up to the function room and they opened it up and there was a kangaroo in it.

"We didn’t know anything about it until this appeared in our hotel. It’s crazy. It’s not something we condone and we don’t want anything to do with it. We got our security guys to escort it out."

marooko
10-19-2010, 12:50 PM
Working in the office today. It's kinda weird, but cool at the same time.

MissingPerson
10-19-2010, 04:21 PM
Further to that incredibly stupid Kangaroo story, full news report with footage of the kangaroo in the disco here:

w_IaVo_ZDyo

Assholes.

EDIT:

Turns out it was a Wallaby. Somebody fed it a load of E.

chiapet
10-20-2010, 05:29 PM
Tonight when I got home and turned on my Tivo, it informed me that we would be streaming Pandora now. (My Blu-Ray player already does this but I never turn the thing on).

So I try it out, the first song is the bonde de role remix of "Alala". I hit the "info" button which shows why they picked the song:

"sampledelia, beats made for dancing, sexist lyrics"

Oh Tivo <3
Pandora <3

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
10-20-2010, 05:49 PM
"sampledelia, beats made for dancing, sexist lyrics"



hahaha wonderful

weeklymix
10-20-2010, 05:50 PM
Larry King has Jon Stewart on tonight if anybody cares.

Pixiessp
10-20-2010, 07:58 PM
Ari Up of the Slits has died. Oh damn it!!!!!!

Sleepingrock
10-20-2010, 11:35 PM
Anyone have any experience with vasectomys?? Its kinda extreme at this age so I they probably wouldn't let it happen, but I kinda want one young, any thoughts/opinions?

Hannahrain
10-20-2010, 11:38 PM
Vasectomy's what?

shakermaker113
10-21-2010, 08:20 AM
you know you haven't slept enough when you wake up and there's only 8 threads with new posts.

canexplain
10-21-2010, 08:24 AM
Anyone have any experience with vasectomy's?? Its kinda extreme at this age so I they probably wouldn't let it happen, but I kinda want one young, any thoughts/opinions?

In and out (burgers), no big deal.

stinkbutt
10-21-2010, 09:38 AM
So apparently this past Saturday my sister, her boyfriend, and some of their friends were smoking K2 (synthetic pot, that's legal) and one of their friends decided to stab her boyfriend multiple times. Does anyone know anything about this stuff? Does it fuck you up that bad, and why would you do it? It's not like weed is that hard to find.

locachica73
10-21-2010, 09:40 AM
I think people do it because you can pass a drug test after you smoke it, although if you just buy synthetic pee you don't have to worry about drug testing anyway. I have seen some news articles about it. I wouldn't try it, I would worry about side effects and finding out later that it causes cancer or the desire to stab people.

weeklymix
10-22-2010, 12:32 AM
Big things going on this weekend. Fingers crossed.

Pixiessp
10-22-2010, 12:44 AM
Further to that incredibly stupid Kangaroo story, full news report with footage of the kangaroo in the disco here:

w_IaVo_ZDyo

Assholes.

EDIT:

Turns out it was a Wallaby. Somebody fed it a load of E.

That's horrible.

HunterGather
10-22-2010, 04:57 PM
http://29.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_la97pjWer01qd28u0o1_500.jpg

MissingPerson
10-22-2010, 07:52 PM
Man, I honestly thought that no news story this week was going to rock my face harder than the E tabbed disco wallaby. But then there was this:

http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/crocodile-on-a-plane-kills-19/story-e6frfq80-1225942045322


A STOWAWAY crocodile on a flight escaped from its carrier bag and sparked an onboard stampede that caused the flight to crash, killing 19 passengers and crew.

The croc had been hidden in a passenger's sports bag - allegedly with plans to sell it - but it tore loose and ran amok, sparking panic.

A stampede of terrified passengers caused the small aircraft to lose balance and tip over in mid-air during an internal flight in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The unbalanced load caused the aircraft, on a routine flight from the capital, Kinshasa, to the regional airport at Bandundu, to go into a spin and crash into a house.

A lone survivor from the Let 410 plane told the astonishing tale to investigators.

Ironically the crocodile also survived the crash but was later killed with a machete by rescuers sifting through the wreckage.

AND THEN, there was this:

http://url.ie/7yo9


New Zealand's brain injury charity says it didn't mean to cause offence by planning a "zombie walk" to raise money for victims of brain damage.

The charity and the event's organisers have come under fire after inviting participants to dress up and "channel their inner zombie", declaring "seeing zombies have been eating brains all these years, we figured it's time we gave back".

The highlight of the fundraiser, to be held in Rotorua later this month, will be a "flash mob" zombie dance to the tune of Michael Jackson's "Thriller" down the main street.

Both broadcaster TVNZ and Rotorua's Daily Post newspaper say they have received complaints from people with brain injuries, saying they were "horrified" at being linked to shuffling corpses returned from the grave.

Discussion forums on the Trade Me website are also riddled with criticism of the event.

But Brain Injury New Zealand president John Clough said no offence was intended and they certainly were not likening brain injury patients to the undead.

"The zombie is a fictional character in horror movies that does not exist," Clough said.

"The organisers have just tried to capture people's imaginations to raise money, not to offend anyone. It's very hard to convince people to part with their hard-earned cash and this is just one way of getting attention," Clough said.

Event organiser Layla Robinson said neither she nor Brain Injury New Zealand had received a complaint.

"I was pretty despondent yesterday when I heard about the complaints, especially when we thought some sponsors were going to pull out - thankfully we've talked to them and they're not," Robinson said.

She said that she was a horror movie buff and thought it would be "a bit of fun" to combine pop culture with a good cause.

"We didn't mean to cause offence, no way. I hadn't even thought about the link side of it," she said.

And now I can't decide. It's like Sophie's Choice, except both the kids are great.

BROKENDOLL
10-22-2010, 08:41 PM
you know you haven't slept enough when you wake up and there's only 8 threads with new posts.
LOL True story.


Anyone have any experience with vasectomys?? Its kinda extreme at this age so I they probably wouldn't let it happen, but I kinda want one young, any thoughts/opinions?


In and out (burgers), no big deal.
Since when did In and Out start selling wieners?

HunterGather
10-22-2010, 08:52 PM
Anyone have any experience with vasectomys?? Its kinda extreme at this age so I they probably wouldn't let it happen, but I kinda want one young, any thoughts/opinions?

I heard most doctors won't do it if you're young (i'm assuming you're 20 something?)

I don't want kids either. I don't like kids. I mean, the ones related to me are alright, but the rest can all gtfo.

BROKENDOLL
10-22-2010, 09:06 PM
So apparently this past Saturday my sister, her boyfriend, and some of their friends were smoking K2 (synthetic pot, that's legal) and one of their friends decided to stab her boyfriend multiple times. Does anyone know anything about this stuff? Does it fuck you up that bad, and why would you do it? It's not like weed is that hard to find.

Wow, after last weekend I was gonna post the same question and didn't know where to ask. Last weekend we went to visit Pete's daughter in San Diego. I noticed when I went outside to smoke a cigarette, that there was a mini bong on the patio table. Thought it was odd since she's in the Navy and all. I kept my mouth shut. A short time later she asks me to join her outside where her and her roommate are filling this bong out of a little jar of what appears to be spices. I reminded her of when she was little and her mom and I would claim to be having "martinis"when we were actually getting stoned, and then asked her what this was. They both claimed it was potpourri and spices, and that it was legal, but got you high like pot... Thinking she was never much of a smoker, I figured she probably would feel more different than say, a seasoned pothead like myself... I took afew hits and thought it tasted like potpourri...not that I had ever smoked that, but I was considering looking further into it if was legal and had a good buzz to it. She said that you could get it at smokeshops, liquor stores, and head shops right over the counter. And I think she said it was about $25-40 per jar. (I'm guessing it was a 2oz size jar)

OMG, at first I thought this tastes decent, natural, and can't possibly be kick ass if it's spices and herbs, right? Let's just say that after only 4-5 bong hits, I may have discovered the smoke version of Four Loco. I actually reached a point in the buzz thinking, I hope it's done creeping up or I'm in trouble! Actually the buzz only lasted about an hour or so, but it was one interesting hour. Got home and immediately went on the internet for more info... The shit's been banned in several countries and several states here are working on bans because it's too unpredictable and not approved. Not to mention the DEA has interest in it now. I'll find an article to post.

BROKENDOLL
10-22-2010, 09:14 PM
That video of the Wallaby broke my heart down just now. Seriously? Someone had given it E and fucked with it in a room full of people?
Fucking people, sometimes...

Geno_g
10-23-2010, 11:49 AM
Fucking lame, my doctor said I have high blood pressure, freaks me out by saying I can die. After multiple appointments, blood test, and money down the drain; so I've been watching what I eat, like low sodium, and today the doctor says "your blood work came out fine and continue the diet, you can leave now..."

At least I'm ok...

BROKENDOLL
10-23-2010, 12:07 PM
Fucking lame, my doctor said I have high blood pressure, freaks me out by saying I can die. After multiple appointments, blood test, and money down the drain; so I've been watching what I eat, like low sodium, and today the doctor says "your blood work came out fine and continue the diet, you can leave now..."

At least I'm ok...
Like you said, Geno, at least you're okay, but still...that's some fine bedsidse manner he's got there...Geez...

Courtney
10-23-2010, 06:45 PM
List of things that could have better/more ergonomic/more efficient design:

ATM machines: average user is 5-6 feet, not 3 feet. Why are the screens directed at 3 feet?

Traffic cones: weighted bottoms

Earring backs: can we makes these magnetic or something so that I'm not constantly losing them?

Hannahrain
10-23-2010, 06:53 PM
You can get things fitted with screw-on backs at most jewelers, or you can get rubber earnuts that go on behind the regular back and/or on the back of a fishhook-style earring to keep the original back on or keep the hooks in. They're extremely inexpensive and very useful. You can also get replacement backs pretty easily.

Numbered street signs should have an up or down arrow on them to indicate whether you're currently facing up or down in numbers.

bballarl
10-23-2010, 07:17 PM
That Decorative Gourd Season article that Rob posted is hands down my favorite McSweeney's article. A friend posted it on Facebook a year or two ago and I almost died with laughter.

Hannahrain
10-26-2010, 11:28 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/New-species-discovered-Amazon/ss/events/sc/102610amazonspecies

Look at the new toad. It's like one guy was painting a swimming pool and another guy was painting a Chipotle restaurant and they bumped into each other partway through and things came to fisticuffs far enough away from the toad to avoid chipping the toadmurals but still close enough to give it a general sense of alarm. Look at that thing.

On second thought, it looks less like a Chipotle restaurant and more like Charlie Brown's chest area. Please make the proper adjustments to your records.

rskapcat
10-26-2010, 11:36 AM
A frog wearing a frog mask.

I.F.A.
10-26-2010, 11:36 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/New-species-discovered-Amazon/ss/events/sc/102610amazonspecies

Look at the new toad.

I wonder what happens if you lick it?

Hannahrain
10-26-2010, 11:39 AM
I wonder if I'll ever learn not to interchange frog and toad with reckless abandon. I bet I won't.

Mr. Dylanja
10-26-2010, 11:41 AM
Toadally uncool, Hannah.

Hannahrain
10-26-2010, 11:43 AM
Froget I ever mentioned it, Dyl-J.

Pixiessp
10-26-2010, 12:14 PM
I wonder what happens if you lick it?

Ask this guy

http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t18/Pixiessp/trouble8.jpg

GeezrRckr
10-26-2010, 01:41 PM
what the fuck is wrong with the board's mail server?! i've gotten like a hundred messages in the last hour...from posts made days ago. wtf?!

Gribbz
10-26-2010, 02:31 PM
Can someone recommend a good site for screensavers? Looking for one nature oriented. I've been googling, but all the sites/designs have been meh.

malcolmjamalawesome
10-26-2010, 03:50 PM
Can someone recommend a good site for screensavers? Looking for one nature oriented. I've been googling, but all the sites/designs have been meh.

Seems like this would be better served in the "Thread for People Over 60".

Courtney
10-26-2010, 04:26 PM
I install the clock on all computers within my reach, always:

http://www.9031.com/downloads/screensavers.html

fatbastard
10-26-2010, 04:48 PM
Court shuts down LimeWire music-sharing service

40 mins ago

NEW YORK (Reuters) – A U.S. federal judge on Tuesday granted the music industry's request to shut down the popular LimeWire file-sharing service, which had been found liable for copyright infringement.

The ruling by Judge Kimba Wood in Manhattan federal court halts one of the world's biggest services for letting consumers share music, movies and TV shows for free over the Internet.

Saying that LimeWire's parent Lime Wire LLC intentionally caused a "massive scale of infringement" involving thousands of works, Wood issued a permanent injunction that requires the company to disable its "searching, downloading, uploading, file trading and/or file distribution functionality."

Record companies "have suffered -- and will continue to suffer -- irreparable harm from Lime Wire's inducement of widespread infringement of their works," Wood wrote.

She called the potential damages "staggering," and probably "well beyond" the New York-based company's ability to pay.

The signed ruling was made available by The Recording Industry Association of America, which represents music companies. It has said Lime Wire has cost its members hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue. A copy of the ruling was not immediately available on the public court docket.

In a statement, Lime Wire expressed disappointment at the ruling. "While this is not our ideal path, we're working with the music industry to move forward," it said.

Lime Wire said the injunction lets it continue testing a service that allows users to buy music from independent labels. The company said it hopes to negotiate agreements with the entire music industry ahead of a full launch.

Founded in 2000 by Mark Gorton, Lime Wire has been a thorn in the side of record companies because millions of fans used it as an easy means to find and download music for free.

U.S. recorded music sales have fallen in value to $7.7 billion in 2009 from $14.5 billion in 1999 according to the RIAA. The music industry blames online and physical piracy as the primary reasons for the decline.

"MASSIVE PIRACY" ALLEGED


Tuesday's injunction "will start to unwind the massive piracy machine that Lime Wire and Gorton used to enrich themselves immensely," the RIAA said in a statement. It said the court will consider damages at a January trial.

The RIAA represents labels owned by Vivendi SA's Universal Music Group, Sony Music Entertainment, Warner Music Group and EMI Group, owned by the Terra Firma private equity firm.

LimeWire has said it has more than 50 million monthly users. These users accounted for 58 percent of people who said they downloaded music from a peer-to-peer service in 2009, a survey by NPD Group showed.

As technology and broadband speeds have improved, LimeWire has also been used to illegally share movies and popular TV shows, attracting criticism from Hollywood as well.

Wood's decision to shut the LimeWire service followed a unanimous 2005 U.S. Supreme Court ruling against file-sharing service Grokster Ltd.

In that ruling, the court said companies could be sued for copyright infringement if they distributed services designed to be used for that purpose, even if the devices could also be used lawfully.

The case is Arista Records LLC et al v Lime Group et al, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, No. 06-05936.

(Reporting by Yinka Adegoke and Jonathan Stempel; Editing by Steve Orlofsky, Bernard Orr)

Courtney
10-26-2010, 09:55 PM
Holy awesome, compete.com is my new favorite toy. So interesting.

http://i55.tinypic.com/hx6uyo.png

bballarl
10-26-2010, 09:56 PM
People were still using LimeWire?

Courtney
10-26-2010, 10:04 PM
http://i54.tinypic.com/104hg95.png

theresalwaysone
10-26-2010, 10:31 PM
http://i52.tinypic.com/2ms1o2b.png

HunterGather
10-26-2010, 11:27 PM
http://i896.photobucket.com/albums/ac163/samburgler/tv/SNICKERS.gif


Snickers Auctions Off the Original Grocery Store Lady Costume

Helloooo, Mrs. Jensen!

On YouTube and elsewhere, a lot of commenters asked SNICKERS® where they could get a costume like the one worn by the creepy grocery store lady.

Well, here’s the real thing.

We are auctioning the actual mask and robe from this year’s SNICKERS® Halloween commercial, and all proceeds will be donated to the SNICKERS® charity partner -- Feeding America.

The robe is very large with a leopard print. The mask was custom made for this commercial, so it's one-of-a-kind.

This is your chance to be a hit at Halloween parties, and donate to a great cause.

http://i985.photobucket.com/albums/ae336/samer24/Snickers20Costume20LARGE.jpg

locachica73
10-27-2010, 12:57 PM
So I woke up to find a letter from my daughter in my bathroom this morning, it says "I love you mom, you're really amazing. One day you're gonna be proud of me and like you took good care of me, I'm gonna take good care of you! You're the best mom I could ever dream of"... Her birthday is next week. I am a little nervous to find out what she is buttering me up for.

Courtney
10-27-2010, 01:02 PM
Hahaaaaa. For a second, for some reason I thought that Gunz was posting this, and I was thinking that Izzy was the smartest six year old ever.

However, coming from a teenager, this is somewhat less impressive.

locachica73
10-27-2010, 01:08 PM
She is gonna be 18 on Tuesday, maybe she is finally realizing life isn't free and I did the best I could. That is at least what I am hoping for and it isn't her way of buttering me up to tell me she is pregnant or something.

GeezrRckr
10-27-2010, 05:36 PM
just thought i'd share this with my coachella friends.

http://sf.funcheap.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/oldnavycoupon-1024x483.jpg

(make sure to read the fine print as you can use it online as well)

not an Old Navy shopper normally, but just got a nice, non-lame jacket for under $40.

TomAz
10-28-2010, 10:39 AM
Coolest office field trip ever.

One of my employees is married to an F-16 pilot at Luke AFB. Tomorrow we are taking a field trip out to the middle of the desert to one of AF target ranges. We get to sit there and watch A-10s and F-16s come in and drop bombs and shoot missiles and blow shit up.

This is gonna be awesome.

algunz
10-28-2010, 11:08 AM
Hahaaaaa. For a second, for some reason I thought that Gunz was posting this, and I was thinking that Izzy was the smartest six year old ever.

However, coming from a teenager, this is somewhat less impressive.

lol, that would be impressive if it were Izzy.

Loca, maybe she just was inspired.

Tom, that does sound cool. Have fun and take pics/video.

locachica73
10-28-2010, 11:15 AM
Loca, maybe she just was inspired.

Well she hasn't dropped any bombshells on me or asked me for anything so maybe you are right. This is the second love note she has left me in a week. The first one came with a clean room and all my laundry done. Maybe the teenager fog is lifting now that she is going to be an adult...

OY, my daughter is going to be an adult.

J~$$$$
10-28-2010, 11:47 AM
Coolest office field trip ever.

One of my employees is married to an F-16 pilot at Luke AFB. Tomorrow we are taking a field trip out to the middle of the desert to one of AF target ranges. We get to sit there and watch A-10s and F-16s come in and drop bombs and shoot missiles and blow shit up.

This is gonna be awesome.

So fucking jealous. The A-10 is an amazing killing machine.

bballarl
10-28-2010, 12:38 PM
Coolest office field trip ever.

One of my employees is married to an F-16 pilot at Luke AFB. Tomorrow we are taking a field trip out to the middle of the desert to one of AF target ranges. We get to sit there and watch A-10s and F-16s come in and drop bombs and shoot missiles and blow shit up.

This is gonna be awesome.

Make sure to bring some beer to optimize how manly this is. Way jealous.

Courtney
10-28-2010, 01:12 PM
I had a little too much fun scrolling through these and identifying the musician before reading the name: http://www.buzzfeed.com/awesomer/the-style-of-music

algunz
10-28-2010, 01:19 PM
Those were cool, but why no ladies?

BROKENDOLL
10-28-2010, 01:32 PM
Coolest office field trip ever.
One of my employees is married to an F-16 pilot at Luke AFB. Tomorrow we are taking a field trip out to the middle of the desert to one of AF target ranges. We get to sit there and watch A-10s and F-16s come in and drop bombs and shoot missiles and blow shit up.
This is gonna be awesome.

Make sure to bring some beer to optimize how manly this is. Way jealous.

Since suffacated rarely pops in anymore, I'm going to take it upon myself to brag for him...and his daughter Lindsay, who's out to sea right now on the USS Reagan gearing up for their deployment in Feb. She is what they call a "green shirt" on the flight deck. (I had no idea what that entailed until she sent pics to her dad afew days ago...) Apparently, this little month long trip is for flight qualifications, certifications, etc...The "green shirts" are the guys (and Gals) that perform various procedures in getting these jets off the carrier...
http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w18/1BROKENDOLL/HOME%20SWEET%20HOME/FAMILY%20and%20FRIENDS/39572_447507152020_212147332020_580.jpg
To say he's a proud father would be an understatement...Apparently, on the day she sent pics and a message to him, this was her job...hanging off the side of the ship helping to guide the jets off the ship.
http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w18/1BROKENDOLL/HOME%20SWEET%20HOME/FAMILY%20and%20FRIENDS/71589_161700847194392_1000006343447.jpg

http://i172.photobucket.com/albums/w18/1BROKENDOLL/HOME%20SWEET%20HOME/FAMILY%20and%20FRIENDS/38090_412560037020_212147332020_501.jpg

captncrzy
10-28-2010, 01:39 PM
I'm seriously starting to melt the fuck down.

canexplain
10-28-2010, 01:40 PM
Free KFC chicken sandwich with the purchase of a 30 oz coke.

http://clients.intrasight.net/drpepper/20101027_OctNewsletter/KFC_Coupon_Page.pdf

I.F.A.
10-28-2010, 01:55 PM
I'm seriously starting to melt the fuck down.

Deep breaths. Count to 10.

OnlyNonStranger
10-28-2010, 04:20 PM
SERENITY NOW!!!

HunterGather
10-29-2010, 01:03 PM
9CC_9aFuEkA

faxman75
10-29-2010, 01:36 PM
this
THIS
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2010/10/29/20101029phoenix-high-speed-rail.html

I.F.A.
10-29-2010, 02:13 PM
9CC_9aFuEkA

Aw, that's really sad. They must have some kind of neurological problems. :(

canexplain
10-29-2010, 02:18 PM
There is an MMJ place here having a Halloween party and costume contest. That might be interesting eh.

amyzzz
10-29-2010, 03:16 PM
this
THIS
http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2010/10/29/20101029phoenix-high-speed-rail.html
HOLY FUCK YES!!!

Hannahrain
10-29-2010, 04:54 PM
I wrote this after watching a tv show about how this elderly lady was conned out of her entire pension and savings...., the program bothered me so much that I sat down and wrote this poem !! The idea of the poem being that scam artists use all kinds of ways to scam people... as in this cake it was through a cake business ( they are very creative in their deceptions .....

"Complimentary Con Man"

There is a complimentary con man
Standing outside my door
Offering me fringe benefits
Hoping to make a score!
He has all this knowledge
The vulnerable do not see
Inside his little bag of tricks
he calls "complimentary"
He knows you have lost a spouse
While browsing through the ads
It's a secret he won't tell you
Because he knows it makes you sad
The Complimentary con man
Wears a "multiple pocket suit"
And he hides his true motives
inside the soul of a boot!
Sure he might offer "free" tickets
to your favorite game
Or salvation sold real cheap
A pyramid of winfall
Or even a new insurance prem
that won't increase!
It doesn't really matter folks
Which pocket he will choose
He markets a "deception" friend
And you are going to lose
So when this complimentary con man
Comes slithering across your path
Just give him your complimentary kick in the A--!

Just write it out. It'll be okay.

yeahfontaine
10-30-2010, 10:19 AM
Fontaine is my name and people are always begrudgingly telling me yes. Hence my screen name. Woke up out of a dream wanting to post this here. No idea why, but I see no reason to deny my subconscious its weird cravings.

MissingPerson
10-30-2010, 04:36 PM
I had wondered, and I'm not being sarcastic. And now I know, so I can move on.

yeahfontaine
10-30-2010, 06:08 PM
Nice. I guess there's always a purpose for even the most random of whims, then. Cool. Thanks for provin' it, MP.

Hannahrain
10-30-2010, 06:14 PM
I had wondered, too.

I just received a Halloween fruit basket. I a) didn't know that was a thing and b) initially thought they had the wrong apartment.

HunterGather
10-31-2010, 12:44 PM
http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lb2j84Dygs1qbd84ho1_500.jpg

meowlouder
10-31-2010, 02:12 PM
HAHAHA that's hilarious

obzen
11-01-2010, 09:30 AM
Fuck you, Monday.

malcolmjamalawesome
11-01-2010, 01:17 PM
Guest speaker in class, 40+ something law professor, just referenced "doing it for the lulz."

Yes.

TallGuyCM
11-01-2010, 01:29 PM
If you have trouble falling asleep, melatonin works wonders. You can get it at any grocery store.

OnlyNonStranger
11-01-2010, 01:44 PM
Don't over do it on the melatonin. The more you take, the less your body produces. Which inevitably leads you to an "addiction."

TallGuyCM
11-01-2010, 01:47 PM
Really? Good to know.

weeklymix
11-01-2010, 01:51 PM
I never saw much success with melatonin. Nyquil.

Pixiessp
11-01-2010, 01:53 PM
Theraflu.

Although it doesn't work as well for me as it used to. Substance abuse. :(

locachica73
11-01-2010, 01:54 PM
Sleepinall or something like that works great too. It is the PM of the Tylenol PM. I found it caused a lot less hangover feel.

rskapcat
11-01-2010, 01:56 PM
I'm at peace with my melatonin addiction.

MissingPerson
11-01-2010, 04:51 PM
They just found a car bomb at Belfast airport, and then realised that it had been there for a year after failing to go off when it was meant to.

I can't decide who's more hysterically incompetent in that case, airport security or the bombers.

OnlyNonStranger
11-01-2010, 09:10 PM
I was about to type something really insensitive.

weeklymix
11-01-2010, 09:46 PM
http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/3856/picture1fh.png
Ha... wait.

discobotica
11-01-2010, 10:09 PM
9CC_9aFuEkA


Aw, that's really sad. They must have some kind of neurological problems. :(

Even sadder, I read yesterday that they both have died due to their disorder :(

Still-ill
11-01-2010, 10:46 PM
I just heard this song. Which brought to a painful time when I actually fapped to this video when I was a Young'un.

gyef-BItce8

weeklymix
11-01-2010, 10:46 PM
discobotica: DOWNER.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
11-01-2010, 11:07 PM
I just heard this song. Which brought to a painful time when I actually fapped to this video when I was a Young'un.

gyef-BItce8

Good grief, this is horrible. Like, wow.

SoulDischarge
11-01-2010, 11:32 PM
You'll be dancing to a reconfigured version of it in the Sahara by 2012, though.

marooko
11-02-2010, 09:00 AM
I got a text this morning from a friend back east. It read: "Today's the day!! Bye bye Boxer!! Don't forget to vote,...."

That was never gonna happen. But WTF?! You got some people that don't even know what's going on around them. Then you have others that can't keep their nose out of your shit. Sure, be aware, but maybe help someone around you be aware and educated before you go across the country.

TomAz
11-03-2010, 09:32 AM
http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/29/the-dark-art-of-statistical-deception/

October 29, 2010, 3:35 pm

The Dark Art of Statistical Deception
By TARA PARKER-POPE

Will sprinters one day break the sound barrier? Do Olympic athletes win more medals if they wear red? And can a simple formula predict happiness?

While those questions may sound absurd, various studies have found a way to prove them true through statistical manipulation of numbers and data. The tendency of academics, politicians and pundits to generate such numerical falsehoods from data — and the tendency of the public to believe the results — is a phenomenon cleverly explored in the new book “Proofiness: The Dark Arts of Mathematical Deception,” by Charles Seife.

Mr. Seife, a writer and professor of journalism at New York University, makes a compelling case that numbers have a unique hold on the human mind, and that we are routinely bamboozled by phony data, bogus statistics and bad math. I recently spoke with Mr. Seife, whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Economist and elsewhere, about the role that proofiness plays in health and medical research. Here’s our conversation.

Q.What is “proofiness?”

A.It’s the mathematical analog of Stephen Colbert’s “truthiness.” It’s using numbers to prove what you know in your heart is true, even when you know it’s not. Numbers have a particular ability to fool us. It’s using that ability to turn nonsense into something that is believable with numbers.

Q.Was there any particular case or event that inspired you to dedicate an entire book to this phenomenon?

A.I’ve been gathering thread about the book since my college days. I was always a split personality, studying to be a mathematician but drawn to writing and journalism. One of the things that drove me to journalism was my annoyance at how innumerate the media seemed to be. We just don’t seem to be able to handle numbers. I wound up picking out little stories where people were deceived by numbers. I thought initially it would be a fun little book about the silly ways people’s thinking can go wrong, but it turned into something much more sinister — the idea that mathematical deception is playing a large role in the way our society was run.

Q.You write about the fact that numbers have enormous power over our thinking. Why is that?

A.From school days, we are trained to treat numbers as platonic, perfect objects. They are the closest we get to absolute truth. Two plus two always equals four. Numbers in the abstract are pure, perfect creatures. The numbers we deal with in the real world are different. They’re created by humans. And we humans are fallible. Our measurements have errors. Our research misses stuff, and we lie sometimes. The numbers we create aren’t perfect platonic ideals. They are mixed with falsehood, but we don’t recognize that.

Q.In the book you make the point that bad math can undermine both the political and judicial process. How can it affect medicine and health?

A.One of the things our minds are designed to do is pick up patterns. If you eat a bit of bad shrimp and get sick, your mind makes that association and you get an aversion to that food. We are extraordinary pattern-matchers. Anytime there is something that is happening, we try to find a cause. But sometimes in medicine, sometimes things are absolutely random. Our minds don’t accept that. We must find a cause for every effect.

A really good example is the autism issue. Whenever a parent has a child who ends up being autistic, the parent more than likely says, “What caused it? How did it happen? Is there anything I could have done differently?” This is part of the reason why people have been so down on the M.M.R. vaccine, because that seems like a proximate cause. It’s something that usually happened shortly before the autism symptoms appeared. So our minds immediately leap to the fact that the vaccine causes autism, when in fact the evidence is strong that there is no link between the M.M.R. vaccine or any other vaccines and autism.

Q.In the chapter titled “Rorschach’s Demon,” you coin the term “causuistry.” Can you explain the word?

A.Casuistry is using bogus arguments through seemingly sound principles. Causuistry is my shorthand for wrongly implying causation. The issue is that in medicine or any other field of study, it’s really easy to show that two things are linked in some manner. Something rises, something else falls. As energy consumption rises, so does life expectancy. However, it’s a fallacy to say without other evidence that one is causing the other. You can’t say building more power plants will cause us to live longer. In fact, what’s going on in this example, there is an underlying cause affecting both. The more technological a society is, the more power plants it has, the longer its people live. It’s very easy for a researcher to mistake a correlation for causation. It’s very hard to show that one thing causes the other.

Q.Can you give me another example of causuistry?

A.A number of years ago there was a study that showed the higher your credit card debt, the worse your health. The conclusion seemed to be “Don’t carry a balance on your credit card, otherwise you’ll get sick.” It’s probably just the opposite. People who are sick are running up medical bills, missing work or maybe have lost their jobs. It’s not that credit cards cause bad health. It’s that bad health causes unpaid bills on your credit card.

Q.Another word you use is “randumbness.” Can you explain it?

A.We’re hard wired to reject the idea that there’s no reason for something happening. This is how Las Vegas makes its money. You’ll have people at the craps table thinking they’re set for a winning streak because they’ve been losing. And you’ll have people who have been winning so they think they’ll keep winning. Neither is true. These events are completely random. The universe doesn’t care if you’ve been winning or losing, but our minds see these pattens we think we can exploit, and this leads us to phony beliefs.

Randumbness is our stupidity about true randomness. We are unable to accept the fact that there’s not a pattern in certain things, so we project our own beliefs and patterns on data, which is pattern-free. In the journal Nature a few years ago, some researchers analyzed a number of Olympic sports and saw that people who wore red were winning more than people who wore blue. They concluded that red confers an advantage. This is nonsense. It was a random event. In the 2008 Beijing Olympics, you can analyze the same events in the same way, and you find just the opposite. People who wore blue had a statistically significant advantage over people who wore red.

Q.One of the tools researchers use to find patterns in data is the regression analysis. Why do you call this “regression to the moon?”

A.A regression analysis is a tool for taking a set of data, a collection of points, and making sense of it with a formula. It’s a powerful technique because it allows you to present data in terms of things you think are relevant.

A good example is in economics. If you think elections are affected by the inflation rate and G.D.P. and the unemployment rate, you turn all of these things into a regression model, and you come up with a formula that predicts the president based on these variables. The problem is that if your initial assumptions don’t have a basis in reality, then it’s going to come up with an answer that makes it look like there’s a connection when in fact there isn’t. This straight regression analysis assumes everything is linear, that there’s a very simple equation that relates to these variables. But the real world isn’t linear. It’s complex.

Q.How are we harmed by “causuistry,” “randumbness” and “regression to the moon?”

A.There’s harm in bad research, and there’s harm in biased research. This is a problem the medical research community has been dealing with. We tend to think things work better or work at all when they in fact don’t. It’s undermining not just the information that doctors and consumers use, but also the scientific process in general. As people recognize that scientific studies are often not as objective and scientific as they seem, that they include biases and bad numbers, it undermines the credibility of an evidence-based medicine system.

Q.So should we be skeptical of all scientific research? Can we believe anything we read?

A.I think the biggest thing to take home is that you have the right to question research, the right to think this number doesn’t make sense. I think the best thing to do is if something doesn’t make sense to you, you’re going to learn something by examining it. Sniff it. Figure out where it’s coming from. A little degree of skepticism is usually warranted, especially when there is a number that doesn’t make sense.

yeahfontaine
11-03-2010, 10:58 AM
Hahahaha. Oh my god, the memories.

JustSteve
11-03-2010, 03:34 PM
just watched an episode of judge judy where one party was suing the other over an issue that came up with a camping ticket for coachella, nice.

Sleepingrock
11-03-2010, 03:43 PM
Our dumbass of a premier resigned today, slowly the liberals are going down :D

Courtney
11-03-2010, 03:45 PM
just watched an episode of judge judy where one party was suing the other over an issue that came up with a camping ticket for coachella, nice.

What was the issue?

JustSteve
11-03-2010, 03:55 PM
dude bought a camping ticket, made a deal with random chick to share it, she paid him $250. gave her ticket since she was arriving first. ends up her cell phone died, she didn't have charger, and he couldn't contact her to meet up all weekend.

here's the description from the judge judy website:
"A man searches for three days for his camping site at the popular Coachella music festival; after failing to find it, he sues the teenager with whom he was supposed to share the site."

anyone know a christopher canaan(sp?) or maia combs? they were the 2 douchenozzles embarrassing themselves on this drivel.

and i have now spent too much time with this topic.

Still-ill
11-03-2010, 04:04 PM
Good grief, this is horrible. Like, wow.

That's why it was worth sharing.

Courtney
11-03-2010, 04:58 PM
I'm finding the recently published NEA study on outdoor arts festivals (http://nea.gov/research/ResearchReports_chrono.html) most interesting. Key tidbits:


-Women outnumber men at festivals 55% to 45% (the US population is 51%/49%)

-71% of festivals generate revenue through corporate sponsorship of some sort

-Music festivals are the highest money earners out of all the art forms

-Only 5% of festivals have chosen to increase their entrance fees in 2010 as a response to lower revenue

-The most common type of music festival is jazz festivals, followed by blues. Rock/pop festivals are down at #5.


I have come to the conclusion that I may enjoy statistics a little too much.

MissingPerson
11-03-2010, 05:10 PM
JAZZ?!?!?!!?

Goddamn.

psychic friend
11-03-2010, 05:25 PM
1st person to PM me their snail mail I will send something goofy to.

you must post pics upon arrival

psychic friend
11-03-2010, 05:28 PM
DONE

MissingPerson
11-03-2010, 05:29 PM
Can surrender monkeys get in on the action?

EDIT: Aw, nevermind. Our laidback European worth ethic strikes again.

psychic friend
11-03-2010, 05:31 PM
http://chzsomuchpun.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/984dfe58-a3a0-4497-8c75-14a4697f3195.jpg

Courtney
11-03-2010, 05:36 PM
Gosh darn it. TOO SLOOOOWWWWWWWWWWWWW.

MissingPerson
11-03-2010, 09:56 PM
It turns out the reason my mam was weird to me on the phone a while back was because I was a bitch to her in a dream.