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View Full Version : Flying Lotus??? Really?



mikeycarbajal
05-04-2010, 01:48 PM
Am i the only one that hasnt jumped on this "shoes-in-a-dryer" bandwagon....his live performances are so lame and un-groovy. i give him his credit for his album/studio work. but live? just sucks ass, bass is cool....but in some kind of pattern/beat. Am i wrong? am i missing something?

Flammenwerfer
05-04-2010, 02:00 PM
Yes, you are wrong, you are not just missing something, you are missing everything.

Try again.

Check him out on his tour for Cosmogramma. Give it another chance.

mikeycarbajal
05-04-2010, 02:12 PM
word.
maybe the third times a charm

RoughSteez
05-04-2010, 02:15 PM
Yes, you are wrong, you are not just missing something, you are missing everything.

Try again.

Check him out on his tour for Cosmogramma. Give it another chance.

QFT

The entire Gobi erupted when he finished his set because he is THAT awesome live.

choice cat
05-04-2010, 02:16 PM
he was suupposed to be at the clubhouse in the campgrounds on saturday right ? supposedly he didnt show

RoughSteez
05-04-2010, 02:20 PM
yup



Due to his set time in the Gobi his management decided it wouldn't work doing the campgrounds aswell so Seven from Tempa U.K played Flylo's slot in the Campgrounds.

choice cat
05-04-2010, 02:25 PM
that makes sense. it didnt make sense to me why he would be billed on the official line up , then come back to play the clubhouse. woulda been cool though

mikeycarbajal
05-04-2010, 02:35 PM
too bad he sucks was better off where ever he was

dahboom
05-04-2010, 04:26 PM
Am i the only one that hasnt jumped on this "shoes-in-a-dryer" bandwagon....his live performances are so lame and un-groovy. i give him his credit for his album/studio work. but live? just sucks ass, bass is cool....but in some kind of pattern/beat. Am i wrong? am i missing something?

It's ok man you don't need to like him cause everyone else says he's good? You gave it a fair shot, just not your thing. NEXT right?

For those of us who do...

RoughSteez is right, the Gobi went ape shit at the end of his set! He got a lot of love there, I was even like wow! The energy in the gobi was 1000 times better than the crowds in some of the other big name groups I saw for the whole weekend.

Devin the Dude
05-04-2010, 04:38 PM
Every one of the three times I've seen Flying Lotus he has one-upped his previous performance, musically and stylistically. His glitchy, non-tempo take on electronic is extremely different and sometimes he comes off as improvised or indirect. Well, that's exactly what he is. Flying Lotus isn't quite a DJ or a producer, he isn't quite a musician. He is something in Limbo, an artist and a music-maker, and certainly nothing typical.

Fucking. Love. Him.

RoughSteez
05-04-2010, 04:53 PM
Dev you going to any of the echoplex shows?

Flammenwerfer
05-04-2010, 05:07 PM
I'll be there on the 15th, attempting to see beyond infinity once again.

frazzles
05-04-2010, 05:18 PM
Worthless thread.

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djandrews25
05-04-2010, 06:20 PM
You arent alone OP, i couldnt stand any of the times ive seen him. At least 4, everytime i was immensely annoyed and promised myself it would be the last.

mikeycarbajal
05-04-2010, 08:16 PM
It's ok man you don't need to like him cause everyone else says he's good? You gave it a fair shot, just not your thing. NEXT right?

For those of us who do...

RoughSteez is right, the Gobi went ape shit at the end of his set! He got a lot of love there, I was even like wow! The energy in the gobi was 1000 times better than the crowds in some of the other big name groups I saw for the whole weekend.

word.....i can dig

zimmy1222
05-04-2010, 08:18 PM
You arent alone OP, i couldnt stand any of the times ive seen him. At least 4, everytime i was immensely annoyed and promised myself it would be the last.

not enough untz...

unit300021
05-04-2010, 08:51 PM
did not catch him this year, and do not really listen to his studio stuff, but him in the dome in 09 was amazing, considering there really was not that many people until the very end when everything else finished and he was still going on. but year he was awesome in the dome

rasooli
05-04-2010, 10:44 PM
Are you fucking serious??? I've been to over 80 shows in my lifetime and his Gobi performance this year might of been the best one I've ever been to. He gave everything he had in that act, and the people at the Gobi gave him what could be deemed as a 10 minute standing ovation if it was a more formal setting. He himself was taken aback by the response he got from the crowd once he finished. He is THAT amazing. I wouldn't miss his show for the world....and as a matter of fact I'm considering driving all the way from the Bay Area (8 hour drive) just to see his echo show. As DTD was saying, there is NO ONE like him in the music industry, his sound, the way he performs, the way his video background mixed with his music, etc. are just so unique. I feel some bands get too much hype/are overrated, but this DEFINITELY isn't the case with Flying Lotus. His performance at Coachella this year was one for the ages, and i for one think it rivals portishead 08/daft punk 06/rage against the machine 07, etc.

zamuelwashington
05-04-2010, 11:56 PM
mikeycarbajal dude you are dumb. If you don't get Flying Lotus live then go listen to Kenny G or John Bieber, music lovers appreciate the work of art from this guy.

Mucho Maas
05-04-2010, 11:59 PM
This set is way up there on my regrets list....definitely trying to catch one of those echo shows....and, judging by the studio albums and the live footage i've seen, this guy is amazing.

CrimesceneCookie
05-05-2010, 02:38 AM
I do love the "shoes in a dryer" expression though.

ADrunkPoet
05-05-2010, 02:41 AM
Don't feed the trolls.

fnmore
05-05-2010, 05:02 AM
u can listen to the new record here

Thom Yorke is on one song http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=125767061

alterboy
05-05-2010, 08:19 AM
Am i the only one that hasnt jumped on this "shoes-in-a-dryer" bandwagon....his live performances are so lame and un-groovy. i give him his credit for his album/studio work. but live? just sucks ass, bass is cool....but in some kind of pattern/beat. Am i wrong? am i missing something?

Yeah, it is complete crap.

Apparently if you do alot of drugs, it somehow becomes listenable and has some worth....which is obviously a weak way for something to become "good".

There is an entire generation brought up on hip hop/electronic garbage that simply have no clue about music. Its sad really. I just feel like all the people who are so passionately supportive of such simplistic and rudamentary and fake "music" are being duped and are foolish. As far as the performance, wtf was that?....dude stands in front of a laptop pretending to do something and that is somehow a "performance"? Its all so weak.

And yeah....there are are a ton of people who are going to flame me for my opinion, but let me remind you that half this country is filled with morons who simply do not get anything, need an example? I will refer you to the Bush elections....so many retards.

frazzles
05-05-2010, 08:25 AM
Not that it matters, but I didn't do any drugs during his set (or at all the entire weekend) and immensely enjoyed it.

FoxeyLady
05-05-2010, 09:34 AM
http://www.thisisbrandx.com/2010/05/flying-lotus-is-the-king-of-la-electronic-music-but-he-wants-more.html

In October 2008, while Steven Ellison's mother lay dying in a hospital bed, he was at her side recording her.

The L.A.-based musician, who records abstract electronic music as Flying Lotus, brought in a mobile recording rig and gathered audio samples: the hypnotic wheeze of a respirator, the ambient pings of vital-sign monitors.

In the stillness and sadness of his mother's last days, he found comfort in the rhythms of the machines.

“I know it was a weird thing to do,” Ellison said. “I'm not the type to go out recording things like that. But I didn't want to forget that space.”

For Ellison, music exists in those kinds of transcendent spaces. The 26-year-old wants his jazz-infused and beat-centric electronic compositions to evoke daydreams, hazy memories, drug trips and even the dim hours between life and death.

It's a difficult, immersive style in the spirit of his great-aunt, jazz composer Alice Coltrane. But it's also made him a superstar in the thriving Los Angeles electronic music underground, particularly at the Low End Theory club series in Lincoln Heights. With his new album, “Cosmogramma,” which came out Tuesday, Ellison may well become famous outside of that scene as well.

Erykah Badu and Radiohead's Thom Yorke sing on the album. Lotus' earlier remix of Kanye West's “Love Lockdown” turned mainstream hip-hop ears, and a generation of twentysomethings know his music for Cartoon Network's gonzo “Adult Swim” series.

“Hendrix obliterated the boundaries with guitars as Lotus does with electronic machines,” said Mary Anne Hobbs, the influential BBC Radio 1 DJ. “His live performance is totally incendiary, melting devastating primal sound and visual art into a hyper-sensory experience.”

Ellison is a prodigious marijuana smoker — on opening his door to a reporter, he mock-grumbled, “It smells like weed in here.” A steep stairway to his basement studio — piled with synthesizers, vinyl albums and Ellison's artwork — is treacherous enough while sober.

Many artists explore space travel and altered states. And like them, Lotus balances that sensibility with a maniacal devotion to his craft. “Cosmogramma” might be the most difficult work to come out of Los Angeles this year. Given the mind-bending new releases from rising Low End peers Shlohmo, Ras G and the Glitch Mob, that's a real feat.

“My time working with Steve was one of the most treasured, rewarding things I've done,” said Kevin Moo, a.k.a. Daddy Kev, the founder of Low End Theory who mastered the “Cosmogramma” LP. “But a mastering job that normally takes a few hours wound up lasting four months.”

Paradoxically, as Ellison's work grew more esoteric, his audience grew. He recently toured with Yorke's new band Atoms for Peace, and last month he performed at Coachella. Alone before a jubilant tent of thousands, he brought forth a hail of broken beats and blissed-out synthesizers. “You just look out and see girls losing it,” he said in disbelief. “You feel like you could just play air horn all night and they'd still love you.”

--August Brown

Haha, maybe the OP has a point...

In all seriousness though, this guy is truly on some next level shit when it comes to electronic music. As a fan of guys like J Dilla and Madlib, this guy takes what they do and pretty much sends it into hyperspace. If you listened to it and don't like it, then it's just not for you. Maybe you're just not a fan of beat music...? but to say this guy has no talent is completely retarded. He is so incredibly unique and his style is constantly evolving. 1983, Los Angeles and Cosmogramma are proof of this. This is what the future sounds like people. One day you'll appreciate it. Until then, more room for us!

SP The Ghost
05-05-2010, 09:47 AM
I didn't do enough drugs and didn't enjoy it as much as I could have. More drugs please!

FoxeyLady
05-05-2010, 10:00 AM
I was sober and loved every second of it. If you can't enjoy the music without drugs then why listen?

CellarOwl
05-05-2010, 10:15 AM
Apparently if you do alot of drugs, it somehow becomes listenable and has some worth....which is obviously a weak way for something to become "good".

Tiesto has based an entire career around this theory.

missleslie
05-05-2010, 11:08 AM
I don't get all the hating. If you don't like it, don't listen. That leaves more space at the show for those of us who like it.

RoughSteez
05-05-2010, 12:13 PM
Whoa. You couldn't be anymore wrong.

Just because you don't like the type of music doesn't make it shitty.

Your complaints are laughable. Please come back when you have vaild points of critique. You sound like an idiot with a chip on his shoulder.


Yeah, it is complete crap.

Apparently if you do alot of drugs, it somehow becomes listenable and has some worth....which is obviously a weak way for something to become "good".

There is an entire generation brought up on hip hop/electronic garbage that simply have no clue about music. Its sad really. I just feel like all the people who are so passionately supportive of such simplistic and rudamentary and fake "music" are being duped and are foolish. As far as the performance, wtf was that?....dude stands in front of a laptop pretending to do something and that is somehow a "performance"? Its all so weak.

Devin the Dude
05-05-2010, 12:28 PM
What is rudimentary or simplistic about a style of music that perplexes you? Dumb post. :/

greghead
05-05-2010, 12:31 PM
Of the 7 times I've seen FlyLo, he's always evolving and constantly out-doing himself. Dude is the truth. But if you don't dig it, you don't dig it; move on.

Sweet Berry Wine!

Devin the Dude
05-05-2010, 12:34 PM
I understand why people with different tastes wouldn't like him. But a lot of the criticisms given in this thread are laughable.

phonographer
05-05-2010, 12:37 PM
My fellow posters.

Download their trippy thingamajig.

http://flying-lotus.com/fieldlines

"Cosmogramma Fieldlines is a free augmented reality application to celebrate the imminent release of the new Flying Lotus album ‘Cosmogramma’. It can be controlled with your webcam or mouse.

Cosmogramma Fieldlines was developed by Aaron Meyers with sound design by Flying Lotus and harp by Rebekah Raff. Based on the artwork by Leigh J. McCloskey."

NoGwenPlease
05-06-2010, 01:10 PM
My fellow posters.

Download their trippy thingamajig.

http://flying-lotus.com/fieldlines

"Cosmogramma Fieldlines is a free augmented reality application to celebrate the imminent release of the new Flying Lotus album ‘Cosmogramma’. It can be controlled with your webcam or mouse.

Cosmogramma Fieldlines was developed by Aaron Meyers with sound design by Flying Lotus and harp by Rebekah Raff. Based on the artwork by Leigh J. McCloskey."
Wow that thing is amazing. After getting done playing with it, I immediately bought the album.

Marketing Ploy FTW! I already had the album downloaded.. but it's definitely worth it.

NoGwenPlease
05-06-2010, 01:28 PM
Yeah, it is complete crap.

Apparently if you do alot of drugs, it somehow becomes listenable and has some worth....which is obviously a weak way for something to become "good".

There is an entire generation brought up on hip hop/electronic garbage that simply have no clue about music. Its sad really. I just feel like all the people who are so passionately supportive of such simplistic and rudamentary and fake "music" are being duped and are foolish. As far as the performance, wtf was that?....dude stands in front of a laptop pretending to do something and that is somehow a "performance"? Its all so weak.

And yeah....there are are a ton of people who are going to flame me for my opinion, but let me remind you that half this country is filled with morons who simply do not get anything, need an example? I will refer you to the Bush elections....so many retards.
I'm not "flaming" you, but his jazz influence is very musical and apparent. If you can't see that you don't know what the fuck you're talking about and should honestly not take part in musical discussion.

I've actually studied music as a profession. This is as real as it gets. What do you do?

CurableOkie
05-07-2010, 12:17 AM
I'm not "flaming" you, but his jazz influence is very musical and apparent. If you can't see that you don't know what the fuck you're talking about and should honestly not take part in musical discussion.

I've actually studied music as a profession. This is as real as it gets. What do you do?

Have we pointed out that his aunt is/was Alice Coltrane? A name I'm sure the people hating on FlyLo will not recognize... but that's why he has a couple track's called Auntie, and why LA was dedicated to Auntie.

But honestly, get Cosmogramma, skip to "Arkestry" listen to the jazz breakdown in the middle and tell me ONE OTHER PERSON that can do that and pull it off in modern music. Immediately after a track featuring Thom Yorke nevertheless.

And he's a Tim & Eric fan!! I mean he can't get much more perfect, guys.

alterboy
05-07-2010, 05:41 AM
I'm not "flaming" you, but his jazz influence is very musical and apparent. If you can't see that you don't know what the fuck you're talking about and should honestly not take part in musical discussion.

I've actually studied music as a profession. This is as real as it gets. What do you do?

So....you are impressed with his SAMPLING of jazz? :massive eyeroll:

And hey, y'all can like his output...the cd's and whatever....but try not to fool yourselves into believing a dude standing on a stage hitting "Play" on a laptop is an actual performance, its not and I think y'all are retards for buying into that.

RoughSteez
05-07-2010, 08:46 AM
So....you are impressed with his SAMPLING of jazz? :massive eyeroll:

And hey, y'all can like his output...the cd's and whatever....but try not to fool yourselves into believing a dude standing on a stage hitting "Play" on a laptop is an actual performance, its not and I think y'all are retards for buying into that.

You continue to astound me with your ignorance.

Just get the fuck over it dude. Move on. You've proved you know very little about music already.

FoxeyLady
05-07-2010, 08:51 AM
So....you are impressed with his SAMPLING of jazz? :massive eyeroll:



Actually on his new album most of the jazz stuff is live instrumentation.

FoxeyLady
05-07-2010, 08:56 AM
http://blogs.laweekly.com/westcoastsound/off-the-record/flying-lotus-announces-live-band-cosmogramma-release/

It's been a fertile past few years for music in L.A., and Lotus' third album is a bit of a milestone, drawing from both the electronic production associated with Low End Theory and the city's current crop of soulful instrumentalists.

Which is to say: incredible beats + live music. Now it looks as if that combination will hit the Echoplex on May 15 as the second night in back-to-back Cosmogramma release shows.

Lotus will debuting his live band, dubbed "∞" on a night that includes performances from his cousin, renowned saxophonist Ravi Coltrane, Low End resident DJ the Gaslamp Killer, space-travellin' swami-type Gonjasufi, and sound artist Matthewdavid.

The membership of the band hasn't yet been announced, but we're willing to bet that at least one of those (ahem, Ravi) will be a part of it. And we'd hope that Cosmogramma guests Rebekah Raff (harp), Thundercat (bass) and Miguel Atwood-Ferguson (strings) would be on hand too.

The previous night is equally exciting in its own right. Lotus and his visually inclined right-hand man Dr. Strangeloop will be throwing an "A/V set" backed by a souped-up soundsystem. Says Low End promoter and show organizer Daddy Kev:

"We're trying to make people levitate. You're gonna feel like you don't know where the floor is."

Also performing on May 14 are beat-makers Ras G, Samiyam, Dr. Strangeloop (music set), and Kutmah, plus emcee Jeremiah Jae. So, basically, it's a Flying Lotus festival.

yes

RoughSteez
05-07-2010, 09:08 AM
^^ Thats whats up!

Anyone catch him at Amoeba last night?

gimmeth3night
05-07-2010, 02:18 PM
So....you are impressed with his SAMPLING of jazz? :massive eyeroll:

And hey, y'all can like his output...the cd's and whatever....but try not to fool yourselves into believing a dude standing on a stage hitting "Play" on a laptop is an actual performance, its not and I think y'all are retards for buying into that.

First off, it wasn't sampling of jazz :massive eyeroll:

Second, I'd love to see you walk up there and hit the same "Play" button he does and perform even half as well as he does. I would get RETARD tattooed across my forehead on the spot if you can pull it off.

gimmeth3night
05-07-2010, 02:58 PM
johnny rotten is a god

Are you kidding? I was raised on punk and love it to this day, but come on now. Let's get real here.

And then you bash on electronic music for not being an actual performance? For some house music, yeah, it can be really fucking simple. But in no way is punk music more difficult to perform than something that Flying Lotus pulls off. I've played in punk bands and I do some production and DJ work. Loving punk (which hasn't had a groundbreaking act in god knows how long) and bashing FlyLo is just sheer ignorance. If it's not your cup of tea mr rotten, that's cool. But if you don't understand music that doesn't have traditional sounds and chord progressions, just shut up. Clearly it's over your head.

sleepybrew
05-07-2010, 03:07 PM
the first time i realized electronic artists weren't simply pushing "play" was when i saw DJ Shadow in SF in '02. he was playing the song "organ donor" and it was fucking incredible. there were cameras on stage that showed what his hands were doing all the time and his sense of time signature, keeping a melody and improvising all at the same time was amazing. then the song kept getting more and more complicated and at one point he missed a beat and the needle dug into the record and he lost timing and fucked up the organ part. he then stepped back and said "well fuck, i'm sorry about that. well, at least you know i'm not up here just pushing buttons." he then went on the play Midnight in a Perfect World and High Noon. It was fucking sick.

The argument saying that EDM live is just people pushing buttons is retarded. Doesn't a pianist "just push buttons". There is a helluva lot going on and the talent (if done right) is absolutely incredible and requires a lot of skill.

sleepybrew
05-07-2010, 03:08 PM
oh. and Flying Lotus is dope. Cosmogramma is rad, but I still think i like Los Angeles better.

RoughSteez
05-07-2010, 03:21 PM
Yeah the decades old argument that dj's just push play has been regurgitated so many times it's become annoying to debate.

On a side note: Sleepy, I lurk the beer thread and came across your blog in your sig. Good shit, I really want to try that Amber Ale you last talked about. Im not too knowledgable about beer, other than i know what i like, so it's all very interesting to read.

sleepybrew
05-07-2010, 03:33 PM
Steez, thanks for reading! The blog is kinda lame, but it's a way for me to have a little fun and pass the time at 2 in the morning when i get off work. Join in on the beer thread! the best way to learn more about beer is just to drink more :) i think most of us in the thread are half buzzed when we're in there anyway and always welcome any recommendations and opinions. cheers

Jman4321
05-10-2010, 02:45 PM
Honestly I got pretty bored during this performance.

It's a shame, because I really love Cosmogramma and Los Angeles, however I guess that music like that out of the context of me listening to it through my stereo or headphones doesn't energize me as much.

mikeycarbajal
05-11-2010, 02:45 PM
Are you fucking serious??? I've been to over 80 shows in my lifetime and his Gobi performance this year might of been the best one I've ever been to. He gave everything he had in that act, and the people at the Gobi gave him what could be deemed as a 10 minute standing ovation if it was a more formal setting. He himself was taken aback by the response he got from the crowd once he finished. He is THAT amazing. I wouldn't miss his show for the world....and as a matter of fact I'm considering driving all the way from the Bay Area (8 hour drive) just to see his echo show. As DTD was saying, there is NO ONE like him in the music industry, his sound, the way he performs, the way his video background mixed with his music, etc. are just so unique. I feel some bands get too much hype/are overrated, but this DEFINITELY isn't the case with Flying Lotus. His performance at Coachella this year was one for the ages, and i for one think it rivals portishead 08/daft punk 06/rage against the machine 07, etc.



sorry to hear you been to 80+ shitty performances

elChurro
05-11-2010, 02:58 PM
Cosmogrammer's too noisey, i prefer the older stuff.

RageAgainst
05-11-2010, 03:48 PM
Are you fucking serious??? I've been to over 80 shows in my lifetime and his Gobi performance this year might of been the best one I've ever been to. He gave everything he had in that act, and the people at the Gobi gave him what could be deemed as a 10 minute standing ovation if it was a more formal setting. He himself was taken aback by the response he got from the crowd once he finished. He is THAT amazing. I wouldn't miss his show for the world....and as a matter of fact I'm considering driving all the way from the Bay Area (8 hour drive) just to see his echo show. As DTD was saying, there is NO ONE like him in the music industry, his sound, the way he performs, the way his video background mixed with his music, etc. are just so unique. I feel some bands get too much hype/are overrated, but this DEFINITELY isn't the case with Flying Lotus. His performance at Coachella this year was one for the ages, and i for one think it rivals portishead 08/daft punk 06/rage against the machine 07, etc.

Lol in no waay was that set better than dafts or rages,ok i love some of fly lo's stuff amazing producer and inventor of this strange genre i just cant dance to it alot of the times i get lost or bored i need a tempo :( cosmograma is a fun listen tho

jusbcus25
05-11-2010, 08:24 PM
Dubstep sets are so boring and repetitive. I love all types of music and have tried time and time again to except dubstep but it just hasn't sucked me in. The only thing that is appealing is the bass. This sounds like the same argument junglist made when drum and bass got big. Then wobble or clownstep took drum and bass by storm and killed the scene. Now the same people who hated wobble are the same people who are producing and showcasing dubstep. How is this genre so groundbreaking? Can someone please explain this to me? Doesn't anyone remember a genre called Garage, pretty much the same shit. My friend was rocking garage sets back in '96 and people hated it cause trance was the big thing back then but he still played it cause he loved it. I found a mix tape of his from 1997 and it sounds almost exact to this so called new and groundbreaking music everyone is in a uproar about. The next big thing will come around and it will die out eventually.

FoxeyLady
05-11-2010, 08:30 PM
I you were at his set or you heard any of his albums, you would know that it isn't dubstep. He uses some elements of dubstep in his music, but his style is completely different than say, Rusko or all that other crap that sounds exactly the same.

jusbcus25
05-12-2010, 12:11 PM
I you were at his set or you heard any of his albums, you would know that it isn't dubstep. He uses some elements of dubstep in his music, but his style is completely different than say, Rusko or all that other crap that sounds exactly the same.

You're right, he is more trip hop and glitch type sound. When I saw him a year ago he played almost all dubstep and I skipped him this year at Coachella. But I still don't like dubstep.

quicksand
05-12-2010, 01:18 PM
I you were at his set or you heard any of his albums, you would know that it isn't dubstep.

For fucks sake.

fatbastard
05-12-2010, 01:48 PM
I preferred Glitch Mob to Flying Lotus.

Neither are going to change the world, but one has to admit that both do count in moving the scrimmage line forward (even if it may only be inches), in the game of electronic music.

mikeycarbajal
05-13-2010, 08:39 AM
Lol in no waay was that set better than dafts or rages,ok i love some of fly lo's stuff amazing producer and inventor of this strange genre i just cant dance to it alot of the times i get lost or bored i need a tempo :( cosmograma is a fun listen tho

i agree....not danceable and boring


Dubstep sets are so boring and repetitive. I love all types of music and have tried time and time again to except dubstep but it just hasn't sucked me in. The only thing that is appealing is the bass. This sounds like the same argument junglist made when drum and bass got big. Then wobble or clownstep took drum and bass by storm and killed the scene. Now the same people who hated wobble are the same people who are producing and showcasing dubstep. How is this genre so groundbreaking? Can someone please explain this to me? Doesn't anyone remember a genre called Garage, pretty much the same shit. My friend was rocking garage sets back in '96 and people hated it cause trance was the big thing back then but he still played it cause he loved it. I found a mix tape of his from 1997 and it sounds almost exact to this so called new and groundbreaking music everyone is in a uproar about. The next big thing will come around and it will die out eventually.

dubstep is very repetitive....

evasquez7
05-13-2010, 04:35 PM
Go take a bong toke, put his album on and come back and tell me hes not amazing.

RoughSteez
05-13-2010, 06:25 PM
i agree....not danceable and boring



dubstep is very repetitive....

Not danceable? That's hilarious because everyone around me was groovin so hard the entire time. The tent was packed as fuck with people dancing.

Weird right?

Josesativa
05-13-2010, 07:22 PM
I preferred Glitch Mob to Flying Lotus.

Neither are going to change the world, but one has to admit that both do count in moving the scrimmage line forward (even if it may only be inches), in the game of electronic music.

this.

glitch mob was pretty fucking sick flying lotus was chill as fuck but they lost me halfway through the set.

Still-ill
05-13-2010, 07:31 PM
this.

glitch mob was pretty fucking sick flying lotus was chill as fuck but they lost me halfway through the set.

Astounding. So many fuck-ups in so few words... alias

FoxeyLady
05-13-2010, 09:46 PM
"they"

lunatic core
05-13-2010, 09:54 PM
Cosmogramma is amazing.

mikeycarbajal
05-14-2010, 07:37 AM
i can dig the albums.....just the live shit sucks anus
and i seen him twice....both at coachella

fatbastard
05-14-2010, 09:34 AM
Flying Lotus Rising
Could spiritual electronica be the next great California sound?
By Chris Martins
published: May 13, 2010
PHOTO BY STAR FOREMAN
http://blogs.laweekly.com/westcoastsound/Flying%20Lotus.jpg
The Cosmogrammarian: Steven Ellison, aka Flying Lotus
PHOTO BY STAR FOREMAN

Flying Lotus "is like Hendrix — he's completely torn up the rule book in electronic music," says BBC DJ Mary Anne Hobbs.There are drumrolls and arpeggiating bass notes. Cascades of harp and dancing cymbals. Sounds swirling in thick air, knocking into wood-paneled walls and chasing one another around the living room of the Echo Park cottage until they pass, like the wind, through a cracked front door.

Through the window, the source is visible. Amid a handful of musicians, a man stalks the room. He pinches his chin and listens intently. He stops the players to give direction. They start again and he jots notes into a green journal filled with arcane diagrams. This is Steven Ellison, aka Flying Lotus — electronic musician, Los Angeles native, force of nature.

Cut to: the previous night, same house, a floor below that beautiful cacophony. The view from Ellison's basement studio is a bit more what you'd expect from a 26-year-old. There's gluey smoke in the air, ash on everything, low shelves crammed with ashy vinyl, and an ash-gray plastic folding table cluttered with keyboards and ash-dusted hard drives.

All that trickles in from upstairs is the sound of Teebs, Ellison's contemporary in the vibrant L.A. beat scene, playing Xbox via a wall-width projector screen, sinking into the same couch that'll be piled with instrument cases the next afternoon. Down here, Ellison's demeanor fits his age: He's thoughtful, unguarded and (only figuratively) wide-eyed.

I've just asked him how it felt to: (a) remix Radiohead's "Reckoner" in 2008, and (b) now count Thom Yorke among his collaborators on the new Flying Lotus album, Cosmogramma.

"How would you feel?" he almost whispers. "I do a reality check in the morning. Am I here? Is this really happening right now? Is this really my third record?"

But Ellison isn't naive — he's just grateful. And he has every reason to be far more confident than he lets on in interviews. That third record is a potential game-changer for electronica, instrumental hip-hop and jazz — hell, maybe even post-rock and the avant-garde.

Cosmogramma builds upon the thick, deep soulfulness of 2008's largely laptop-produced Los Angeles LP by adding loads of live instrumentation and diverse musical modes, so that it's nigh-on impossible to pry the organic from the digital, or to untangle historic nods from left-field futurisms. It's a magnum opus, imbued with a tangible mysticism.

"My aunt had an ashram in Agoura full of devotees," says Ellison. "And I was listening to one of her recorded discourses talking about how once this earthly experience is over, we won't be wearing our costumes anymore, playing parts in this 'cosmic drama,' she called it.

"But I thought she said 'cosmogramma.' That word haunted me for a long time until I found out it actually exists. It refers to the study of the universe, and heaven and hell as well."

You can't get very far in the Flying Lotus story without addressing Ellison's rarefied heritage.

He grew up in Winnetka, a Valley burg about 20 minutes east of the sprawling Vedic temple founded in 1983 by his great-aunt Alice Coltrane, harpist, pianist and wife of jazz great John Coltrane. Ellison was raised by his mother, Tammy, and grandmother Marilyn McLeod, a former Motown songwriter responsible for Diana Ross' 1976 disco hit "Love Hangover."

His father was absent, but he had older brothers, in effect, in his cousins Ravi and Oran Coltrane — both sax players. The two families were incredibly close. They lived just blocks apart before the Northridge temblor brought down Ellison's first home. ("Shaped by a quake," he quips.)

"He was a cool little kid, man," says Ravi, 44, calling from Brooklyn. "He had some chops too. He could do things that other kids couldn't — freakish things. He memorized all the dialogue to Ghostbusters when he was 3 or 4. He'd playact the scenes, mimicking the motions too."

Film was Ellison's first love. When he wasn't playing video games, he'd make stop-motion shorts starring Ninja Turtles figures. He didn't have many friends outside the family, but family was enough. Ravi sneaked him into Hollywood jazz clubs when he had gigs, and Oran would invite him over to tinker in his home studio. He also gave Ellison his first instrument.

"It was a Roland MC-505 Groovebox," says Oran, who lives in Woodland Hills. "I'd made some beats on it and wanted his opinion so I brought it over. He started playing with it, so I just gave it to him. I said, 'Look, dude, I think you could do more with it than I could.' The amount of songs he had written within a year or so was incredible."

"That opened up everything for me," Ellison recalls. He was about 15 at the time. "I didn't really know my place in the family legacy. I knew I wasn't trying to do the music they were doing — I knew I didn't want to play horn. That was like, 'Oh, wow, now I see my part in this thing.'"

He did do some time on alto sax in the school band, but mainly took away a love of drum and bass — "the fastest, craziest sounds I had ever heard" — after borrowing a tape from the tuba player. West Coast gangsta rap had also been a heady intoxicant for Ellison, a mix of local pride, teenage defiance and appreciation for G-funk's infatuation with melody.

But Ellison's initial fling with music was short. He lost direction in high school and, after a brief stint "selling weed for no reason," wound up at a continuation school.

"I lived in the Valley," he says. "No one fucking cared about what a 16-year-old beat-maker had to say back then. It wasn't anything."

So he finished up, packed up and left for film school in San Francisco.

The ground floor of Ellison's apartment is brimming with DVDs and still-packed moving boxes — signs of his abdicated career path, and symptoms of his current one, respectively. The living room's lone decoration is a gigantic portrait of Alice Coltrane by L.A. artist Kofie. An adjacent den houses a piano, more boxes and a coffee table with a half-eaten Subway pita on it.

There's no rest for the figurehead of the new, internationally heralded West Coast sound. Ellison moved into his cozy hillside abode about eight months ago, but between finishing Cosmogramma, touring and fielding ravenous press, there's been no time to settle. And now he's prepping his album collaborators for their live debut at a May 15 record-release show.

Ellison's new musical steadies are an intimidating pack: harpist Rebekah Raff (Ghostface Killah, Partch Ensemble, daKAH Hip Hop Orchestra), bassist Thundercat (Suicidal Tendencies, Snoop Dogg, Sa-Ra Creative Partners), string arranger Miguel Atwood-Ferguson (Suite for Ma Dukes, OutKast, John Cale), plus Ravi and others. But this is where Ellison is unflinching, confident.

"It's almost like playing with a classical musician," says Thundercat. "Steve knows his craft. There's no hesitation and he's great at what he does. He's in a class of his own. There's nobody that sounds like Flying Lotus."

Ironically, it was while studying cinema at the S.F. Academy of Art that Ellison discovered his calling. In his first year, he met David Wexler, the grandson of Oscar-winning cinematographer Haskell Wexler who's since ditched Hollywood to become the video artist Dr. Strangeloop.

"I really do feel like the reason I even moved there was to meet him," says Ellison. "Because he was that kid I should have grown up with. We both lived in L.A. — we just missed each other. He was there for film too, but he'd be making music on his laptop in the hallway, which at the time just blew my mind. I was like, 'What? How is this possible? You're making it sound like that?'"

"We weren't finding much interest in our classes," Wexler says. His improvised projections are a staple of the Flying Lotus live set. He's also released music on Brainfeeder, the label that Ellison founded in 2008. "It was more about smoking weed, playing Atari and listening to Aphex Twin. That was the education, really."

In 2004, with only a year of school under their belts, Ellison and Wexler returned home. From that moment on, the rise of Flying Lotus has been in lockstep with that of L.A.'s beat movement.

Phase one: Ellison cut his teeth interning at hip-hop mainstay Stones Throw Records, absorbing knowledge from instrumental-rap forefathers Madlib and J Dilla. Meanwhile, in the parking lots of established clubs, the now-familiar names of a new generation began to make a scene.

"Mr. Dibiase would come through with the boom box and we'd all play our tunes," remembers Ellison. "The Gaslamp Killer, Kutmah, Ras G, Daedelus, Take ... we'd gather here and there when we could, and it was always inspiring. I felt like I was part of a secret society."

Phase two: In 2006, Ellison released his debut album, 1983, on local label Plug Research. It included tracks that Adult Swim used as bumper music after he responded to an open call for beats. This is the same year that L.A. promoter and producer Daddy Kev founded Low End Theory, the Lincoln Heights weekly that would become the scene's hub.

Phase three: Amid mounting buzz, Ellison signed to Warp Records, which released Los Angeles. The record was praised for its warmth and innovation, and rightly linked to the bass-loving, beat-steeped musicians of L.A. U.S. press moved slow, but the U.K. swooned, with BBC DJ Mary Anne Hobbs dubbing L.A. "the most exciting electronic scene on the planet."

"In a way, it felt like a vision waiting to be fulfilled," says Daddy Kev. He also runs Alpha Pup Records, which distributes Brainfeeder. "That said, I never cease to be amazed by all of this. The momentum is beyond us all, beyond our expectations. I feel like I'm holding on for dear life."

So went the "heaven" that informed Cosmogramma's universe. The attention raised the stakes, putting Ellison in a position to make a real statement this time around, not just a sequel to Los Angeles, itself a great record. He was steeling himself for this.

Then came the hell. On October 31, 2008, Ellison's mother died suddenly of complications from diabetes. This was only a year and some months after his great-aunt Alice passed. He went into a tailspin, questioning everything. What is music worth? Why is he here? Why are we here at all?

"I decided that if I was going to speak after that experience," says Ellison, "it better be something honest, and deeper than a record that was just made for the times. I wanted to do something that made her proud. Something that could last forever, hopefully."

That was when he resolved to bring others into his world. He hadn't planned on working with live musicians, but he wanted something more expansive that would connect directly with his bloodline. Those elements — the harp, the bass, the strings, live drums, Ravi's sax — make Cosmogramma what it is.

And still, it is unmistakably a Flying Lotus album. Buried within the hyperactive strains of drum and bass, four-on-the-floor thump, glitchy sound effects and freewheeling experimentalism, there are intimate intricacies, like the sounds of Tammy Ellison's hospital machines, folded into several songs, tucked away in places that only Ellison knows.

More abstractly, the warmth of the California sun comes through in the crackly texture, the rumblings of L.A.'s unstable earth are heard in the ominous bass, and the entire thing is imbued with a searching psychedelia — an interest in astral traveling common to Ellison's dual lineage, kith and kin, and fueled by his own frequent lucid dreams.

"I get those once a week," says Ellison. "Sleep paralysis too, especially now that I'm hardly ever in my own time zone. I'll be trying to go to sleep and I'll just feel the weight of the darkness. You feel yourself sinking, then see the dream space materialize from your thoughts. For a second there, at the very beginning, if you're in control then you're creating all the imagery."

Ultimately, even Thom Yorke, who sings on "And the World Laughs With You," is just a guest passing through Ellison's cosmic soup. Ellison hopes people feel all of it — the highs, the lows, the questioning, the reaching for higher ground. As for the results, let the jury tell it:

Mary Anne Hobbs, "First Lady of Bass," Radio 1 DJ: "Cosmogramma speaks in a completely new sonic language. Lotus is like Hendrix — he's completely torn up the rule book in electronic music and it's so liberating. I hear his sound echoing in every corner of the planet right now."

The Gaslamp Killer, producer, Low End Theory resident: "Remember when Fatboy Slim and Moby were on MTV? That's going to happen with Steve except he's actually the truth, and he has an insane crew of crazy-talented dudes that he rolls with."

Ravi Coltrane, world-renowned saxophonist, cousin: "I hear him speaking, you know? He played the whole thing for me last fall when I was at his crib. We listened to it top to bottom and when it was over, I just stood up and hugged him. I felt like he did it."

It's late in the basement. We've been speaking for well over two hours. We've accumulated well over two inches more ash. We've eaten two servings of cannabis-infused goldfish crackers. And we've been talking about the future.

Ellison wants to score a video game, plans to return to film somehow and admits he'd produce a track for Lil Wayne with the caveat of no murder talk. He's excited about using Brainfeeder to nurture the talented kids who have moved to L.A. to get closer to the scene, closer to him.

He's been taking calls from Erykah Badu lately — she's trying to convince him to stop being so nice to everyone, to just "do your thing" already. But he seems to get this idea on his own.

"For this record to actually come out on Tuesday, it's like a weight off my shoulders, man," says Ellison just days before Cosmogramma's release. "It sums up a chapter of my life. I feel like I can start over at this point, do whatever I want." He laughs. "I can be a doctor if I want to."

It's true — he probably could.

quicksand
05-14-2010, 02:27 PM
i agree....not danceable and boring


/validity for anything ever.

RoughSteez
05-14-2010, 02:58 PM
/validity for anything ever.

I support this statement.

rasooli
05-14-2010, 07:40 PM
Flying Lotus Rising
Could spiritual electronica be the next great California sound?
By Chris Martins
published: May 13, 2010
PHOTO BY STAR FOREMAN
http://blogs.laweekly.com/westcoastsound/Flying%20Lotus.jpg
The Cosmogrammarian: Steven Ellison, aka Flying Lotus
PHOTO BY STAR FOREMAN

Flying Lotus "is like Hendrix — he's completely torn up the rule book in electronic music," says BBC DJ Mary Anne Hobbs.There are drumrolls and arpeggiating bass notes. Cascades of harp and dancing cymbals. Sounds swirling in thick air, knocking into wood-paneled walls and chasing one another around the living room of the Echo Park cottage until they pass, like the wind, through a cracked front door.........


This article was written before his performance for the ages at Coachella. I feel he has risen to even a higher level after that set.

fatbastard
06-01-2010, 05:34 AM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/05/30/arts/30lotus-span/30lotus-span-articleLarge.jpg

May 25, 2010
Lost, With Laptops, in Psychedelic Space
By MIKE RUBIN
THE Los Angeles electronic music producer Flying Lotus sees his new album, “Cosmogramma,” as something of a “space opera.” “It’s kind of a space epic,” he said, “very theatrical at times, only in the ‘Star Wars’ sense of things. Not like ‘Pavarotti Space Viking.’ ”

The record, released this month by the British label Warp, is of course libretto free, mostly dispensing with vocals in favor of complex, often orchestral arrangements. The songs are densely constructed, each consisting of up to 80 layers of different tracks painstakingly assembled on a laptop. Blending skittering machine beats with musicians playing harp, bass and strings, “Cosmogramma” is a marriage of 21st-century technology and 1960s West Coast psychedelic experimentation, sounding at times like a futuristic take on free jazz.

Which is why it seems oddly old-school that Flying Lotus, 26, whose real name is Steven Ellison, gave the master recordings of his interstellar opus a test ride on the stereo in his decidedly terrestrial 2002 Toyota Camry.

“We would get in, and he would literally turn the volume all the way up so there was this wall of distortion,” said Daddy Kev, the veteran Los Angeles hip-hop producer, D.J. and event promoter who mastered the album. “I can’t hear a damn thing because it doesn’t even sound like what I just worked on. And this is how he is making the decision of what’s good and what’s bad, with it turned up all the way to 11, full blast on the worst sound system you can imagine.”

Four months and 13 rejected masters later, the pair finally nailed it. Daddy Kev said the extra effort was worth it. “Lotus is kind of like Neo from ‘The Matrix,’ ” he said. “He is ‘The One.’ ”

Generally known more as a rap and rock mecca than a dance music breeding ground, Los Angeles is now home to a thriving community of artists working at the crossroads of electronic music and hip-hop. Revolving around Daddy Kev’s weekly Low End Theory party and Mr. Ellison’s digital record label, Brainfeeder, the producers and D.J.’s are a diverse bunch of charismatic personalities, from the mustachioed Gaslamp Killer, who infuses his D.J. sets with punk energy and acid rock, to the dandified Daedelus, who remixes Wagner’s “Ring” cycle while styling in Victorian-period threads. But the scene’s most widely acclaimed artist is Flying Lotus, whose ethos, inspired by the consciousness-expanding jazz released in the late ’60s on the Impulse! label — including that of his great-aunt, Alice Coltrane — is trying to shift hip-hop’s focus from the material world to the cosmic.

United by an affinity for rib-rattling subharmonic bass frequencies and restless, sometimes ungainly, time signatures, the music of Flying Lotus and his Los Angeles peers is largely instrumental, stressing improvisation in live performance and freely dabbling in jazz, world music, psychedelia and electronic genres like dubstep. By turns glitchy and ambient, insinuatingly funky and deliberately difficult, their experimental hip-hop is an often-exhilarating collision between the avant-garde and the dance floor.

“It’s really challenging, it’s defiant, it’s confrontational,” said Mary Anne Hobbs, the influential D.J. on BBC Radio 1. “They’re creating beats unlike anything you’ve ever heard in your entire life.”

She has repeatedly showcased the scene on Radio 1 and has played at the Low End Theory party. Her support has helped the music attract an international following. Several of these artists have played at major electronic music festivals in Europe, and Flying Lotus and the Gaslamp Killer performed at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in California in April.

Mr. Ellison, who is soft-spoken, with a slightly, yes, spacey air, grew up in the San Fernando Valley, part of a musical family transplanted from Detroit. His grandmother Marilyn McLeod was a Motown songwriter and producer. His cousin is Ravi Coltrane, the jazz saxophonist. (He plays on two songs on “Cosmogramma.”) But the most enduring influence on his career was his great-aunt Alice, the wife and collaborator of John Coltrane and a celebrated harpist and pianist; her lushly symphonic album “Lord of Lords” (1972) is one of the main influences on “Cosmogramma.”

As a child Mr. Ellison would visit Auntie, as he called her, on Sundays at Sai Anantam, the ashram she founded in 1983 in Agoura Hills, Calif. Ms. Coltrane, who died in 2007, would deliver “a spiritual discourse,” Mr. Ellison said. “Then they’d play music for hours and sing songs. That was my church experience.”

Family also inspired “Cosmogramma” in less cheerful ways. Mr. Ellison’s mother died in 2008, shortly after the release of his second album, “Los Angeles” (Warp). He recorded the sounds of her respirator and vital signs monitors in her hospital room and hid samples of them in the mix of “Cosmogramma.” “... And the World Laughs With You,” a response to her death, is the centerpiece of the album, and features guest vocals by Thom Yorke of Radiohead. (Mr. Ellison recently opened for Atoms for Peace, Mr. Yorke’s new side project.)

“Los Angeles” has sold about 19,000 copies, an impressive number for an experimental electronic release. As of May 16 “Cosmogramma” had already sold 12,000. As respect for Mr. Ellison’s music has grown, he has been able to pursue his multidisciplinary interests. In the last couple of months he organized a screening of a documentary on Afrofuturism in Los Angeles, performed his own score to the experimental filmmaker Harry Smith’s “Heaven and Earth Magic” at the Ann Arbor Film Festival in Michigan and celebrated the release of “Cosmogramma” in Los Angeles with the debut of Infinity, a band featuring Mr. Coltrane.

“In the same way that Jimi Hendrix was completely reinventing what you could do with a guitar, Lotus is reinventing what you can do with electronic tools,” Ms. Hobbs said. “When you listen to his records, you get a sense of what he can do, but then when you actually see him in physical form, rolling out a live performance, that’s when he really takes flight.”

At Le Poisson Rouge in Greenwich Village in March, Mr. Ellison bobbed up and down like a marionette in zero gravity as he hunched over his gear. Using a laptop and a MIDI controller — “It’s kind of this jukebox of all my work,” he said the next day at his Midtown hotel — he mixed and matched parts of his songs into fluidly recombinative new arrangements. At one point you could hear Mr. Yorke’s plaintive wail from the Radiohead song “Idioteque”: “Here I’m allowed/Everything all of the time.” The lyric is also an apt description of the Los Angeles beat scene’s open-minded, anything-goes aesthetic.

Daddy Kev, 36, whose real name is Kevin Marques Moo, started the 18-and-up Low End Theory party in 2006 at the Airliner, a club in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, and serves as a resident D.J. “When you go there the first time, you really feel comfortable,” said Nosaj Thing (born Jason Chung), 25, whose 2009 album, “Drift,” released on Mr. Moo’s Alpha Pup label, displays an ear for lilting, spectral melodies reminiscent of Aphex Twin or Boards of Canada. “It sounds kind of corny, but it’s all about the music there.”

Low End Theory draws capacity crowds of 600 or so each Wednesday. The energetic throng has to engage in what Mr. Moo calls the “head-nod wave-thing” because “there’s no room to move.” “I’ve tried to make it so it’s sonically perfect,” he said of the club’s sound system. “The way that we mount the speakers in there, it’s almost like you’re in a subwoofer. You feel like you’re levitating in there sometimes.”

The Los Angeles beat scene has resisted an onslaught of attempts to coin a catch-all genre name — “lazer bass,” Mr. Moo said, was “definitely the worst one” — perhaps because the music is essentially instrumental hip-hop, partly inspired by the work of off-kilter producers like J Dilla in the early 2000s. “In your iTunes it might not say ‘Hip-Hop,’ ” said the Gaslamp Killer, another Low End Theory resident D.J., “but that’s how it’s made.”

In some ways the artists’ virtuosity is a logical evolution of 1990s turntablism, with laptops usurping the wheels of steel. “When I was coming up, if you wanted to produce hip-hop music, the way you did that was by producing rappers,” Mr. Moo said. “Then all of a sudden there were all these young guys out here, they just really weren’t tripping off M.C.’s, like, at all.” The aesthetic now, he added, is “about instrumental beats and letting it ride on its own, and a guy that can get up there with only a laptop and tear the room apart.”

But not all of the Los Angeles D.J.’s have completely abandoned their turntables. The Gaslamp Killer (born William Bensussen), 27, is an old-fashioned crate digger, creating his productions out of obscure international psychedelia, over-the-top Bollywood soundtracks and fuzzed-out Turkish prog rock. His 2009 E.P., “My Troubled Mind” (Brainfeeder), invokes the theremin-heavy soundtracks of 1950s sci-fi films and the sleek synthesizer scores of early-’70s John Carpenter thrillers. His production on the recent album “A Sufi and a Killer” by the otherworldly vocalist Gonjasufi (Warp) sounds like prewar radio broadcasts of Billie Holiday that have returned to Earth as stoned-out trip-hop after bouncing around the asteroid belt.

“I think that the common thread that connects us is that we’re all kind of seeking through sound,” Mr. Ellison said. “Seeking the perfect beat, trying to find ourselves, trying to understand God through the sound, that seeker sound. You can hear people looking for more.”

For Mr. Moo such revelations have been a long time coming. “I was here at the birth of the rave scene,” he said of Los Angeles, “and the entire time, everything that we were into, that we were trying to promote, was always a reflection of something else from another city — house from Chicago, or techno from Detroit, or acid house and progressive house from the U.K., drum and bass — everything was always an import.

“I just feel like we finally have something that’s our own.”

dahboom
06-01-2010, 02:05 PM
For anyone interested...

Here is the KCRW Live set he did a few weeks ago.

2 sets = 2 files.

Set 1
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=4OR3MTK6

Set 2
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=PTIF0VFN

OK Calculator
06-06-2010, 12:16 AM
Are you fucking serious??? I've been to over 80 shows in my lifetime and his Gobi performance this year might of been the best one I've ever been to. He gave everything he had in that act, and the people at the Gobi gave him what could be deemed as a 10 minute standing ovation if it was a more formal setting. He himself was taken aback by the response he got from the crowd once he finished. He is THAT amazing. I wouldn't miss his show for the world....and as a matter of fact I'm considering driving all the way from the Bay Area (8 hour drive) just to see his echo show. As DTD was saying, there is NO ONE like him in the music industry, his sound, the way he performs, the way his video background mixed with his music, etc. are just so unique. I feel some bands get too much hype/are overrated, but this DEFINITELY isn't the case with Flying Lotus. His performance at Coachella this year was one for the ages, and i for one think it rivals portishead 08/daft punk 06/rage against the machine 07, etc.

cool story bro

OK Calculator
06-06-2010, 12:17 AM
http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/05/30/arts/30lotus-span/30lotus-span-articleLarge.jpg

May 25, 2010
Lost, With Laptops, in Psychedelic Space
By MIKE RUBIN
THE Los Angeles electronic music producer Flying Lotus sees his new album, “Cosmogramma,” as something of a “space opera.” “It’s kind of a space epic,” he said, “very theatrical at times, only in the ‘Star Wars’ sense of things. Not like ‘Pavarotti Space Viking.’ ”

The record, released this month by the British label Warp, is of course libretto free, mostly dispensing with vocals in favor of complex, often orchestral arrangements. The songs are densely constructed, each consisting of up to 80 layers of different tracks painstakingly assembled on a laptop. Blending skittering machine beats with musicians playing harp, bass and strings, “Cosmogramma” is a marriage of 21st-century technology and 1960s West Coast psychedelic experimentation, sounding at times like a futuristic take on free jazz.

Which is why it seems oddly old-school that Flying Lotus, 26, whose real name is Steven Ellison, gave the master recordings of his interstellar opus a test ride on the stereo in his decidedly terrestrial 2002 Toyota Camry.

“We would get in, and he would literally turn the volume all the way up so there was this wall of distortion,” said Daddy Kev, the veteran Los Angeles hip-hop producer, D.J. and event promoter who mastered the album. “I can’t hear a damn thing because it doesn’t even sound like what I just worked on. And this is how he is making the decision of what’s good and what’s bad, with it turned up all the way to 11, full blast on the worst sound system you can imagine.”

Four months and 13 rejected masters later, the pair finally nailed it. Daddy Kev said the extra effort was worth it. “Lotus is kind of like Neo from ‘The Matrix,’ ” he said. “He is ‘The One.’ ”

Generally known more as a rap and rock mecca than a dance music breeding ground, Los Angeles is now home to a thriving community of artists working at the crossroads of electronic music and hip-hop. Revolving around Daddy Kev’s weekly Low End Theory party and Mr. Ellison’s digital record label, Brainfeeder, the producers and D.J.’s are a diverse bunch of charismatic personalities, from the mustachioed Gaslamp Killer, who infuses his D.J. sets with punk energy and acid rock, to the dandified Daedelus, who remixes Wagner’s “Ring” cycle while styling in Victorian-period threads. But the scene’s most widely acclaimed artist is Flying Lotus, whose ethos, inspired by the consciousness-expanding jazz released in the late ’60s on the Impulse! label — including that of his great-aunt, Alice Coltrane — is trying to shift hip-hop’s focus from the material world to the cosmic.

United by an affinity for rib-rattling subharmonic bass frequencies and restless, sometimes ungainly, time signatures, the music of Flying Lotus and his Los Angeles peers is largely instrumental, stressing improvisation in live performance and freely dabbling in jazz, world music, psychedelia and electronic genres like dubstep. By turns glitchy and ambient, insinuatingly funky and deliberately difficult, their experimental hip-hop is an often-exhilarating collision between the avant-garde and the dance floor.

“It’s really challenging, it’s defiant, it’s confrontational,” said Mary Anne Hobbs, the influential D.J. on BBC Radio 1. “They’re creating beats unlike anything you’ve ever heard in your entire life.”

She has repeatedly showcased the scene on Radio 1 and has played at the Low End Theory party. Her support has helped the music attract an international following. Several of these artists have played at major electronic music festivals in Europe, and Flying Lotus and the Gaslamp Killer performed at the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in California in April.

Mr. Ellison, who is soft-spoken, with a slightly, yes, spacey air, grew up in the San Fernando Valley, part of a musical family transplanted from Detroit. His grandmother Marilyn McLeod was a Motown songwriter and producer. His cousin is Ravi Coltrane, the jazz saxophonist. (He plays on two songs on “Cosmogramma.”) But the most enduring influence on his career was his great-aunt Alice, the wife and collaborator of John Coltrane and a celebrated harpist and pianist; her lushly symphonic album “Lord of Lords” (1972) is one of the main influences on “Cosmogramma.”

As a child Mr. Ellison would visit Auntie, as he called her, on Sundays at Sai Anantam, the ashram she founded in 1983 in Agoura Hills, Calif. Ms. Coltrane, who died in 2007, would deliver “a spiritual discourse,” Mr. Ellison said. “Then they’d play music for hours and sing songs. That was my church experience.”

Family also inspired “Cosmogramma” in less cheerful ways. Mr. Ellison’s mother died in 2008, shortly after the release of his second album, “Los Angeles” (Warp). He recorded the sounds of her respirator and vital signs monitors in her hospital room and hid samples of them in the mix of “Cosmogramma.” “... And the World Laughs With You,” a response to her death, is the centerpiece of the album, and features guest vocals by Thom Yorke of Radiohead. (Mr. Ellison recently opened for Atoms for Peace, Mr. Yorke’s new side project.)

“Los Angeles” has sold about 19,000 copies, an impressive number for an experimental electronic release. As of May 16 “Cosmogramma” had already sold 12,000. As respect for Mr. Ellison’s music has grown, he has been able to pursue his multidisciplinary interests. In the last couple of months he organized a screening of a documentary on Afrofuturism in Los Angeles, performed his own score to the experimental filmmaker Harry Smith’s “Heaven and Earth Magic” at the Ann Arbor Film Festival in Michigan and celebrated the release of “Cosmogramma” in Los Angeles with the debut of Infinity, a band featuring Mr. Coltrane.

“In the same way that Jimi Hendrix was completely reinventing what you could do with a guitar, Lotus is reinventing what you can do with electronic tools,” Ms. Hobbs said. “When you listen to his records, you get a sense of what he can do, but then when you actually see him in physical form, rolling out a live performance, that’s when he really takes flight.”

At Le Poisson Rouge in Greenwich Village in March, Mr. Ellison bobbed up and down like a marionette in zero gravity as he hunched over his gear. Using a laptop and a MIDI controller — “It’s kind of this jukebox of all my work,” he said the next day at his Midtown hotel — he mixed and matched parts of his songs into fluidly recombinative new arrangements. At one point you could hear Mr. Yorke’s plaintive wail from the Radiohead song “Idioteque”: “Here I’m allowed/Everything all of the time.” The lyric is also an apt description of the Los Angeles beat scene’s open-minded, anything-goes aesthetic.

Daddy Kev, 36, whose real name is Kevin Marques Moo, started the 18-and-up Low End Theory party in 2006 at the Airliner, a club in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, and serves as a resident D.J. “When you go there the first time, you really feel comfortable,” said Nosaj Thing (born Jason Chung), 25, whose 2009 album, “Drift,” released on Mr. Moo’s Alpha Pup label, displays an ear for lilting, spectral melodies reminiscent of Aphex Twin or Boards of Canada. “It sounds kind of corny, but it’s all about the music there.”

Low End Theory draws capacity crowds of 600 or so each Wednesday. The energetic throng has to engage in what Mr. Moo calls the “head-nod wave-thing” because “there’s no room to move.” “I’ve tried to make it so it’s sonically perfect,” he said of the club’s sound system. “The way that we mount the speakers in there, it’s almost like you’re in a subwoofer. You feel like you’re levitating in there sometimes.”

The Los Angeles beat scene has resisted an onslaught of attempts to coin a catch-all genre name — “lazer bass,” Mr. Moo said, was “definitely the worst one” — perhaps because the music is essentially instrumental hip-hop, partly inspired by the work of off-kilter producers like J Dilla in the early 2000s. “In your iTunes it might not say ‘Hip-Hop,’ ” said the Gaslamp Killer, another Low End Theory resident D.J., “but that’s how it’s made.”

In some ways the artists’ virtuosity is a logical evolution of 1990s turntablism, with laptops usurping the wheels of steel. “When I was coming up, if you wanted to produce hip-hop music, the way you did that was by producing rappers,” Mr. Moo said. “Then all of a sudden there were all these young guys out here, they just really weren’t tripping off M.C.’s, like, at all.” The aesthetic now, he added, is “about instrumental beats and letting it ride on its own, and a guy that can get up there with only a laptop and tear the room apart.”

But not all of the Los Angeles D.J.’s have completely abandoned their turntables. The Gaslamp Killer (born William Bensussen), 27, is an old-fashioned crate digger, creating his productions out of obscure international psychedelia, over-the-top Bollywood soundtracks and fuzzed-out Turkish prog rock. His 2009 E.P., “My Troubled Mind” (Brainfeeder), invokes the theremin-heavy soundtracks of 1950s sci-fi films and the sleek synthesizer scores of early-’70s John Carpenter thrillers. His production on the recent album “A Sufi and a Killer” by the otherworldly vocalist Gonjasufi (Warp) sounds like prewar radio broadcasts of Billie Holiday that have returned to Earth as stoned-out trip-hop after bouncing around the asteroid belt.

“I think that the common thread that connects us is that we’re all kind of seeking through sound,” Mr. Ellison said. “Seeking the perfect beat, trying to find ourselves, trying to understand God through the sound, that seeker sound. You can hear people looking for more.”

For Mr. Moo such revelations have been a long time coming. “I was here at the birth of the rave scene,” he said of Los Angeles, “and the entire time, everything that we were into, that we were trying to promote, was always a reflection of something else from another city — house from Chicago, or techno from Detroit, or acid house and progressive house from the U.K., drum and bass — everything was always an import.

“I just feel like we finally have something that’s our own.”

tl;dr

mikeycarbajal
06-06-2010, 01:30 AM
meh...

unknown
06-08-2010, 11:21 AM
Saturday night @ Reset: Flying Lotus >>>>>>> bassnectar.

Musical fucking journey.

RoughSteez
06-08-2010, 12:59 PM
I'm jealous, couldn't make it down to SD. I wish we could have gotten a bootleg of his coachella performance. Both that and the show's he did at the echoplex were just rediculous. I wish his next show wasn't the Hard MIA event, then he moves on to the east coast.

unknown
06-16-2010, 08:48 AM
I would LOVE it if there was a recording from Coachella.

roughsteez - do you have his mixes and stuff? We should compare and share.

RoughSteez
06-17-2010, 12:57 PM
I think I might only have his Essential Mix, but i'm pretty sure I have all his remixes. When I get home i'll check out my itunes.

MUST HAVE EVERYTHING HE HAS TOUCHED!

unknown
06-17-2010, 01:25 PM
There are a couple mixes floating around. I'll PM you links when I get to a computer. I am SO SO SO love his remix of I Feel Like Dying. Wow.

RoughSteez
06-17-2010, 02:39 PM
Yeah thats my favorite for sure. Especially live when the sirens go off in the beginning. The A Milli remix is my second favorite.

Would super appreciate those. I also have the Volcano party one from Annie Mac and his KCRW set, but that's for surely all i have as far as live sets/mixes.

frazzles
06-17-2010, 02:48 PM
I also have the July Heat, Raw Cartoons, and Whole Wide World releases from him if anyone wants them.

I'll see if I can manage to rip the Shhh! Vinyl EP off of YouTube.

unknown
06-17-2010, 02:50 PM
Ok Frazzles. Need.

RoughSteez
06-17-2010, 02:55 PM
Me too Frazzles. Please share.

Love you long time!

frazzles
06-17-2010, 03:15 PM
The Shhh! EP was easier to find than I would have guessed. Give me about 30 minutes or so and then check your PMs.

RoughSteez
06-17-2010, 03:23 PM
The Shhh! EP was easier to find than I would have guessed. Give me about 30 minutes or so and then check your PMs.

You sir, are a gentleman and a scholar.

unknown
06-17-2010, 03:25 PM
Ok. That's 2 days in a row you have hooked me up with some of my favorite artist's material. You officially fucking rock.

frazzles
06-17-2010, 03:44 PM
Yes. Yes, I do.

Also for good measure, the aforementioned I Feel Like Dying remix, sans retard. Much better, IMO.
http://www.mediafire.com/?gj2czjmxejw

greghead
06-17-2010, 05:02 PM
The KPFK radio mix from a year or two ago pretty is sweet as well. Are any of you members on what.cd? They have a ton of his shit on there, something like 60 different recordings

steve7268
06-24-2010, 09:49 PM
1. Thank you to everyone who posted interviews and vids.. highly interesting stuff to say the least.

2. FlyLo haters come in 2 flavors:

Flavor A: I hate people, therefore i hate everything that large groups of people like.
Flavor B: I just don't get it, yet all these people are going crazy about it, and i feel threatened by this.

if it's not your thing it's not your thing, no need to get angry.

3. You don't need to be on drugs while you are listening to this music. However i do think it helps if you have used drugs in the past, particularly LSD, in order to understand the bigger picture behind this or similar music.

Here are few tips: Stop waiting for a steady bassline to dance to, stop expecting loud vocals to sing along to, and dont' hone in on any one sound. Find a detatched center point to feel all the sound from and then let go. See where it takes you in your thoughts. Forgetting you are listening to music for long stretches at a time is not a bad thing.. some would argue that is the goal

4. North Coast Festival. who's in?

RoughSteez
06-25-2010, 03:33 PM
Too true on all points, Steve.

This thread really turned itself around from the former piece of shit it was.

No North Coast Festival for me, but the lineup is pretty solid.

steve7268
06-25-2010, 04:56 PM
Too true on all points, Steve.

This thread really turned itself around from the former piece of shit it was.

No North Coast Festival for me, but the lineup is pretty solid.

I'll say.. the real kicker is that it's only 75 bucks.. 65 if you got yours early.

RoughSteez
06-26-2010, 02:02 PM
I'll say.. the real kicker is that it's only 75 bucks.. 65 if you got yours early.

If I lived near Chicago, I'd be there in a heartbeat. The Chems, Moby, Flying Lotus, Boys Noize, Green Velvet, Phantogram......

303dubbin
07-13-2010, 10:56 AM
i have about 10 mixes that he has done, send me a pm if you want a few links to them
most are short (45 mins<) but i have a few that are over an hour.

weezy f baby
07-14-2010, 03:07 PM
Yeah I don't get the whole "hate on Flylo" thing. Like my GF isn't like a fan of his music, but she doesn't hate on it. It's not for everyone I get it. But to insult his production or musical knowledge is just foolish. His productions are so intense. FlyLo is no joke. He's a master at his craft.

unknown
07-14-2010, 04:27 PM
I agree. He's a fucking genius in my eyes.

I have to remember to send 303 a pm. It never hurts to acquire more flylo mixes. I've been listening to his 2009 DEMF set lately. Would love it if a Coachella or Reset recording surfaced. I am planning on catching him at Bestival. That's how much I love his music- could see him in southern California quite often yet I am really looking forward to checking him out at an overseas fest.

djandrews25
07-14-2010, 04:31 PM
When the masses love someone ALOT, those who dont like it seem to have more hate. For instance Deadmau5

dahboom
07-20-2010, 09:34 AM
Here are a couple of vids that I forgot I had of flying lotus sat nite 5-15-10 at the echoplex and his live band he called infinity.

http://www.youtube.com/user/toylikepeople#p/u/13/mRWBSV_KxBs
http://www.youtube.com/user/toylikepeople#p/u/12/e8ptAW6N7fg

greghead
07-21-2010, 07:43 PM
I agree. He's a fucking genius in my eyes.

I have to remember to send 303 a pm. It never hurts to acquire more flylo mixes. I've been listening to his 2009 DEMF set lately. Would love it if a Coachella or Reset recording surfaced. I am planning on catching him at Bestival. That's how much I love his music- could see him in southern California quite often yet I am really looking forward to checking him out at an overseas fest.

Link?

unknown
07-21-2010, 08:09 PM
demf (http://uploaded.to/file/y3v4vc)

greghead
07-22-2010, 11:05 AM
Sweet, thanks

303dubbin
07-25-2010, 02:12 PM
http://letsgetdigitaldigital.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/a-bunch-of-trade-friendly-flying-lotus/

frazzles
07-25-2010, 02:39 PM
fucking jackpot!

unknown
07-28-2010, 01:39 PM
anyone going to Low End Theory tonight? I can't pass up another Flying Lotus show.

unknown
07-29-2010, 12:20 PM
Flying Lotus was excellent last night. Played for close to an hour with drummer Ronald Reubens (pretty sure that's his name) and bassist ThunderCat (from Cosmogramma). Take also played (around 30 minutes) - he was very good as well (all the usual Low End djs played as well: d-styles, daddy kev, gaslamp killer, nobody). All the music was great and it was just ridiculously packed. I was a hot sweaty mess from 10pm-1am. Glad I arrived early (around 9:30) and was able to secure a spot 2nd back in the dead center. Crowd was great except for the PBR drinking hipster hoebag that I had to elbow a few times.

rasooli
07-29-2010, 03:27 PM
how did it compare do his Coachella show?

unknown
07-29-2010, 03:43 PM
I was at Les Claypool. Not sure if Coachella was similar to Reset but Reset and last night were VERY different. Last night seemed to be more about collaborating with the other musicians whereas Reset was a straight dj style dance set (more of his remixes and stuff). I feel both performances fit their respective settings perfectly. One was a large arena edm show where the other was a very small & intimate show. Very different but both very good.