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View Full Version : Grizzly Bear sells out- superbowl commercial



buscuit
02-07-2010, 10:34 PM
Okay, so I'm not one of those people that thinks every form of selling out is necessarily bad- I mean, there have been many mainstream, genuine artists, but I just saw Grizzly Bear's 'Two Weeks' played in a VW commercial during the superbowl and a little part of me died.

I hate car commercials- ESPECIALLY the snobby ones! Ugh...I'll still enjoy their show- I'm sure...but still, that kills their coolness a bit- just like Phoenix was killed by their car commercial sell-out.

It's just so the opposite of what art should mean (ideally)...it's like when commercials use Beatles songs- it's just gross and wrong and only morons enjoy it...

I don't know. I don't feel like I'm alone on this.

PanasonicYouth
02-07-2010, 10:37 PM
Grizzly Bear is about as mainstream as anyone right now, so it's not really a big deal.

cheeksneak
02-07-2010, 10:38 PM
Grizzly bear is probably poor like the rest of us, more power to them.

buscuit
02-07-2010, 10:39 PM
It's not really them being mainstream that bothers me- it's that their helping sell VWs- they're endorsing the snobbery...but honestly I wouldn't know how mainstream or un-mainstream they are because I never get to listen to the radio cause my car has been broken for far too long (like over 6 months- it's retarded).

I just hate VWs commercials! Their SO stuck up and catering to rich bastard mentality.

It'd be cool if they hit up some other business for cash. I don't mind them making wealth from the art they produce. That's completely fair and appropriate, and I want success for them.

Sorry, I know this is a random thing to care so much about, but it just bugs me, and I feel like some other person on this planet should feel hatred for certain commercials the way I and my friends do- and thus through transference feel somewhat bothered by their favorite artist contributing to the practice.

I also just took some drugs and I'm a little out of it, but I had to express this innocuous grievance of mine (sorry for the pretentious vocab, but it just fits).

im so indie
02-07-2010, 10:43 PM
Get it straight. This is not selling out. Selling out is changing your music to please the radio stations, the grammy committee, or the record company. TONS of great bands have songs in commercials. The Arcade Fire's "Wake Up" was all over the place today and I don't consider them sell outs in any way because they make good, honest music that they write themselves.

cheeksneak
02-07-2010, 10:46 PM
I don't want to hear "Wake Up" for a long time.

buscuit
02-07-2010, 10:53 PM
ARE YOU PEOPLE EVEN READING MY POSTS!?!?!

I CLARIFY that I don't mind the simple act of selling out, but it is a matter of WHO they sold out to...

God, why do I bother writing decent sized posts? It's like I expect someone on this planet to have an attention span, or even a brain. I set myself up for failure. Sorry, if I sound like an asshole- it's probably because I am one.

and I didn't mind Arcade Fire being used in a kids movie that had awesome visuals, and attempted to not suck (though failed I hear). That's not selling out to Volkswagen.

wewantmuse
02-07-2010, 10:55 PM
I've grown so tired of this ridiculous argument. How about we size up artists based on their talent, musicality, and ability, and not what commercials their songs play on? WHO CARES?! If their music is consistent, regardless of how many commercials they appear on, what difference does it make? Everyone is out to make money. We all go to work everyday to make money, or go to school to pursue a job that will a) be something we hopefully enjoy and b) make us more money. Artists are no different and it shouldn't take away from their credibility because they pursue some money.

Plus, beyond the money, it's also about getting your music to the masses. Nobody wants to be unheard. Artists want to gain some sort of recognition. Because the music industry right now, especially with indie artists, is so competitive and tough to break through, you have to sometimes take the offer to appear in a commercial.

Get the fuck off of your "musical elitist" train and really examine what you're arguing: it's stupid. Granted, if the music CHANGES for the worse as a result of hunger to step into the top 40 charts (e.g., Head Automatica) then by all means, call them a sell out. But an artist making means to support themselves is not selling out.

Santigold said it best in this interview in my opinion. Skip to 1:45.

d28uDWElTqE

T-REV
02-07-2010, 10:56 PM
Get it straight. This is not selling out. Selling out is changing your music to please the radio stations, the grammy committee, or the record company. TONS of great bands have songs in commercials. The Arcade Fire's "Wake Up" was all over the place today and I don't consider them sell outs in any way because they make good, honest music that they write themselves.

Arcade Fire donated 100% of the licensing proceeds to Haiti. So, yup.

wewantmuse
02-07-2010, 10:57 PM
I CLARIFY that I don't mind the simple act of selling out, but it is a matter of WHO they sold out to...

Seriously? I hate Bud Light so now I better hate Santigold because she "sold out" to Bud Light. Dumb argument is dumb.

buscuit
02-07-2010, 10:58 PM
God, you fucking moron! Read my posts! I'm not against artists making money or selling out- I'm against who they sell out to!

JUST. READ! It's not that hard.

and I don't dislike Grizzly Bear- I even stated that I would STILL enjoy their performance- I only said that it makes them a little less cool.

boarderwoozel3
02-07-2010, 11:00 PM
What's snobby or pretentious about this?

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buscuit
02-07-2010, 11:03 PM
Ok, you're right- the commercial itself isn't snobby, but generally their commercials cater to the upper class, and just generally kind of bug me. I'm too stoned to debate and I'm probably wrong.

sorry. I was just sad at the discovery =(

wewantmuse
02-07-2010, 11:03 PM
I only said that it makes them a little less cool.

Thus making you a little less cool in front of all your hipster elitist friends, AMIRITE? Better get to finding the next super underground band before they break.

I understand your argument. Doesn't change the fact that it's fucking retarded.

buscuit
02-07-2010, 11:06 PM
I'm NOT an elitist- if I were I wouldn't have just admitted I could "probably be wrong"...you just aren't reading my posts well, or I'm not expressing myself right. I have more problem with VWs then with Grizzly Bear and that's more where my contempt lies- so, sorry I wasted your time trying to explain something that has more to do with principles and social commentary then with their music at all.

It was just a thought.

the commercial DOES do the cutesy thing though, and I hate cutesy commercials, but I also just might hate everything. Aye, there's the rub...but really that's why Seinfeld was great- it didn't rose-color life...and I'll end on that irrelevant tangent.

(and wewantmuse your argument is completely based on ad hominem attacks so I feel comfortable dismissing you in the future because you are clearly not capable of engaging in intelligent discussion where people make actual points and go back and forth)

cheeksneak
02-07-2010, 11:12 PM
So, what's wrong with VW, socially?

ivankay
02-07-2010, 11:16 PM
That was a good commercial.

Egull
02-07-2010, 11:17 PM
Yeah fuck money.

cheeksneak
02-07-2010, 11:19 PM
Oh man I just noticed the actual commercial. That was good. Slug Bug on road trips was the best.

buscuit
02-07-2010, 11:25 PM
So, what's wrong with VW, socially?

Well, I tend to think of the auto-industry as a huge, monopolized market that swindled a bunch of bailout money from their respective governments with the excuse of the financial crisis. It would obviously be much more distasteful if it had been a bank, but car company's aren't my favorite.

So, I dislike Volkswagens more because their commercials are merely annoying, but car companies as a whole don't have my favor as they are generally not friends of regular taxpaying citizens. So, it's a mix of trivial, personal complaints and social commentary, honestly.

It's a little convoluted I admit, but I like to be uptight about things I find offensive to the general well-being of average people. Being somewhat conscious of these things makes me feel better- it's like it replaces the meaning religion was supposed to give to my life.

I remember vaguely reading something very disconcerting about VW specifically in a book called the Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein (sp?), but I can't remember what it was specifically...so it's not really helpful to my explanation, but I thought I'd throw it out there just in case you knew who she was and found her to be an informative and reliable journalist too.

wewantmuse
02-07-2010, 11:26 PM
(and wewantmuse your argument is completely based on ad hominem attacks so I feel comfortable dismissing you in the future because you are clearly not capable of engaging in intelligent discussion where people make actual points and go back and forth)

(and buscuit your argument is completely made in run-on sentences all of which have no degree of correct communication which make them slightly more difficult to read and understand clearly indicating you are perhaps less intelligent)

By the way, yes I have made a couple of attacks on you, but that in no way changes my attacks on your argument. Saying that my argument is COMPLETELY based on ad hominem attacks is not only false, but indicates that you are not reading or comprehending my posts. I am not saying I believe you're wrong in your views because I think you're an elitist. Quite the contrary, I am saying I think you're wrong because your argument is simply flawed.

psycobetabuckdown
02-07-2010, 11:30 PM
Well, I tend to think of the auto-industry as a huge, monopolized market that swindled a bunch of bailout money from their respective governments with the excuse of the financial crisis. It would obviously be much more distasteful if it had been a bank, but car company's aren't my favorite.

So, I dislike Volkswagens more because their commercials are merely annoying, but car companies as a whole don't have my favor as they are generally not friends of regular taxpaying citizens.

It's a little convoluted I admit, but I like to be uptight about things I find offensive to the general well-being of average people. Being somewhat conscious of these things makes me feel better- it's like it replaces that meaning religion used to give to my life.

I kind of see what you're saying, even though it might not be relevant to Volkswagen specifically. I don't know anything about the German government.

What if Grizzly Bear disagrees with you? Are you defining "cool" as any band who aligns with your political point of view and hates car companies? I, for one, think Thom Yorke is a fucking dolt for his position on "climate change," but it doesn't make Radiohead any less cool. It just makes him a little more of a douchebag. Being a douchebag might not be "cool", but that's sort of irrelevant to whether the music is "cool."

BKsaysAction!
02-07-2010, 11:33 PM
You only sell out if you're in the commercial.

cheeksneak
02-07-2010, 11:33 PM
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buscuit
02-07-2010, 11:40 PM
I kind of see what you're saying, even though it might not be relevant to Volkswagen specifically. I don't know anything about the German government.

What if Grizzly Bear disagrees with you? Are you defining "cool" as any band who aligns with your political point of view and hates car companies? I, for one, think Thom Yorke is a fucking dolt for his position on "climate change," but it doesn't make Radiohead any less cool. It just makes him a little more of a douchebag. Being a douchebag might not be "cool", but that's sort of irrelevant to whether the music is "cool."

I agree. It IS irrelevant to whether their music is cool. We're on the same page there. I just mean that it merely disappoints me because it's not in the spirit of what art means to me. I don't like the idea of art being something used to sell a car and make money for people that exploit the working class and below to make a profit.

I mean, John Lennon was a big deal partially because of his activism, and his principles were a part of what made him as an individual, respectable. Maybe what I meant to say is that I respect them less- cool was maybe a mislabeling of my feelings toward their "selling-out".

I still think their music is great and will continue to invest in them as long as I feel they are delivering quality material, but as far as their individual members go, I don't know, it's just disappointing, but of course, they have the right to do whatever they please with their work.

I can understand why it might be seen as nit-picking, but I'm just meticulous in the judgment of those that inspire me and their album Veckatimest was a big deal to me- I really enjoyed it, and the contrast of my appreciation of the album and their VW commercial just left a bad taste in my mouth. It's like when your parents say their disappointed in you- it's only because they have great expectations of you as stupid an analogy as that is.

Is that fair enough?

By the way, what is Thom Yorke's position on climate change? I really don't know, but I'm curious what it is and why you disagree with it =)

tessalasset
02-08-2010, 12:01 AM
Hah I just found out my friend (who is a music supervisor) was the one who got that Grizzly Bear song in the commercial. Awesome.

psycobetabuckdown
02-08-2010, 12:06 AM
Fair enough. I don't think it's important unless it is a guy like Lennon who makes activism part of his image and then goes back on it. Grizzly Bear, as far as I know, never claimed to give two shits about politics or justice, so to me, they're just a band who makes nice tunes. Let's face it, there are some artists who have no business getting involved in activism, so I don't expect every artist to be an activist.


By the way, what is Thom Yorke's position on climate change? I really don't know, but I'm curious what it is and why you disagree with it =)

I remember him throwing a fit about Obama not doing enough on behalf of America to instill strict policies about climate change. Which basically means that Yorke's position is not only more or less opposite mine about global warming/cooling/whatever, but he's even more radical about it than our radical president. So, essentially, he's made me as nauseous as Bono's ever made me in the last few weeks.

edit: Tessa - tell your friend nice work if you get a chance. I love it when indie bands get in commercials, it's better than radio play.

erselone
02-08-2010, 12:23 AM
I guess since Gay Z and BeYAWNce like them you're bound to get more exposure. Maybe so much exposure that you GET ASKED "to use one of your songs" for a commercial!!!!!

imrad
02-08-2010, 12:30 AM
wilco did it too.

BROKENDOLL
02-08-2010, 01:12 AM
To the OP, are you sure you're just not all pissy because you've had to walk everywhere for the last 6 months?

Devin the Dude
02-08-2010, 01:30 AM
Why do you care that they sold out to Volkswagon? Great car company. GTI dude. You're a ***.

Devin the Dude
02-08-2010, 01:31 AM
Why do you care that they sold out to Volkswagon? Great car company. GTI dude. You're a ***.

So right.

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 02:40 AM
I think if you've ever downloaded an album leak or shared an MP3, you've kind of forfeited your right to complain about an artist selling out. They've got a right to a payday. It's what keeps them in plectrums and metronomes after all.

For me, the problem isn't so much that the artist is getting paid - I don't begrudge them their mortgage - the issue is with tying something that was a piece of art to a product for thirty seconds at a time. I worked in a store that sold iPods when the Feist ad was big, and it just about killed that song for me. Hearing the same little bit of it, over and over, in that context, just drained any life out of the thing. It no longer feels like a song to me, because the snippet from the ad has been so totally crystallised in my mind and the rest of the song just sort of decorates it. Everytime I hear 1234 now, it sounds to me like "startbit,startbit, THE BIT YOU KNOW FROM THE AD, endbit", and then it's over and I can get back to listening to the actual songs on the album.

There's also a risk that the song on an ad works so well that the artist gets trapped in it a little bit. Sticking with the previous example, when I saw Feist play in Dublin a while back, there was a real sense of impatience from the casual portion of the audience who only really knew that song - when was she going to be done with stuff like The Water and get to it? - and a sense of "Oh, well that's that then" once it was done. Feist's argument, that it's her song and iPod is a "clean" way to make money from it, is a fine one - but I still don't really want to hear that song ever again as long as I live, at least outside of Sesame Street.

Similarly, Arcade Fire had entirely benevolent reasons for giving NFL their song, and they would never have agreed to the deal otherwise, but I'd be lying if a I said I wasn't a bit glad I live outside of NFL territory. I'm already sort of sick of Wake Up - they don't have any control over how their music is used in this country; so it's already all over our sports shows and has served as the theme tune to what might just have been the very worst sitcom ever fashioned by the cruel hand of man:

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To date, I've heard No Cars Go in no less than 3 different motoring shows. Last month the BBC even used the song "Haiti" on a cookery show, so we were treated to scenes of a smug-arsed chef frying things and swigging wine as actual Haitians starved to death in the streets of Port Au Prince.

Now, in Arcade Fire's case, the "Big Fat No" licensing policy they adopted up to this point wasn't so much about the money, it was about making sure their music was used sparingly and appropriately. Thus, Alan Ball could get Rebellion (Lies) for Six Feet Under, but Paul Haggis couldn't for The Black Donnellys - "It didn't feel right", in Win Butler's words. My Body Is A Cage could feature on an ad for Benjamin Button, and, of course, Wake Up could appear on the ad for Where The Wild Things Are, because those things really suited.

For them, as well as trying to keep any given lump of their music from getting worn out by overexposure, it was an attempt to keep them themselves get tied to a single signature song in people's imagination. This has arguably already happened thanks to WTWTA - looking at the Twitter traffic last night, it's clear that plenty of people think the song was written specifically for the movie - but at least it didn't happen earlier on, I guess. I have an unpleasant sneaking suspicion that the song will haunt them from here on out though, all the same.

I think Owen Pallett has the most sensible policy in this regard - he considers it cheating to double-dip. Some time ago, as part of a settlement with a company that used a blatant This Is The Dream of Win & Régine knock off, he had them sponsor a music festival rather than pay him outright for this reason. He'll compose something either for an ad or for an album, but not both. Previously, he drew a sharp distinction between the two kinds of music; commercial output was credited to "Owen Pallett":

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while the actual artistic end of things was under "Final Fantasy".

This is sadly no longer possible - copyright and all, doncha know - but I think the philosophy behind it is a good one. Do a commercial gig, or your artistic thing; but don't risk trying to cross the streams. Even if you get away with it now, it could dog you in the long term.

alex gardner
02-08-2010, 02:46 AM
buscuit quit being a ***. fuhreal.

Friar44
02-08-2010, 04:01 AM
VW Rep: Hey Grizzly Bear, here's 2,000,000. Can we use a 30 sec. clip of your song in a commercial?
Grizzly Bear: ok.


End of story.

you are a ******.

sbessiso
02-08-2010, 04:18 AM
think of all the harpsichords they can buy!

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 04:34 AM
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooOOoO!

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 04:37 AM
VW Rep: Hey Grizzly Bear, here's 2,000,000. Can we use a 30 sec. clip of your song in a commercial?
Grizzly Bear: ok.


End of story.

you are a ******.

Grizzly Bear would be stupid to think it's this simple.

I don't think Grizzly Bear are stupid.

Monklish
02-08-2010, 05:03 AM
That was a song?

Grizzly Bear should thank their lucky stars. They suck.

Incidentally, I think people that invest this much thought into whether or not artists cross the line over into commercials are fucking psychopaths. I'm not sure that Feist should give a shit whether or not one of her songs got ruined for the couple thousand people who work in Apple stores. Considering that MTV doesn't play videos and the radio doesn't play real music anymore, they're kind of out of options for ways to get exposure. Get real, you fucking nerds.

As usual, Radiohead has the right opinion on the matter. I forget the exact phrasing, but I remember in some interview reading Thom Yorke say that if you paid them enough money you could have whatever Radiohead song you want.

gooftroop
02-08-2010, 05:19 AM
Grizzly Bear should thank their lucky stars. They suck.



Wrong. So very wrong.

But good for them, selling their music will allow them only more financial independence and freedom to keep making music. It's not like they sold their song to Hummer, VW is a respectable, albeit somewhat elitist, car manufacturer.

And they're really amazing live, fuck the haters.

Monklish
02-08-2010, 05:20 AM
See, that's when you dorks go wrong.

It is completely irrelevant which car company pays them because they are all evil.

gooftroop
02-08-2010, 05:23 AM
It is completely irrelevant which car company pays them because they are all evil.

That's a bit of hyperbole wouldn't you say? The automobile industry (and cars themselves for that matter) are full of flaws but it is an extremely important industry for many reasons. Now if we were talking about car insurance companies I would agree with you.

Phantasma Del Mar
02-08-2010, 05:28 AM
Holy shit it's hipster fest up in this joint.

Monklish
02-08-2010, 05:33 AM
That's a bit of hyperbole wouldn't you say? The automobile industry (and cars themselves for that matter) are full of flaws but it is an extremely important industry for many reasons. Now if we were talking about car insurance companies I would agree with you.

...riiiight, because car insurance companies have done so many terrible things to the world.

fiopadp7791
02-08-2010, 06:40 AM
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the Heavy "sold out". How you like 'em now Biscuit?
That Santogold interview on the 1st page of this thread really is the proper way to look at this... and how Monklish paraphrased Radiohead.

beavington
02-08-2010, 06:41 AM
Get it straight. This is not selling out. Selling out is changing your music to please the radio stations, the grammy committee, or the record company. TONS of great bands have songs in commercials. The Arcade Fire's "Wake Up" was all over the place today and I don't consider them sell outs in any way because they make good, honest music that they write themselves.

At least in Arcade FIre's defense they are donating all the money they made from Wake Up during the Super Bowl to haiti. And perhaps that is what Grizzly Bear did too.

JustSteve
02-08-2010, 08:01 AM
Ok, you're right- the commercial itself isn't snobby, but generally their commercials cater to the upper class, and just generally kind of bug me. I'm too stoned to debate and I'm probably wrong.

sorry. I was just sad at the discovery =(

yeah, the upper class is buying/leasing $20,000 cars :/

retard.

guedita
02-08-2010, 08:13 AM
For me, the problem isn't so much that the artist is getting paid - I don't begrudge them their mortgage - the issue is with tying something that was a piece of art to a product for thirty seconds at a time. I worked in a store that sold iPods when the Feist ad was big, and it just about killed that song for me. Hearing the same little bit of it, over and over, in that context, just drained any life out of the thing. It no longer feels like a song to me, because the snippet from the ad has been so totally crystallised in my mind and the rest of the song just sort of decorates it. Everytime I hear 1234 now, it sounds to me like "startbit,startbit, THE BIT YOU KNOW FROM THE AD, endbit", and then it's over and I can get back to listening to the actual songs on the album.

There's also a risk that the song on an ad works so well that the artist gets trapped in it a little bit. Sticking with the previous example, when I saw Feist play in Dublin a while back, there was a real sense of impatience from the casual portion of the audience who only really knew that song - when was she going to be done with stuff like The Water and get to it? - and a sense of "Oh, well that's that then" once it was done. Feist's argument, that it's her song and iPod is a "clean" way to make money from it, is a fine one - but I still don't really want to hear that song ever again as long as I live, at least outside of Sesame Street.


Yes. I saw her a few years ago and there were definitely people in the audience who were only there for that song, some even chanting it out in the middle of her other songs. She commented on it right before she played 1,2,3,4, saying something like, "Oh my god...Itunes....What was I thinking??" But it's fairly obvious she wasn't crying over all the money she made. She was just noting how huge and annoying that song had become and how it had affected her status as an artist.

And the VW being elitist? Get real. The Jetta starts at around $17,000.

Drewski27
02-08-2010, 08:14 AM
Well, I tend to think of the auto-industry as a huge, monopolized market that swindled a bunch of bailout money from their respective governments with the excuse of the financial crisis. It would obviously be much more distasteful if it had been a bank, but car company's aren't my favorite.

So, I dislike Volkswagens more because their commercials are merely annoying, but car companies as a whole don't have my favor as they are generally not friends of regular taxpaying citizens. So, it's a mix of trivial, personal complaints and social commentary, honestly.

It's a little convoluted I admit, but I like to be uptight about things I find offensive to the general well-being of average people. Being somewhat conscious of these things makes me feel better- it's like it replaces the meaning religion was supposed to give to my life.

I remember vaguely reading something very disconcerting about VW specifically in a book called the Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein (sp?), but I can't remember what it was specifically...so it's not really helpful to my explanation, but I thought I'd throw it out there just in case you knew who she was and found her to be an informative and reliable journalist too.

i think youre just a really whiny bitch. STFU.

Egull
02-08-2010, 08:20 AM
Grizzly Bear should thank their lucky stars. They suck.


Whenever I see you post it reminds me how happy I am that I like more then 5 bands.

HAMMERHEAD
02-08-2010, 08:29 AM
Whenever I see you post it reminds me how happy I am that I like more then 5 bands.

5 bands? That's a little generous for someone that doesn't seem to like any of the artists discussed here here.

Davids81
02-08-2010, 08:43 AM
yeah, the upper class is buying/leasing $20,000 cars :/

retard.

This is EXACTLY what I thought when I read biscuits post(s), however; a part of me fears the worst when I hear a song I like in a commercial. Not because I think they "sold out" or whatever, but because it brings the wrong kind of attention sometimes. The Feist thing hits the nail on the head.

jackstraw94086
02-08-2010, 10:09 AM
OP, you are full of shit. You would have been every bit as pissed off if it were a commercial for Tide detergent or Doritos or Miller Lite. You would have simply tried to veil your elitist babble in a different way.

FoxeyLady
02-08-2010, 10:13 AM
God, who cares if they sold their song for a commercial. If I was in the band and some company asked me, "Hey, wanna make a bunch of money for simply doing nothing but letting us expose your music to a wider audience by putting it in a car commercial?" I'd be like "fuck yeah you can."

At least they didn't do what Of Montreal did for those Outback commercials... that shit was embarrasing.

TBrown33
02-08-2010, 10:18 AM
Bands don't make money off records anymore because we're all downloading them for free now. This is one of the ways that help them still make a career out of this. Nobody cares - especially the bands - that you don't like VW's, the auto industry, or what either may or may not "represent" in YOUR worldview. Get over it.

magenta
02-08-2010, 10:23 AM
Post starter....Your an idiot. Everyone needs a car in todays society. I have a vw golf, and I luuuuv it! I'm not snobby either, its great on gas and 've had it for about 8 years, still looks good.

anyways I digress. GET OVER IT! They are not your band, you can't keep sunshine in a bottle. If this equals more exposure and more money for them, then fuck yeah and fuck you for being selfish.

vw caters to snobs....blah blah blah.....who they sold out tooo wah wah wah

I hope your next car is a VW!

jackstraw94086
02-08-2010, 10:24 AM
Exactly. Like Santi said in that video, That commercial may be the only reason they're able to continue their tour or even work on the next album.

Here's a tactic for helping prevent your next favorite band from "selling out". Don't buy their music. Don't talk to anyone about them. Keep them completely off the radar so that ad companies don't see a use for them. That way everyone wins.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-08-2010, 11:03 AM
I don't understand how Volkswagen is snobby or elitist. Their commercials have been appealing to the hip, young, urban crowd for years.

From what i know their cars are well made, good on mileage, and well-priced. I'd rather have a band I like in a commercial for them than say, light bulbs or laundry detergent.

At least with a company like Volkswagen, the product is appealing to the same demographic that the music used in the commercial appeals to.

miscorrections
02-08-2010, 11:06 AM
Who the fuck cares if it's in a commercial? When your fat ass is parked on the couch watching tv and that commercial comes on press the MUTE button and shut the fuck up.

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 11:16 AM
7mSE-Iy_tFY

kYkefl_w-4g

Swiftcover refused to cover musicians when those ads started, incidentally, they only started doing so when they were embarrassed into doing so by the press.

Come on, tell me those don't make you involuntarily clench a little.

alternapop
02-08-2010, 11:22 AM
ARE YOU PEOPLE EVEN READING MY POSTS!?!?!

I CLARIFY that I don't mind the simple act of selling out, but it is a matter of WHO they sold out to...

God, why do I bother writing decent sized posts? It's like I expect someone on this planet to have an attention span, or even a brain. I set myself up for failure. Sorry, if I sound like an asshole- it's probably because I am one.

and I didn't mind Arcade Fire being used in a kids movie that had awesome visuals, and attempted to not suck (though failed I hear). That's not selling out to Volkswagen.

it doesn't sound like you understand what 'selling out' means.

in what fantasy world is a vw for the rich and upper class? you can buy a vw for under $20k

magenta
02-08-2010, 11:30 AM
Awwww boo, cry me a river.

Whatever pays the bills babe!

Passion Pit - Sleephead


<object width="560" height="340"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/dXdExYKC3bU&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/dXdExYKC3bU&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="340"></embed></object>

psycobetabuckdown
02-08-2010, 11:30 AM
I don't think Grizzly Bear is doing as poorly financially as some of you are imagining, but it's exactly right - that money will keep them going for a while, and they didn't give anything up except credibility to Nirvana fans or something.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-08-2010, 11:41 AM
How much money do you think a band like this even gets from a commercial license?

20k, 50k? Obviously it depends on the band and the client, but split four ways it's a decent paycheck, but hardly the cashcow that a lot of people might imagine it to be

FoxeyLady
02-08-2010, 11:45 AM
It's not just the money, I mean, their song was in a super bowl ad. That's a shiteload of exposure right there to a lot of people who probably have never heard Grizzly Bear.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-08-2010, 11:48 AM
It's not just the money, I mean, their song was in a super bowl ad. That's a shiteload of exposure right there to a lot of people who probably have never heard Grizzly Bear.

Yeah, but is that a bad thing?

I get the logic that MP used in relation to Feist, but still, if it in anyway helps stimulate record, merch, or concert ticket sales, exposure for a band is not a bad thing

From Beyond
02-08-2010, 11:52 AM
wilco did it too.

The Buzzcocks, Fu Manchu and The Dandy Warhols as well....

fatbastard
02-08-2010, 11:57 AM
I'll never get the 4 minutes lost reading this thread.

FoxeyLady
02-08-2010, 12:24 PM
Yeah, but is that a bad thing?

I get the logic that MP used in relation to Feist, but still, if it in anyway helps stimulate record, merch, or concert ticket sales, exposure for a band is not a bad thing

No of course not, I meant that it was a good thing. I always find it a little odd when people hate when their favorite indie band becomes popular. The only reason to start hating a band is if they start making shitty music (or start clubbing baby seals). Of which GB has done neither.

Lynn163
02-08-2010, 12:35 PM
That Iggy puppet is scary!

psycobetabuckdown
02-08-2010, 01:17 PM
Yeah, but is that a bad thing?

I get the logic that MP used in relation to Feist, but still, if it in anyway helps stimulate record, merch, or concert ticket sales, exposure for a band is not a bad thing

I would kill a puppy to have a song popular enough so my audience heckles me about it during other songs

HAMMERHEAD
02-08-2010, 01:20 PM
i don't think i've ever seen a thread get shot down so hard.

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 01:26 PM
I would kill a puppy to have a song popular enough so my audience heckles me about it during other songs

This is just being contrarian for the sake of it.

And yeah, the tone of most of Feist's stuff is not very forgiving to people yelling shit in the middle of it.

tSCDxDMMBAA

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 01:35 PM
On a not unrelated note:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/parenting/detail?entry_id=56811&plckFindCommentKey=CommentKey:d7feb9bb-42f0-469b-a0ae-5ef8422250bf#CommentKey:d7feb9bb-42f0-469b-a0ae-5ef8422250bf


"Wake Up" by Arcade Fire is becoming the new "Hallelujah" by Jeff Buckley. Great song that has become all but ruined by sheer repetition in commercials/TV shows/movie soundtracks

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/parenting/detail?entry_id=56811&plckFindCommentKey=CommentKey:d7feb9bb-42f0-469b-a0ae-5ef8422250bf#CommentKey:d7feb9bb-42f0-469b-a0ae-5ef8422250bf#ixzz0ezDLiJQv




questmanagement
2/8/2010 4:54:44 AM

In response to your Arcade Fire quote below.

I manage the band. They licensed the use of their song "Wake Up" to the NFL in return for a fee of $200,000. 100% of this money went to Partners In Health www.pih.org

They felt that by doing short term licenses they would be able to help an organisation they have supported for many years with their aid efforts in Haiti. If only more artists could use this initiative we'd all be in much better shape.

We issued a press release with this information but I can only guess your organisation ignored it. With regards to your other comment, the song was re-recorded for a "Where The Wild Things Are" trailer. It's the only film use of this song we have ever approved. Why? Because we have a relationship with the film maker and loved what he had done.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/parenting/detail?entry_id=56811&plckFindCommentKey=CommentKey:d7feb9bb-42f0-469b-a0ae-5ef8422250bf#CommentKey:d7feb9bb-42f0-469b-a0ae-5ef8422250bf#ixzz0ezDSXtA7

Iamjoeswastdlife
02-08-2010, 01:49 PM
Empire of the Sun must have sold out because of their Vizio commercial then?

I actually love hearing them come on TV.

mickflyy
02-08-2010, 01:51 PM
oh no!

Iamjoeswastdlife
02-08-2010, 01:51 PM
Oh, and in that case Royksopp sold out because of that Geico commercial. Now I hate Royksopp too. Boo hoo.

Botrocker
02-08-2010, 01:51 PM
Hasn't that song already been on a comercial?

FoxeyLady
02-08-2010, 01:52 PM
On a not unrelated note:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/parenting/detail?entry_id=56811&plckFindCommentKey=CommentKey:d7feb9bb-42f0-469b-a0ae-5ef8422250bf#CommentKey:d7feb9bb-42f0-469b-a0ae-5ef8422250bf

:pulse Arcade Fire

psycobetabuckdown
02-08-2010, 02:04 PM
Wow, what is Arcade Fire's management getting its panties in a bunch about? One person on the Chronicle's live blog expressing his opinion? He didn't say they were sellouts, he said the song is getting watered down by all the recent media exposure.

woah!chella
02-08-2010, 02:17 PM
I used to be completely opposed to bands licensing music to television commercials because it makes me think of the product the music is licensed to. Led Zeppelin's 'Rock n' Roll' and Cadillac is a the perfect case in point. But my view has changed. For newer artists who don't have the luxury of being the financial powerhouse that is Led Zeppelin, and will NEVER sell as many albums as them, if not because they aren't as big, but because of the prevalence of music piracy, who can blame these bands for wanting to make some money for their work? It's capitalism at it's finest folks. If you want them to keep recording, then they need to get paid.

Let's be honest, music piracy IS taking away a certain percentage of money away from the artists. Granted I understand all the arguments against paying for albums, I practice them myself; supporting the artist directly by seeing them live, buying merchandise instead, taking away from big-label 'fat cats' etc., but you have to admit there is still some loss being incurred by that avenue of revenue share disappearing. Sure it seems like for the most part this is being made up for with the alternatives mentioned above, but give these guys a break. Someone says here's $100k for a song you already recorded, all you have to do is sign this paper and we'll give you a check and play 15 seconds of it in an occasional commercial for 3 months, you would say yes.

For VolksWagen's part, they seem to have a pretty solid track record of artists who license their music to their advertisements, Wilco, John Mayer (<- flame me here), and now Grizzly Bear. For god's sake even The Flaming Lips 'sold out' to Dell a few years back with 'The W.A.N.D.' It's nothing new, and I for one think that if Grizzly Bear making a little bit of money from advertising will get me some more of their wonderful music, then go for it.

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 02:30 PM
One person on the Chronicle's live blog expressing his opinion

I'd consider it a factual correction, rather than an opinion thing. The writer suggested the song has been watered down from continuous use in movies, tv and commercials, when they have in fact licensed it exactly twice. That those two occasions were quite high-profile is another matter.

To be honest, I'd say the guy has been waiting with jaded industry inevitability for the sellout shouts to start flying, and reacted a bit disproportionately. More notable to me was the mention of the exact fee.

I agree the song has been a wee bit overexposed though, but uh... then again I daresay I've heard it a lot more than most.

psycobetabuckdown
02-08-2010, 02:34 PM
I actually disagree. Wake Up never got radio play in San Francisco at least until the movie came out, so if anything it's finally getting exposure - not overexposure. If my brother has heard and likes the song, that makes Arcade Fire bigger than before, and that can only be a good thing for when they start selling out arenas in 10 years.

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 03:23 PM
In Ireland, the state broadcaster can use any song it likes to advertise it's own shows, or to soundtrack them, so long as it never acknowledges the band or the album. It's a weird little quirk that means Arcade Fire are all over our sports shows, The National are all over our current affairs review shows, Owen Pallett is all over our documentaries for some reason, and that one Temper Trap song is on fucking everything else.

However, if an independent company wants to use a song to sell a product, they do have to have permission. I'm not sure if they have to get that directly from the artist or just from a licensing agency, but it does make for a certain degree of saturation. Because we're a smaller territory, nice and distant from their own beloved sod of turf, artists can make a couple of bucks from us while flying under Pitchfork's radar. A smaller paycheck that they'd get in the States, to be sure, but there's no risk to their credibility in mainstream international music press.

So while you guys only heard Feist on a few bits and pieces, I've heard her on ads for - among other things - movies, sitcoms, mail order clothes, vitamins, self-assembly furniture, banks, aftershave, beds, and I'm pretty sure there was at least one about insurance or something. For some time, it was quite possible to hear three ads in a row with Feist songs on them.

I'm glad to see a good artist get paid, and I suppose it's better to have good music rather than shitty music on my television in whatever form it takes. But from an artsy fartsy standpoint, you can't tell me that kind of saturation won't start to degrade an album as a body of work to somebody's ears.

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 03:32 PM
It occurs to me that I could have saved myself an awful lot of typing with the words "Suntori Whiskey".

I'm watching a motorshow with Aphex Twin in the background, btw.

elChurro
02-08-2010, 03:40 PM
Good for them, I'm pretty sure the marketing people who created the commercial for Volkswagen are young and into good music.

icarus
02-08-2010, 03:41 PM
Hey guys, glad I skipped over most of this shitty thread! Just stopping by to say the OP is a whiny bitch! Thanks.

FoxeyLady
02-08-2010, 05:12 PM
I actually disagree. Wake Up never got radio play in San Francisco at least until the movie came out, so if anything it's finally getting exposure - not overexposure. If my brother has heard and likes the song, that makes Arcade Fire bigger than before, and that can only be a good thing for when they start selling out arenas in 10 years.

I never heard KROQ play Wake Up until Where The Wild Things Are came out.
At least, KROQ was playing one good song

COACHILLA
02-08-2010, 05:13 PM
I seen someone post the same shit about Phoenix and that "sellout" shit is nothing but retard talk. Exposure and money seems like a great opportunity for any band, if you hate on a move like this I find it hard to believe you are a working adult.

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 05:24 PM
I think there's a difference between a band like Phoenix taking an ad gig and Grizzly Bear doing it. Grizzly Bear are already pretty comfortably established - I mean, they're not doing lines of blow off golden hookers or anything, but they have what they need to keep ticking over. It's different for Phoenix, as I understand it that ad pretty much made them right?

blackchango
02-08-2010, 05:28 PM
="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/hokPyOltvuQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/hokPyOltvuQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

rage patton
02-08-2010, 05:28 PM
What's snobby or pretentious about this?

MQ3wgX2Oruo

Aaaaaahahahaha. That is an awesome commercial. I love it.

Seriously. Think about this for a second. If you were Grizzly Bear, how would you say no to a commercial like this?

ghettosteez
02-08-2010, 05:36 PM
Yeah seriously! I can't imagine why any band would want to make profit...

MissingPerson
02-08-2010, 05:36 PM
I don't really have a problem with Grizzly Bear doing it as such. Grizzly Bear aren't exactly anarchic anti-capitalists or anything, so it's not like they're somehow compromising themselves by participating in The Machine, in the same way as somebody like Nirvana would have been.

I find the subject in general very interesting though, and I find the first two pages of moronic namecalling quite frustrating given that it's something bands themselves are still trying to figure out. I mean, it's not nearly as simple as it looks if you give it any thought at all. Naturally bands want to make money, money is nice to have - but they're supposed to be about art too, and at some point along the sliding scale from one to the other they have to figure out where exactly they're happy to stand.

Monklish
02-08-2010, 05:38 PM
I think there's a difference between a band like Phoenix taking an ad gig and Grizzly Bear doing it. Grizzly Bear are already pretty comfortably established - I mean, they're not doing lines of blow off golden hookers or anything, but they have what they need to keep ticking over. It's different for Phoenix, as I understand it that ad pretty much made them right?

Grizzly Bear isn't as well known as you think. They're still just a hipster band. And frankly this commercial isn't going to do nearly as much for them primarily because it's not the kind of song people are going to run to the computer to look up.

C DUB YA
02-08-2010, 05:41 PM
VW has helped sell a ton of records for many artists in the past, look what it did for Pink Moon by Nick Drake. When they launched the new beetle, that record's sales went up 600% over a 6 month period that the commercial ran (initially), many more acts have benefited from VW (including the above mentioned The Orb)

sbessiso
02-08-2010, 05:43 PM
I just actually watched the commercial...

why is no one talking about the Stevie Wonder/Tracy Morgan cameo in the end? That shit was funny

boarderwoozel3
02-08-2010, 05:46 PM
"No really, how'd you do that?!"

I loled.

C DUB YA
02-08-2010, 05:46 PM
Let's be honest, music piracy IS taking away a certain percentage of money away from the artists. Granted I understand all the arguments against paying for albums, I practice them myself; supporting the artist directly by seeing them live, buying merchandise instead, taking away from big-label 'fat cats' etc., but you have to admit there is still some loss being incurred by that avenue of revenue share disappearing. Sure it seems like for the most part this is being made up for with the alternatives mentioned above, but give these guys a break. Someone says here's $100k for a song you already recorded, all you have to do is sign this paper and we'll give you a check and play 15 seconds of it in an occasional commercial for 3 months, you would say yes.

Not the place for this discussion, but

There are no decent arguments for stealing.

and the losses are not being made up, that's a falsehood mantra by file-sharing supporters, nothing more.

sbessiso
02-08-2010, 05:47 PM
"No really, how'd you do that?!"

I loled.

"I said "HA!"

I loled too

C DUB YA
02-08-2010, 05:49 PM
"No really, how'd you do that?!"

I loled.

It was a funny way to wrap that spot up.

Monklish
02-08-2010, 05:54 PM
Not the place for this discussion, but

There are no decent arguments for stealing.

and the losses are not being made up, that's a falsehood mantra by file-sharing supporters, nothing more.

There are plenty of decent arguments for stealing.

psycobetabuckdown
02-08-2010, 06:25 PM
I want to live in a world where Aphex Twin and Final Fantasy are all over my TV. I don't want to live in Ireland, but uh, the music part yes.

ghettosteez
02-08-2010, 07:27 PM
Not the place for this discussion, but

There are no decent arguments for stealing.

and the losses are not being made up, that's a falsehood mantra by file-sharing supporters, nothing more.

I wrote an essay (based on a few sources) about this and while I don't have enough info to respond intelligently about the actual profits being made up, there's no denying that file sharing has provided a platform for MANY bands to become relatively popular (or at least hipster popular) that otherwise wouldn't have. In terms of artist recognition (not necessarily economic success, but who knows), I stand by the idea that piracy has helped.

ambient sounds
02-08-2010, 07:55 PM
Selling out is what Of Montreal did with Wraith Pinned to the Mist and Other Things. How they let Outback Steakhouse change a song they wrote just so it could fit their commercial. You either take the song as is, or you don't. You don't let someone else mess with what is essentially a finished piece of your artwork just they can fit it into their commercial. Now that is what I would call selling out. Grizzly Bear didn't do that they just allowed their song to be used so new people could hear it. Good music needs to be heard.

schavira
02-08-2010, 08:29 PM
I smell pretension!

TallGuyCM
02-08-2010, 08:56 PM
Wow, glad I used the search button.

Fuck pretension, I don't like Grizzly Bear associated with kids playing Slugbug. LAME.

FoxeyLady
02-08-2010, 09:22 PM
Selling out is what Of Montreal did with Wraith Pinned to the Mist and Other Things. How they let Outback Steakhouse change a song they wrote just so it could fit their commercial. You either take the song as is, or you don't. You don't let someone else mess with what is essentially a finished piece of your artwork just they can fit it into their commercial. Now that is what I would call selling out. Grizzly Bear didn't do that they just allowed their song to be used so new people could hear it. Good music needs to be heard.

I agree, the commercial is just another way for Grizzly Bear to get their music more exposure, and they get paid for it, which also allows them to continue to do what they are doing.

jackstraw94086
02-09-2010, 08:28 AM
I find the subject in general very interesting though, and I find the first two pages of moronic namecalling quite frustrating given that it's something bands themselves are still trying to figure out. I mean, it's not nearly as simple as it looks if you give it any thought at all. Naturally bands want to make money, money is nice to have - but they're supposed to be about art too, and at some point along the sliding scale from one to the other they have to figure out where exactly they're happy to stand.

It's not that complicated. There isn't much to "figure out". Randy's right.
The vast majority of people in this country don't know Grizzly Bear. And the people who do are probably less likely to pay for their music than most genres of music. I'll bet grizzly bear didn't spend 5 seconds thinking about this and they don't feel bad in the least. They're not worried about upsetting their fans because they just licensed a song for a commercial aimed at their fans.


Here's what some people like this original poster are so afraid of, what they refuse to accept, the reason the song was probably used in the first place. grizzly bear fans or people who listen to similar music are VW's TARGET AUDIENCE. Not because they want to expand their market, but because it already IS THEIR MARKET. Ad companies aren't stupid. They rarely take big gambles or waste money. VW commercials have been using folky/indie shit for YEARS. And they keep doing it because it apparently works for them. That's who's buying their cars.

These people who are having a fit at indie bands "selling out" need to wake the fuck up and realize that every 2nd person at the show is driving home in a VW or audi or whatever. No band can survive for any reasonable length of time on pretentious hipsters alone.

signmeup
02-09-2010, 08:31 AM
has it been discussed how much indie music is used in commercials all the time?

or for that matter in the soundtracks to shit primetime television shows?

ghornett
02-09-2010, 08:33 AM
the grizz mainstream?
i mean weezer is mainstream, not grizzly bear

jackstraw94086
02-09-2010, 08:39 AM
has it been discussed how much indie music is used in commercials all the time?

or for that matter in the soundtracks to shit primetime television shows?

exactly. people who listen to "indie" music are not kids. They buy shit. expensive shit. They are middle income people with houses and condos and mortgages and 1.4 children and fucking foreign cars.

these bands dont exist only inside skinny jeans pockets.

Davids81
02-09-2010, 09:37 AM
exactly. people who listen to "indie" music are not kids. They buy shit. expensive shit. They are middle income people with houses and condos and mortgages and 1.4 children and fucking foreign cars.

these bands dont exist only inside skinny jeans pockets.



...sounds like you're describing me, personally. Except for the "kids" thing. That's inaccurate.


BTW... I like the commercial, but that Outback thing makes the hair on my arm stand straight up. I have to admit, I didn't even know who Of Montreal was, but I have hated those Outback commercials for a long time. I wonder if I heard an Of Montreal album, what my impressions would be. I think some research is in order.

Leckie
02-09-2010, 09:50 AM
oh no, your little underground artist isn't "underground" anymore... big deal

BrettShipes
02-09-2010, 09:55 AM
From the book "The Musician's Legal Companion" written by music lawyer Michael Aczon,


"A ... major source of income for songwriters is synchronization or synch fees, which are the fees paid for the use of songs in synchronization with videos, film, and television. With the explosion of television programming due to the expansion of cable television stations and the cross-promotion of recorded music and movies, sync income has become a significant source of income for songwriters and publishers.
...
Companies will pay upwards of hundreds of thousands of dollars - sometimes even millions of dollars - for the use of songs in major multiyear advertising campaigns."

Of course the artist, in the publishing contract, can insert restrictions that bar the publisher from allowing the artist's song in certain things, i.e. X-rated stuff, cigarettes, coke, whatever. But most of the time it's the act of the PUBLISHER, not the artist, that gets the songs into commercials. Because you know, music is a business and the PUBLISHERS are the ones who sell it (usually) while the artist is free to create more music.

BrettShipes
02-09-2010, 09:58 AM
Also, I have connections with 3rd Eye Blind, so I can tell you that one of their songs was once in a commercial and the band had no idea until someone told them. Because that kind of thing happens ALL THE TIME. So unless you know what kind of contractual obligation the publisher has to the band, you can't get mad at the band for selling out.

Lt. Bowie
02-09-2010, 10:58 AM
Get it straight. This is not selling out. Selling out is changing your music to please the radio stations, the grammy committee, or the record company. TONS of great bands have songs in commercials. The Arcade Fire's "Wake Up" was all over the place today and I don't consider them sell outs in any way because they make good, honest music that they write themselves.

Exactly. Of Montreal writing an Outback Steakhouse song is considered selling out...but who cares again?

Rudimus
02-09-2010, 11:07 AM
I'm upset that a VW used a shitty pitchfork endorsed trendy band like Grizzly Bear. I'm gonna go make a thread about it because I am so angry.

StubbADubb
02-09-2010, 11:27 AM
I don't like Grizzly Bear at all. And I could see why the poster was annoyed at the commercial...probably along the lines of why I was annoyed to see MUSE become the teeny-bopper's delight because of all that terrible Twilight bullshit. In fact, to see stupid young girls going crazy for a band just because they have been featured in those god-awful films (and not because they are musically gifted), drives me bonkers.

But I still like Muse and I don't think they sold out and I don't think Grizzly Bear has sold out either if they are in a VW commercial. It gets them exposure and it's still THEM. Their sound.

As many people have pointed out, "SELLING OUT" only really applies when the band changes their sound JUST to sell more records or to appeal to the public, radio, etc. That's selling out - it's like fucking for popularity.

That said, I don't like Muse's new album very much compared to their really old stuff, but I don't think the sound change was due to "selling out," just a musical evolution. But who knows?

hobomilitia
02-09-2010, 11:29 AM
It is completely irrelevant which car company pays them because they are all evil.


word.

commercials are the new radio- no traditional radio station will ever play an "indie" band such as grizzly bear, so they have to get their music out to the ignorant masses somehow

Neutral Milk Hotel
02-09-2010, 11:35 AM
Grizzly Bear are going to be selling out the Hollywood Bowl, not the Super Bowl.

Alchemy
02-09-2010, 12:03 PM
of Montreal didn't sell out by writing "Outback Steakhouse pinned to the Mist and Other Games." If False Priest features special guests Lil' Wayne, Rihanna, and the Jonas Brothers, then they will have sold out.

Monklish
02-09-2010, 12:11 PM
Grizzly Bear selling out the Hollywood Bowl? Lulz.

michaelmontanez
02-09-2010, 12:23 PM
Simi Valley sold out by being shown in a VW commercial... lol

invisiblerobots
02-09-2010, 12:31 PM
Exactly. Of Montreal writing an Outback Steakhouse song is considered selling out...but who cares again?

Of Montreal didn't write anything for Outback. They allowed Outback's ad agency to cover/parody one of their songs and Kevin Barnes walked off a huge wad of cash to pay for the staging of his subsequent live shows.

Neutral Milk Hotel
02-09-2010, 12:39 PM
Grizzly Bear selling out the Hollywood Bowl? Lulz.

Disbelief suspended for the sake of terrible joke making.

psycobetabuckdown
02-09-2010, 12:39 PM
Also, I have connections with 3rd Eye Blind, so I can tell you that one of their songs was once in a commercial and the band had no idea until someone told them. Because that kind of thing happens ALL THE TIME. So unless you know what kind of contractual obligation the publisher has to the band, you can't get mad at the band for selling out.

Tell them to reunite with Kevin please

BrettShipes
02-09-2010, 12:50 PM
Tell them to reunite with Kevin please

Stephen screwed him out of a whole heap of money through a legality loophole and there was all kinds of legal blah blah blah and they finally settled. Far as I know, they want nothing to do with each other. Also they're busy planning a Europe tour and making a fancy light-up drum kit of some sort to look like stars or something for their fancy pants stage show.

psycobetabuckdown
02-09-2010, 01:19 PM
That sounds gay. Used to be my favorite band, never seen em live even though they played a free show last summer.

Sad sad city.

greghead
02-09-2010, 01:21 PM
3rd Eye Blind used to be your favorite band?

how embarrassing

Jankypirate
02-09-2010, 01:33 PM
I was going to reply to your points directly, but as I read down the pages, I realized others already have and it doesn't get through to you.

Im sure VW offered them good $$ and you think they should have said "no because youre too pretentious and snobbish and I'm too cool for you"?? Grow up.

They get their sound out to a huge audience and get paid.

And STFU about the upper class snobbery bull shit.
IT VW NOT BENTLEY!

Just because you're broke and can't put down the bong long enough to go make a better life for yourself doesnt mean those who do are "rich snobs"
I smoke on a regular basis but I have no patience for people who think like this.



http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c126/jankypirate/ATT560240.jpg

psycobetabuckdown
02-09-2010, 02:02 PM
3rd Eye Blind used to be your favorite band?

how embarrassing

Well I was 12 in 1998. But their first album is still great - not good, great.

StubbADubb
02-09-2010, 03:09 PM
It's OK Psycho, I used to like 3rd Eye Blind too way back when :)

and BrentShippes or whatever, is right on that...well, not about the Third Eye Blind, I can't vouch for that but that the band's sometimes have no control over what their label does with their songs.

I learned that after getting into a very heated argument about the fact that Radiohead was used in those god-damn Twilight movies. It broke my heart until someone said that Radiohead might have not had control of where it was used.

But it was a song from In Rainbows...so they did have control. Which still makes me mad. Twilight? Really? WHY??

humanoid
02-09-2010, 03:22 PM
It's OK Psycho, I used to like 3rd Eye Blind too way back when :)

and BrentShippes or whatever, is right on that...well, not about the Third Eye Blind, I can't vouch for that but that the band's sometimes have no control over what their label does with their songs.

I learned that after getting into a very heated argument about the fact that Radiohead was used in those god-damn Twilight movies. It broke my heart until someone said that Radiohead might have not had control of where it was used.

But it was a song from In Rainbows...so they did have control. Which still makes me mad. Twilight? Really? WHY??

because as much as we would like to pretend Radiohead doesn't care about album sales...introducing your music to an entirely new generation of listeners and potential purchasers of your band's back catalog can be quite the shrewd business move.

Or Thom is a closet Twilight fan...Edward Cullen is rather dreamy.

StubbADubb
02-09-2010, 03:25 PM
I believe it's the latter...

I don't have a problem with what you're saying. You're probably right...I just have a problem with that film, lol.

And also just that Radiohead just seem very vocal about bands who sell out and celeb pop culture and what not, so it kinda seemed out of character to appear in such a trendy film. Trendy, terrible film :)

jackstraw94086
02-09-2010, 03:29 PM
The Bay City Rollers are my favorite band.


And they've never sold out.


I win at musics.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-09-2010, 03:35 PM
I would rather have music i love in shitty movies that really shitty music in movies I love

jackstraw94086
02-09-2010, 03:44 PM
you take second place at musics.

StubbADubb
02-09-2010, 03:50 PM
Radiohead came on at the credits lol. It did not save the film. It just added to the joy that it was all over :)

lickety_spit
02-09-2010, 03:56 PM
It's not like they sold their song to Hummer, VW is a respectable, albeit somewhat elitist, car manufacturer.

B33Yox4WxXQ
& i still love ratatat.

BKsaysAction!
02-09-2010, 06:41 PM
What's snobby or pretentious about this?

MQ3wgX2Oruo

Ok I got it, ^ not selling out but this...

BzGx1XCAJ9E

Selling out.

boarderwoozel3
02-09-2010, 08:17 PM
Oh man... Nike...

I'm sure these bands don't have advertisers knocking down their door but still, fucking Nike. Though that's easy to say not being the one with all those zeros looking back at me.

psycobetabuckdown
02-09-2010, 08:27 PM
And also just that Radiohead just seem very vocal about bands who sell out and celeb pop culture and what not, so it kinda seemed out of character to appear in such a trendy film. Trendy, terrible film :)

I don't think there have been that many bands that give a shit about this kind of thing since Nirvana. And even then it was just Kurt. Dave Grohl has no problem with Foo Fighters music being all over the place.

What about video games? Why are we not jumping on Metric, MGMT, Ratatat and Del the Funky Homosapien for being in NBA2K? Just because a smaller market has access to it? Doesn't make any sense to me if the argument is about songs being art.

StubbADubb
02-09-2010, 08:35 PM
I don't think there have been that many bands that give a shit about this kind of thing since Nirvana. And even then it was just Kurt. Dave Grohl has no problem with Foo Fighters music being all over the place.

What about video games? Why are we not jumping on Metric, MGMT, Ratatat and Del the Funky Homosapien for being in NBA2K? Just because a smaller market has access to it? Doesn't make any sense to me if the argument is about songs being art.

I don't know. I don't have any problems with band's music being all over the place. I don't consider that selling out.

Having Captain Midnight run during the credits in The Darkness turned a lot of fans on to the awesome that is Tomahawk.


But I admit I cringed when I saw tiny MUSE and Radiohead t-shirts pop up among the Twilight crap at Hot Topic/Wet Seal, lol.

psycobetabuckdown
02-09-2010, 08:52 PM
I want these kids to like Radiohead. Radiohead deserves to be the most fucking mainstream band in existence. It may make us cringe, but shit, I want everyone to listen to and love my favoritish band.

StubbADubb
02-09-2010, 08:58 PM
Well it's working...even Miley Cyrus wants to say hello to Mr. Yorke. My own personal "issue" is that they are liking the band for the wrong reasons...because it's cool, because Stephanie Meyers said so (and I'm actually talking more about Muse, Radiohead hasn't really caught on the way they have) - and I'll admit it's silly. I liked Sonic Youth for the wrong reasons in high school, so I'm not one to talk.

Also, I want the kids to like FNM, but that doesn't seem to be catching on...yet!

BUT enough about that, back to this Grizzly Bear band...my useless two cents? Not sell-outs. :)

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-09-2010, 09:04 PM
you're giving twilight way too much credit. plenty of assholes have been into radiohead and muse for a long time before those books/movies. You've also skimmed over the fact that grizzly bear was in the last twilight movie too.

hendrixfan143
02-09-2010, 09:11 PM
Well, I tend to think of the auto-industry as a huge, monopolized market that swindled a bunch of bailout money from their respective governments with the excuse of the financial crisis. It would obviously be much more distasteful if it had been a bank, but car company's aren't my favorite.

So, I dislike Volkswagens more because their commercials are merely annoying, but car companies as a whole don't have my favor as they are generally not friends of regular taxpaying citizens. So, it's a mix of trivial, personal complaints and social commentary, honestly.

It's a little convoluted I admit, but I like to be uptight about things I find offensive to the general well-being of average people. Being somewhat conscious of these things makes me feel better- it's like it replaces the meaning religion was supposed to give to my life.

I remember vaguely reading something very disconcerting about VW specifically in a book called the Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein (sp?), but I can't remember what it was specifically...so it's not really helpful to my explanation, but I thought I'd throw it out there just in case you knew who she was and found her to be an informative and reliable journalist too.

I have no idea what i'm talking about but isn't VW a foreign company? i thought only domestic received bailouts.

StubbADubb
02-09-2010, 09:18 PM
Drinky -Yeah they have. But I've noticed a GIANT jump in girls around me who suddenly swing on the Muse wagon solely because of the books and film. I'd play muse before and they never had any interest. Maybe it's a girl thing, I don't know. And I'm probably just miffed that they didn't listen to me to begin with. Like I said, it's silly, and I'm not taking myself too seriously either.

As for Grizzly Bear being in Twilight, I don't care. I don't particularly like Bear but I'm sure the exposure has helped expand their fanbase.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-09-2010, 09:27 PM
out of curiosity, how old are you?

seandigi
02-09-2010, 09:32 PM
God forbid they make a little cash doing what they do. Doing a comercial has nothing to do to with the artist losing their integrity or selling out. Unless we are talking about Saul Williams, the guy always preaches about bringing down big corporations because they exploit people. Now his track is on a Nike commercial. Talk about selling out.

TomServo
02-09-2010, 09:39 PM
Backing up the Third Eye Blind story - I'm acquainted with a band (Jupiter One) who routinely finds out from FANS about their tracks being used in TV shows. They have a music rights rep who finds buyers for the music, and the band generally has little notice of how or where it's used.

Toss in the fact that Trent Reznor has no idea where/when NIN tracks are being sold out (the ones he didn't self-publish, that is)... and selling out isn't the issue some want it to be. Everyone's trying to make money, and they should be.

StubbADubb
02-09-2010, 09:48 PM
Drinky - 28. But thanks to having a younger bf and his friends who have a penchant for younger girls, I'm often surrounded by 20 year old Twilight fans. Though I have friends who are 40 and also Twilight fans. Anyway, my ranting and raving is probably very off topic. This is a Grizzly Bear thread, not one of those I Hate Twilight facebook groups. My apologies :)

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-09-2010, 10:49 PM
Backing up the Third Eye Blind story - I'm acquainted with a band (Jupiter One) who routinely finds out from FANS about their tracks being used in TV shows. They have a music rights rep who finds buyers for the music, and the band generally has little notice of how or where it's used.

Toss in the fact that Trent Reznor has no idea where/when NIN tracks are being sold out (the ones he didn't self-publish, that is)... and selling out isn't the issue some want it to be. Everyone's trying to make money, and they should be.

hmm, I never got the sense that trent wasn't somehow involved with most if not all of the commercial of film uses of his music (with the exception of some of the recent trailer usages, but even then)

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-09-2010, 10:51 PM
Drinky - 28. But thanks to having a younger bf and his friends who have a penchant for younger girls, I'm often surrounded by 20 year old Twilight fans. Though I have friends who are 40 and also Twilight fans. Anyway, my ranting and raving is probably very off topic. This is a Grizzly Bear thread, not one of those I Hate Twilight facebook groups. My apologies :)

Huh, NOT the age I was expecting.


I'm your age but date a 21 year old who happens to love Twilight. Muse and Radiohead are such major radio bands here in L.A. and have been for years that they were already pretty embraced by the audience that Twilight targets, so that might be why i don't notice it.

ANYWAY...you should listen to Grizzly Bear more

psycobetabuckdown
02-10-2010, 12:09 AM
San Francisco radio doesn't play Radiohead, that's for sure.

If anything pisses me off, it's that Muse came up biting Radiohead, and now are selling out arenas (like Coldplay). I sleep comfortably knowing Radiohead has more lasting power.

And come on, this isn't off topic. It's not a Grizzly Bear thread, it's a thread about bands selling out. If it was a Grizzly Bear thread it would've lasted 1 page.

StubbADubb
02-10-2010, 10:09 AM
Lol that's not true! I've seen long Grizzly Bear threads out there. And it did get off topic for me, I get wound up and go off on a tangent that has no end!

Drinky - well, I don't feel 28 if that helps :) yeah, I'm one of the few girls I know who hates Twilight. Everyone else seems to love it. As a writer myself, the sucess of the books bugs me to no end. I tries to read them and just couldn't do it. I watched the films and nearly got kicked out of the theatre for laughing the entire time. Conclusion is that there must be something wrong with me, cuz I just don't get it.

I heard Grizzly Bear on some late night show recently. I'm sure they are talented and whatnot but honestly they are not my type of music. Know lots of people who adore them tho.

Radiohead and Muse also have not been played much at all on the radio in Vancouver until Muse's last album. And Radiohead is still fairly neglected here as well. I WISH they played more Radiohead, and more of Muse in the Absolution era but none doing. We're stuck with fucken Nickleshit and other crap. Which is why I listen to Classic Rock instead.

TomServo
02-10-2010, 10:19 AM
hmm, I never got the sense that trent wasn't somehow involved with most if not all of the commercial of film uses of his music (with the exception of some of the recent trailer usages, but even then)

I read a quote from Trent a couple years ago about Rock Band tracks - he had no idea what songs were in the game, and said that he hadn't personally authorized any music in a long time. He also claimed that any licensing of NIN music in a soundtrack he didn't produce was done without his knowledge or consent - that the only way he would use NIN music in that way is if he had control.

This is paraphrasing, of course, so don't stab me in the neck if it's inaccurate, but that's how I remember it. Since then more NIN tracks have popped up on RB, so I dunno about those.

Edit - Looking back at his interviews, either it wasn't Rock Band related, or he's telling two different stories... so I'm almost definitely wrong on that. Maybe it was a Film Threat or Onion AV Club interview. I dunno. I was surprised, though.

daxton
02-10-2010, 10:51 AM
Drinky - 28. But thanks to having a younger bf and his friends who have a penchant for younger girls, I'm often surrounded by 20 year old Twilight fans. Though I have friends who are 40 and also Twilight fans. Anyway, my ranting and raving is probably very off topic. This is a Grizzly Bear thread, not one of those I Hate Twilight facebook groups. My apologies :)


StubbADubb aka Lusty?

StubbADubb
02-10-2010, 10:56 AM
Haha yeeeeees. Did my Twilight bashing give me away? :P

amyzzz
02-10-2010, 11:06 AM
I should probably be beaten repeatedly for reading the Twilight books. I'm currently in the middle of number 3.

StubbADubb
02-10-2010, 11:09 AM
Amy - hey like I said, I'm the odd one for NOT liking them :)

amyzzz
02-10-2010, 11:38 AM
I like parts of it and roll my eyes at other parts. Or make fun of it to my husband.

psycobetabuckdown
02-10-2010, 12:57 PM
We're stuck with fucken Nickleshit and other crap. Which is why I listen to Classic Rock instead.

The one good thing about Bay Area radio, I couldn't find a station that plays Nickelback if I tried. No Seether, very little Three Days Grace, very little :emo (even when it was popular).

But now we're off topic. What happened to the off topic smiley? FUCKING BULLSHIT!!!!!

StubbADubb
02-10-2010, 03:15 PM
There's an off topic smiley? Lol I'm such a noob

daxton
02-11-2010, 05:50 AM
Haha yeeeeees. Did my Twilight bashing give me away? :P

No, being from Vancouver did. I remember you saying that on the fnm blog.

elChurro
02-11-2010, 06:15 AM
I just saw the commercial and you could just as easily say that Stevie Wonder was a sell out for making a cameo and not singing.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
02-11-2010, 09:12 AM
I just saw the commercial and you could just as easily say that Stevie Wonder was a sell out for making a cameo and not singing.

but he was making a joke about being BLIND!!!! HILARIOUS!!!

The Dude
02-11-2010, 09:46 AM
Considering the state of the recording industry and that this is one of a few ways for an artist to make a living anymore, I really don't think this is selling out. They gotta eat too.

trentmorrison
02-11-2010, 12:11 PM
Get it straight. This is not selling out. Selling out is changing your music to please the radio stations, the grammy committee, or the record company. TONS of great bands have songs in commercials. The Arcade Fire's "Wake Up" was all over the place today and I don't consider them sell outs in any way because they make good, honest music that they write themselves.

arcade only agreed to that after all the money went too haiti, so thats a pass for them

buscuit
02-12-2010, 01:25 AM
I used to be completely opposed to bands licensing music to television commercials because it makes me think of the product the music is licensed to. Led Zeppelin's 'Rock n' Roll' and Cadillac is a the perfect case in point. But my view has changed. For newer artists who don't have the luxury of being the financial powerhouse that is Led Zeppelin, and will NEVER sell as many albums as them, if not because they aren't as big, but because of the prevalence of music piracy, who can blame these bands for wanting to make some money for their work? It's capitalism at it's finest folks. If you want them to keep recording, then they need to get paid.

Let's be honest, music piracy IS taking away a certain percentage of money away from the artists. Granted I understand all the arguments against paying for albums, I practice them myself; supporting the artist directly by seeing them live, buying merchandise instead, taking away from big-label 'fat cats' etc., but you have to admit there is still some loss being incurred by that avenue of revenue share disappearing. Sure it seems like for the most part this is being made up for with the alternatives mentioned above, but give these guys a break. Someone says here's $100k for a song you already recorded, all you have to do is sign this paper and we'll give you a check and play 15 seconds of it in an occasional commercial for 3 months, you would say yes.

For VolksWagen's part, they seem to have a pretty solid track record of artists who license their music to their advertisements, Wilco, John Mayer (<- flame me here), and now Grizzly Bear. For god's sake even The Flaming Lips 'sold out' to Dell a few years back with 'The W.A.N.D.' It's nothing new, and I for one think that if Grizzly Bear making a little bit of money from advertising will get me some more of their wonderful music, then go for it.

I could totally understand this perspective. I hate the combination of commercials and good music prominently because of how much I hate commercials. They're so mind numbing, often offensive, moronic, and intrusive (some are alright, though), so maybe I'm just highly sensitive to their being associated. But in light of arguments about exposure, and their selling capacity being diminished due to music piracy I think you have a point.

I just hate to see the worlds of commercial and art collide because ideally, I'd prefer they be separate.

I liked the comment about their success as capitalism at its finest. It was also a good point =)