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whynotsmile99
11-13-2009, 08:20 PM
Rodney Bradford might have been just another New York teenager arrested and charged with burglary had it not been for his Facebook account. As it has turned out, time spent on the internet has proved to be time well spent for him. He is the first person to be cleared of a crime as a result of an update on his Facebook profile. It’s the Facebook defense alibi!

The 19-year-old was arrested on October 18, 2009 for suspicion of robbery. He was accused of mugging Jeremy Dunklebarger and Rolando Perez-Lorenzo at gunpoint where he lives in the Farragut Houses in Brooklyn, New York. One of the crime victims picked him out of a line-up and he was sent to the New York City jail on Rikers Island on charges of robbery in the first degree. He was already facing a robbery indictment from a separate incident in happened in 2008.

Bradford sat in jail for two weeks, until his father happened to see that he had updated his Facebook profile on the date he was accused of committing the crime. The robbery occurred on October 17, 2009 and Bradford insisted he had been in Harlem at his father’s apartment on that day. His father, Rodney Bradford, Sr. and stepmother, Ernestine Bradford, backed up his claim.

It wasn’t until the Facebook alibi was found that the burglary charges against him were dropped. The time-stamp on his latest facebook update was 11:49 a.m. on Saturday, October 17, 2009. That was exactly one minute before the two men were mugged in Brooklyn. Facebook was able to verify that it was updated from Bradford’s father’s apartment in Harlem.

So what did Rodney Bradford write that turned out to be his alibi? ‘On the phone with this fat chick… where my IHOP.’ Apparently, that was a playful jab at his pregnant girlfriend who was miffed that he had gone to IHOP to eat


the night before without her.

Who would have ever expected a message like that would get someone out of jail on Rikers Island?

Experts on internet social networking sites and crime report that these types of sites have been used as part of the prosecution in several cases in the past, but it is believed that Rodney Bradford’s use of the Facebook defense is the first time a social networking site has provided an alibi for a crime.

NQwvAq_2u5c&feature=related

I really wish that reporter said ‘On the phone with this fat chick… where my IHOP.’

SDsoldier7
11-14-2009, 08:26 AM
how the fuck do they know that someone else did'nt update his status?

so what did they say after he spent two weeks in jail for no reason? what did they do, go to his jail cell and say "well, looks like we got the wrong guy, your facebook status says you wanted i hop that night, sorry about that. our mistake."

JustSteve
11-14-2009, 08:29 AM
i like that he is already facing another charge from '08. so he is still a scumbag, most likely.

SDsoldier7
11-14-2009, 08:36 AM
This could be a good alibi for so many things then...

marooko
11-14-2009, 10:13 AM
Who wrote this?


Rodney Bradford might have been just another New York teenager arrested and charged with burglary had it not been for his Facebook account. As it has turned out, time spent on the internet has proved to be time well spent for him. He is the first person to be cleared of a crime as a result of an update on his Facebook profile. It’s the Facebook defense alibi!

The 19-year-old was arrested on October 18, 2009 for suspicion of robbery. He was accused of mugging Jeremy Dunklebarger and Rolando Perez-Lorenzo at gunpoint where he lives in the Farragut Houses in Brooklyn, New York. One of the crime victims picked him out of a line-up and he was sent to the New York City jail on Rikers Island on charges of robbery in the first degree. He was already facing a robbery indictment from a separate incident in happened in 2008.

Bradford sat in jail for two weeks, until his father happened to see that he had updated his Facebook profile on the date he was accused of committing the crime. The robbery occurred on October 17, 2009 and Bradford insisted he had been in Harlem at his father’s apartment on that day. His father, Rodney Bradford, Sr. and stepmother, Ernestine Bradford, backed up his claim.

It wasn’t until the Facebook alibi was found that the burglary charges against him were dropped. The time-stamp on his latest facebook update was 11:49 a.m. on Saturday, October 17, 2009. That was exactly one minute before the two men were mugged in Brooklyn. Facebook was able to verify that it was updated from Bradford’s father’s apartment in Harlem.

So what did Rodney Bradford write that turned out to be his alibi? ‘On the phone with this fat chick… where my IHOP.’ Apparently, that was a playful jab at his pregnant girlfriend who was miffed that he had gone to IHOP to eat


the night before without her.

Who would have ever expected a message like that would get someone out of jail on Rikers Island?

Experts on internet social networking sites and crime report that these types of sites have been used as part of the prosecution in several cases in the past, but it is believed that Rodney Bradford’s use of the Facebook defense is the first time a social networking site has provided an alibi for a crime.

NQwvAq_2u5c&feature=related

I really wish that reporter said ‘On the phone with this fat chick… where my IHOP.’

marooko
11-14-2009, 10:15 AM
how the fuck do they know that someone else did'nt update his status?

so what did they say after he spent two weeks in jail for no reason? what did they do, go to his jail cell and say "well, looks like we got the wrong guy, your facebook status says you wanted i hop that night, sorry about that. our mistake."

Yeah, this is gonna have to be tied down. I can go commit a crime and have you hang out on my facebook account, at home.

No officer, I was doing the facebooks. At home even.

gaypalmsprings
11-14-2009, 11:00 AM
http://fc08.deviantart.net/fs27/f/2008/038/9/8/charlie_punk_by_Devils_Alibi.jpg

bmack86
11-14-2009, 11:16 AM
so what did they say after he spent two weeks in jail for no reason? what did they do, go to his jail cell and say "well, looks like we got the wrong guy, your facebook status says you wanted i hop that night, sorry about that. our mistake."

He responds with a false imprisonment tort suit to collect punitive damages, if he's smart about it.

BROKENDOLL
11-14-2009, 11:47 AM
He responds with a false imprisonment tort suit to collect punitive damages, if he's smart about it.
God, where were you 15 years ago Bmack?
Actually, my defense attorney said I couold have done something similar, but I just wanted that whole nightmare to end and I wasn't about to pay him another dime...It was the appealate attorney that handled my appeal.The original one was the railroader...WTF???

SDsoldier7
11-14-2009, 12:12 PM
i want some pancakes right now.