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RageAgainstTheAoki
11-05-2009, 11:00 PM
I'm one of the millions who got laid off this year. I'm aware that we have threads about EDD and collecting unemployment benefits. I thought this thread could be for job seekers to ask questions of those of you who work in HR and/or who hire for your department.

I currently reside in San Diego. Lately, I've been applying for jobs in Los Angeles. They range from entry level to experienced, but not quite middle management yet. In other words, not the kinds of jobs that employers are interested in relocating candidates for; especially not in a job market like this in which the number of applicants far outweighs the number of available jobs. Now, if I land a job based in LA I fully plan to relocate to LA and to cover all of my own relocation expenses.

My questions is about my resume and what I should do about my address. I've read that the average hiring manager/recruiter takes 3-5 secs. to peruse a resume before deciding if s/he should continue reading or discard the application. That's 3-5 seconds to be impactful and make them want to know more. That's also 3-5 seconds for them to find one red flag which will allow them to add your application to the circular file. I worry that the people looking at my resume will take one look at my zip code and say, forget it, I've got 50 other applications here from people already in LA.

Here's what I've been contemplating. Tell me if you think any of these are reasonable ideas. (No mater what, I would briefly mention in my cover letter than I fully plan to relocate to Los Angeles and fully expect to cover the cost of relocation myself.)

Don't list an address on my resume.
This seems sketchy to me. After just going through a recession, they could reasonably wonder if I'm homeless.

List my current address, but below it write "Relocating to Los Angeles in [MONTH]"
Too much info? Too cluttered?

Don't list my address and only include name, ph, email and "Relocating to Los Angeles in [MONTH]."

Ask a friend in LA if I can use their mailing address on my resume.
I already have offers to do so from friends, but I feel very iffy about this. Perhaps this could backfire if I'm fortunate enough to make it to a final interview/background check.


Thanks for your input! BTW, if you're not an HR Manager or Hiring Manager, but have an opinion to share, I'd love to hear it.

casey
11-06-2009, 08:44 AM
i don't work in HR, but when i relocated from SF to LA and was putting out resumes, i used the address of someone who lived in LA. if i made it to the interview and they brought up the fact that i "lived" in culver city, i'd say, "right now i'm living in splitting time between san francisco and culver city, moving all my stuff over slowly while i'm on the job hunt."

it worked, i got 3 job offers out of 4 interviews i went on, and the 4th job i was super underqualified for but was hoping for the best. :)

good luck on your job search!

locachica73
11-06-2009, 08:52 AM
When I moved for Oregon to Arizona I put in my cover letter that I was relocating and available for interviews on such and such a date. That way they had a specific date of when I would be in town. That was in the 90's though when the economy was much better. I only went on 1 interview the day I drove into town and had the job offer on the answering machine before I got home from the interview.

Those were the days.

Young blood
11-06-2009, 08:56 AM
I know of job openings through referral basis if anyone is looking.....


Position: Trade Marketing Manager
Location: Denver, CO



Position: Accounting Manager
Location: Denver, CO


Position: Regional Sales Manager, 2 positions
Location: Dallas, TX Metropolitan Area & Northeastern US Territory
(preferably NJ)


Position: Regional Education Manager, 2 positions
Location: Southeastern US Territory & Northwestern US Territory

Let me know and I can PM details.

SDsoldier7
11-06-2009, 11:30 AM
would you mind posting up your resume on here? the more input you have the better...

TomAz
11-06-2009, 11:42 AM
Thanks for your input! BTW, if you're not an HR Manager or Hiring Manager, but have an opinion to share, I'd love to hear it.

I think you're making much ado about very little. Just do something reasonable. If it were me I would list current address and then "Relocating in Month" just below.

Devin the Dude
11-06-2009, 11:45 AM
option #4. worked for my mom's Social Security case, as well as mine. do that.

Alchemy
11-06-2009, 12:04 PM
Tom is correct.

roberto73
11-06-2009, 01:43 PM
I agree with Tom. When I was doing my job search at the end of my undergrad years, I think I did something like this:

Current address:
Address as of (date):

chairmenmeow47
11-06-2009, 01:54 PM
i just prefer to see that someone has made some sort of step towards moving or has a place to stay. i don't like to see that they will move IF i give them the job cause quite frankly, the job that i'm hiring for definitely isn't worth such trouble and based on the pay range i'm hiring at, i can't be confident that you'll be here when i need you. i tend to look down on addresses that are across town too or if they mention things like the bus because the bus absolutely sucks here. i of course interview and don't hold it against them in the process, but it does worry me if i don't think someone can get to work every day.

RageAgainstTheAoki
11-06-2009, 04:03 PM
would you mind posting up your resume on here? the more input you have the better...

Really? Look, I know you're just trying to be nice and I really do appreciate it. I know that this this board is filled with a*holes so I try to keep a pleasant demeanor, but you really think I'm going to upload my resume to the Coachella messageboard? Perhaps I can add it to the "Post unauthorized photographs of your co-workers with accompanying slanderous comments sure to get you fired thread". Besides the inappropriateness of doing that, I'm not seeking input on other aspects of my resume. I've gone over it with a fine tooth comb for the last four months and had it reviewed and edited by consultants, recruiters and former colleagues in my field. Sometimes I wonder if some of you are just deliberately posting on here to make San Diegans look dim-witted.




I think you're making much ado about very little. Just do something reasonable. If it were me I would list current address and then "Relocating in Month" just below.

Yes, it probably seems like much ado to those of you gainfully employed, but when you've had four long hard months to go over every aspect of your resume in minute detail, you look for anything that could be a potential red flag. It's not just something I've read on the interweb. I've spoken to former colleagues and to a recruiter I know who told me that all it takes is one small seemingly insignificant red flag for them to move your resume to the bottom of the pile or even toss it before reading it. I'm just trying to do everything I can do avoid that scenario. There are no sure things; I know that. BTW, I think I'm going to go with your suggestion as well. If I were out of state, I'd probably get a friend's local address, but I think it's reasonable for a San Diegan to relocate to LA.




i just prefer to see that someone has made some sort of step towards moving or has a place to stay. i don't like to see that they will move IF i give them the job cause quite frankly, the job that i'm hiring for definitely isn't worth such trouble and based on the pay range i'm hiring at, i can't be confident that you'll be here when i need you. i tend to look down on addresses that are across town too or if they mention things like the bus because the bus absolutely sucks here. i of course interview and don't hold it against them in the process, but it does worry me if i don't think someone can get to work every day.

Exactly the kind of reaction I'm talking about. However, many hiring managers won't extend the courtesy you do. My cover letter won't state "If I get this job, I will move to [CITY] and cover my own expenses" but will state something like "While I maintain a strong interest in this position, I will be relocating to [CITY] on [DATE] regardless of the outcome of my application."


Thank you for your feedback, guys. Much appreciated. If anyone else has these types of questions, please add them to this thread.

chairmenmeow47
11-06-2009, 04:21 PM
Exactly the kind of reaction I'm talking about. However, many hiring managers won't extend the courtesy you do. My cover letter won't state "If I get this job, I will move to [CITY] and cover my own expenses" but will state something like "While I maintain a strong interest in this position, I will be relocating to [CITY] on [DATE] regardless of the outcome of my application."

your idea sounds great. i have to be nice per HR policies, lol. i'm not really allowed to throw out a resume JUST because of their address. it can be a reason for me to go looking for other reasons to toss it though. that 3-5 seconds is pretty spot in. i am just LOOKING for reasons to make the stack of people i actually have to talk to smaller, lol.

karecares
11-06-2009, 05:24 PM
thank you for this thread, i've been in the process of posting my resume and in the process of moving to LA and am going to borrow that statement ;)

RageAgainstTheAoki
11-06-2009, 06:15 PM
karecares:
Good luck on the move! Moving from NJ, I take it?

chairmenmeow47:
Thank you. Really appreciate your input. BTW, if you're ever having a crummy day after looking through 57 resumes all making the same fateful mistakes, feel free to log onto this thread and post us a list of chaimenmeow47's no-no's for resumes and cover letters.

karecares
11-07-2009, 09:50 AM
yes i'm heading out the 2nd week of Dec :)

Alternate
11-07-2009, 09:55 AM
good luck!

I LiveInCoachella-campgrd
11-22-2009, 02:15 AM
Find out who the owner is, then call up and get the owner's direct fax number. Handwrite a message with a thick Sharpie on the resume, write the owner's name on it, and let them know that you expect him/her to contact you immediately because it is a job that you are ready to BEGIN TODAY, and that you will continue to contact them via fax, email, and telephone 3 TIMES A DAY until you speak with them first-hand.

You should get them to contact you within that first week, be ready to be just as aggressive on the telephone when speaking with them, immediately ask "What time tommorrow can we meet?"

Let me know if that works for ya.

For myself, I can always land the job.....it's just the discipline of showing up to work when there is better things to do that I have a hard time with. Now I work from home. If you are getting unemployment...get it for as long as you can, and aggressivly look for a job. Lots of employers are opened to you doing freelance work (this way it won't mess up your benefits.)

TheWatcher
11-23-2009, 02:43 PM
What is a good answer to "What have you been doing this past year?", after the interviewer sees you have been unemployed for a year?

locachica73
11-23-2009, 02:45 PM
I was just honest and said the market sucked and I have been looking for work for 5 months... put a little more eloquently than that of course. In fact I even told them that I decided to take 2 months prior to even looking for work due to personal reasons.

TheWatcher
11-23-2009, 08:09 PM
Yeah, I have basically been saying the same thing. I read an article by someone analyzing statistics, and it seems that due to the number of people vs. number of jobs, I have the same chance of finding a job as a high school graduate has of getting accepted to Harvard. :(

I still feel lame, I think maybe they want someone who can say, well I have been doing volunteer work or freelance or something, I don't know.

guedita
11-23-2009, 08:24 PM
I asked my Mom who has been in HR and also leads support groups/resume workshops for the unemployed your question. First, she said that many people merely put the city and state in which they live (no zip code). Addresses on resumes used to be important because often job offers were sent in the mail, and this obviously does not happen anymore. She also said that writing "Relocating to..." is not a great idea, because it does clutter the resume and can send up warning flags. It's highly doubtful that you'll ever be questioned "Why didn't you list a complete address," she thinks, and if you are, it's completely reasonable for you to say that for security/identity protection reasons you don't list your address, or that you are in the process of moving/finalizing things.

As for your cover letter, she says that it's not necessary for you to mention relocation, because you aren't moving too far of a distance (like, across the country). But if part of your letter discusses the work you've done in SD, it would be fine to indicate that you are moving to Los Angeles to further pursue/develop your career. She also strongly urges that you don't mention anything about "covering costs," in your letter, because it could be interpreted negatively.

I hope this is somewhat helpful for you....my mom LOVES to blather on about these kind of questions, so send me a PM if you have any more. It gives me and her something to talk about other than what "my life plans are." :)

guedita
11-23-2009, 08:32 PM
What is a good answer to "What have you been doing this past year?", after the interviewer sees you have been unemployed for a year?

Employers are completely aware of how terrible the economy is, so this question is posed not so much to inveigh a "what the hell is wrong with you" sentiment, but to see what type of response you give as an indicator of your personality/work type. So, respond to these questions in the most positive way possible, and think of answers that will demonstrate how you constructively use your "free" time to better yourself/serve your community/develop necessary skills etc. Some people might actually bring along a side-resume/list of "classes" or "training" they've done to demonstrate their commitment to both finding work/making themselves the best possible candidate.

So many hoops to jump through...

bmack86
11-23-2009, 08:48 PM
For those of you out of work and looking for something to tell people you've been doing, you should find a volunteer project. That way, you have something to put on the resume for the whole time you're there, and it will look good for people skills and just generally be a good experience.