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View Full Version : Help me choose a career.



SoulDischarge
06-26-2009, 02:11 PM
It's gotten to the point where I need to throw myself back into school of some kind for something practical because I've been out of work for about 4 months and I don't see anything changing. I was thinking about some kind of computer/tech degree/certificate. I need something that's going to get me a job that's going to allow me to support myself and pay off my massive student loans (for a useless film degree I never even finished), preferrably something that requires a minimum of customer service skills. I was wondering if anyone else has gone to any kind of tech school, what your experiences have been like, how easy finding a job has been, what different kinds of paths are available, is it rewarding, is pay sufficient, etc.?

TeamCoachellaHellYeah
06-26-2009, 02:16 PM
what sucks is nowadays almost everything requires some "customer service" in the job....customer service wouldn't be so bad if people didn't suck so much....I work in hotels....

wmgaretjax
06-26-2009, 02:19 PM
become a fortran programmer.

dorkfish
06-26-2009, 02:22 PM
become a fortran programmer.
pascal

marooko
06-26-2009, 02:23 PM
milk the system.

frenzplz
06-26-2009, 02:25 PM
go to mi and get a degree in music business or recording

Cdubby
06-26-2009, 02:27 PM
wyoming tech, work on cars

dorkfish
06-26-2009, 02:29 PM
It's gotten to the point where I need to throw myself back into school of some kind for something practical because I've been out of work for about 4 months and I don't see anything changing. I was thinking about some kind of computer/tech degree/certificate. I need something that's going to get me a job that's going to allow me to support myself and pay off my massive student loans (for a useless film degree I never even finished), preferrably something that requires a minimum of customer service skills. I was wondering if anyone else has gone to any kind of tech school, what your experiences have been like, how easy finding a job has been, what different kinds of paths are available, is it rewarding, is pay sufficient, etc.?
Most employers care about experience more than certification up until a certain point. Certification is more for advancement within the IT careers.

Getting your MCSA is pretty easy if you've worked with Windows 2003 servers, at all.

Getting your CCNA is pretty easy if you've worked with Cisco routers, as all.

If you haven't, then the exams will be harder.

Just look to see what jobs are available in your area, and see what employers are looking for. Cater to what seems to be a popular desire.

captncrzy
06-26-2009, 02:30 PM
Nursing.


This is not a joke by the way; nurses make great money and work whenever they want. Plus, I'd love to see you in the little white hat.

chairmenmeow47
06-26-2009, 02:30 PM
working in higher education, it sounds like you really just need a certificate program or a trade school. as much as having a bachelors can be helpful, it's a lot of time that you probably don't want to invest, especially since the majority of bachelor's degrees are general enough that unless you're studying engineering or something, it's not like you're guaranteed much better out of university. most bachelor's just don't offer a specific, marketable skill set. they mainly just prove you can accomplish something over an extended period of time.

as far as trade schools, i don't have any good recommendations other than make sure it's something you are actually interested in before investing money or starting classes. don't just say "hey, computers seem cool" and dive right in. do some personal education on these subjects, maybe reading some intro books at the library or something to be sure you can in fact imagine yourself doing the job.

also, i imagine you must be an ok typist if you're on here all day, ever think of court reporting? people are always telling me to do that and i don't think it's too hard to get certified. plus it would be fairly minimal in responsibility. along with the TTY or whatever the typing for the deaf program is called.

best of luck :)

coofal
06-26-2009, 02:30 PM
pascal

assembly

BlackSwan
06-26-2009, 02:31 PM
Nursing.

This is not a joke by the way; nurses make great money and work whenever they want. Plus, I'd love to see you in the little white hat.

This is a good idea, but where did you hear that nurses get to work whenever they want?

Sleepingrock
06-26-2009, 02:32 PM
http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee177/simslicious/simslicious-imagem-sobre-ts2-vu.jpg

chairmenmeow47
06-26-2009, 02:32 PM
don't forget the drugs! :thu

miscorrections
06-26-2009, 02:32 PM
Depending on what kind of nurse you are it's very easy to set your own schedule/determine how many months per year you work/etc.

BlackSwan
06-26-2009, 02:35 PM
Depending on what kind of nurse you are it's very easy to set your own schedule/determine how many months per year you work/etc.

Ah, this may be true. The only nurses I know are ER nurses and this is not the case with most of them. Their control over their schedule is based on seniority.

miscorrections
06-26-2009, 02:37 PM
I don't know offhand which offer the freedom but there's a ton of options in nursing. I'd do it if I didn't mind cleaning up people's shit, but I do. Plus I'd have a hard time not snapping back at the doctors.

SoulDischarge
06-26-2009, 02:43 PM
Nursing is out, but thanks for the suggestion. I hate hospital and nursing homes (mom has worked as an activities director my whole life, so I was exposed to them a lot as a kid), not to mention people already kind of disgust me.

A career in sound would be something I might be into, obviously being a music geek/frequent concert goer. Even in film school, I was kind of interested in sound editing. But is there really much work these days?

I'll look into that court reporting thing. Minimal in responsibility is definitely something I'm looking for in a job. I'm not really trying to get into something that requires a 4 year bachelors or anything. My aim isn't to find something to do for the rest of my life. I just need something that's going to allow me to support myself over the next couple of years while I work out what I really want to do with my life/become a little more stable/move out of Ohio and to a real city again.

amyzzz
06-26-2009, 02:45 PM
Nurses are in great demand all over the world and have been for years, but it's fucking HARD WORK. My mom did it for 30 years. But you'd always have a job somewhere.

frenzplz
06-26-2009, 02:47 PM
A career in sound would be something I might be into, obviously being a music geek/frequent concert goer. Even in film school, I was kind of interested in sound editing. But is there really much work these days?



theres tons of work

live sound
music recording
audiobook recording
radio soundboard engineer
film recording
voice acting recording

all kinds of shit

captncrzy
06-26-2009, 02:56 PM
This is a good idea, but where did you hear that nurses get to work whenever they want?

My best friend is a nurse. She makes her own schedule. SHe works in a hospital but not in the ER. She works in medsurge so she has to deal with a lot of junkies.

dorkfish
06-26-2009, 03:47 PM
assembly
assembly is still used by some companies. same with fortran.

pascal's deader than it was useless

Alchemy
06-26-2009, 03:56 PM
Get a degree in creative writing with a minor in anthropology. It's working out so far, because my dentist offered me a job as assistant dentist... Or maybe it was assistant to the dentist? Either way, the crw and anth route was fun times.

BlackSwan
06-26-2009, 03:58 PM
Weird, I majored in anthropology with minors in photography and creative writing.

Alchemy
06-26-2009, 04:14 PM
Weird, I majored in anthropology with minors in photography and creative writing.

You should have done it the other way around and became a dentist.

SDsoldier7
06-26-2009, 04:19 PM
http://k43.pbase.com/o4/50/547750/1/66498442.n4TS6uO2.September072006.jpg

a fast and short career

gaypalmsprings
06-26-2009, 04:53 PM
http://www.bucksbitsnbytes.com/Webquest/ani_thinkingcap.gif

gaypalmsprings
06-26-2009, 04:55 PM
http://www.floatem.com/images/hasslehoff.gif

wmgaretjax
06-26-2009, 05:00 PM
assembly is still used by some companies. same with fortran.


some of the legacy shit at my work has fortran components.

i saw some assembly code once. fuck that.

Cheddar's Cousin
06-26-2009, 05:08 PM
I don't want to sell anything, buy anything, or process anything as a career. I don't want to sell anything bought or processed, or buy anything sold or processed, or process anything sold, bought, or processed, or repair anything sold, bought, or processed. You know, as a career, I don't want to do that.

gaypalmsprings
06-26-2009, 05:18 PM
http://www.nataliedee.com/080906/haha-dork-i-bet-your-dogs-name-is-ipod.jpg

Pixiessp
06-26-2009, 07:18 PM
I don't want to sell anything, buy anything, or process anything as a career. I don't want to sell anything bought or processed, or buy anything sold or processed, or process anything sold, bought, or processed, or repair anything sold, bought, or processed. You know, as a career, I don't want to do that.

That's it!!! Be a Kickboxer.

Alchemy
06-27-2009, 09:37 AM
Hobo used to be a good job, but if you don't have a credit card machine then forget it. Plus, people won't trust you even if you did have a credit card machine.

Jon Blazed
06-27-2009, 09:50 AM
You should be a fireman because you have a lot of time off and a great retirement plan. Also, I think it is nearly impossible to get laid off. Spend a year or two taking some paramedic classes at the community college and working out/running.

Still-ill
06-27-2009, 10:48 AM
A career in sound would be something I might be into, obviously being a music geek/frequent concert goer. Even in film school, I was kind of interested in sound editing. But is there really much work these days?
.

I'm currently an Audio Engineer student and I can tell you jobs are not hard to find at all, well paying jobs on the other hand... But if you're persistent you'll have no problem getting a great job within the career.

fatbastard
06-27-2009, 10:52 AM
Health Care - People get sick and die.

vinylmartyr
06-27-2009, 12:03 PM
Bouncer

CrimesceneCookie
06-27-2009, 01:09 PM
I'm currently an Audio Engineer student and I can tell you jobs are not hard to find at all, well paying jobs on the other hand... But if you're persistent you'll have no problem getting a great job within the career.

I'm curious, where/how did you train for audio engineering?
thanks

MissingPerson
06-27-2009, 01:14 PM
You should be a fireman because you have a lot of time off and a great retirement plan. Also, I think it is nearly impossible to get laid off. Spend a year or two taking some paramedic classes at the community college and working out/running.

On the other hand, there's a certain amount of personal risk, you have to be extremely physically and mentally resiliant, and there's a good chance you'll have to see somebody burn to death at least once in your career.

Then again, the uniform is great.

Principal Onyx Blackman
06-27-2009, 01:19 PM
Alaskan crab fisher. (Sorry I'm watching Deadliest Catch.)

menikmati
06-27-2009, 06:41 PM
I'd try that crab fishing thing. (If I was in Dutch Harbor, Alaska...)

marooko
06-27-2009, 07:42 PM
become a career criminal.

Cheddar's Cousin
06-27-2009, 08:22 PM
become a smooth criminal...

marooko
06-27-2009, 09:12 PM
that too.

MarkO
06-27-2009, 09:37 PM
On the other hand, there's a certain amount of personal risk, you have to be extremely physically and mentally resiliant, and there's a good chance you'll have to see somebody burn to death at least once in your career.

Then again, the uniform is great.

Firefighters see more people dead from drugs or car crashes than they do from fires.

~75% of calls are medical emergency related iirc.

frenzplz
06-27-2009, 09:50 PM
I'm currently an Audio Engineer student and I can tell you jobs are not hard to find at all, well paying jobs on the other hand... But if you're persistent you'll have no problem getting a great job within the career.

exactly what i told him the first time


and crimescene cookie
there are millions of audio schools across the country


but if you are in so cal

go to los angeles recording school

or

Musicians Institute

MI gives you music business also
if you are interested in a music career

dorkfish
06-30-2009, 01:26 AM
some of the legacy shit at my work has fortran components.

i saw some assembly code once. fuck that.
I can admin AS/400 like nobody's business. Snap. F'reals.