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SoulDischarge
05-19-2009, 01:15 AM
Wherein we teach to and learn from one another about the history of electronic and dance music. There's a lot of it out there, and it's growing increasingly specialized and compartmentalized, and this thread should serve as a primer in making the distinctions between the different forms, where they came from, how they developed, where they're going. The goal is to cover as much ground as possible, from early musique concrete, to the primitive electronic pop of krautrock and Kraftwerk, through disco, electro, techno, house, jungle/drum'n'bass, trance, IDM, industrial, experimental, ambient, and beyond.

Let's try to start with an Electronica 101 approach, covering the broad basics. Do a write up about a major genre of electronic music or an important artist/DJ who pioneered some form of electronic music. Try not to get too obscure too quickly. If you're covering house, start with someone like Frankie Knuckles or Larry Heard. At the same time, I think we can skip the exceedingly obvious examples that seriously everybody has heard (Daft Punk, etc). Over time we can delve deeper once the basics have been established. I'll start

Juan Atkins (aka Cybotron, Model 500, Infiniti)

Juan Atkins is widely recognized as the godfather of techno. He took the electronic pop of Kraftwerk and the electro-funk of Afrika Bambaataa and stripped it down to it's most basic, mechanical level. Where house was more soulful and linked directly to disco, Atkins' techno was hard edged, minimalist, and robotic, the soundtrack to inner city life in Detroit. His single "Clear" under his Cybotron alias is techno ground zero:

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He hit his stride with the singles released under his Model 500 alias in the late 80s, released on his own Metroplex Records label. His most famous release as Model 500 is probably "No U.F.O.'s," which relies heavily on a variety of primitive drum machine tracks.

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Many of his other releases as Model 500 have a more sinister, isolated mood, supposedly inspired by late night drives through the city.

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Juan Atkins has stayed active over the course of the 90's and 00's, releasing albums that have kept up with trends while still staying true to his original vision of techno music and compilations of his best work, including 20 Years Metroplex 1985-2005, which contains a large amount of his most crucial tracks, and is a good starting place.

f1_eocLUr6U

hawkingvsreeve
05-19-2009, 09:07 AM
http://archives.starbulletin.com/2006/12/07/features/art2bx.jpg

Mordecai
05-19-2009, 09:16 AM
That would have been much more entertaining if I didn't admire what this thread was trying to achieve. Did it really deserve to be firebombed? Really?

wmgaretjax
05-19-2009, 09:20 AM
3XfeWp2y1Lk

chairmenmeow47
05-19-2009, 09:23 AM
i'm really not good at musician bios or i'd be all over this. i'm better at knowing who puts on a good show and can make people dance :(

i support the thread though, good idea!!! it'd be nice if we required artist & genre though, as genre makes a big difference in whether or not someone's gonna like the artist.

hawkingvsreeve
05-19-2009, 09:31 AM
That would have been much more entertaining if I didn't admire what this thread was trying to achieve. Did it really deserve to be firebombed? Really?

Chad?

real talk
05-19-2009, 09:33 AM
http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo137/rtorres/coolflash.gif

...

BlackSwan
05-19-2009, 09:40 AM
Christmas cool.

miSTEVEious
05-19-2009, 09:42 AM
http://techno.org/electronic-music-guide/music.swf

all you need and funny to boot

Dogvolta
05-19-2009, 09:55 AM
http://techno.org/electronic-music-guide/music.swf

all you need and funny to boot

Holy shit that is amazing

captncrzy
05-19-2009, 09:58 AM
That site is cool

TommyboyUNM
05-19-2009, 10:00 AM
I don't like to click on links until I get The Captn's approval. Thank you.

SFChrissy
05-19-2009, 10:08 AM
SouldDischarge...very nice presentation!!! I don't have the knowledge to contribute as extensively as you did but...


George Kranz is a German dance music singer and percussionist. He is best known for his song "Trommeltanz", otherwise known as "Din Daa Daa". The song hit No. 1 on the Hot Dance Music/Club Play chart in 1984 and then returned to the chart in a new version in 1991, peaking at No. 8. "Din Daa Daa" (sometimes spelled "Din Da Da") is considered a classic dance music track and has been remixed, sampled and bootlegged many times, most recently on The Ying Yang Twins song "Shake", featuring Pitbull, and in an Xbox 360 television commercial.



This is a great track...
<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/i4vXbscw7-8&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/i4vXbscw7-8&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

and was later covered by the roots on this album

http://images-eu.amazon.com/images/P/B0002A2WAY.03.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Love both versions!!!

Bud Luster
05-19-2009, 02:38 PM
WKywmELG690

SoulDischarge
05-19-2009, 06:27 PM
Ishtur would be more helpful if he wasn't trying to be funny all the time. It's still sort of impressive that he put it all together, but his snide candee kid comments bring the whole thing down.

And by the way, fuck you all. Everyone bitches about no one knowing anything about good electronic music


You'd be surprised how many people on here these days have never heard of some of these older bigger electronic names....everyone has been brainwashed by shitty electro these days, it's sickening.

or admits to not being too knowledgable themselves


This conversation makes me realize how little I listen to electronic music. Or at least, I don't know how to classify EDM into a sub-genre on first listen.

Stop pissing on everything constructive.

boarderwoozel3
05-19-2009, 06:47 PM
I'll be following this closely. But if you could include the big names--if only as an associative name drop--when describing the genres I'll be very appreciative. :thu

SoulDischarge
05-19-2009, 06:59 PM
Yeah. It'd be helpful if you'd post some kind of write up if you're going to post a video, even if it's just copied and pasted from somewhere else, just so there's some kind of context. It doesn't have to be all music crit or anything. Even if it's something simple like "This is so-and-so, he was an important part of the early UK jungle scene, sounds kind of similar to/influenced whoever, the best starting point would be the Best Of."

greghead
05-19-2009, 07:46 PM
Ohm - The Early Guru's of Electronic Music.
The liner notes alone are worth the purchase, but the music is ridiculously awesome. It ranges from Musique Concrete to Brian Eno and John Hassell. Amazing history of experimental sound artists.

Well worth the purchase or download.

fireitup
05-19-2009, 07:46 PM
http://techno.org/electronic-music-guide/music.swf

all you need and funny to boot

what the fuck, that is the coolest fucking site ever and i will lose many hours to it i can already tell

greghead
05-19-2009, 07:51 PM
what the fuck, that is the coolest fucking site ever and i will lose many hours to it i can already tell

The guy has really expanded upon it. Last time I was on it was over a year ago and it did not have half of that stuff. His attention to detail is almost inspiring.

SoulDischarge
05-19-2009, 07:56 PM
Ohm - The Early Guru's of Electronic Music.
The liner notes alone are worth the purchase, but the music is ridiculously awesome. It ranges from Musique Concrete to Brian Eno and John Hassell. Amazing history of experimental sound artists.

Well worth the purchase or download.

Seriously. There's so much good stuff on there. It's pretty much the first stop for anyone looking for a primer on the history of the development of electronic music. Some of it is pretty obtuse and academic, but there's a lot of stuff that's surprisingly accessible and fun. "Cindy Electronium" is one of my favorite pieces of electronic music.

1SHJ6CcML80

fireitup
05-19-2009, 08:05 PM
The guy has really expanded upon it. Last time I was on it was over a year ago and it did not have half of that stuff. His attention to detail is almost inspiring.

it's one guy that runs it? he is my hero and i love him! i've already learned so much about my own tastes

JSam67
05-19-2009, 08:11 PM
or admits to not being too knowledgable themselves


That post is exactly why I ventured into this thread, to learn. More posts like your first one, please. Thread would be very helpful for me.

Wheres the beef?
05-19-2009, 08:18 PM
QUESTION: How do people take samples out of songs and put them in other songs? Like if I wanted the vocals from around the world over some other synth beat and the drums and bass from another song and mash them together.

Wheres the beef?
05-19-2009, 08:18 PM
That post is exactly why I ventured into this thread, to learn. More posts like your first one, please. Thread would be very helpful for me.

Paging Donaldj, HEADSTRUCK, chairmenmeow...

hawkingvsreeve
05-19-2009, 08:55 PM
QUESTION: How do people take samples out of songs and put them in other songs? Like if I wanted the vocals from around the world over some other synth beat and the drums and bass from another song and mash them together.

Well when it comes to vocals, if they are lucky they can find an acapella version of the song and then just chop it up digitally as they please. Otherwise they have to mess around with levels and equalization to try to pull only vocals off of a track, and even then you will still have a good chunk of the music behind it. Some people with try to find songs that are at least in the same key, so that the music blends together more seamlessly so that the final product doesn't seem so blatantly out of place.

Edit:

The short answer is: Computers.

SoulDischarge
05-19-2009, 09:05 PM
I don't know if this is really fucking obvious or not, but I'm going to do Autechre. Most everyone knows Aphex Twin by now, and I'm pretty sure all Aphex fans know Autechre, but like I said, I'm starting with a 101 approach, and there might be some people out there not too familiar with them.

Autechre

Autechre are an British IDM duo on Warp Records, pretty much the premier label for the genre in the 90s, and they expanded on the basic sound laid out by Aphex Twin. They took the familiar 80s dance music influences (techno, house, acid, ambient), and combined them into a distinctive blend, contrasting complex, occasionally abrasive beats with sometimes dark, sometimes beautiful otherworldly synth ambience.

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WTor5QkaPus

I think they reached their pinnacle with their third full length, Tri Repetae. It's a perfect compromise between experimental inclinations and accessibility, rhythm and atmosphere. I'd say this is one of my ten favorite electronic albums of all time, up there with Aphex Twin's Selected Ambient Works '85-'92 in terms of artistry and influence.

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After this, they became increasingly interested in exploring the mechanical rhythmic side of their music, de-emphasizing the ambient textures, or at least burying them behind some times impossibly complex drum patterns. Some of it is really good stuff once you learn how to listen to it, but it's far from the ideal place to start with Autechre as it's pretty far divorced from typical dance music and can be fairly abrasive. "Arch Carrier" off LP5 is actually a pretty straightforward song from this era that's pretty easy to latch onto.

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While "Pen Expers" off Confield is probably the most extreme example of their new direction.

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Their latest album, 2008's Quaristice, is a return to simpler patterns, with a slight infatuation for acid (the genre) showing through, although some of it feels kind of half baked. It's still a good listen and a chance to catch up with their next level shit.

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The most obvious point of reference is Richard D. James, although their music doesn't share any of his sense of humor, and their influence is all over Boards Of Canada, although BoC is much warmer and user friendly. If you want to catch up on some good electronic music history, there's two really good Warp compilations out there. The first is Artificial Intelligence, which features many of the IDM superstars coming out of the label in the early to mid 90's (Aphex, Autechre, Plastikman/Richie Hawtin, Black Dog, B12, almost all under psuedonyms), and Warp 10+1: The Influences, a 10 year anniversary disc that collects a ton of the most important dance tracks from the 80's whose mark is all over these artists.

pancakespancakes
05-19-2009, 09:47 PM
I heart Autechre.

Definitely agree, Tri Repetae is their high-water mark.

But I also have this strange passionate love for Untilted within me... I can't explain it but I have really latched onto that album over time more than anything else by them, the sound is so addicting...
The noisier side of Autechre:
alaFdWQ-GFc

greghead
05-19-2009, 09:53 PM
Seriously. There's so much good stuff on there. It's pretty much the first stop for anyone looking for a primer on the history of the development of electronic music. Some of it is pretty obtuse and academic, but there's a lot of stuff that's surprisingly accessible and fun. "Cindy Electronium" is one of my favorite pieces of electronic music.

1SHJ6CcML80

Yes. This is my favorite composition on the compilation, you beat me to it.

SoulDischarge
05-20-2009, 07:01 PM
Detroit Techno

Techno as a term has become synonymous with all forms of electronic dance music among people who don't listen to much of the stuff, but originally, it referred to a specific style of EDM. It's a little harder to pin down a definition for techno than many other forms of EDM as it doesn't have as immediate of signifiers. Generally, techno is a stripped down, mechanical, and often cold form of electronic music, taking the man-machine aesthetic of Kraftwerk to its furthest conclusion. Where house is warm and soulful, and jungle/drum'n'bass is jazzy and funky, techno is sleek, streamlined, and pounding. Most techno features an obsession with futurism and science fiction. For the most part, it was developed in Detroit, most notably by the Belleville Three, a trio of friends from a high school in a Detroit suburb: Juan Atkins, Derrick May, and Kevin Saunderson. Atkins was the first to develop the style, and had the purest techno sound of the three, some times called electro. May and Saunderson incorporated more Chicago house influences into their work. Virgin Records put out a compilation of Detroit techno and house called Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit that established both the music and the term techno.


Cybotron - Clear
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Derrick May - Nude Photo
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Kevin Saunderson (Kreem) - Triangle Of Love
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From here, techno was developed in a hundred different directions. There was a second wave of Detroit techno that was most faithful to the original vision of techno. Some artists experimented with the sound and expanded its palete, while others stripped it down and made it even harder and more mechanized, leading to minimal techno.
Second wave Detroit techno is where the style truly started to sound modern. Important second wave artists include:

Jeff Mills
KevUFO2moZI

Carl Craig
NuqxioVL1Xs

Robert Hood
HuGRvISMfpA

Kenny Larkin
SSZO-_nYCjY

Additionally, there were a lot of artists in Detroit throughout the 90s mining the darker, futurist electro sound of the earliest techno:

Drexciya
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Dopplereffekt
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Ectomorph
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Different strains of techno have been developed all over the world, with the UK and Berlin being particuarly fertile areas. Techno has combined with just about every other form of electronic music to create a wide variety of hybrids and progressed into both more complex (IDM) and simplified (minimal) forms. Still, the jumping off point for all of it is the original Detroit sound.

Recommended listening

Single artist compilations and albums

Juan Atkin - 20 Years Metroplex: 1985-2005
Kevin Saunderson - Faces & Phases
Derrick May - Innovator
Jeff Mills - Purpose Maker Compilation
Carl Craig - anything and everything, but Landcruising is a great album that kind of feels like Kraftwerk for the 90s
Robert Hood - Minimal Nation
Drexciya - The Quest
Dopplereffekt - Gesamtkunstwerk (this is a compilation of their earlier singles, after this they started creating creepy formless soundscapes)

Various Artists comps:
Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit
Detroit: Beyond The Third Wave
Elements Of And Experiments With Sound (pretty basic second wave stuff, not as esoteric as it sounds)
Welcome To The Detroit Sound I'm not really sure if this is an actual compilation, but I found it on Soulseek and it fucking rocks. It's 75 tracks of absolute classics from the established names and includes a few great one offs too, like A Number Of Names:

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SoulDischarge
05-20-2009, 07:20 PM
I'm not too much of an expert on drum'n'bass or house, so someone else should do those.

Donaldj
05-20-2009, 08:26 PM
Patrick: I'll throw my two cents in here on UK hardcore from 1991-1994 (precursor to d&b) when I get the chance

hawkingvsreeve
05-20-2009, 08:33 PM
So many youtubes. Too many youtubes.

SoulDischarge
05-20-2009, 08:58 PM
They're there for your convenience. Listen to them or don't. Maybe at some point I'll make downloadable mixes, but I'm lazy, so don't count on it.

hawkingvsreeve
05-20-2009, 10:35 PM
It just makes loading the thread difficult. That's all.

WhyTheLongFace
05-21-2009, 12:32 AM
http://techno.org/electronic-music-guide/music.swf



all you need and funny to boot

OMG LMFAO! I remember clicking this link months ago and kicking myself for not saving it. Thank you thank you thank you.

wmgaretjax
05-21-2009, 08:30 AM
Tri Repetae is great... but Untilted is their masterpiece.... It's the accumulation of everything they have been working towards. I also have a special place in my heart for Gantz Graf.

higgybaby23
05-21-2009, 12:50 PM
I really enjoyed the film Modulations: Cinema for the Ear . It is a scattershot documentary on electronic music, covering the early days (Moog, Theremin) to current acts up to the 90's. There are lots of great interviews, including one with Bob Moog. This is a great film for someone interested in the history of electronic sounds or someone who wants a general introduction to the scene.

Other notable electronic docs:
Haack: The King of Techno (highly recommended)
Better Living Through Circuitry (this one is just average)
Theremin: An Electronic Odyessey(very good)

MantisMel
05-21-2009, 01:33 PM
I really enjoyed the film Modulations: Cinema for the Ear . It is a scattershot documentary on electronic music, covering the early days (Moog, Theremin) to current acts up to the 90's. There are lots of great interviews, including one with Bob Moog. This is a great film for someone interested in the history of electronic sounds or someone who wants a general introduction to the scene.

Other notable electronic docs:
Haack: The King of Techno (highly recommended)
Better Living Through Circuitry (this one is just average)
Theremin: An Electronic Odyessey(very good)

You forgot "Pump Up The Volume" an amazing documentary about the evolution of house music

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/tTHbchszdNE&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/tTHbchszdNE&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

An amazing run through of electronic music scene.... its 20 parts on youtube tho.

orbit
05-22-2009, 09:54 AM
every autechre album has a special place in my heart. even though tri repetae might be their highest ranked album, confield is their most complete work. the live sets around untitled are fantastic though. and chiastic slide needs a lot more love.

wmgaretjax
05-22-2009, 10:46 AM
I love Chiastic Slide. I listened to it the other day.

Aurgasm
05-22-2009, 10:56 AM
hey guys.. i dont know where to ask this question, but i think it might work here.

Does the Crystal Method ever perform Filter's (Can't You) Trip Like I Do at live shows? i missed their coach set and havent listened to the bootleg in its entirety (the LFMAO appearance makes me shut it down every time i hear it).

i have to TCM live shows this week 8^)

unknown
05-22-2009, 11:07 AM
I once had a pretty good documentary on the history and evolution of drum n bass but cannot figure out the name of it for the life of me. I'll have to ask the ex since I think he kept that dvd in the split :( bastard wasn't even into dnb till he met me.... waah.

Aurgasm
05-22-2009, 11:13 AM
aww that sucks.. coming to tucson soon unknown? tcm this weekend!

unknown
05-22-2009, 11:38 AM
not anytime too soon but I will be out the weekend of June 20th. My plan is to head out the 19th after work and come back the 21st.... You going to the Santogold show? That's where I'll be Saturday night. If anything we should get some people together for some drinks!

WhyTheLongFace
05-22-2009, 11:40 AM
Anyone want to reccomend some good trip-hop besides the big names? I have all them but I want the lesser known but still amazing artists.

orbit
05-22-2009, 11:45 AM
which ones are the big names?

Aurgasm
05-22-2009, 11:59 AM
portishead massive attack sneaker pimps etc...

Distorted_Jungle
05-22-2009, 12:23 PM
I want a detailed explanation to what is so damn "amazing" about Underworld, i'm not here to talk shit on them i am just curious as to why everyone thinks they are so amazing.

MantisMel
05-22-2009, 12:26 PM
Seriously duder. We went through this Underworld thing like not too long ago.

BlackSwan
05-22-2009, 12:32 PM
Anyone want to reccomend some good trip-hop besides the big names? I have all them but I want the lesser known but still amazing artists.

Try:

Lamb, Morcheeba, Unkle, Laika, A Forest Mighty Black and Baby Mammoth.

I'm assumming you consider Tricky and DJ Shadow big names.

blackchango
05-22-2009, 01:44 PM
Hearing this at desert parties used to make me go nuts !

="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/PQfKFwa-jEY&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/PQfKFwa-jEY&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Hears Francois K play this at a party in LA once. Guess what ? It made me go nuts ! Hahahaha!

="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/uM2It3WbXGk&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/uM2It3WbXGk&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Distorted_Jungle
05-22-2009, 04:17 PM
Seriously duder. We went through this Underworld thing like not too long ago.


all we went over was that we disagree in whats good, what i was looking for was a explanation of what is so special not just us arguing about if they are good or not.

MantisMel
05-22-2009, 04:43 PM
Kinda true, but we did have a discussion about what genre Underworld was and how their music evolved. I'll tell you why they are good, they produce music that doesnt have a set format. If you listen to any of their albums they have anything from amazing dance tracks to super chill ambient. Their live performance's are entertaining to say the least and their talent extends past their music. Look up Tomato and you will see their design website. These are a few reasons why Underworld is so good.

RotationSlimWang
05-22-2009, 05:01 PM
I want a detailed explanation to what is so damn "amazing" about Underworld, i'm not here to talk shit on them i am just curious as to why everyone thinks they are so amazing.

I explained this to you in pretty thorough detail. They completely changed the face of electronic music. Now shaddup.

LooseAtTheZoo
05-22-2009, 05:02 PM
I explained this to you in pretty thorough detail. They completely changed the face of electronic music. Now shaddup.

Can you guide me to this explanation? I'm interested

RotationSlimWang
05-22-2009, 05:08 PM
They were one of the first electronic acts to come to prominence blending multiple genres. You can find pieces of progressive house, progressive trance, techno, electronica, and dnb in the old Underworld albums. They were completely before their time and they set a new bar for the acts coming up. Just being Detroit Techno or Chicago House looked inevitably boring after you see Underworld up there with live vocals, live instruments, shifting between moods and emotions and genres seemlessly.

I don't see how this is even an argument. Fucking go listen to Second Toughest In The Infants.

SoulDischarge
05-22-2009, 05:08 PM
Stop mucking up my thread. Post something useful or get the fuck out.

RotationSlimWang
05-22-2009, 06:26 PM
I was educating. You made the title, motherfucker, and people asked the question, hence I provided the insight. Rock n' roll, deal with it.

Principal Onyx Blackman
05-22-2009, 06:28 PM
Nice rules of attraction reference.

SoulDischarge
05-22-2009, 06:28 PM
I was referring to the whole inane argument in general.