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mountmccabe
02-04-2007, 08:03 PM
I am about a third of the way into Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. One of the main reasons I got this was a backhanded recommendation (or was it serious?) from Tom.

It's really good. I like the writing style quite a bit. I'm not far enough in to quite have a grasp on the story and what's really at work here.


Also I am reading the 33 1/3 for Bee Thousand. It is choppy and a little rough and exuberant... so fairly appropriate.


What are you reading/wondering about reading.

amyzzz
02-04-2007, 08:08 PM
I'm reading some crazy fantasy epic by Stephen R Donaldson about a leper. I think it's called Lord Foul's Bane. I hate the book, but my husband loves the damn series so much that I should probably at least finish the first book in the series.

Maybe I'll start re-reading my D H Lawrence library after this. I haven't read him in a while. Anyone have any recommendations?

I tend to read classic books, horror, and sci-fi mostly. I should probably read more modern books about real life. I'm also thinking about reading more Toni Morrison.

bmack86
02-04-2007, 08:10 PM
Currently in the middle of What is the What by Dave Eggers. It's very good. A pseudo Autobiography of a sudanese refugee, and it's written in Eggers' very idiosyncratic style. I'd recommend it.

kreutz2112
02-04-2007, 08:14 PM
Currently in the middle of "Integrin a5b1 and Fibronectin Regulate Polarized Cell Protrusions Required for Xenopus Convergence and Extension"...Yeah I dont read books I read journal articles...me=awesome:(

corbo
02-04-2007, 08:19 PM
dang its been a good while since ive read a good book
:nono

bballarl
02-04-2007, 08:26 PM
Although "Bone" by Jeff Smith is a graphic novel and thus not a true book, I really enjoyed it. I've been on a kick with those recently since they are easier to read when I have 15000 articles and books for school that require my attention. "From Hell" is next.

bmack86
02-04-2007, 08:29 PM
Bone was a fun comic. I really enjoyed those.

kreutz2112
02-04-2007, 08:52 PM
I haven't read any fiction in about 5 or 6 years. Right now I'm reading
Food Of The Gods by Terence McKenna. Next in line is DMT: The Spirit Molecule by Dr. Rick Strassman.

DMT huh?..."life" is CRAZY

tessalasset
02-04-2007, 08:55 PM
me:books::general public:music

i feel like i don't know where to start, so i just kind of pick up something if i've heard people talking about it a lot (a million little pieces, for instance). i don't have any favorite authors besides maybe john grisham and j.k. rolling....so yeah, you see where i'm coming from.

right now i'm reading Magical Mystery Tours: My Life with the Beatles by Tony Bramwell and it's fascinating. at the library i was choosing between that, and the book about Bill Graham's experience as a music promoter.

vicorintian
02-04-2007, 09:25 PM
Although "Bone" by Jeff Smith is a graphic novel and thus not a true book, I really enjoyed it. I've been on a kick with those recently since they are easier to read when I have 15000 articles and books for school that require my attention. "From Hell" is next.

man, i bought the complete bone late last year. Thick as a phonebook but worth it all the way. Besides chicks dig bone!!
Right now in the middle of two good books: Stepehn King{s Dark tower IV Wizard and Glass and George RR Matin{s A Game of Thrones!

TomAz
02-05-2007, 06:29 AM
I am about a third of the way into Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy. One of the main reasons I got this was a backhanded recommendation (or was it serious?) from Tom.


It was both backhanded and serious. I mean I love that book, I love everything I've ever read by McCarthy, I went out and bought The Road on the day it came out. But Blood Meridian is a challenging book and I didn't think it the best choice for the book exchange.

I am currently reading a throwaway bit of sci-fi, Interface, a Neil Stephenson novel from the 90s. It's barely holding my interest. And I usually like Stephenson.

For Christmas I got a compendium of the last couple of years' editions of The Onion, which is wonderful. I also got another Calvin & Hobbes book which is always nice. but the real treat was the New Yorker cartoon book.

Zipkoppie
02-05-2007, 06:41 AM
Just finished "in your dreams" by Tom holt, quite a good book I must say.

In an attempt to relive my childhood, I have started rereading the disc world novels by terry Prachet, going to take me a long time, only busy with the first one now, the color of magic.

bug on your lip
02-05-2007, 06:44 AM
Penthouse Forum
Vol.4 issue # 56 March 2007

TomAz
02-05-2007, 07:28 AM
bug, is that the one where the guys go off playing golf and the wives get together and have a few glasses of wine and things start getting wild?

bug on your lip
02-05-2007, 07:45 AM
no it was the one where some guy from Montana looks up an old flame from the 6th grade dance and mails her a letter. She then responds that he should "chat" with her via webcam, & that's when things start getting hot. I literally had to put the book down and go poop.

amyzzz
02-05-2007, 08:20 AM
I haven't read any fiction in about 5 or 6 years. Right now I'm reading
Food Of The Gods by Terence McKenna. Next in line is DMT: The Spirit Molecule by Dr. Rick Strassman.
My husband wants to get that one.

TomAz
02-05-2007, 09:00 AM
but he listed two.

amyzzz
02-05-2007, 10:56 AM
The latter one.

CuervoPH
02-05-2007, 11:09 AM
Um...er...a Fantasy Baseball magazine...

oh...and doing a re-read of "Waiting For Godot" by Samuel Beckett...I really want to see a performance of this play somewhere.

mob roulette
02-05-2007, 11:27 AM
i have a somewhat elaborate kidnapping fantasy involving mr. david foster wallace that would find him chained to my living room table until he produces for us a new book. i don't foresee the need to break his legs though.

also he's got a little something (http://www.newyorker.com/fiction/content/articles/070205fi_fiction_wallace) in this week's New Yorker that I haven't made my mind up about yet. he had a new son last Thursday too, so that might have something to do with not only this piece but the lack of new material as well...

york707
02-05-2007, 11:41 AM
I'm reading the same books I was reading the last time we had one of these threads.

bug on your lip
02-05-2007, 11:42 AM
go read some Kerouac lowlife

Kali27
02-05-2007, 11:45 AM
I haven't read any fiction in about 5 or 6 years. Right now I'm reading
Food Of The Gods by Terence McKenna. Next in line is DMT: The Spirit Molecule by Dr. Rick Strassman.

DMT: The Spirit Molecule is pretty good. You should enjoy it if you're down with those kind of books.

mountmccabe
02-05-2007, 03:35 PM
Tessa, I will make you a books you would like mix. Wait that doesn't make any sense.

mountmccabe
02-05-2007, 03:38 PM
Um...er...a Fantasy Baseball magazine...

oh...and doing a re-read of "Waiting For Godot" by Samuel Beckett...I really want to see a performance of this play somewhere.

I love Beckett so much. And yes, performed live is the so much the way to go.

Also I think I recently decided that I'm going to give up on the Fantasy Baseball. I've been playing since 1999 but I don't pay attention anymore. I'm the sort of manager that I would've been really annoyed by 5 or 6 years ago.

PotVsKtl
02-05-2007, 03:38 PM
Do not pick up A Million Little Pieces. Do not. Do not. Do not. Do not pick up a Million Little Pieces. Little Pieces. Do not pick it up.

And then I blacked out.

fatbastard
02-05-2007, 04:42 PM
Anthony Bourdain / The nasty bits- I enjoyed reading Kitchen Confidential a couple of years ago. His new book are various stories from his travels. I enjoy reading about the places he travels and his restaurant experiences.

Peter J. D'Adamo / Eat right 4 your type-Someone from work just lend me this book. This book identifies how one diet for everyone is impossible because of the difference in our blood type. I'm an "O" and have been experimenting with the groceries.

devachan
02-11-2007, 10:31 AM
I'm reading Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, again. This time I'm going to figure out why Brett sleeps with every man she sees.

DeltaSigChi4
02-11-2007, 10:42 AM
Currently reading Ethics and College Student Life.

I'm not even enrolled in an ethics course; just found it on a bookshelf and thought I should read it.

E

fober
02-11-2007, 10:50 AM
Everytime you read a book, the terrorists win.

CheersDarlin
02-11-2007, 12:29 PM
me:books::general public:music

i feel like i don't know where to start, so i just kind of pick up something if i've heard people talking about it a lot (a million little pieces, for instance).

I read that book and loved it. I don't care if it was all lies, it was still a good story. My Friend Leonard was good too.

wmgaretjax
02-11-2007, 12:38 PM
Umberto Eco - Travels in Hyperreality
Don DeLillo - Underworld
Italo Calvino - 6 Memos for a New Millenium

and my aesthetics textbooks for school this quarter.

Courtney
02-11-2007, 12:41 PM
I don't read, I watch TV.


No, just kidding. I'm reading Aporias by Derrida. I can't decide if it's depressing or strangely uplifting.

Courtney
02-11-2007, 12:52 PM
I'm reading Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, again. This time I'm going to figure out why Brett sleeps with every man she sees.

God I love that book.


i have a somewhat elaborate kidnapping fantasy involving mr. david foster wallace that would find him chained to my living room table until he produces for us a new book. i don't foresee the need to break his legs though.

He's terrific. I went to a reading he gave a couple years ago, and was pleased to find that he is as charming and lovely as his writing is good.

dedzilla
02-11-2007, 01:54 PM
Reading The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. It's pretty decent for her first book. Has anyone here read Time's Arrow by Martin Amis? If so, what did you think of it?

At first, I thought it should have been longer with more character development. But then I decided if the book had been any longer, the whole backwards theme would have gotten old. And while I don't want to see many more books like this come out, I think it might have been one of my favorite reads of the year.

roberto73
02-11-2007, 03:31 PM
"Saturday" by Ian McEwan, Milton's "Paradise Lost," and endless articles/essays for grad school.

I'd recommend Rob Sheffield's "Love Is a Mix Tape" for all you music fans out there, especially those of you "of a certain age," like me (late 20's/early 30's). It's bound to bring back some memories, and Sheffield's a funny guy.

schoolofruckus
02-11-2007, 03:48 PM
I just started reading "Rebels on the Backlot", a book that traces the history of directors Quentin Tarantino, Paul Thomas Anderson, David Fincher, Steven Soderbergh, Spike Jonze, and David O. Russell, while I was doing my laundry.

I'm going to leave now and go read some more.

bmack86
02-11-2007, 03:51 PM
that sounds like an interesting book

dedzilla
02-11-2007, 09:54 PM
I just started reading "Rebels on the Backlot", a book that traces the history of directors Quentin Tarantino, Paul Thomas Anderson, David Fincher, Steven Soderbergh, Spike Jonze, and David O. Russell, while I was doing my laundry.

I'm going to leave now and go read some more.

Wow, the cover of that book is so gratuitous. And I am by no means a film geek, but it sounds interesting (read: I like Quentin Tarantino). How do you like it so far?

mob roulette
02-15-2007, 12:59 PM
bump

amyzzz
02-15-2007, 01:20 PM
I am now reading the 2nd book in this Stephen R Donaldson fantasy series about (character) Thomas Covenant. It's called The Illearth War. The series is starting to get a bit more interesting. Now not only is there a leper who gets to escape to a fantasy world, there's a blind man too.

mob roulette
02-15-2007, 01:33 PM
I'd recommend Rob Sheffield's "Love Is a Mix Tape" for all you music fans out there, especially those of you "of a certain age," like me (late 20's/early 30's). It's bound to bring back some memories, and Sheffield's a funny guy.

"Mix Tape" is pretty good. Better than that chode Klosterman.

ClearlyImaginative
02-15-2007, 01:38 PM
For anyone out there who enjoys a good fantasy novel

Runelord Series by David Farland --- awesome books, one aspect is based on being able to take other people attributes and bestow them upon yourself, ie one man being as strong as 15 as fast as 10 and with the sight and beauty of 40, just some crazy shit, good writer as well

Dragonlance by Margaret Weis --- classic fantasy story and easy reading

Kings Dragon(Crown of Stars Series) by Kate Elliot --- excellent writer and fantastic story line, very descriptive and entertaining.

breakjaw
02-15-2007, 01:52 PM
For anyone out there who enjoys a good fantasy

http://imageigloo.com/images/801product_detail_g_said.gif

amyzzz
02-15-2007, 02:09 PM
Ok, that one made me rofl a little tiny bit.

comiddle
02-15-2007, 11:50 PM
I'm currently reading The Humanure Handbook: A Guide to Composting Human Manure.

I've got some Ray Bradbury on the go right now as well. I also saw a new Gaiman at the book store the other day which I plan on picking up as soon as it shows up at Fair's Fair. He never disappoints me.

Cpt. Funkaho
02-16-2007, 12:50 AM
Reading Slaughterhouse-Five by Vonnegut, E.L. "Bob" Bartlett: A Life In Politics by Claus Naske and Alaska: An American Colony by Stephen Haycox.

The last two are for a documentary I'm interning on. I'm not ordinarily into the Alaska political histories much.

Tomaz, I thought the same thing about Interface... worst part is the ending, which is very improbable. To the point of silliness. And not the good kind. Stephenson should stick to writing books solo, is what it is.

thinnerair
03-06-2007, 02:41 PM
I am reading Fortress of Solitude by Jonathan Lethen
I like it a lot, probably because I like reading about early 70s Brooklyn and the author goes into a lot of detail of streets and scenarios.

amyzzz
03-06-2007, 02:41 PM
You've saved me from my own laziness, dahling.

So someone recommend a book to me, pronto. I'm getting sick of this fantasy trilogy I'm reading.

mountmccabe
03-06-2007, 02:41 PM
If you go to the top of this page under Thread Tools you can select "Subscribe to this thread."

Then later you can go to your USER CP and the first page you see will be your subscribed threads. Well, at least the ones with new posts since your last visit. But you can click through that to see all your subscribed threads.

It's a great tool for keeping track of threads that keep getting pushed to other pages.

amyzzz
03-06-2007, 02:42 PM
Thanks, John, but that is way too high-maintenance message boarding for me. But thanks.

TomAz
03-06-2007, 02:49 PM
There are a few authors where I will pick up and read anything they've written without a second thought. Cormac McCarthy, Larry McMurtry, Ian McEwan, Roddy Doyle, Neil Stephenson, Nick Hornby. others too but I cant think of them right now.

mountmccabe
03-06-2007, 02:53 PM
Thanks, John, but that is way too high-maintenance message boarding for me. But thanks.

That's ridiculous. This feature makes it easier to find things. Makes it so you can look at just your favorite threads; if that's what you want. There's nothing to maintain.

I don't have any good book suggestions right now. Hmm. I'm also still reading Blood Meridian. I am slow.

amyzzz
03-06-2007, 02:55 PM
I can't deal with change very well. Looking at my "User CP" and having everything on the first page being my subscribed threads seems very scary to me. I want everything on the first page to be the latest posts.

TomAz
03-06-2007, 02:56 PM
That's ridiculous. This feature makes it easier to find things. Makes it so you can look at just your favorite threads; if that's what you want. There's nothing to maintain.

I don't have any good book suggestions right now. Hmm. I'm also still reading Blood Meridian. I am slow.

Blood Meridian is worth savoring.

dedzilla
03-06-2007, 05:32 PM
There are a few authors where I will pick up and read anything they've written without a second thought. Cormac McCarthy, Larry McMurtry, Ian McEwan, Roddy Doyle, Neil Stephenson, Nick Hornby. others too but I cant think of them right now.

I love Neal Stephenson! Particularly the Diamond Age, but Snow Crash is good too. Although, I felt so cheated by the ending to Cryptonomicon that I threw the book across the room and am currently taking a break from reading any of his other titles. Still, if I disregard the attorney-gone-rambo scene, it was an okay book.

amyzzz
03-06-2007, 05:34 PM
I've read Diamond Age and Snow Crash, but not Cryptonomicon. Is it bad? My husband liked it.

John Peel is My Co-pilot
03-06-2007, 05:42 PM
Watchoo reading FOR.....

jimmycrackcorn
03-06-2007, 05:51 PM
the best book i have read in the last few years is "the time travelors wife" by audrey n.... EVERYONE who i bought it for or read it on my recommendation has told me they loved it... it was outside my normal reading genre but i took a chance because the cover art caught my attention...

Lounge Fly
03-06-2007, 05:51 PM
I'm going to feel retarded after posting this considering the books you're all reading (I read a lot of different books though so not really) but right now I'm reading 'The Alphabet of Manliness' by Maddox. I can't help it I find him to be all sorts of funny. That book and both books by 'Tucker Max' make me laugh so hard I almost piss myself, especially Tuckers.
http://www.loonypandora.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2006/06/Alphabet-of-Manliness-Cover.jpg

dedzilla
03-06-2007, 06:17 PM
I've read Diamond Age and Snow Crash, but not Cryptonomicon. Is it bad? My husband liked it.

The thing about Cryptonomicon is that it took a great deal of effort to stay interested in the book because I don't like war stories. So by the time I got through it, I felt like the ending didn't quite reward my effort. It was rushed and rather anticlimactic. Although, I'd say go ahead and read it. Bobby Shaftoe is one of my favorite Stephenson characters. Just don't expect to like it as much as the Diamond Age or Snow Crash. When you're done, if you haven't already, try The Iron Dragon's Daughter or Stations of the Tide. Swanwick is kind of a perv but the books are still okay.

Jenniehoo
03-06-2007, 06:29 PM
Girly Alert:

I just finished "The Wonder Spot" this weekend. It's by Melissa Bank, who wrote "Girls Guide to Hunting and Fishing" - I really liked it. She's self-effacing and makes herself so bland that everyone else around her looks zany. Good stuff.

I think my plan is to read "Ceremony" again, now. I love that book.

Two cents. There they are. Shiny pennies.

Lounge Fly
03-06-2007, 07:20 PM
Girly Alert:

I just finished "The Wonder Spot" this weekend. It's by Melissa Bank, who wrote "Girls Guide to Hunting and Fishing" - I really liked it. She's self-effacing and makes herself so bland that everyone else around her looks zany. Good stuff.

I think my plan is to read "Ceremony" again, now. I love that book.

Two cents. There they are. Shiny pennies.


A girly book called 'The Wonder Spot'.
Fantastic Name!!!!!!

amyzzz
03-07-2007, 07:25 AM
Girly Alert:

I just finished "The Wonder Spot" this weekend. It's by Melissa Bank, who wrote "Girls Guide to Hunting and Fishing" - I really liked it. She's self-effacing and makes herself so bland that everyone else around her looks zany. Good stuff.

I think my plan is to read "Ceremony" again, now. I love that book.

Two cents. There they are. Shiny pennies.
I believe you were searching for :2c

menikmati
03-07-2007, 07:30 AM
Tucker Max is a douche.

TomAz
03-07-2007, 07:48 AM
I've read Diamond Age and Snow Crash, but not Cryptonomicon. Is it bad? My husband liked it.

I liked Cryptonomicon a lot. It was the first Stephenson I read. I loved Diamond Age. I thought that was very clever.

I should have also put William Gibson on my list. Stephenson and Gibson is the only sci-fi I can stand, but I think they do theirs quite well.

mob roulette
03-07-2007, 10:26 AM
gibran_the prophet. spring is here and i am changing.

Hannahrain
03-07-2007, 10:32 AM
gibran_the prophet. spring is here and i am changing.

that's what I read at aforementioned wedding, actually.

wmgaretjax
03-07-2007, 10:34 AM
just finished "Oh Pure and Radiant Heart" by Lydia Millet, quite good. easy read.

On to, Pynchon's "Against the Day"

cheers.

mob roulette
03-07-2007, 10:36 AM
that's what I read at aforementioned wedding, actually.

i confess that i trust the advice of random girls on the internet more than i do my closest colleagues. unless it has something to do with webcams.

Lounge Fly
03-07-2007, 07:34 PM
Tucker Max is a douche.

Yeah he his but that's pretty much why I find his stories so funny.
I dated a girl this summer down in Hoboken who went out with him a couple times. She said he really is pretty much as forward as he sounds in his books and right at dinner would just bring up if they were going to sleep together or not.
Anyway douch or not, the shit cracks me up.

lindseyb
03-07-2007, 08:53 PM
just started reading the namesake, by jumpha lahiri (sp?). i see they are coming out with a movie. i really loved interpreter of maladies, so i'm looking forward to this one. so far so good. also, in my book club we are reading the alchemist by paolo coehlo...one of my all time favorite books.

Lounge Fly
03-08-2007, 02:07 AM
also, in my book club we are reading the alchemist by paolo coehlo...one of my all time favorite books.


Next you should introduce your book club to 'The Alphabet of Manliness' that I mentioned above. I think its good to change things up from time to time. Now you may be asking youself 'yeah but isn't this book just for men?' and to that I would say 'yeah, in the same way that lesbian porn sites are just for women.'

Courtney
03-19-2007, 09:33 AM
Just finished reading two books: Bukowski’s Ham on Rye and Nabokov's Laughter in the Dark.

I am somewhat embarrassed to say that this was my first foray into Bukowski, but I liked it a lot. His terse, often harsh prose does a good job of capturing the moment he writes about -- the underbelly of depression-era Los Angeles. I especially enjoyed all the local Los Angeles references which still have currency: the protagonist Henry Chinaski eats at Clifton's Cafeteria and Philippe's (which indeed even then had the cheapest coffee in town); he enrolls in classes at LACC.

I think the blurb on the back of the book said that Ham on Rye was Bukowski's answer to A Catcher in the Rye, but I'm not sure how you could compare the two. Yes, they're both coming-of-age stories about disillusioned boys suffering hardship in the harsh face of the world. They both have an interest in sexuality and graphic language. But whereas Salinger is so intimately tied to the elitist east coast tradition of authors like Fitzgerald, Bukowski's prose seems very much embedded within a dirty, often chaotic free-wheeling lifestyle that's distinctly Californian. Any sort of resemblance between Ham on Rye and Catcher in the Rye is, in my opinion, purely superficial.

I'd like to read more Bukowski. Any suggestions for a second book? He has published a staggering amount of work.

ApathyAndExhaustion
03-19-2007, 09:47 AM
I really enjoyed Ham On Rye. I'd probably suggest Post Office or Factotum next - his two most well-regarded novels featuring Henry Chinaski.

I'm studying for an English Literature degree, so I have to spend most of my time reading. In the next few days I need to read Martha Quest by Dorris Lessing - bildungsroman set in a fictional African country colonised by the British - and The Tempest by Big Will.

I wish I had time to read stuff for fun, but it's not gonna happen til the semester finishes.

TomAz
03-19-2007, 09:52 AM
I really enjoyed Ham On Rye. I'd probably suggest Post Office or Factotum next - his two most well-regarded novels featuring Henry Chinaski.

I'm studying for an English Literature degree, so I have to spend most of my time reading. In the next few days I need to read Martha Quest by Dorris Lessing - bildungsroman set in a fictional African country colonised by the British - and The Tempest by Big Will.

I wish I had time to read stuff for fun, but it's not gonna happen til the semester finishes.

bildungsroman. +5.

Courtney
03-19-2007, 10:05 AM
I really enjoyed Ham On Rye. I'd probably suggest Post Office or Factotum next - his two most well-regarded novels featuring Henry Chinaski.

Thanks, that's helpful. For chronology, it looks like Factorum might be the most logical choice. But alas, the cover of Post Office is so much prettier...

mountmccabe
03-21-2007, 08:22 PM
So I finished Blood Meridian. I'm not sure the last time I've read a better book. I loved the prose. I loved the story. I loved near everything. More Cormac McCarthy is certainly on the horizon for me.

The only Bukowski book I've read other than Ham on Rye was Factotum. I liked it more.

I am trying to remember Bukwoski's Rye; it seems to me that if anything he was attacking the idea from Salinger's Rye that such troubles of the young are just a way of life and everybody feels that way and you'll grow out of it. Or, rather, not as much attacking as amending to say that, well, still some people will have it worse than Holden and they won't just grow out of it, they'll become crazy abusive drunks. Holden will catch many kids that feel out of place and isolated but there will be others that are beyond his powers. They get to read Bukowski instead.

Alchemy
03-21-2007, 09:05 PM
Letter to a Christian Nation by Sam Harris. Great book, but Sam Harris is a little too extreme for his cause and I think it hurts his goal.

The Book of Mormon. I am not Mormon, but I am reading it. It's alright.

CuervoPH
03-21-2007, 09:07 PM
I'm reading "An Artist of the Floating World" by Kazuo Ishiguro now. My first Ishiguro was "The Remains of the Day", which is a truly beautiful book. I had seen the movie and enjoyed it, and I remember other people on the board mentioning the book, so I read it. After that, I read "A Pale View Of Hills" and am now working myself forward through Ishiguro's books.

Oh and I've read Cryptonomicon, but that's the only Neal Stephenson I've read. His baroque cycle looks daunting to say the least.

edited to make more sense as wine has kicked in now.

roberto73
03-21-2007, 09:17 PM
I read Ishiguro's Never Let Me Go in December. It was my first exposure to him. A terrific book.

After devouring Ian McEwan's Saturday it's on to a little trash reading: Neil Gaiman's American Gods. Then I'll get back to reading "reputable" things.

CuervoPH
03-21-2007, 09:20 PM
I've heard raves about Saturday but haven't read anything yet by McEwan. Does it matter where I start with him?

roberto73
03-21-2007, 09:29 PM
McEwan has two books of short stories - First Love, Last Rites and In Between the Sheets - that are some of my favorites of his. They'd make a good way to sample him, but they're a little tough to find. My favorite novel of McEwan's is Enduring Love, which was made into a movie a couple years ago with Daniel Craig, Samantha Morton, and Rhys Ifans. Very creepy and Hitchcockian.

Courtney
03-22-2007, 06:18 AM
So I finished [/i]Blood Meridian[/i]. I'm not sure the last time I've read a better book. I loved the prose. I loved the story. I loved near everything. More Cormac McCarthy is certainly on the horizon for me.

The only Bukowski book I've read other than Ham on Rye was Factotum. I liked it more.

I am trying to remember Bukwoski's Rye; it seems to me that if anything he was attacking the idea from Salinger's Rye that such troubles of the young are just a way of life and everybody feels that way and you'll grow out of it. Or, rather, not as much attacking as amending to say that, well, still some people will have it worse than Holden and they won't just grow out of it, they'll become crazy abusive drunks. Holden will catch many kids that feel out of place and isolated but there will be others that are beyond his powers. They get to read Bukowski instead.

I agree that Bukowski seems to go to a much darker place than Salinger. I think much of the difference is class-based. Whereas Holden Caulfield has the structures of a wealthy society to fall back upon, Henry Chinaski is truly alone in the world. But maybe that's exactly how Bukowski is responding to Salinger. I also think Bukowski's writing style is much more graphic. It's been a while since I read Catcher In the Rye, but I don't remember wincing nearly as much as I did for some of the more crass passages of Ham On Rye.

I like Cormac McCarthy, although I can't read him now without imagining him looking like the Owen Wilson/Eli Cash character in The Royal Tenenbaums. Sometimes his writing is a little too self-consciously testosterone-filled and bleak for me, but mostly it's good stuff. I haven't read Blood Meridian, but I did read his "Border Trilogy," starting with All The Pretty Horses. I guess that might be his best known book. I think I'm remembering now that there was a film adaptation too? I didn't see it. But the story is good -- another young man encountering the harsh face of the outside world sort of coming of age piece. In this case, it's the character of a young cowboy crossing the border to Mexico, written in McCarthy's idiosyncratic, sweeping writing style with a general lack of punctuation. The second part of the border trilogy, The Crossing, tells a parallel story, and then the third book, Cities of the Plain, brings the two together. Recommended reading.

menikmati
03-22-2007, 07:31 AM
I get the new Nirvana biography book in the mail today, yay!

amyzzz
03-22-2007, 07:41 AM
I get the new Nirvana biography book in the mail today, yay!
How many Nirvana books do you have at this point?

menikmati
03-22-2007, 07:43 AM
Come As You Are
Journals
Heavier than Heaven
Cobain
and now Nirvana: The Biography

I think that's it

PsyGuyRy
03-22-2007, 07:59 AM
I haven't had a chance to read through all the posts, but has anyone read "Infinite Jest?" I'm reading it... slowly (at this rate it'll take me another two months)... But I like it so far. I like the style and the character development... Anyone else have any thoughts on it?

mob roulette
03-22-2007, 08:00 AM
"casino" by nicholas pileggi.

also random books on feng shui and gardening.

also a book about whitey bulger that i can't remember the name of right now.

that's all for this week. looking for a GOOD novel though.

mob roulette
03-22-2007, 08:00 AM
I haven't had a chance to read through all the posts, but has anyone read "Infinite Jest?" I'm reading it... slowly (at this rate it'll take me another two months)... But I like it so far. I like the style and the character development... Anyone else have any thoughts on it?

my favorite book of the last twenty five years. feel free to ask any questions that you might have at your leisure.

amyzzz
03-22-2007, 08:12 AM
I'm reading another new (to me) anthology of sci-fi stories from The Year's Best Science Ficton: The Twenty-Second Annual Collection (2004). My current story is called "The Voluntary State" by Christopher Rowe.

KarliCucumber
03-22-2007, 05:00 PM
I really liked the style of Fight Club. Better than the movied I'd say.

Alchemy
03-22-2007, 05:06 PM
I really liked the style of Fight Club. Better than the movied I'd say.

Agreed.

Hannahrain
03-30-2007, 10:52 AM
Has anyone picked up Zimbardo's "The Lucifer Effect" yet?

TomAz
03-30-2007, 10:58 AM
I recently finished Borkmann's Point by HŚkan Nesser. It was pretty good as far as murder mysteries go. It was lean and logical rather than all poofed up like most of them. And, give the author credit, I had the murderer figured out early in the book but then several red herrings caused me to change my mind and I wound up being surprised at the end after all.

thelastgreatman
03-30-2007, 11:00 AM
Sorry, but saying that the Fight Club book was better than the movie is blasphemous. That one was of the best adaptations (and improvements) in the history of film. Chuck was novel at first, Survivor was pretty good, Choke's alright, but frankly he needs to cut down on the new paragraph gimmicks.

Pick up anything by Richard Russo if you grew up in a small town.

Mr.Nipples
03-30-2007, 11:02 AM
Reading Jailbird by kurt vonnegut at the moment...

Hannahrain
03-30-2007, 11:06 AM
Just started timequake today. So far it's good, but then I got to wondering about the SPExp and figured maybe I had better bump this thread.

gaypalmsprings
03-30-2007, 11:34 AM
http://www.funnyguy.com/idlecover240.gif

somahead
04-01-2007, 10:47 PM
I just did my "pick a random title from the NY Times list" and ended up with Running With Scissors. Funny book although I should have at least researched the author a bit before jumping into the novel. The content was a bit unexpected.

mob roulette
04-24-2007, 07:14 PM
Every living American should read Chris Ware. DO it.

Hannahrain
04-24-2007, 07:55 PM
Pulitzer prize winner David Halberstam died in a car crash near Menlo Park today.

atom heart
04-24-2007, 08:08 PM
I just finished Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency and Catch-22. Surprisingly, Catch-22 was way more zany than Dirk Gently. I think that was the most sober Douglas Adams book I have ever read.

I saw pictures of that crash this morning. It was really gnarly.

ewiggy
04-24-2007, 09:40 PM
but frankly he needs to cut down on the new paragraph gimmicks.

yes. i couldn't agree more.


I just did my "pick a random title from the NY Times list" and ended up with Running With Scissors. Funny book although I should have at least researched the author a bit before jumping into the novel. The content was a bit unexpected.

oh? i just saw this movie and was thinking about picking up the book. what do you mean 'unexpected'? is it like, graphic or something?

CuervoPH
04-25-2007, 03:58 AM
I just finished "The Unconsoled" by Kazuo Ishiguro. After reading "The Remains Of The Day" and being amazed by it, I've been reading his other novels in order of publication. The writing in "The Unconsoled" is again brilliant, but also confusing, at least to me. In other Ishiguro novels, the narrator tended to remember the past a bit differently than it actually happened, and that comes out as the book progresses. In this book, the narrator not only seems to be seeing things differently than the reader sees them, but also seems to be living in an artificial reality of his creation, so it's difficult to tell which of the events in the book are at least somewhat real and which are totally a product of the narrator's alternate reality. Still, even when I have no idea what in the hell is going on, I love Ishiguro's writing.

Next up for me is "Hard-Boiled Wonderland And The End Of The World" by Haruki Murakami. I know very little about this book, other than what the synopsis on Amazon states, but it was in several recommended lists by people who liked "The Unconsoled". (I also have "When We Were Orphans" by Ishiguro to read, but wanted to mix things up a bit.)

TomAz
04-25-2007, 05:43 AM
just finished 'The Return' by HŚkan Nesser, so now I've read both his books that have been translated and published in the US so far. He's a light read but not dumb like most light reads are, which is nice.

Before that I read Uncertainty: Einstein, Bohr, Heisenberg and the Struggle for the Soul of Science by David Lindley. This is one of the best lay person's books on relativity and quantum mechanics I've read (and I've read several, I have to admit). The personal stories and ego clashes are what makes the book worth reading though.

unbeliever
04-25-2007, 06:04 AM
Just finished Insomnia by Stephen King. I read this once, years and years ago, and didn't much care for it. This time around though, I rather enjoyed it. It was like a dirty rock crumbling open to reveal a glimmering, gleaming core.

Next up is the second trilogy in Stephen R. Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever. I might also start re-reading Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins. Good stuff.

dedzilla
04-25-2007, 06:33 AM
I just finished 100 Years of Solitude. I'm not really a fan but then again, this book was translated. *shrug*

menikmati
04-25-2007, 07:31 AM
I'm still reading that new Nirvana book.

mountmccabe
04-25-2007, 07:36 AM
I am nearing where I finish The System of the World by Stephenson and then I borrowed Mort by Terry Pratchett to try so those've gotta go before I start reading some Judy Budnitz short stories.

Courtney
04-25-2007, 08:48 AM
I keep thinking this thread is going to be about the band The Books.

I am currently reading Philosophy in a Time of Terror (post-9/11 interviews with Habermas & Derrida) for work and Oh the Glory of It All by Sean Wilsey for fun.

mob roulette
04-25-2007, 10:59 AM
I keep thinking this thread is going to be about the band The Books.

I am currently reading Philosophy in a Time of Terror (post-9/11 interviews with Habermas & Derrida) for work and Oh the Glory of It All by Sean Wilsey for fun.

do the russians miss the young folks?

blakely
04-25-2007, 11:03 AM
The Velveteen Rabbit By Margery Williams

CuervoPH
04-25-2007, 02:39 PM
I am nearing where I finish The System of the World by Stephenson

What did you think of this one? All I've read by him is "Cryptonomicon". That whole baroque cycle looks a bit daunting.

mountmccabe
04-25-2007, 03:31 PM
What did you think of this one? All I've read by him is "Cryptonomicon". That whole baroque cycle looks a bit daunting.

There is no need to fear this book cycle, Trey. Yeah it's ~2700 pages but if you dug Cryptonomicon you'll dig this too. It's possibly a little easier to read that the earlier novel and it's often absolutely hilarious.

The eight novels (published in three volumes) of the Baroque Cycle is a set of sequels to Cryptonomicon so there'll be Shaftoes, Waterhouses, Comstocks and other recognizable families. And Enoch Root, of course.

I'd also recommend trying to read them one after the other or at least not with two years in between like I did. I mean I still know what's going on and there are some reminders but yeah.

ewiggy
04-25-2007, 03:59 PM
i just picked up running with scissors today. based on the first few pages, i like it.

MonsoonSeason
04-25-2007, 04:01 PM
The Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

ewiggy
04-25-2007, 04:20 PM
ugh, REALLY? that book is one sentence stretched across like 200 pages.

mountmccabe
04-25-2007, 04:25 PM
That book is wonderfulness incarnate.

ewiggy
04-25-2007, 04:33 PM
yay!

mountmccabe
04-25-2007, 04:39 PM
Huh? I have not read the Scissors one; I was talking about the Joyce.

ewiggy
04-25-2007, 04:41 PM
oh, i forgot i posted that. damnit. i had to read that book in high school. couldn't make sense of it.

mountmccabe
04-25-2007, 04:53 PM
You read Running with Scissors in high school? Weird.

comiddle
04-26-2007, 04:28 AM
I've been reading Nomads of the Longbow: The Siriono of Eastern Bolivia. Quite fascinating really. Much easier than most anthropological texts in the sense that it makes things exciting. From detailing the fashioning of tools to the seasonal fare to describing the technique used when hunting Howler monkeys.

I've been reading it for a while now... I've been slacking off and watching movies instead of reading at work... My eyes are starting to hurt though, so it's back to books tomorrow.

amyzzz
06-15-2007, 02:11 PM
I'm reading Beloved by Toni Morrison which is about a black family circa 1873 getting on after slavery. I bought it because Diane Rehm on NPR had a show about this book several months back (last fall?), and it sounded interesting. I think I saw the movie (with Oprah) when it came out years ago. Anyone reading anything good?

PotVsKtl
06-15-2007, 02:23 PM
I fucking hate Thomas Pynchon. If I ever see him I'm going to solder his genitals to a bobcat. Then shoot the bobcat up with PCP.

mob roulette
06-15-2007, 02:31 PM
I hate Diane Rehm. What Pot said though.

protodisco
06-15-2007, 02:37 PM
I haven't had a chance to read through all the posts, but has anyone read "Infinite Jest?" I'm reading it... slowly (at this rate it'll take me another two months)... But I like it so far. I like the style and the character development... Anyone else have any thoughts on it?

yes.


I fucking hate Thomas Pynchon. If I ever see him I'm going to solder his genitals to a bobcat. Then shoot the bobcat up with PCP.

no.

bmack86
06-15-2007, 02:40 PM
I'm starting Underworld by Dan Delillo soon. I read What is the What, and it was entertaining, and i just finished Cat's Cradle, which was great. I also wanna read One Day In the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Dubliners, Portrait of an Artist..., Crying of Lot 49 and many others over summer.

Hannahrain
06-15-2007, 02:43 PM
I'm going to start Tim Egan's "The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl" in the near future. It's supposed to be interesting.

mob roulette
06-15-2007, 02:47 PM
I'm going to start Tim Egan's "The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl" in the near future. It's supposed to be interesting.

It's very good. My favorite true story since The Devil In The White City. Will be interested to hear your opinions on it.

mob roulette
06-15-2007, 02:50 PM
riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs...

Hannahrain
06-15-2007, 02:53 PM
Yeah, I dunno what that is. I kind of do, I guess. I googled it, but I don't want to be one of those assholes who relies on googling to have a conversation about anything other than the weather.

mountmccabe
06-15-2007, 02:58 PM
riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs...

Jimmy FTW.

I liked Beloved but didn't love it. The supernatural aspects turned me off. I guess it was the way they were treated/approached. I did love Song of Solomon though.

Bryan as nice as The Crying of Lot 49 if you're not familiar with Pynchon (shut up haters) I might push you towards one of his fuller novels. Lot 49 is wonderful but V and Gravity's Rainbow and the others are actually well plotted and such. They're miles ahead. If you want something shorter I'd say that you should consider the short stories collection Slow Learner, in particular "Entropy." If you're a Pynchon vet then forget all this... or, if you wish, comment upon my advice.

mob roulette
06-15-2007, 02:58 PM
Joyce>Wallace>Pynchon. I don't know why more people don't see that. It's a simple formula really.

Sorry Hannah.

mountmccabe
06-15-2007, 03:01 PM
I am currently reading Thirst For Love by Mishima. It's clearly an early novel and at this point it seems like he could've used an editor with more teeth but the story is picking up and approaching the glories of his other books. Though I've only read two others. Thus far.

mob roulette
06-15-2007, 03:01 PM
Jimmy FTW.

I liked Beloved but didn't love it. The supernatural aspects turned me off. I guess it was the way they were treated/approached. I did love Song of Solomon though.

I like the cut of your jib, kiddo.

Song Of Solomon>The Bluest Eye>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Beloved.

This was a good bump.

mountmccabe
06-15-2007, 03:05 PM
Joyce>Wallace>Pynchon. I don't know why more people don't see that. It's a simple formula really.

I'll grant that Jimmy is better than Tommy but they're different enough that it's a tough comparison. The latter is clearly influenced heavily by the former but he add much of his own.

Also I have no idea what Wallace you'd care to throw in with those giants. I can't come up with any that've been around long enough to even consider. Also I can't find any Wallaces that I've read which is what I mean, sort of.

amyzzz
06-15-2007, 03:06 PM
I'm going to start Tim Egan's "The Worst Hard Time: The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl" in the near future. It's supposed to be interesting.
I heard about that book on Diane Rehm too (sorry mob). It does sound interesting.

PotVsKtl
06-15-2007, 03:12 PM
Consider the fact that I am currently reading both Gravity's Rainbow and Mason & Dixon. Simultaneously. One of them starts pissing me off due to some 40 page tangent about mechanical ducks and so I switch to the other. Back and forth like that until I start soldering genitals. Don't give me any bullshit.

amyzzz
06-15-2007, 03:13 PM
Jimmy FTW.

I liked Beloved but didn't love it. The supernatural aspects turned me off. I guess it was the way they were treated/approached. I did love Song of Solomon though.

Bryan as nice as The Crying of Lot 49 if you're not familiar with Pynchon (shut up haters) I might push you towards one of his fuller novels. Lot 49 is wonderful but V and Gravity's Rainbow and the others are actually well plotted and such. They're miles ahead. If you want something shorter I'd say that you should consider the short stories collection Slow Learner, in particular "Entropy." If you're a Pynchon vet then forget all this... or, if you wish, comment upon my advice.
I read Song of Solomon for a college class years ago, and I remember really enjoying it. I think I tried to get unbeliever to read it, but he's stuck in sci-fi/Neal Stephenson shizz. I can't remember too many details except the kids were named by randomly pointing somewhere in the Bible (First Corinthians, Pilate, etc), and the main character Milkman was breastfed until he was 13 (see girls only thread). The book was Milkman's journey of self-discovery or whatever.

I haven't read ANY Pynchon. I remember my high school English teacher telling us in hushed tones how hard he was to read.
I guess I never got around to him because of that.

atom heart
06-15-2007, 03:19 PM
Consider the fact that I am currently reading both Gravity's Rainbow and Mason & Dixon. Simultaneously. One of them starts pissing me off due to some 40 page tangent about mechanical ducks and so I switch to the other. Back and forth like that until I start soldering genitals. Don't give me any bullshit.

I actually agree with this ('cept the soldering bit). Pynchon's style gets really cloying in his long novels. Lot 49 may not have much of a plot but it's small enough to get through without feeling like you need to crack your head against a wall and it has plenty of little gems of passages. Entropy is definitely my favorite of his writings.

mountmccabe
06-15-2007, 03:23 PM
I actually agree with this ('cept the soldering bit). Pynchon's style gets really cloying in his long novels. Lot 49 may not have much of a plot but it's small enough to get through without feeling like you need to crack your head against a wall and it has plenty of little gems of passages. Entropy is definitely my favorite of his writings.

I'm not sure I'd say it was that 49 doesn't have a plot as much as Pynchon just says what happens rather than allowing the events to happen, instead of describing events.

I'm not sure I could handle GR and M&D at the same time. Much respect, Pot. I think when I was reading GR I would break it up with plays by Stoppard and Ionesco and such.

mob roulette
06-15-2007, 03:26 PM
I'll grant that Jimmy is better than Tommy but they're different enough that it's a tough comparison. The latter is clearly influenced heavily by the former but he add much of his own.

Also I have no idea what Wallace you'd care to throw in with those giants. I can't come up with any that've been around long enough to even consider. Also I can't find any Wallaces that I've read which is what I mean, sort of.

David Foster. I know he's still a youngster, but his next book will make him a giant. Mark my words. Joyce wrote sometimes dirty books that possessed a direct and mystical connection to the infinite while Pynchon mostly writes little pornographic fantasies. Tom's clearly not quite as good as his influences would suggest, IMO. I enjoy "V" and "Rainbow", but I also think we throw around the word "genius" far too often these days. Think I'd rather read J.G. Ballard or Burroughs most of the time, though I haven't approached either since I was a youngster.

Anyway, I think Wallace falls somewhere in between the two. Easily the most promising American writer out there right now. Read "Jest" if you haven't and then the short stories. Trust me, you won't be sorry.

atom heart
06-15-2007, 03:27 PM
I'm not sure I'd say it was that 49 doesn't have a plot as much as Pynchon just says what happens rather than allowing the events to happen, instead of describing events.


Yes, but when Pynchon allows things to happen it takes so long to happen that I forgot what had happened before and I wondered why I was in a sewer hunting pasty alligators.

protodisco
06-15-2007, 04:25 PM
Consider the fact that I am currently reading both Gravity's Rainbow and Mason & Dixon. Simultaneously. One of them starts pissing me off due to some 40 page tangent about mechanical ducks and so I switch to the other. Back and forth like that until I start soldering genitals. Don't give me any bullshit.

fact considered. that seems like a silly strategy though. if tiring from one why not go to another author altogether?

i don't agree w/ the joyce > wallace > pynchon. i sort of feel as if joyce should be excused from that comparison altogether, not because he's wonderful or anything, i hold no particular reverance for joyce, but just because it's inaccurate. wallace > pynchon > gaddis seems a more apt evolution.

if wallace's next novel is anywhere near the quality of infinite jest (and it will be a while before his next novel, as suggested by his reading of "something that is part of something larger and not even close to halfway finished yet"), he will have cemented himself among literary giants.

mob roulette
06-15-2007, 05:37 PM
wallace > pynchon > gaddis seems a more apt evolution.

if wallace's next novel is anywhere near the quality of infinite jest (and it will be a while before his next novel, as suggested by his reading of "something that is part of something larger and not even close to halfway finished yet"), he will have cemented himself among literary giants.

Thank you. Gaddis. That's exactly what I meant. Joyce is of a different caste entirely.

PotVsKtl
06-15-2007, 05:41 PM
wallace > pynchon > gaddis seems a more apt evolution.

Mathematical symbols > evolutionary chart arrows.

protodisco
06-15-2007, 07:02 PM
Mathematical symbols > evolutionary chart arrows.

the implication isn't that the arrows represent evolution (if they did they'd be pointing the other way.), it's that the three authors presented have evolved from each other. pynchon has evolved from gaddis so he's greater (>) than gaddis. wallace has evolved from pynchon so he's greater than pynchon.

duh.

roberto73
06-16-2007, 09:57 AM
I'm starting Underworld by Dan Delillo soon. I read What is the What, and it was entertaining ...

Have you read DeLillo's White Noise? It's one of my favorites, and as much as I loved Underworld, I don't think it's as good. What is the What is on my shelf, too. Maybe this summer. I'm currently wrapping up a collection of short stories published by McSweeney's (Eggers' literary mag). Fun, previously unpublished genre stuff from people like Rick Moody, Elmore Leonard, Michael Chabon, Nick Hornby, and Sherman Alexie.


My favorite true story since The Devil In The White City. Will be interested to hear your opinions on it.


I keep meaning to pick up "The Devil in the White City", too.

Devil in the White City is great. Well worth reading, Hannah. Have either of you read Under the Banner of Heaven? It's written by Jon Krakauer and details Mormon fundamentalism in the context of a 1984 double murder. Creepy and riveting.

mob roulette
06-16-2007, 01:32 PM
Have you read DeLillo's White Noise? It's one of my favorites, and as much as I loved Underworld, I don't think it's as good. What is the What is on my shelf, too. Maybe this summer. I'm currently wrapping up a collection of short stories published by McSweeney's (Eggers' literary mag). Fun, previously unpublished genre stuff from people like Rick Moody, Elmore Leonard, Michael Chabon, Nick Hornby, and Sherman Alexie.

Devil in the White City is great. Well worth reading, Hannah. Have either of you read Under the Banner of Heaven? It's written by Jon Krakauer and details Mormon fundamentalism in the context of a 1984 double murder. Creepy and riveting.

Krakuer's book is very good. Reminded me of The Executioner's Song.

Also,

Libra>White Noise>Underworld. Meant to comment on that before. Underworld is perhaps a bit too ambitious for its own good. Doesn't always hit the right notes, IMO.

Re-reading No Country for Old Men now. In preparation.

amyzzz
06-20-2007, 04:35 PM
I'm reading John Steinbeck's East of Eden because I enjoyed his book The Winter of Our Discontent so much. So far it kind of reads like those Peyton Place movies (never read the book if there is one).

miscorrections
06-20-2007, 04:38 PM
i'm re-reading accordion crimes by annie proulx. when i finish that i'm moving on to what is the what.

mob roulette
06-20-2007, 05:20 PM
I'm reading John Steinbeck's East of Eden because I enjoyed his book The Winter of Our Discontent so much. So far it kind of reads like those Peyton Place movies (never read the book if there is one).

Stick with it, Amy. It's biblical.

roberto73
06-20-2007, 07:17 PM
I just started T.C. Boyle's Drop City.

roberto73
07-22-2007, 07:05 PM
Those of you not reading Harry Potter, what are you reading instead?

I'm working on Frank Portman's King Dork and Bret Easton Ellis' Lunar Park.

atom heart
07-22-2007, 07:14 PM
It's summer, so I finished reading the Dirk Gently Omnibus. Light stuff. Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency is my favorite Douglas Adams book.

TomAz
07-22-2007, 08:29 PM
I'm reading this book of Dylan interviews. Also, I'm reading The Yiddish Policeman's Union.

CuervoPH
07-22-2007, 09:34 PM
I'm about 250 pages into "The Agony And The Ecstasy" by Irving Stone. It's a biographical novel of Michelangelo (description stolen from book cover). It is amazingly well written (IMHO) and is making me want to revisit Italy more and more.

And I agree with Atom re: Dirk Gently. I loved the first Dirk Gently book and also "The Long Dark Tea Time Of The Soul". Both rank towards the best Douglas Adams wrote (especially since the ending to "Mostly Harmless" kind of spoiled the Hitchhiker's series for me somewhat). I still haven't read "The Salmon of Doubt", though. Supposedly the main novella in that is the third Dirk Gently book.

mountmccabe
07-23-2007, 08:42 AM
I haven't read "The Salmon of Doubt" either but I believe you are right. That was the working title for the book Adams had been working on for, well, years. Must've been a lot of baths.

"Mostly Harmless" was nothing special but it couldn't dim my love for the first three books in the trilogy.

I read part one of "All the Pretty Horses" by Cormac McCarthy last night. It is good.

J~$$$
07-23-2007, 08:51 AM
I bought "Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs, and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market" yesterday I really should have bought it from a used book Im not all that sure it will be an interesting book.

Courtney
07-23-2007, 10:01 AM
...and Oh the Glory of It All by Sean Wilsey for fun.

I am still reading this. I am also reading the August 2007 issue of Lucky Magazine. I know; I fail.


Also, I'm reading The Yiddish Policeman's Union.

Is it good? Back when I had a real job about half of my co-workers were reading that book. I know because they would all be reading it at the same time in the shuttle from the parking lot to the main building. Cute.


I'm about 250 pages into "The Agony And The Ecstasy" by Irving Stone. It's a biographical novel of Michelangelo (description stolen from book cover). It is amazingly well written (IMHO) and is making me want to revisit Italy more and more.

It was also made into a fantastically cheesy movie staring Charlton Heston. It's totally art historically inaccurate, but very fun.


I read part one of "All the Pretty Horses" by Cormac McCarthy last night. It is good.

I love that book.

amyzzz
07-23-2007, 10:05 AM
I read As I Lay Dying by William Faulker before I started reading the last 3 Harry Potter books.

PotVsKtl
07-23-2007, 10:10 AM
I gave up on Mason & Dixon for a while and am now reading a ridiculous fantasy series called A Song of Ice & Fire. It's about dragons and wenches and shit. I also just found out it's not even done and there are two more books in the series for dude to write. Nonsense.

Yablonowitz
07-23-2007, 10:21 AM
Everytime I read, I fall asleep. I have problems.

mountmccabe
07-23-2007, 11:18 AM
Everytime I read, I fall asleep. I have problems.

Maybe you should try reading while Stef Maybe holds you in his arms and smells your hair.

amyzzz
07-23-2007, 11:22 AM
I read to help myself go to sleep sometimes.

TomAz
07-23-2007, 01:12 PM
Is it good? Back when I had a real job about half of my co-workers were reading that book. I know because they would all be reading it at the same time in the shuttle from the parking lot to the main building. Cute.


I haven't decided yet.

Courtney
07-29-2007, 09:39 AM
Ok I finished Oh The Glory of It All by Sean Wilsey. It picked up and got better in the end, imo, as it got less self-indulgent and more focused on the father character. I am quite sure that the book does not merit comparison to A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, as many of the reviews reprinted on the first couple pages inside the cover suggest. But it was well-written, and interesting in a voyeuristic, society pages sort of way.

I did enjoy the section on his crazy travels to Russia with his eccentric mother as part of the "Children as Teachers of Peace." But really where the book started to get better, for me at least, is his tenure at the Amity School in Italy. The section opens with a 2+ page quote from Murakami's Norwegian Wood, which seems like the sort of thing that most first-time novelists would shy away from but fits well within Wilsey's general collage photo album-style of writing where he seems to paste various mementos from his childhood both literally and metaphorically into his book's pages. But other than the fact that I love love love Murakami, I think the reason this section and the ones that follow work so much better is that all of a sudden Wilsey's writing gets out of the moment and adopts a more retrospective distance. Or maybe I just couldn't handle his brattishness earlier in the book.

I'm glad I read Oh The Glory of It All, but I'm not sure I'd recommend it to friends unless they had a particular interest in San Francisco society gossip. Also, Wilsey lived in MARFA (!!!!) briefly, so he can't be all bad.

bballarl
07-29-2007, 09:53 AM
I'm finally going to read "A Clockwork Orange". I'm also about 10 pages into "Life of Pi" by Yann Martel.

miscorrections
07-29-2007, 10:36 AM
life of pi made me laugh. it's a good book, worth the read.

bmack86
07-29-2007, 12:16 PM
Well, I loved White Noise, which prompted me to pick up Underworld, but that one left me cold. I didn't feel like he was cohesive in his story telling and the characters (pretty much caricatures, in both cases) didn't ever connect with me in the way they did in White Noise. Also, it dragged on for too long.

Next up: Either V or Gravity's Rainbow by Pynchon or The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie. Recommendations?

Hannahrain
08-07-2007, 10:26 PM
I was going to go to bed, but instead I decided to start "Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas".

roberto73
08-07-2007, 10:46 PM
I was going to go to bed, but instead I decided to start "Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas".

Hooray for Tom Robbins. Another Roadside Attraction is my favorite.

TomAz
08-08-2007, 05:54 AM
Also, I'm reading The Yiddish Policeman's Union.



Is it good? Back when I had a real job about half of my co-workers were reading that book. I know because they would all be reading it at the same time in the shuttle from the parking lot to the main building. Cute.


I liked this book a lot. I am just going to read Chabon from now on.

mountmccabe
08-08-2007, 06:58 AM
Well, I loved White Noise, which prompted me to pick up Underworld, but that one left me cold. I didn't feel like he was cohesive in his story telling and the characters (pretty much caricatures, in both cases) didn't ever connect with me in the way they did in White Noise. Also, it dragged on for too long.

Next up: Either V or Gravity's Rainbow by Pynchon or The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie. Recommendations?

Gravity's Rainbow is in my top ten of all time. I liked V but it was more difficult for me to follow; it seemed a little less smooth. It might be a better entry point for Pynchon's real novels, though. Either would be overwhelmingly awesome.

I have at times considered reading some Rushdie but it's never happened so I have nothing to add there, really.

mountmccabe
08-08-2007, 07:01 AM
Oh and also I finished All the Pretty Horses and it ruled my face. I started Orlando by Virginia Woolf while camping. I love Virginia Woolf an incredible amount. This is going to be a weird one; it is a fantasy. Maybe more distance from Mrs. Dalloway than Dalloway is from To the Lighthouse or The Waves. I think I shall still like it but I suspect it might not leave me in mindless rapture like the latter two did.

amyzzz
08-08-2007, 08:28 AM
I'm reading The Terror by Dan Simmons. It's historical fiction about the search for the North-West Passage in the late 1840's. I :pulse anything by Dan Simmons.

Hannahrain
08-08-2007, 08:41 AM
Hooray for Tom Robbins. Another Roadside Attraction is my favorite.

I liked Still Life with Woodpecker better. Although it's probably been a good five years since I've read Another Roadside Attraction. I owe it a re-read.

amyzzz
08-08-2007, 09:35 AM
I never could finish Still Life with Woodpecker. I just didn't like it.

Down Rodeo
08-08-2007, 11:05 AM
A couple days ago, I finished Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and then watched Blade Runner. It was awesome.

nothingman00
08-08-2007, 11:30 AM
I decided to read "American Psycho" by Bret Easton Ellis and wowza!!! So much better than the movie (also so much more graphic). I'm thinking I need to veer towards something much lighter, like the Madden '08 game manual. In all seriousness, I'm going back and re-reading "The Castle" by Kafka. I re-read "The Trial" while at the beach earlier this summer and realized how poignant it was the second time around, especially when placed in the proper context (i.e. this crazy hack legal system of the past decade or so). As an English major with a taste for eccentricity, I probably need to hop aboard the Tom Robbins train soon. Never read a book by him, though he's always at the top of my "to read" list... Any advice where to start with Robbins?

roberto73
08-08-2007, 12:17 PM
As an English major with a taste for eccentricity, I probably need to hop aboard the Tom Robbins train soon. Never read a book by him, though he's always at the top of my "to read" list... Any advice where to start with Robbins?

I'd go with either Hannah's pick, Still Life With Woodpecker, or mine, Another Roadside Attraction. Of course, now that I think about it, Skinny Legs and All is also pretty great, if you want a book in which two of the main characters are a spoon and a can of beans. Or Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas, one of the rare books written entirely in second person. You could probably pick any one of his at random and not be disappointed.

PotVsKtl
08-08-2007, 12:18 PM
Skinny Legs and All pissed me off. Fuck Robbins.

mountmccabe
08-08-2007, 12:20 PM
Or Half Asleep in Frog Pajamas, one of the rare books written entirely in second person.

This just made me want to read this and I've only heard about this guy from this board and others like it. I think.

downingthief
08-08-2007, 12:25 PM
A couple days ago, I finished Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and then watched Blade Runner. It was awesome.

Beautiful. One of my favorite books, and one of my favorite movies.

downingthief
08-08-2007, 12:28 PM
I'm reading The Terror by Dan Simmons. It's historical fiction about the search for the North-West Passage in the late 1840's. I :pulse anything by Dan Simmons.

I love historical fiction. One of the best that i have read was "Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follett. I tried to read more of his stuff, and it was complete shit. Pillars, however, was masterful. HIGHLY recommend.

amyzzz
08-08-2007, 12:29 PM
I love historical fiction. One of the best that i have read was "Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follett. I tried to read more of his stuff, and it was complete shit. Pillars, however, was masterful. HIGHLY recommend.
That sounds really familiar. Synopsis? I may have read it too.

clarky123
08-08-2007, 12:33 PM
A couple days ago, I finished Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? and then watched Blade Runner. It was awesome.

If you like PKD try and get his book called Counter Clock World.

lmntz4
08-08-2007, 12:37 PM
Pillars of the Earth was also a favorite.

Currently reading Atlas Shrugged. Next up - Kite Runner, followed by some Bret Easton Ellis and Dave Eggers. And Kafka.

downingthief
08-08-2007, 12:41 PM
That sounds really familiar. Synopsis? I may have read it too.

Takes place in 12th century England, if memory serves correct. Main story is centered around the building of a cathedral in a fictional town. Takes place over 50 years, or so. Very simple premise, but the relationships are fantastic, as is the detail on the actual construction and architecture. Lots of politics come into play, too. Both church and government.
I loved it because I was very into old architecture at the time, as well as that period of history.

amyzzz
08-08-2007, 01:51 PM
Yeah, I read that. Liked it. :thu

nothingman00
08-08-2007, 01:58 PM
This just made me want to read this and I've only heard about this guy from this board and others like it. I think.

I believe "Bright Lights, Big City" by Jay McInerney was written entirely in second person, also. I remember loving that book because of that... I also referred to coke as Bolivian Marching Powder for about 6 months after that. Ah, to be young and carefree again.

As for Robbins, I will start with Hannah's rec (which was seconded by Roberto), then I'll move onto "Another Roadside Attraction"... I'll post here when I finish the first. Strange that out of his novels, I hadn't heard much about either of those. As a big fan of the Beat writers (especially Kerouac), I always cringe when people neglect to mention "Big Sur", "Dharma Bums" or "the Subterraneans" or hell, even "Tristessa", "Desolation Angels" etc...

It's always "On the Road" and "Howl and other Poems" by Ginsberg, maybe "Naked Lunch" by Burroughs, but never those other gems. When I think of Robbins I always think "Even Cowgirls get the Blues" and "Jitterbug Perfume" (the latter because I had a friend in college that was such a fan of that book... I'll finally pay my dues to Mr Robbins. I'm giddy, now... Thanks for the recs.

nothingman00
08-08-2007, 02:00 PM
Pillars of the Earth was also a favorite.

Currently reading Atlas Shrugged. Next up - Kite Runner, followed by some Bret Easton Ellis and Dave Eggers. And Kafka.

get mentally prepared for Easton Ellis. Seriously, stay away from drugs when reading him.

I need to check out that damn Kite Runner book. I probably almost bought it about 100 times and B&N, then put it down and bought something else.

nothingman00
08-08-2007, 02:06 PM
Gravity's Rainbow is in my top ten of all time. I liked V but it was more difficult for me to follow; it seemed a little less smooth. It might be a better entry point for Pynchon's real novels, though. Either would be overwhelmingly awesome.

I have at times considered reading some Rushdie but it's never happened so I have nothing to add there, really.

Oh, "Midnight's Children" by Rushdie is an absolute must-read. Skip "The Satanic Verses" and go straight to "Midnight's Children". Do not pass GO, do not collect $200...

In all seriousness, I haven;t read that book in 5-6 years (since undergrad), but it was wonderful.

atom heart
08-08-2007, 04:54 PM
Reading Dave Eggers is like having someone shouting constantly at you. I found his ranting to be really grating after a while.

What's "Big Sur"?

Hannahrain
08-08-2007, 05:56 PM
This just made me want to read this and I've only heard about this guy from this board and others like it. I think.

It might take me awhile to finish, but I'll swap it with you for something else when I'm done. If you want.

mob roulette
08-08-2007, 07:04 PM
Andre Dubus "Selected Stories". It's a re-read because I haven't bought anything new lately, but dear God, he was good.

Hannahrain
08-08-2007, 07:07 PM
Reading Dave Eggers is like having someone shouting constantly at you. I found his ranting to be really grating after a while.


I think he's funny. Although not in the same way that HE thinks he's funny.

mob roulette
08-08-2007, 09:04 PM
Someone just handed me Al Gore's "The Assault On Reason". Anybody going to stop me?

nothingman00
08-08-2007, 09:45 PM
Reading Dave Eggers is like having someone shouting constantly at you. I found his ranting to be really grating after a while.

What's "Big Sur"?

It's a Kerouac novel. Possibly his best work. Certainly the loneliest... Very sad portrayal of the newly christened "King of the Beats" trying to avoid his newfound fame, holing up in a cabin and basically driving himself crazy, drinking himself to death, etc.

mob roulette
08-08-2007, 09:59 PM
Hey nothingman, was that the one where he decided to be a Forest Ranger or fire lookout or something for awhile? That was a good book.

matildawong
08-08-2007, 10:56 PM
I loved "Pillars of the Earth" too. Nice to see it mentioned here. I haven't met anyone else who has read it!

Edit: I'm reading Margaret Atwood, "The Blind Assassin" and just finished Joan Didion's "The Year of Magical Thinking."

PotVsKtl
08-08-2007, 11:32 PM
http://stuffmeister.com/MrsPiggleWiggle3.jpg

bmack86
08-08-2007, 11:33 PM
I'm reading the Sirens of Titan right now. It's very entertaining.

Down Rodeo
08-09-2007, 12:47 AM
If you like PKD try and get his book called Counter Clock World.

My roommate is trying to get me to read Ubik soon. I haven't heard about Counter Clock World, but I'll look into it.

nothingman00
08-09-2007, 01:05 AM
Hey nothingman, was that the one where he decided to be a Forest Ranger or fire lookout or something for awhile? That was a good book.

That was the first part of "Desolation Angels"... Ok, that may be the loneliest novel by Kerouac, at least that first part where he's a fire lookout for Mt. Hozomeen. I want to say the first part is called "Desolation in Solitude", the second part is "Desolation in the World and examines the time after Kerouac comes down from his fire lookout post and still feels lost and lonely in the world, despite the constant partying with the other typical Kerouac characters. Then the "Passing Through..." series takes him to Mexico, Tangiers (where he semi-overdoses on opium), New York and a couple other places...

The first part is lonely but hopeful, while "Big Sur" has a feeling of impending doom. I think one of my favorite Kerouac lines is somewhere near the beginning of "Desolation Angels". It closes a chapter of typical Kerouac fretting over the meaning of it all and reads, "But I will be the Void, moving without having moved." I could recite the entire last paragraph of "On the Road" as it is simply the best closing paragraph of any novel, in my opinion, and one of the most beautiful paragraphs ever written in general, but I love the simplicity of "But I will be the Void, moving without having moved". If recollection serves correctly, the entire first few chapters deal with the Void, and it is certainly a recurring theme throughout the book. "Desolation Angels" and "Passing Through" were originally intended to be two separate works, again, if memory serves correct, as the tone of each is completely different.

mob roulette
08-15-2007, 06:26 PM
Thanks nothingman.





Wow. It sure is quiet in here.





Like a library or something.





I am enjoying this very much.





So anyway, I was thinking of adding another element to this thread. Favorite excerpts and quotes from books you enjoy. Or books you don't enjoy, whatever. Just stuff that moves you in some way. What do you guys think? It could be as long or as short as you want. What could be cool about it is that you could just pop in, leave something in italics, with no explanation necessary. We'd all know what you'd be doing. Kind of like a reading. Just cite the author maybe. Here, I'll start. This is one of my all-time favorite endings:

I do not feel the peace I once did: not with God, nor the earth, or anyone on it. I have begun to prefer this state, to remember with fondness the other one as a period of peace I neither earned nor deserved. Now in the mornings while I watch purple finches driving larger titmice from the feeder, I say to Him: I would do it again. For when she knocked on my door, then called me, she woke what had flown dormant in my blood since her birth, so that what rose from the bed was not a stable owner or a Catholic or any other Luke Ripley I had lived with for a long time, but the father of a girl.

And He says: I am a Father too.

Yes, I say, as You are a Son Whom this morning I will receive; unless You kill me on the way to church, then I trust You will receive me. And as a Son You made Your plea.

Yes, He says, but I would not lift the cup.

True, and I don't want You to lift it from me either. And if one of my sons had come to me that night, I would have phoned the police and told them to meet us with an ambulance at the top of the hill.

Why? Do you love them less?

I tell Him no, it is not that I love them less, but that I could bear the pain of watching and knowing my sons' pain, could bear it with pride as they took the whips and nails. But You never had a daughter and, if You had, You could not have borne her passion.

So, He says, you love her more than you love Me.

I love her more than I love truth.

Then you love in weakness, He says.

As You love me, I say, and I go with an apple or carrot out to the barn.

-Andre Dubus, "A Father's Story"

PineapplePete
08-15-2007, 06:39 PM
ok...

M Sparks
08-15-2007, 06:41 PM
I've been trying to read "Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal" for months.

It's good, but I just don't have the time. And yes, I know I post crap on message boards all the time, but I do that while waiting for bits of video to render.

Alchemy
08-15-2007, 06:42 PM
I just started reading Beasts Of No Nation by Uzodinma Izweala. I'm about halfway through. I'll get back to all of you.

So far it's very graphic, but quite interesting.

matildawong
08-15-2007, 07:07 PM
I'm finishing up "Moloka'i" -- about the leper's colony in the early 1900s. It's fiction, though.

mob roulette
08-15-2007, 07:12 PM
At the hour he'd always choose when the shadows were long and the ancient road was shaped before him in the rose and canted light like a dream of the past where the painted ponies and the riders of that lost nation came down out of the north with their faces chalked and their long hair plaited and each armed for war which was their life and the women and children and women with children at the breast all of them pledged in blood and redeemable in blood only. When the wind was in the north you could hear them, the horses and the breath of horses and the horses' hooves that were shod in rawhide and the rattle of lances and the constant drag of the travois poles in the sand like the passing of some enormous serpent and the young boys naked on wild horses jaunty as circus riders and hazing wild horses before them and the dogs trotting with their tongues aloll and foot-slaves following half naked and sorely burdened and above all the low chant of their traveling song which the riders sang as they rode, nation and ghost of nation passing in a soft chorale across that mineral waste to darkness bearing lost to all history and all rememberance like a grail the sum of their secular and transitory and violent lives.

-Cormac McCarthy, All The Pretty Horses

ghettojournalist
08-15-2007, 08:14 PM
right now, i'm reading Love is a Mix Tape: Life and Loss, One Song at a Time by Rob Sheffield. It's a heartbreaking chronicle of his relationship with his now-deceased wife that uses their mixtapes as a jumping-off point for each chapter.

other books i have read so far this year:
Finn by Jon Clinch
The Post-Birthday World by Lionel Shriver
Ask Again Later by Jill A. Davis

all were really good imo, so if anyone else has read them, please chime in.

i started The Terror by Dan Simmons but didn't have the time to finish it.

matildawong
08-15-2007, 08:48 PM
I had the total wrong idea in my head about the Rob Sheffield book. You just piqued my curiosity.

roberto73
08-15-2007, 08:54 PM
The Sheffield book is great. A must-read for music fans.

algunz
08-15-2007, 08:55 PM
I just read Falling Man by Delillo. Does anyone know if there is any truth to the allusions of the performance artist that appears throughout the book? I'd have figured I would have heard of this, but then again there was too much shit to pay attention to at the time.

FYI - the book deals with 9/11

mob roulette
08-15-2007, 09:06 PM
I just read Falling Man by Delillo. Does anyone know if there is any truth to the allusions of the performance artist that appears throughout the book? I'd have figured I would have heard of this, but then again there was too much shit to pay attention to at the time.

FYI - the book deals with 9/11

Please elaborate.

breakjaw
08-16-2007, 01:57 AM
Is it just me,or does starting a new book before finishing the one you were reading feel like a betrayal?I was halfway through the excellent biography of Houdini that I got for X-Mas,but it was a hardcover and I didn't want to lug it around on my trip to Michigan.So I picked up Philip Roth's novel "The Plot Against America" about what would have happened if Lindbergh had been elected President in 1940 instead of Roosevelt.
I love the new book so much,but feel like a dick for abandoning Harry Houdini,just when things were getting interesting...

ghettojournalist
08-16-2007, 02:16 AM
if the trip from MI is over, then i shall chastize you.

Alchemy
08-20-2007, 11:31 AM
http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-images/Books/Pix/covers/2005/09/01/beasts_final.jpg


Well I have finished "Beasts Of No Nation" today. Overall, the book is a very interesting piece on warfare. Specifically the transformation of normal people with normal dreams into these "beasts". How an average person like you can me can be driven to kill and rape. It follows a boy in an unnamed African country who is dragged into a civil war, when a group of rebels raid his village and capture him. It is a first person narrative, but is interesting because it is written in the way the boy would speak and think. He is very innocent and young, so the text is like that as well (for example, you find word are sounding like this not like word in book from city where are teach english so well well.)

It's really short, so it will take like a night or two to get through it.

mob roulette
08-20-2007, 11:52 AM
I think I'm going to read that, Alchemy. Thanks.

Alchemy
08-20-2007, 11:57 AM
I think I'm going to read that, Alchemy. Thanks.

No problem. You should look for the "Best Book of the Year" version because it has an interview with the author in the back.

TomAz
08-20-2007, 12:11 PM
Is it just me,or does starting a new book before finishing the one you were reading feel like a betrayal?I was halfway through the excellent biography of Houdini that I got for X-Mas,but it was a hardcover and I didn't want to lug it around on my trip to Michigan.So I picked up Philip Roth's novel "The Plot Against America" about what would have happened if Lindbergh had been elected President in 1940 instead of Roosevelt.
I love the new book so much,but feel like a dick for abandoning Harry Houdini,just when things were getting interesting...

I do that all the time. Usually for the same reason you just cited. I too sometimes think of it as a betrayal, then I remember it's a damned book and it doesn't give a shit about me or my feelings so why should I care about it?

mob roulette
08-20-2007, 12:17 PM
I am reading "The Big Nowhere" by James Ellroy and Hemingway's "Green Hills of Africa" concurrently. It doesn't seem to be presenting too much of a problem.

TomAz
08-20-2007, 12:21 PM
"Green Hills of Africa" is one of those I put down and never picked back up again. I read quite a bit of it though. I would have liked to have known which writer he was dissin in that one part. But all in all Hemmingway is much better when there is a plot. I had the same problem with "Death in the Afternoon".

mob roulette
08-20-2007, 12:38 PM
Yeah, I'm not feeling it as much as his other ones. It's not holding me in a death grip like his best work does.

roberto73
08-20-2007, 01:04 PM
Mob, is this your first Ellroy experience? I love his stuff so much. White Jazz is, I think, my favorite, but The Big Nowhere ranks right up there.

mob roulette
08-20-2007, 01:31 PM
No, I've read White Jazz, Suicide Hill, My Dark Places, and L.A. Confidential, of course. I go back and forth on his stuff. I enjoy his work but sometimes feel like it's just too much language. Too much banter, not enough exposition. But that might just be. I've been avoiding The Black Dahlia though because I thought the movie was so much crap. Thoughts?

RotationSlimWang
08-20-2007, 01:33 PM
What Is The What? is turning out to be pretty good halfway through. And that says a lot coming from me 'cause there's generally no easier way to turn me off than a sympathetic story about the genocide of poor Africans.

miscorrections
08-20-2007, 01:35 PM
it wasn't my favorite of his, because i like his short stories more. but definitely good.

roberto73
08-20-2007, 02:22 PM
No, I've read White Jazz, Suicide Hill, My Dark Places, and L.A. Confidential, of course. I go back and forth on his stuff. I enjoy his work but sometimes feel like it's just too much language. Too much banter, not enough exposition. But that might just be. I've been avoiding The Black Dahlia though because I thought the movie was so much crap. Thoughts?

I actually need to reread Dahlia. I read it about ten years ago, so it's definitely not fresh in my mind. One thing in its favor, though, is that it's the first Ellroy I read and I was completely and immediately hooked, which speaks in its favor, I guess. If I were you, I wouldn't let the movie be a deterrent to reading the book. If anything, it'll probably just point out how truly miserable the movie was.

algunz
08-20-2007, 02:34 PM
Please elaborate.

The book, Falling Man, deals with a guy who survived the towers and his relationship with his "family." There are also a couple of chapters that deal with the minds of the terrorists.

But throughout the book, there is this performance artist who harnesses himself to buildings and bridges throughout the city after the attacks and falls. His attire and position directly mimics the horrible photograph of the man jumping from the buildings. (You all know the one where his knee is bent and he's in a suit.) I am curious if the performance artist really existed or if he is just someone whom Delillo created.

mob roulette
08-20-2007, 05:38 PM
It's a construct, algunz. But it's based on this. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Falling_Man)

Also,


And the answer, said the judge. If God meant to interfere in the degeneracy of mankind would he not have done so by now? Wolves cull themselves, man. What other creature could? And is the race of man not more predacious yet? The way of the world is to bloom and to flower and die but in the affairs of men there is no waning and the noon of his expression signals the onset of night. His spirit is exhausted at the peak of its achievement. His meridian is at once his darkening and the evening of his day. He loves games? Let him play for stakes. This you see here, these ruins wondered at by tribes of savages, do you not think that this will be again? Aye. And again. With other people, with other sons.

-Cormac McCarthy, Blood Meridian

mob roulette
09-05-2007, 05:17 PM
Last time. Then I'm switching authors.

For a good friend:


I do like it that way, she said. You got that part right.

It don't take long to get a taste for it, does it?

No, she said. It don't.

Well, it ain't as simple as it sounds. You'll see.

Why is that.

There's always somebody knows where you're at. Knows where and why. For the most part.

Are you talkin about God?

No. I'm talkin about you.

She ate. Well, she said. You'd be in a fix if you didnt know where you was at.

I don't know. Would you?

I don't know.

Suppose you was someplace that you didnt know where it was. The real thing you wouldnt know was where someplace else was. Or how far it was. It wouldnt change nothin about where you was at.

She thought about that. I try not to think about stuff like that, she said.

You think when you get to California you'll kind of start over.

Them's my intentions.

I think maybe that's the point. There's a road going to California and there's one comin back. But the best way would be just to show up there.

Show up there.

Yeah.

You mean and not know how you got there?

Yeah. And not know how you got there.

I don't know how you'd do that.

I don't either. That's the point.

She ate. She looked around. Can I get some coffee? she said.

You can get anything you want. You got money.

She looked at him. I guess I ain't sure what the point is, she said.

The point is there ain't no point.

No. I mean what you said. About knowin where you are.

He looked at her. After a while he said: Itís not about knowin where you are. Itís about thinkin you got there without takin anything with you. Your notions about startin over. Or anybodyís. You donít start over. Thatís what itís about. Every step you take is forever. You cant make it go away. None of it. You understand what Iím sayin?

I think so.

I know you donít but let me try one more time. You think when you wake up in the morning yesterday donít count. But yesterday is all that does count. What else is there? Your life is made out of the days itís made out of. Nothin else. You might think you could run away and change your name and I donít know what all. Start over. And then one mornin you wake up and look at the ceiling and guess whoís layin there?

She nodded.

You understand what Iím sayin?

I understand that. I been there.

Yeah, I know you have.

-Cormac McCarthy, No Country for Old Men

roberto73
10-05-2007, 06:28 AM
For a lark, I'm taking a graduate level Lit. class this quarter. The first book we're reading? Joyce's Ulysses. I read it once years ago, but I still feel like I've been thrown in the deep end of the pool without floaties.

TomAz
10-05-2007, 06:42 AM
hey, it's roberto! how have you been?

roberto73
10-05-2007, 06:51 AM
Swamped, hence the absence. Thanks for asking. Classes started a week ago and I've got a new job on campus that's keeping me insanely busy. Plus it's the year of my qualifying exams and dissertation research, so I've been meeting to negotiate with my faculty committee more than I'd like. I'm now officially tired of responsibility.

Jenniehoo
10-11-2007, 02:32 AM
I just read Chuck Klosterman's IV and I read Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs last month. I'm really excited I found him. He's funny and concise and he inspires me. But no one told me about him. WHY DIDN'T ANY OF YOU TELL ME ABOUT HIM?

I also read 1984 for the first time last week. Our culture has been so steeped in that book that I felt like I'd already read it even though I hadn't. It was very compelling.

I just finished (tonight) some girly book called Some Like it Hot. It was terrible. Yesterday I finished a book called Room for Love about a woman that looks for men by pretending to be interested in renting an apartment from them. It was okay. I read girl books like I drink water - they go fast.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-11-2007, 03:03 AM
How can there be a thread about great books and authors without one mention of PAUL AUSTER? That's like having a thread about good music and nobody mentioning Radiohead. WHAT THE FUCK, PEOPLE? If there is anyone on this board who hasn't read "The New York Trilogy" by Auster, you need to do so. Right now. And then read everything else he ever wrote.

I am currently reading "Notes from Underground" by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. I've read everything by Bukowski and Fante and I fancied something similar, and they always namecheck Dostoyevsky, so I figured I'd give it a try. I'm about 100 pages in and it's actually pretty disappointing so far. He shares the same misanthropism and nihilism as Buk and Fante, but without the immediacy of their sparkling prose. So instead of identifying with the main character, I just find myself wishing he wasn't such an asshole. Still, maybe it'll get better.

I've also been working on my own novel (which has been in progress for like 3 years) and I'm about 30,000 words in but it's pretty disheartening and I am wondering whether to just stop completely. Basically it's a story about a guy in a band and a bunch of shit that happens to him and the people close to him, drawing from a lot of my own experiences as well as a parody of someone like Pete Doherty. I think it'd be a good read, but perhaps not a great book, so I'm losing the will to write it.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-11-2007, 03:05 AM
Oh and I'll add this quote to the thread:

I'd say that the quantity of boredom, if boredom is measurable, is much greater today than it once was. Because the old occupations, at least most of them, were unthinkable without a passionate involvement; the peasants in love with their land; my grandfather, the magician of beautiful tables; the shoemakers who knew every villager's feet by heart; the woodsmen; the gardeners; probably even the soldiers killed with passion back then. The meaning of life wasn't an issue, it was there with them, quite naturally in their workshops, in their fields. Each occupation had created it's own mentality, it's own way of being. A doctor would think differently from a peasant, a soldier would behave differently from a teacher. Today we're all alike, all of us bound together by our shared apathy towards our work. The one great collective passion of our time.


From "Identity" by Milan Kundera.

amyzzz
10-11-2007, 06:36 AM
I just finished The Shipping News last night. I liked the characters in it a lot, but I'm so used to reading sci-fi/fantasy shit with lots of action that this seemed really slow. I'm killing my brain with junk food reading I guess.

roberto73
10-11-2007, 07:34 AM
How can there be a thread about great books and authors without one mention of PAUL AUSTER? That's like having a thread about good music and nobody mentioning Radiohead. WHAT THE FUCK, PEOPLE? If there is anyone on this board who hasn't read "The New York Trilogy" by Auster, you need to do so. Right now. And then read everything else he ever wrote.

Seconded. New York Trilogy is still my favorite of Auster's work. For people who don't know it (or him), it's a series of three linked novellas. They're mysteries, but unlike any mysteries you've ever read. Auster does some really spellbinding stuff with story structure and characterization, and in the course of these three stories, manages to say some profound things about the nature of personal identity. Here's one of my favorite passages in the trilogy, from the beginning of "City of Glass":

New York was an inexhaustible space, a labyrinth of endless steps, and no matter how far he walked, no matter how well he came to know its neighborhoods and streets, it always left him with the feeling of being lost. Lost, not only in the city, but within himself as well. Each time he took a walk, he felt as though he were leaving himself behind, and by giving himself up to the movement of the streets, by reducing himself to a seeing eye, he was able to escape the obligation to think, and this, more than anything else, brought him a measure of peace, a salutary emptiness within. The world was outside of him, around him, before him, and the speed with which it kept changing made it impossible for him to dwell on any one thing for very long. Motion was of the essence, the act of putting one foot in front of the other and allowing himself to follow the drift of his own body. By wandering aimlessly, all places became equal, and it no longer mattered where he was. On his best walks, he was able to feel that he was nowhere. And this, finally, was all he ever asked of things: to be nowhere. New York was the nowhere he had built around himself, and he realized that he had no intention of ever leaving it again.

And because I need to read something of no literary value whatsoever while I'm plodding through Ulysses, I just picked up Bret Easton Ellis' Lunar Park. Delightfully trashy.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-11-2007, 07:43 AM
I have a signed copy of Lunar Park but I haven't read it yet. I went to see Ellis do a reading from it, and a brief Q&A, which was pretty interesting, but it still didn't sound as compelling as his earlier books.

full on idle
10-11-2007, 07:55 AM
I'm reading A Supposedly Fun Thing That I'll Never Do Again. So far it's about tennis and math and the midwest. And wind.

matildawong
10-11-2007, 09:50 AM
I'm on a biography kick. I'm reading "The Kennedy Women" and I am totally into it. It's one of those books where I can't wait to sit down at the end of the work day/errands/etc and get lost in.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-22-2007, 02:49 AM
A couple of books I read recently...

1. "A Seperate Peace" by John Knowles:
I bought this book because someone recommended it to me ages ago and because when I searched for it on amazon, one of the marketplace sellers was offering it for 1p, including postage, so I decided to buy it just to see if they would actually send it to me for just 1p, and they did! Anyway, I really liked it. It reminded me a lot of Ian McEwan's "Atonement" (so much so that I wonder if McEwan intended his book to somehow reference / pay homage to this one?), seeing as it's set against the background of an impending war, and is about a childhood mistake and the guilt that results from it and then affects people's entire lives. Definitely worth checking out.

2. "Travels In The Scriptorium" by Paul Auster:
As previously mentioned, Paul Auster is one of my favourite authors. His books are always great, and this was no exception; I read it all in a day because it was so gripping. It's a sort of mystery, and you're never really sure who the central character is, until a clever twist reveals everything at the very end. However, it references quite a few of his earlier books and probably wouldn't make much sense unless you'd read those first, so it's probably only a book for a real Auster fan. You'd definitely need to have read "The New York Trilogy", "Leviathan" and "The Music Of Chance" to understand this book properly, and I recommend all of those to anyone who wants to check Auster out, before you read this one.

3. "Ask The Dust" by John Fante:
Fante was one of Bukowski's favourite authors, so I decided to check him out, but I thought this was one of his slower books, and I prefer Bukowski overall. They both talk about life as deadbeats in California, and they both share a graphic and simple style of prose, but Bukowski always seems to revel unashamedly in his drunken madness, whereas Fante seems apologetic and remorseful a lot of the time. If you've exhausted Bukowski's canon, this is a good place to turn, though.

tessalasset
10-22-2007, 07:33 AM
I'm reading "The Deep End of the Ocean" right now about a woman who loses her three-year-old son in a hotel lobby during her 15th reunion and how it tears her family apart in the following years. I think something big happens that I haven't gotten to yet - I think they find him like 10 years later or something. We'll see. It's really good so far.

TomAz
10-22-2007, 07:51 AM
A couple of books I read recently...

1. "A Seperate Peace" by John Knowles:
I bought this book because someone recommended it to me ages ago and because when I searched for it on amazon, one of the marketplace sellers was offering it for 1p, including postage, so I decided to buy it just to see if they would actually send it to me for just 1p, and they did! Anyway, I really liked it. It reminded me a lot of Ian McEwan's "Atonement" (so much so that I wonder if McEwan intended his book to somehow reference / pay homage to this one?), seeing as it's set against the background of an impending war, and is about a childhood mistake and the guilt that results from it and then affects people's entire lives. Definitely worth checking out.



I had to read this in high school. I hated it. but I was like 15 so wtf did I know? I loved Atonement though.

mountmccabe
10-22-2007, 08:22 AM
A couple of books I read recently...

1. "A Seperate Peace" by John Knowles:

3. "Ask The Dust" by John Fante:


I also read the Knowles in high school. At the time I hated reading mostly because I hated English class and the stupid stuff they made you do. Or, rather, that you had to come up with/spout their interpretations of the books to get credit. I'mn't good at that sort of thing.

And I read that Fante, approaching it for much the same reasons. I really liked it and want to read more. And I'm probably more eager for more Fante than for more Bukowski.


I think I am going to give up on the Somali novel I'm reading. I'm 100 pages in and finished part 1 which seems like a good place to stop since it'sn't anything special.