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Alchemy
07-15-2010, 01:43 PM
I've been slowly, but surely, reading the short stories in James Joyce's Dubliners. Many hits and few misses.

guedita
07-15-2010, 01:46 PM
Araby is one of my favorite short stories ever.

Alchemy
07-15-2010, 02:46 PM
Araby is one of my favorite short stories ever.

Yes! So far, that's my favorite one from the collection.

jdaws
07-15-2010, 06:37 PM
Post script. Physics of the Impossible is a good book to read if you're looking to know how long it's going to take before you're terrified to leave the house and also terrified to stay home but slightly less terrified of putting your head in the oven so nobody tompeeps at you while wearing some sort of completely unreasonable camouflage projection garment.

Sounds like that book should've included an epilogue addressing how to time travel back to a happier time when you weren't so scared. I read another book by Kaku on Einstein's theories and I was really grateful for how accessible it was. One of Einstein's most powerful mental tools was being able to "see" what his theories predicted as very simple visual concepts, which were relayed well to the reader along with a lot of interesting anecdotes regarding his public notoriety.

Hannahrain
07-15-2010, 07:00 PM
Time travel is addressed, as it happens. He divides the book into three phases of impossibility. Class I impossibilities are currently impossible but do not violate the known laws of physics and could potentially come into fruition within the next few centuries, Class II impossibilities are "technologies that sit at the very edge of our understanding of the physical world" but still don't violate our laws and therefore could, long into the future, be realized, and Class III impossibilities are things that would require a complete reevaluation of our currently accepted laws and completely upturn what we think we know about the world. Time travel is considered a Class II impossibility.

I completely agree about his accessibility. He's got a really great way of making you fully understand something without feeling stupid for needing to have it explained to you.

Hannahrain
07-15-2010, 07:06 PM
Though I guess I sort of take umbrage at the word "impossible" being used so liberally, because if it's possible after years of global maturation and technological advances, it's already "possible". Possible isn't a volatile state. It's a yes or no. It's just a matter of what it takes to get us to the point of action. We may not have always had the technology to walk on the moon, but it's been possible since before there was a "we".

moomoo
07-15-2010, 07:13 PM
I wish I could just stop reading this Dune quadrosextogy and move on.

You wish you could stop reading Dune? Blasphemy.

How is the series after the first book? I've only finished the first book but it's one of the only series I am actually excited to attempt and complete.

mountmccabe
07-15-2010, 07:48 PM
Powell's is doing free shipping until Sunday. The world remains rotative at regular speed, but maybe you also save six bucks.

So I guess I have another five books speeding their way to me. And that was without much trying. And with putting a bunch back.

That store.

Hannahrain
07-15-2010, 08:16 PM
You will get zero sympathy from me. I bought nine books on the internet today.

Hannahrain
07-20-2010, 02:21 PM
http://www.katu.com/news/tech/98867509.html

I realize this only references hardcover, but I've been thinking a lot lately about what e-readers mean for the print industry as a whole, and I don't like it. Before too long (if they haven't already), publishing companies could start experimenting with digital-only releases in the same vein as the recording industry's utilization of the digital format without any physical counterpart, and it could eventually become the new norm. Which, the more that I think about it, has always seemed like a future inevitability. I just didn't think the future was going to start so soon.

It makes me feel paranoid and and hoard-y. Leaflets and canned food and all that. Root vegetables and batteries and the beginning of the end.

marooko
07-20-2010, 02:33 PM
its then only a matter of time before this is the norm. lol.

Thank you board.

And fuck CDJ's!

Hannahrain
07-20-2010, 02:41 PM
If you're going to laugh at what I'm saying, you could at least laugh at my actual text and not a poorly written paraphrase that misses the potentiality of the whole statement and substitutes iron conviction.

marooko
07-20-2010, 02:46 PM
I'm not at all, Hannah. Not laughing, not making fun, nothing. This absolutely sucks and it scares the hell out of me. Sorry to offend, not my intention at all.

Bud Luster
07-20-2010, 03:19 PM
publishing companies could start experimenting with digital-only releases in the same vein as the recording industry's utilization of the digital format without any physical counterpart, and it could eventually become the new norm.

I don't think the recording industry analogy works because just about everyone that purchases digital music has the ability to create a physical counterpart.

I.F.A.
07-20-2010, 03:22 PM
Try being a librarian right now. I'm really getting sick of people telling me that I'm obsolete.

I don't think that print will go away entirely - certainly, it will suffer, but some sort of equilibrium will be established. There will always be people who prefer text in a tangible form, so as long as there is a market for them books will still be made.

guedita
07-20-2010, 03:24 PM
But books will undoubtedly become more expensive than they already are, so that the publishing industry can make a profit/compete.

marooko
07-20-2010, 03:27 PM
Try being a librarian right now. I'm really getting sick of people telling me that I'm obsolete.

I don't think that print will go away entirely - certainly, it will suffer, but some sort of equilibrium will be established. There will always be people who prefer text in a tangible form, so as long as there is a market for them books will still be made.

And that's you in your avatar?

Hannahrain
07-20-2010, 03:33 PM
I don't think the recording industry analogy works because just about everyone that purchases digital music has the ability to create a physical counterpart.

The analogy refers to releasing avenues. There's nothing keeping you from printing off a .pdf you download the same way you'd burn a CD. What you're saying is true, but it does nothing to negate my analogy and/or my fear.

Bud Luster
07-20-2010, 03:43 PM
I suppose your fear is justified, but there are plenty of reasons that keep folks from printing off a 500+ page document. It's not the same as simply burning a CD.

Hannahrain
07-20-2010, 03:45 PM
Whether or not it's the same has nothing to do with whether or not we ultimately become a fully digital society. I understand your point, but I don't see why you're trying to apply it against mine. It's not an argument against. It's just a separate thing that is also true.

jackstraw94086
07-20-2010, 03:51 PM
its then only a matter of time before this is the norm. lol.

Thank you board.

And fuck CDJ's!

need a hanky, dood?

I.F.A.
07-20-2010, 03:52 PM
As a private citizen, in some ways, I would be fine with that. The fact is, the industry is bloated. 99% of the books/magazines/newspaper articles that get published are schlock - perhaps then the industry will have to be a little more selective about what it puts out? As a librarian... well, I'm on the fence.

When it was first created, print was all about the democratization of ideas. Which was great. However, when everyone has a voice, those who actually have something intelligent or thoughtful to say get drowned out. And, the unfortunate fact is that the printing industry is definitely, well, industrial. They want to sell you something. It's no longer a democratic process… actually, it never really was. It's always been an arena for the elite. First because printing was prohibitively expensive, now because it's in the hands of giant corporations who get to decide what to print. Small, independent, presses are where it's at, but they are by nature inaccessible, and they've been barely floating along since long before the advent of the internet. Don't get me wrong, the Dean Koontzes and Steven Kings will always be published, precisely because they sell. The latest celebrity memoir/political tract/scandel/conspiracy theory/etc. will always have a place because they sell. As print continues to compete with the internet and e-publishing, it's likely that publishing houses will trend towards taking less chances on the little guy and sticking with what they know will make them money. I.e. the shit. It's been happening for a while. The publishing industry is definitely fucked, but books aren't going anywhere. Actually, probably not even cheap books - there's always an incentive to make things cheaper so that they can sell more of them.

My career choice is based on a personal philosophy that information, in whatever form, should be readily available to the masses. Now that I'm working in more of a research capacity than in a public library that hasn't changed, but I have a more nuanced view. I do a lot of online research for the attorneys in my firm, as well as research in print based sources. Each has its place. Either way, there's this idea that because of the internet librarians aren't really needed. Fact is, I'm trained to know where and how to find information. Google really isn't the be-all-end-all. Neither are e-books. I don't know, I think about this issue a lot, because it definitely effects me personally a lot more than it might most people, and I'm still not sure how I feel about all of it. Like, I'm strongly anti-censorship, so I kind of surprised myself when I realized that yeah, I actually do wish that publishing was more elite - but I also understand that there is already a de facto self-censorship being perpetrated by the publishing corporations, because they are choosing what is made available in print. And with that choosing, there is a definite dumbing down of the information available - I could apply the same criticisms to the publishing world that I would to "mainstream media". The internet redemocratized the written word - that's been gone from print for a long time (if it ever really existed). So, in that way, e-publishing is a good thing, because that means that more people can get their work out. However, also a bad thing, because that means more shit to sift through... maybe I'm not as democratic as I thought?


Thinking about this depresses me.

I.F.A.
07-20-2010, 03:53 PM
And that's you in your avatar?

Yes, that's me, in the library I work in. With the candlestick.

marooko
07-20-2010, 03:54 PM
Sweet.


need a hanky, dood?

I always hope you'll show up whenever I mention something like that. Thank you.

jackstraw94086
07-20-2010, 04:02 PM
http://www.katu.com/news/tech/98867509.html

I realize this only references hardcover, but I've been thinking a lot lately about what e-readers mean for the print industry as a whole, and I don't like it. Before too long (if they haven't already), publishing companies could start experimenting with digital-only releases in the same vein as the recording industry's utilization of the digital format without any physical counterpart, and it could eventually become the new norm. Which, the more that I think about it, has always seemed like a future inevitability. I just didn't think the future was going to start so soon.

It makes me feel paranoid and and hoard-y. Leaflets and canned food and all that. Root vegetables and batteries and the beginning of the end.

The music industry analogy is fucking scary because the tendency for folks to jump around through MP3s. This would be ghastly if applied to books. When you buy a physical book (similar to buying a physical CD) you're generally invested enough to see it all the way through. I can just see a bunch of hipsters skimming a few chapters of (what they're told are) important books, and trying to converse about them in flat shoes with no arch support, standing upon a poorly swept coffee shop floor, drinking a $4 double espresso prepared by a 38 year old with a long, unkempt beard that doesn't quite match the color of the hair on his head that pokes out between his mesh hat and the thick arms of his absurdly thick eyeglasses.

I.F.A.
07-20-2010, 04:03 PM
I can just see a bunch of hipsters skimming a few chapters of (what they're told are) important books, and trying to converse about them in flat shoes with no arch support, standing upon a poorly swept coffee shop floor, drinking a $4 double espresso prepared by a 38 year old with a long, unkempt beard that doesn't quite match the color of the hair on his head that pokes out between his mesh hat and the thick arms of his absurdly thick eyeglasses.

This is already happening.

Hannahrain
07-20-2010, 04:04 PM
I didn't know you could run an espresso machine, Jack.

Alchemy
07-20-2010, 04:18 PM
The thing I'm worried about when it comes to digital books is that writers won't make as much money (as if most were making much to begin with). It's hard to be a writer, and if a writer needs to take up a lot of their time trying to make ends meet, then they are going to have less opportunities to work on their writing. I'm afraid that publishing companies might get a little more picky about who to print as Kindles and such become more and more available. I mean, so many people have droid phones and iphones, so they are able to read digital books. And you can get digital books pretty cheap... So maybe new writers will be pushed into the digital. Unlike bands, unless you're Chuck Palahnuik or David Sedaris, a writer can't go on a tour and make money off readings/merchandise, so digital books do more damage than MP3s, I think. Anyway, I think many "respectable" writers just get invited to read at universities on their tours (for free readings), and that's no way to make a living, because they'll pretty much just pay you in food and some funds and let you stay at a hotel on their account. The good thing is that you'll have a little table to sell books at, but if most of your books are going digital... If you're a new writer, you can hope to publish a book and get enough money to live easily for long enough to produce new work. So my main concern is if that opportunity will not come as much for new writers, because less money will be coming in.

chiapet
07-20-2010, 04:23 PM
Does "trying to be a librarian" mean you are a librarian and are trying to stay employed, or that you are still studying to be a librarian? Just curious because (from the little I know from friends who are in library science careers and those who are still in masters programs), the studies seem to be very focused on archive collecting/management, including digital, digital loaning/DRM.

As a private citizen, I like it, though the current structure does not really work for me, where digital versions are priced as high (or almost as high) as print copies. I'm all for the artist, in this case the author, getting their financial due from their work; I guess I don't care about the publisher profiting so grossly when there is no real cost to "publish" in this format.

marooko
07-20-2010, 04:46 PM
I don't like the idea of the digital versions being close to as much. I know that there are many different costs incurred, but I don't like the loss of people. Somewhere along the line people will be losing work. I refuse to go through self checkout at any store.

mountmccabe
07-20-2010, 05:00 PM
I refuse to go through self checkout at any store.

WTF? Those are the best. I've had times when I've had a pile of groceries I had gathered and saw that the self checkouts were closed and almost just up and left.

Self checkout is quicker - unless the store has a checker and a bagger on your line - less boring and I get to pack my items in my bags as I see fit. Also you have to talk to people less.

marooko
07-20-2010, 05:08 PM
WTF? Those are the best. I've had times when I've had a pile of groceries I had gathered and saw that the self checkouts were closed and almost just up and left.

Self checkout is quicker - unless the store has a checker and a bagger on your line - less boring and I get to pack my items in my bags as I see fit. Also you have to talk to people less.

That cracked me up.

I get what you're saying, I used to be the same way. As much as I dislike people, I really enjoy the interactions. Also, I don't wanna be Will Smith a few years from now fighting some automated teller or something. But that's just my paranoia.

I laugh at your fucking sig every time I read it.

Courtney
07-20-2010, 06:28 PM
Ha, I avoid the self checkout lines, but that's mostly just because I'm much slower at entering the produce codes than any cashier is going to be. And most of what I end up buying is usually produce and bulk grains and nuts and whatnot that need to be coded.

humanoid
07-20-2010, 06:41 PM
The first several times I ever used self checkout lines, there was some type of issue that arose, forcing an employee to come over anyways, making me stand there waiting like an idiot...

It has taken me a few years to get over the trauma

Alchemy
07-20-2010, 06:42 PM
The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet by David Mitchell came in the mail today. Hardcover. Beautiful.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-20-2010, 06:48 PM
WTF? Those are the best. I've had times when I've had a pile of groceries I had gathered and saw that the self checkouts were closed and almost just up and left.

Self checkout is quicker - unless the store has a checker and a bagger on your line - less boring and I get to pack my items in my bags as I see fit. Also you have to talk to people less.

I almost never not have alcohol with me at the grocery store and these self checkout aisles still won't you buy alcohol. Those bastards.

Courtney
07-20-2010, 06:59 PM
The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet by David Mitchell came in the mail today. Hardcover. Beautiful.

I saw that cover recently while buying Citrus County and it was so pretty that it almost made me buy it on the spot. Let me know if the insides are as good.

chiapet
07-20-2010, 07:13 PM
Don't they let you do alcohol? I've purchased alcohol in self-check out, but possibly not in CA... there is one cashier for all the self-check out lanes, they come over and card you.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-20-2010, 07:19 PM
Not in any of the stores i've gone to in l.a.

bmack86
07-20-2010, 07:54 PM
All the ones I've done in LA and California in general let you do that.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-20-2010, 08:08 PM
All the ones I've done in LA and California in general let you do that.

Weird. Maybe it's a SF Valley thing.

roberto73
07-20-2010, 08:09 PM
You can buy alcohol at self-checkouts in Georgia, but this is offset by the fact that A) supermarkets only carry wine and beer, and B) you can't buy booze of any kind anywhere on Sunday. One of the many things I've had to adjust to.

Also, continuing my trend of reading one grown-up book and one young adult book at the same time, I'm now reading Will Self's Great Apes and Gennifer Choldenko's Al Capone Does My Shirts. I'll let you decide which is which.

Hannahrain
07-20-2010, 08:52 PM
Oregon supermarkets are also just wine and beer, but you can buy them through the self-check as well. Perhaps self-check machines in the Valley don't particularly care for the cut of Drinkey's jib and he alone is refused alcohol purchase.

I used to use the self-check all the time, but I've been buying most of my groceries at Trader Joe's these days they do not offer it. Which, then, leaves mostly produce to be bought elsewhere, and produce in a self-check goes much slower than produce in a standard checkout. Additionally, the supermarket at which I usually buy the produce offers that thing through the regular checkout where you can round up to the nearest dollar to donate to cancer research, and I quite like that. I don't think you can do that in the self-check. So, these days I usually go through the regular lines unless I'm feeling particularly antisocial (which happens frequently enough, I guess).

I know this makes me sort of a bad person, but when buying things like tampons I will often pick the most timid-looking teenaged male supermarket checker instead of going through self-check because they get a special, downcast "yes ma'am/no ma'am" kind of awkward and it's fucking hilarious. On the verso, if I'm somehow embarrassed by my groceries (I can't currently think of what I'd be embarrassed to buy in this day and age but I can remember the feeling, so obviously it's happened before) I will self-check. Quickly.

I guess I'm also prone to going to the store in the middle of the night when it's basically just me, a homeless person, two hookers, and a drunk guy shopping/wandering while the night employees restock for the next day, and at that hour the self-check is closed.

mountmccabe
07-20-2010, 09:13 PM
Yeah, I often go to farmer's market style grocery stores that don't have self checkout. In fact I went to Sunflower Market tonight and went through the (only open) line and said more than a few words to the checker. It was fun.

Though really the idea of produce going slowly at self check is weird to me. I know a fair number of the codes for items I buy frequently. Contextually, at least. I'mn't at a register so if you say banana I won't necessarily say 4011. Though I do know that one because it is really easy.

I am still reading Spook Country. I have started to actually make progress, partially because I am enjoying it more because I am starting to pick out a story and partially because I feel weird because five books are being shipped to me as we speak:

Sarah Vowell: Take the Cannoli: Stories from the New World
Yuikio Mishima: Spring Snow (Sea of Fertility #1)
Malcolm Lowry: Under the Volcano
Philip K Dick: Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick #03: Second Variety
Philip K Dick: Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said

algunz
07-20-2010, 11:58 PM
I just finished Portrait of an Addict as a Young Man, perfect summer read. :)

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-21-2010, 12:11 AM
I used to use the self-check all the time, but I've been buying most of my groceries at Trader Joe's these days they do not offer it.

I guess I'm also prone to going to the store in the middle of the night when it's basically just me, a homeless person, two hookers, and a drunk guy shopping/wandering while the night employees restock for the next day, and at that hour the self-check is closed.

These things actually describe most of my food purchases as well. Also, the pain of rejection trying to self-checkout several years ago led me to stop trying and things may have changed since then.

bballarl
07-21-2010, 12:20 AM
I read Game of Thrones on my trip, and it was awesome. Now I am reading A Clash of Kings. It is probably awesome as well.

mountmccabe
07-21-2010, 04:27 AM
Have they made Kindles so that Amazon, et al can't take books away from you at their whim? A friend of my was trying to push them when Woot/Amazon were having their sales, etc but that made me hesitate. The screen looks to be about 70% bigger than the one on my phone, which really would make a decent difference. I've read a few short stories on my phone's bookreader (Aldiko) and I have a few other favorite sort of works - The Waste Land, Dubliners - and various others that I'd like to read - Tender Buttons, Flatland, some Chesterton and Russell - but I currently just see them as backup options rather than anything to actually go to. It was good enough to read an old Dick short at the DMV when I was there without a physical book but at home in a chair I wouldn't think of it. So I am happy for the public domain/Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page).

amyzzz
07-21-2010, 08:56 AM
WTF? Those are the best. I've had times when I've had a pile of groceries I had gathered and saw that the self checkouts were closed and almost just up and left.

This cracks me the fuck up.

:pulse :pulse mountmccabe

marooko
07-21-2010, 09:02 AM
Seriously. I'm still getting a good laugh out of it. Especially because I'm pretty much the opposite. If i walked in to a store and all they had was self checkout, I wouldn't go back.

I.F.A.
07-21-2010, 09:11 AM
Does "trying to be a librarian" mean you are a librarian and are trying to stay employed, or that you are still studying to be a librarian? Just curious because (from the little I know from friends who are in library science careers and those who are still in masters programs), the studies seem to be very focused on archive collecting/management, including digital, digital loaning/DRM.

As a private citizen, I like it, though the current structure does not really work for me, where digital versions are priced as high (or almost as high) as print copies. I'm all for the artist, in this case the author, getting their financial due from their work; I guess I don't care about the publisher profiting so grossly when there is no real cost to "publish" in this format.

My title is library technician, and I work in a private law library. I've worked in a combination of public and private libraries for the last 11 years (since my first job at 15). I don't have the degree, and though getting it has always been my plan, at this point am not sure that I will, for various reasons - I have huge beef with the stratification between "professional" librarians (i.e. those with degrees), and library support staff, and the way that the system is designed to pretty much ignore (or, in a lot of cases, even provide) on the job training. I had hit the ceiling at the public library without an MLS, so I got lucky with my current job, which is allowing me advancement and continued training based on experience and knowledge. And that's not to say that I'm knocking people who go the degree route, but I think there should be room for both. Anyway, this is a rant in and of itself. Basically, aside from some administrative stuff (which I've never had interest in anyway), I do what a degreed librarian does.

And, yes, much of the training in an MLS program has changed to focus on using online databases and maintaining a digital collection. We had an e-lending program at the public library I used to work at (and frankly, it sucked - but it was basically a pilot program, with limited compatibility and coverage.)

Even with "real" publishing, 99% of authors get the shaft and never see a profit from their work. While a publishing house might front the bill to get a lesser known author in print, they do little to promote the books. Their advertising budgets go toward the sure bets. And, someone above mentioned authors touring - that's not strictly true. Really, the only way for an unknown author to get the word out is to do their own PR. Frankly, it's pretty stupid not to set up readings and signings etc., because short of Oprah somehow getting a copy, that's the only way to create readership. Unfortunately, that usually has to be done on the author's impetus and dime, because the publishing companies won't generally foot the bill. Independent publishers actually usually put more effort into promotion, but they don't have the $$ that the large companies do, so the effectiveness is still limited. So, authors today (again, except for the big ones) pretty much have to be their own PR machine. It's not just a matter of getting published and that's it.

I.F.A.
07-21-2010, 09:49 AM
And while we're on the subject, this is from NPR today:

Why The Next Big Pop-Culture Wave After Cupcakes Might Be Libraries (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128651136&sc=fb&cc=fp)

chiapet
07-21-2010, 10:44 AM
Have they made Kindles so that Amazon, et al can't take books away from you at their whim? A friend of my was trying to push them when Woot/Amazon were having their sales, etc but that made me hesitate. The screen looks to be about 70% bigger than the one on my phone, which really would make a decent difference.


Well, not really, but they've said they wouldn't. :) Meaning they officially went on record as saying they would not do that again. I think it was a matter of not having a thought-out policy to deal with the possibility of someone publishing something they didn't have the rights to publish. Amazon allows authors & publishers to self-publish. One of these registered "users" published a number of e-books for which they did not possess any right to distribute or publish. 1984 was one of a number of books that were withdrawn when that account's holdings were removed. I thought at the time they insinuated that it was a programming design flaw rather than a decision based on policy. I should ask one of my exes who works on Kindle. :)

And you can turn off syncing which would prevent them from removing books. Not a long term answer, of course. I leave syncing off normally and turn it back on occasionally to check for firmware updates or when I have bought something from Amazon. No reason other than paranoia. :) I mostly use my Kindle for.... books I have not purchased, so I load stuff via computer (it acts as a usb drive) rather than syncing.

The screen is pretty big compared to most phones... I have an iphone, the (2nd gen?) kindle, the screen on the kindle is over 250% the viewable space that my phone has.

jackstraw94086
07-21-2010, 10:53 AM
Don't they let you do alcohol? I've purchased alcohol in self-check out, but possibly not in CA... there is one cashier for all the self-check out lanes, they come over and card you.

The person at the self-checkout kiosk will generally just approve you from a distance if you're obviously 21 and they don't have to take the plastic cap off.

chiapet
07-21-2010, 11:16 AM
I still get carded :( but only when first seen at a distance. I look old up close.

amyzzz
07-21-2010, 11:21 AM
I am somewhat appalled at the alcohol self check-out revelation.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-21-2010, 11:24 AM
Why, I never! Hmph!

amyzzz
07-21-2010, 11:34 AM
Hey my kids are quickly approaching jr high age so hush.

marooko
07-21-2010, 01:35 PM
I still get carded :( but only when first seen at a distance. I look old up close.

The dude at the hobby shop just told me I'd be the first kid in town with that upgraded part. I said "guy". He said whatever. Then was shocked to find out how old I was. No, I wasn't carded for the part.

humanoid
07-21-2010, 01:43 PM
Did you knife him for the offense?

donkey sex
07-21-2010, 02:56 PM
Port of Saints by Kim Carson

"Meet me in St. Louis Louie
Meet me at the fair
Don't tell me the lights are shining
Anyplace but there"

menikmati
07-30-2010, 10:41 AM
I really like the new Kindle that is coming out...I watched the Charlie Rose segment on it and everything, it looks really great and seems to have some great improvements on the previous model, and the $189 price tag is awesome...I'm really considering picking one up possibly in the next couple of months....the only problem I have though is that I like having hard copies of books (always have), so I don't wanna pay for a hard copy, then have to turn around and pay another 10 bucks or more for the same book in kindle format...and what about all the books I've already bought off Amazon, would really suck to have go back and repurchase all of those in Kindle format too...just so much money to re-spend.

I really wish Amazon offered a feature, where say if you were to buy a hard copy of a book off their site, for maybe and extra 2-3 bucks more tops, they would throw a kindle version of it on your order as well...that way for people who buy Kindles, but also enjoy having hard copies, would get both without having to spend top dollar twice for the same thing. I dunno, just a thought.

amyzzz
07-30-2010, 10:44 AM
I agree. I'm gunning hard to get a kindle for my birthday.

boarderwoozel3
07-30-2010, 10:44 AM
Currently reading David Byrne's new book Bicycle Diaries. It's all over the place but I like it a lot. He's got good perspective and asks a lot of important questions of society, I feel.

chiapet
07-30-2010, 11:05 AM
The new Kindle looks good, I'm still happy with mine but wish I had the global 3G.

chiapet
07-30-2010, 11:07 AM
I should not admit this here, but especially for books I have already purchased in hard copy... I just do not buy them. Rationalize that it's no worse for the author than if I were to borrow a library book instead. Most books are disposable to me (I used to buy paperbacks and then give them away or sell them), if I read something and really like it, now I buy a hard cover copy to hang on to.

And I go to the library more now than I did pre-Kindle, to have physical books to read now and then.

menikmati
07-30-2010, 12:22 PM
I just think it's dumb that if buy a hard copy of some book, I have to turn around and pay another 10 bucks to get the Kindle version as well...I understand the Kindle is marketed for people who don't wanna store hundreds or thousands of physical books anymore, but I think it would be really cool if I bought some paperback for 11 bucks, that Amazon would offer a service where for 3 bucks more, I could get the Kindle version to go along with it...or say just go with Hardcover/kindle version for 20 bucks, Paperback/kindle version for 15 bucks...I would totally go for a system like that.

PotVsKtl
07-30-2010, 01:02 PM
If you want physical copies of books don't buy an e-reader. It's been difficult for me to accept but you either make the transition to digital or you don't, there's no sensible middle ground.

chiapet
07-30-2010, 01:27 PM
It hasn't been that tough for me but perhaps my book collecting was strange to begin with.

My old model was to buy a paperback of the book I'd never read, if I loved it, I kept the paperback until I bought a hardcover/nicer copy of the book, which I keep indefinitely. If I didn't love the book, I gave away the paperback.

My new model (let's pretend I'm really buying for a moment) is to read on the Kindle and if I adore the book, by a hardcover version too.

Though I do agree that it would be nice to have some sort of combined pricing or a discount for buying in multiple formats.

menikmati
07-30-2010, 02:08 PM
I know they're not exactly the same, but look at what labels do with selling vinyl...most new releases, if you buy the vinyl, you get the download code to get an mp3 version of it...something similar on amazon with buying hard copies would be a good idea I think...as a way to get people introduced to e-reading if nothing else.

atom heart
07-30-2010, 03:52 PM
I'm currently reading Proust's Swann's Way.

The introspective philosophical part of me likes the first part, and the part of me that hates stories about Society (like Age of Innocence) is increasingly annoyed with the middle.

Alchemy
07-30-2010, 09:06 PM
I hope to finish Cormac McCarthy's Blood Meridian tomorrow, and then I'll get started on David Mitchell's The Thousand Autumns of Jacob De Zoet.

So far Blood Meridian has had some really great moments, but I have to admit that the scalping isn't as exciting as it was during the first few incidents. Good thing these crazy lunatics mix it up here and there with other kinds of madness.

rage patton
07-30-2010, 10:12 PM
Picked this up the other day after Jeff (boarderwoozle) made me aware of it.

http://www.colleen-taylor.com/blog/images/http%3A//www.lighthousecycles.com/storage/Bicycle%2520Diaries%2520Byrne.jpg

I am not very far into it, but it is fantastic so far. Can't wait to read more.

RageAgainstTheAoki
08-03-2010, 12:50 AM
I just got done with Faulkner's Sound and the Fury and found it equally engrossing and maddening. Keeping up with those sudden time shifts was impossible for me at times. Looking for some light reading to cleanse the palate. Anyone read this? I'm hoping he's as pessimistic and dark a writer as he is a comedian.

http://images.bookdepository.co.uk/assets/images/book/small/9780/0073/9780007324491.jpg

For those unfamiliar. 30 seconds of Mr. Boyle...
SZTahQZs76Y

guedita
08-07-2010, 12:32 PM
My recent reads:

Evelyn Waugh, A Handful of Dust - standard modernist classic about the collapse of society and self after WWII. It was actually quite humorous and not as bogged down language wise as I expected, it turned out to be a quick, enjoyable read.

Flannery O'Conner, The Violent Bear It Away - Fucking fantastic. O'Connor is able to create such an antagonizing sense of frustration that I enjoy as a reader. This novel is so much better than Wise Blood, which is great in its own right. Both of the characters in this book are juxtaposed in a horrific binary that invites a really rich exploration of your own position in whatever intellectual/religion culture you've experienced. If you're looking for a place to start with Flannery O'Connor, I always recommend her short story "Revelation."

And now I'm currently reading Jose Saramango's Blindness, which is equally captivating, though entirely reminiscent of The Plague... but better.

CuervoPH
08-08-2010, 07:10 AM
Blindness was the first Saramago I read and it was the reason I read other Saramago novels. I never bothered watching the movie based upon the novel because I didn't think there was any way they make it work as a movie.

Oddly enough, though, I am currently re-reading Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami (one of my favorites of his) because a movie is in the works that I hope will do it justice.

MissingPerson
08-08-2010, 07:17 AM
Anyone read this? I'm hoping he's as pessimistic and dark a writer as he is a comedian.

http://images.bookdepository.co.uk/assets/images/book/small/9780/0073/9780007324491.jpg

For those unfamiliar. 30 seconds of Mr. Boyle...
SZTahQZs76Y

Frankie Boyle might just be the funniest dude in comedy today. I've only read extracts, but it's pretty much exactly what you expect.

chiapet
08-08-2010, 11:08 AM
Oddly enough, though, I am currently re-reading Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami (one of my favorites of his) because a movie is in the works that I hope will do it justice.

Whhhhhaaaaaaaaaat? I don't know how I feel about that. Loved the story, don't necessarily want to see it in film. :/

shermanoaksyo
08-10-2010, 02:07 AM
drooling

http://posterous.com/getfile/files.posterous.com/warrenellis/VumhrVNI93MxMCtOZVbHC1AYVDQrEXVFX4zFjoJ9IWsBbI3qRT iv6EpbNBgF/photo.jpg.scaled.500.jpg

mountmccabe
08-10-2010, 03:57 AM
And I finished Spook Country just Sunday. I'd say it took some time to get going but I liked what I got.

I am going to start Malcolm Lowry's Under the Volcano rather than run out and buy that, as much as I'd like to. Let us know how it is!

CuervoPH
08-10-2010, 04:09 AM
Whhhhhaaaaaaaaaat? I don't know how I feel about that. Loved the story, don't necessarily want to see it in film. :/

I am naive to think it matters, but the director did apparently consult with Murakami during the filming process. I reserve the right to form a final opinion until after I see it though.

M Sparks
08-17-2010, 06:27 PM
Apologies if this has already made the rounds...

e1IxOS4VzKM

PotVsKtl
08-18-2010, 10:07 PM
Yes, I'd also like to apologize if that has made the rounds.

Hannahrain
08-18-2010, 10:13 PM
There's redemption in one of the associated videos, though:

HBa9wdOANHw

PotVsKtl
08-24-2010, 07:03 PM
Greatest living writer:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a9/Genewolf1.png

bmack86
08-24-2010, 07:39 PM
Last night I read The Doll's House, the second Sandman collection. The serial killer issue is spectacular.

I also read all three Girl With the Dragon Tattoo books over the course of a week, and they were entertaining and not horribly written.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 08:42 AM
I'm slogging through Infinite Jest, mostly because bmack mentioned it, and I apparently write like David Foster Wallace according that weird internet test thing we all did a while back.

TomAz
08-25-2010, 08:45 AM
reading your posts is like playing whack-a-mole.

bmack86
08-25-2010, 08:49 AM
I'm slogging through Infinite Jest, mostly because bmack mentioned it, and I apparently write like David Foster Wallace according that weird internet test thing we all did a while back.

If it gets painful, set it down for a long time and come back to it refreshed. That's what I did and the second time around really helped me get into the story right from the beginning, and having a brief orientation with Wallace's style really helped as well.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 09:04 AM
Thanks, Bryan. I've been reading it in fits and starts, and various parts of the story are starting to become cohesive in my mind (since the story is all over the place). Everything seems to be so random at first, and I find myself giggling at weird stuff like the woman's whose heart got purse-snatched and wondering why the fuck that scene is in the book (and was it the junkie with the feather boa from the previous overdosing junkie scene who stole it?).

chiapet
08-25-2010, 09:10 AM
I still need to read Infinite Jest. I've only read his short stories (quite liked his writing style but it was in small doses).

bmack86
08-25-2010, 09:35 AM
Thanks, Bryan. I've been reading it in fits and starts, and various parts of the story are starting to become cohesive in my mind (since the story is all over the place). Everything seems to be so random at first, and I find myself giggling at weird stuff like the woman's whose heart got purse-snatched and wondering why the fuck that scene is in the book (and was it the junkie with the feather boa from the previous overdosing junkie scene who stole it?).

It was indeed the boa junkie. You'll get a lot more out of it if you remember those little things, because lots of these characters pop up more than once.

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 09:47 AM
I started Despair last night. God I love Nabokov. That last sentence feels like a palindrome on your tongue, but it isn't. How disappointing.

bmack86
08-25-2010, 09:47 AM
That one's really good.

donkey sex
08-25-2010, 10:48 AM
HG Wells 'The Time Machine'

SoulDischarge
08-25-2010, 12:32 PM
Just get past the first 100 pages with Infinite Jest and you'll find your groove.

I wish I didn't owe the library money. I've been putting off finishing The Grapes Of Wrath for like 2 months now because I won't have anything to read once I finish it.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 12:38 PM
Patrick, I'm still counting my progress (now at page 161), but it's getting easier. The Canadian spies were really annoying at first.

bballarl
08-25-2010, 12:41 PM
I'm working my way through the whole A Song of Ice and Fire saga. I'm about 400 pages into a A Storm of Swords now, which is pretty good. You can never bank on anything happening the way you expect it to with these books. He has no qualms about killing people off.

Also, George R.R. Martin probably has some interesting sexual fetishes, based on the stuff he writes about in this series.

wmgaretjax
08-25-2010, 12:43 PM
and he kills people off who deserve to be killed off. the end to that book is bonkers. just wait. so excited for the TV show.

wmgaretjax
08-25-2010, 12:44 PM
oh, and if you aren't really reading the footnotes in infinite jest you WILL miss out on a lot of critical information. seriously, even the ridiculously long filmography.

fatbastard
08-25-2010, 12:47 PM
I'm inside the cafeteria sipping a free cup of hot tea when this young girl comes over and plunks herself down on the plastic seat next to me. In her right hand she has a paper cup of hot coffee she bought from a vending machine, the steam rising up from it, and in her left hand she's holding a small container with sandwiches inside - another bit of vending machine gourmet fare, by the looks of it.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 12:48 PM
oh, and if you aren't really reading the footnotes in infinite jest you WILL miss out on a lot of critical information. seriously, even the ridiculously long filmography.
Infinite Jest documentary redone a bunch of times. Got it.

PotVsKtl
08-25-2010, 12:51 PM
I'm working my way through the whole A Song of Ice and Fire saga. I'm about 400 pages into a A Storm of Swords now, which is pretty good. You can never bank on anything happening the way you expect it to with these books. He has no qualms about killing people off.

Unfortunately, chances are this series is never going to be completed. But yeah, if that's the one that ends with the banquet...

bmack86
08-25-2010, 12:54 PM
Patrick, I'm still counting my progress (now at page 161), but it's getting easier. The Canadian spies were really annoying at first.

I grew to really like them. Especially once the bizarreness of their whole situation really starts to play out.

bballarl
08-25-2010, 01:08 PM
and he kills people off who deserve to be killed off. the end to that book is bonkers. just wait. so excited for the TV show.

Truth re: the killings, and agreed on being excited for the show.


Unfortunately, chances are this series is never going to be completed. But yeah, if that's the one that ends with the banquet...

Sadly, yeah. Don't know what the fuck his deal is. And I guess I need to read this even faster, if the both of you are saying the ending is crazy.

PotVsKtl
08-25-2010, 01:27 PM
I'm going to burn one minority a day until everyone starts reading Gene Wolfe's Sun series.

wmgaretjax
08-25-2010, 01:32 PM
Sadly, yeah. Don't know what the fuck his deal is. And I guess I need to read this even faster, if the both of you are saying the ending is crazy.

In hindsight, I think splitting the one book into two that way was a huge mistake. I think it absolutely destroyed his forward momentum. Supposedly he is almost finished with the next one... and from the sound of it has been working on lots of stuff for the next book as well.

Hopefully the TV show will light a fire under his ass. If it does well, there will be lots of pressure to finish the thing...

wmgaretjax
08-25-2010, 01:33 PM
Infinite Jest documentary redone a bunch of times. Got it.

Scratching the surface... The references to actors and timelines etc. are really important pieces to some of the ambiguous background to some of the characters.

PotVsKtl
08-25-2010, 01:36 PM
Here's an idea: if you're a lazy reader, don't pick up a 1200 page book.

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 01:39 PM
I can hollow it out for you if you want to keep your hallucinogens in it, Z.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 01:40 PM
Well, I'm not going to list out every single thing I've learned from the huge ass footnote, now, am I?

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 01:41 PM
We can hollow out the footnote area separately for glow paraphernalia sorted by relevance.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 01:44 PM
(I was secretly hoping the redone Infinite Jest documentary was the entertainment cartridge that is killing everyone, but no one mentioned anything about that when I posted that so I must have guessed wrong).

SoulDischarge
08-25-2010, 02:02 PM
The entertainment cartridge that kills everyone is actually a VHS of the Garbage Pail Kids movie. Oh yeah, *spoilers*.

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 02:05 PM
I'm currently hollowing out a copy of Bear Attacks: Their Causes and Avoidance. I really need to find a fucking job.

SoulDischarge
08-25-2010, 02:08 PM
I just hollowed out an actual bear and filled it with books. I really need to find a fucking bookcase.

mountmccabe
08-25-2010, 03:10 PM
I'm going to burn one minority a day until everyone starts reading Gene Wolfe's Sun series.

I have some Wolfe at home I'm not reading. The first of the Long Sun series, I think?

bmack86
08-25-2010, 03:13 PM
I really loved the Filmography. I went back to that note quite a bit. It provides a great timeline for the events of the book, really helps to straighten stuff out, especially for the chronology of Subsidized time.

PotVsKtl
08-25-2010, 03:38 PM
I have some Wolfe at home I'm not reading. The first of the Long Sun series, I think?

I would recommend going through the New Sun series first but they aren't particularly interdependent. Short Sun on the other hand basically turns Long Sun into a 7 volume series. They're all so god damn good.

SoulDischarge
08-25-2010, 03:38 PM
Also, you really need to read along with the page by page annotations on the IJ wiki if you want to get the most out the book http://infinitejest.wallacewiki.com/david-foster-wallace/index.php?title=Main_Page Helps explain all the obscure references and provides definitions for some of the uncommon words used.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 03:42 PM
At least I get all the Arizona references.

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 03:58 PM
Finally. A safe place to hide my slightly smaller copy of Bear Attacks.

http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4135/4927490627_0544d6a26b.jpg

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 04:01 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions, everyone.

STFU, Hannah.

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 04:07 PM
Well, I know when I've been bested. I forfeit.

Mr. Dylanja
08-25-2010, 04:17 PM
If only I knew how to make you succumb so easily.

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 04:22 PM
What are you doing in here? I thought the Prominent Date Rapists of the Greater Southwest convention was still going on. They kick you out early for public drunkenness?

bballarl
08-25-2010, 04:36 PM
This thread got a lot better after I left. +5000.

mountmccabe
08-25-2010, 04:38 PM
Hannah those're some sweetass skeleton keys.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 11:10 PM
Back off, Dylan. She's mine.

Mr. Dylanja
08-25-2010, 11:19 PM
Sorry, I have bigger tits.

amyzzz
08-25-2010, 11:32 PM
Well, there you go then. You win.

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 11:39 PM
I don't know why you two are operating under the assumption that I have a finite amount of rejection to work with. Don't fret. I brought enough for the whole class.

Mr. Dylanja
08-25-2010, 11:45 PM
Those keys look awfully familiar.

Hannahrain
08-25-2010, 11:54 PM
I drive the giant steampunk robotic tarantula from the Wild Wild West movie. Only when I turn all twelve keys in conjunction will the complex locking system of cogs and tumblers allow me to gun my shining, regal octobot into the gaping sunset with the wind flagging freely at my sun-tired temples. Also, there are hookers.

Mr. Dylanja
08-25-2010, 11:57 PM
http://a69.g.akamai.net/n/69/10688/v1/img5.allocine.fr/acmedia/medias/nmedia/18/68/34/57/19021911.jpg

bballarl
08-29-2010, 10:13 PM
So I just read a certain couple of chapters in A Storm of Swords that left me feeling genuinely ill. I can't believe it. George R.R. Martin has elephantine balls. I can't think of any section of any book I have ever read that hit so unexpectedly.

marooko
08-30-2010, 08:27 AM
I hope the majority of you are purchasing books. Not suggesting anything, just saying I hope people are actually buying books. Oxford is gonna quite printing the dictionary, and with Amazon's report a couple weeks ago, it just looks gloomy for books and it kinda freaks me out.

bmack86
08-30-2010, 08:54 AM
It seems weird and counterintuitive to me to download a book, but then again I was raised on having the physical thing.

chiapet
08-30-2010, 08:54 AM
I drive the giant steampunk robotic tarantula from the Wild Wild West movie. Only when I turn all twelve keys in conjunction will the complex locking system of cogs and tumblers allow me to gun my shining, regal octobot into the gaping sunset with the wind flagging freely at my sun-tired temples. Also, there are hookers.

:pulse


I hope the majority of you are purchasing books. Not suggesting anything, just saying I hope people are actually buying books. Oxford is gonna quite printing the dictionary, and with Amazon's report a couple weeks ago, it just looks gloomy for books and it kinda freaks me out.

To be honest, I am not buying a lot of books new, but I never have. Usually go to the library or buy used. I think people who read several to a dozen books per year are the market for new book buying. Those of us who read scores or hundreds per year have probably never been buying a majority via methods that directly benefit the publishers.

Alchemy
08-30-2010, 08:55 AM
I don't purchase books anymore. I just look at the title and cover of books on Amazon and then I imagine what the book is about.

SoulDischarge
08-30-2010, 08:57 AM
Libraries are where it's at y'all.

marooko
08-30-2010, 09:04 AM
:pulse



To be honest, I am not buying a lot of books new, but I never have. Usually go to the library or buy used. I think people who read several to a dozen books per year are the market for new book buying. Those of us who read scores or hundreds per year have probably never been buying a majority via methods that directly benefit the publishers.

I see this. I guess my concern is for the written word itself. I have a couple e-books, but I just can't get in to them, I like holding a book.

SoulDischarge
08-30-2010, 09:06 AM
I like holding a book hostage.

marooko
08-30-2010, 09:08 AM
Well that's just amazing. Really.

amyzzz
08-30-2010, 09:09 AM
I buy books, but I think I'm getting a Kindle pretty soon, so we'll see what happens after that.

chiapet
08-30-2010, 09:11 AM
I see this. I guess my concern is for the written word itself. I have a couple e-books, but I just can't get in to them, I like holding a book.

I am betting though that my "not really buying new books" still amounts to more books than the average person buys. I am making an effort to buy less than 10 "new" per year and not more than 20 from any source per year. Mostly because I'm out of book shelves.

Courtney
08-30-2010, 10:29 AM
Mostly because I'm out of book shelves.

Me too. It's getting to cataclysmic proportions and the stack of books next to my bed is now approaching bedside table height.

I think I need to start selling them on Amazon or something.

amyzzz
08-30-2010, 10:42 AM
We recently just sold a bunch of books/DVD's to Half Price Book Store. Love that place. We're probably acquired more stuff from there than sold stuff though.

bballarl
08-30-2010, 10:46 AM
I'm out of room for books, CDs and records. It sucks, but I am powering through and buying things anyway. I'm glad other people have the same problem.

Courtney
08-30-2010, 10:47 AM
If we all lived in the same city, I would suggest a book swap whereby you would all come over to my house (bringing all unwanted reading materials) and drink horribly named literary-theme cocktails while browsing.

In fact, maybe I will do that for my Honolulu friends. It will get rid of all my unwanted bottles of alcohol and books at the same time. Win!

chiapet
08-30-2010, 10:48 AM
It may be worth moving to Honolulu for your awful cocktails/good book meeting.

SoulDischarge
08-30-2010, 03:13 PM
I concur. I'd probably buy a bunch of thrift store books just to be able to attend. The entire bibliography of V.C. Andrews, anyonw?

menikmati
08-31-2010, 09:56 PM
I'm out of room for books, CDs and records. It sucks, but I am powering through and buying things anyway. I'm glad other people have the same problem.

Ditto...I'm a hoarder when it comes to books/movies/records, and I don't like giving them out, and I hate the idea of selling them back...so I just hold onto everything forever.

Hannahrain
09-03-2010, 01:36 PM
Encountered this while obsessively looking at the Powell's event calendar for September. He's not someone I've ever read, but this thread talks about him enough that it seemed worth a post here.

http://www.williamgibsonbooks.com/source/tour.asp

algunz
09-03-2010, 01:59 PM
I'm almost done with I'm Down by Mishna Wolff - very entertaining and fun

bballarl
09-05-2010, 11:31 AM
A Storm of Swords was excellent. The ending was fantastic. Started A Feast for Crows a couple of days ago and haven't had a ton of time to read, so I am not very far.

Alchemy
09-05-2010, 04:40 PM
I finally finished reading David Mitchell's The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet. It was quite long. It was also really interesting and, in the last half, very exciting. Fans of Mitchell's previous stuff should like this. It seems like a book out of Cloud Atlas, because it uses humor in the same silly way, but is, of course, much longer than those individual stories. Sometimes the humor is a little too silly... Too Black Swan Green-ish. Not a problem though. It's a fun adventure and there's a really cool "twist" in it.

MissingPerson
09-05-2010, 05:00 PM
I'm about to crack into this:

http://www.imagechicken.com/uploads/1253288911088238600.jpg

I don't think it will make for light reading.

Hannahrain
09-06-2010, 01:39 AM
In retrospect, a weekend housesitting alone in an already unsettling oversized half-glass stucco construction far outside of town was an irresponsible time to decide to finally tackle House of Leaves.

MissingPerson
09-06-2010, 05:35 AM
I laughed out loud.

Or... or was that me?

wmgaretjax
09-06-2010, 08:59 AM
A Storm of Swords was excellent. The ending was fantastic. Started A Feast for Crows a couple of days ago and haven't had a ton of time to read, so I am not very far.

There is no hurry... heh... take your time. Although the rumor is he only has 3 (out of 11) POVs left to complete... as of last month.

Alchemy
09-06-2010, 12:16 PM
I am now reading the terrifying, unimaginable story called At the Mountains of Madness, and by the end of it, I'll probably have wished that I never ventured into the cyclopean imaginations of that madman, H. P. Lovecraft, and I will probably enter myself into a psychiatric hospital before throwing myself out of a high window minutes after frantically typing out a thread called "It's Raining Alchemy, Let Me Tell You Why and Warn You of the Elder Horrors from an Aeon-Cursed Land That Have Led Me to This Point," which will be written in the first-person and make use of scientific vocabulary.

wmgaretjax
09-06-2010, 12:23 PM
Welcome.

bballarl
09-06-2010, 01:04 PM
In retrospect, a weekend housesitting alone in an already unsettling oversized half-glass stucco construction far outside of town was an irresponsible time to decide to finally tackle House of Leaves.

Hahahaha. I can't imagine why.

Hannahrain
09-06-2010, 01:16 PM
In retrospect, a weekend housesitting alone in an already unsettling oversized half-glass stucco construction far outside of town was an irresponsible time to decide to finally tackle House of Leaves.

Aaaand tackled. It was interesting, but I think I built it up a little bit and ultimately expected it to require a little more of me as a reader than it did. I would've liked to work a little harder/decode a little more/etc, especially considering having picked it up in a rare situation where my only obligation for several days was to physically occupy a space. Also, I think there was a little bit of a hole in the bucket for me as soon as I (highlight at your own risk) started irreversibly picturing Zompanó as Danny Trejo. It was fun, though, and while I found Johnny Truant's calculatedly different writing style a little grating at its moments of blatancy (should of, would of - really? You can't just throw those onto a character who otherwise demonstrates a perfectly adequate grasp on English and expect them to stick), I really enjoyed the voice of the principal text. More narrative-relevant codes next time, please. It's nice when your work actually serves to forward the story.

MissingPerson
09-06-2010, 01:25 PM
I've enjoyed the House of Leaves and Lovecraft posts. Good work, page.

MissingPerson
09-07-2010, 12:58 PM
Finished Alan Moore's Brought To Light. Reader goes into a bar, and meets the CIA in the form of a drunken be-suited bald eagle, which proceeds to brag about all the shit it's been able to get away with. One of the weaker Alan Moore ones I've read, and the reason it didn't leave much of an impression kind of depressed me.

It kept presenting me with terrible and dreadful factual tales of the CIA's appalling exploits around the world and expecting me to be shocked. I wasn't. Appalled, but not shocked. I think because I'm slightly too young to think of the CIA as anything other than the US's racket manager, its grubby little backroom kneecapper. I'm not shocked to read about the coups and massacres and assassinations that happened at its behest, because I don't know what else it's for, and I expect it to be able to act with impunity because it always has.

That aside, the visual tally it keeps - the infamous swimming pool of blood, and how many they filled, figuratively - is striking at first, but eventually it only serves to diminish the significance of the numbers involved rather than reinforce it. A red swimming pool is a far less immediate concept to me than twenty thousand bodies, twenty thousand faces, or twenty thousand names, even and especially when those swimming pools start to multiply.

Worth reading, but the actual events it documents have lost a lot of their punch, and Moore's own stamp on it isn't quite distinct enough to recommend it in itself.

bballarl
09-07-2010, 01:06 PM
There is no hurry... heh... take your time. Although the rumor is he only has 3 (out of 11) POVs left to complete... as of last month.

Awesome. I'm kind of addicted to these, so as much as I want to take my time, I'm reading a lot. I'll be done within a couple of weeks. I can't believe how long it has taken him (actually, I can. Nevermind.) I'm just glad I didn't start these when they were coming out, because a five-year wait between books (and it sounds like it will end up being even longer) would really bum me out.

Alchemy
09-08-2010, 07:07 PM
I finished At the Mountains of Madness. I didn't really like it as much as his other, shorter work. I loved the setting and the monsters, but so much of the story was Lovecraft hammering what everything looked like into my head. It wouldn't be so bad if the descriptions varied, but I feel like he told me that things looked like cubes and cones over a hundred times. Also, I'm kind of over the whole, "So-and-so saw something that made him insane, but what so-and-so actually saw, we'll never know." I wouldn't mind if they did more with the plot in the movie adaptation, so long as the descriptions of things stay true and they keep a few things as mysteries.

I am now going to start Alan Moore & Kevin O'Neill's The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen - Volume 1.

bballarl
09-17-2010, 06:30 PM
Finished A Feast For Crows tonight. Now I can join the masses in ever-so-patiently waiting for the next book. I cracked up at his letter dated sometime in 2005 stating the other book would be out within a year. I'm glad I haven't been waiting that long.

Alchemy
09-17-2010, 06:58 PM
I've been reading White Noise by Don DeLillo little by little. It's really great so far. I'd finish it faster, but I'm pressured into finishing Best Book Ever Written by Alchemy for school.

roberto73
09-24-2010, 02:26 PM
I just picked up a copy of A Game of Thrones based solely on recommendations from this board. The last time I read a book in this genre I think I was in 7th grade. I'm not sure what to expect.

Alchemy
09-26-2010, 11:07 AM
I need to hurry the hell up with White Noise. These next two weeks, I'm going to read Visions of Gerard and On the Road: The Original Scroll and then discuss them with Joyce Johnson on the two Saturdays. I haven't read either books. Just the edited version of On the Road.


Joyce Johnson (born 1935) is an American author of fiction and nonfiction who won a National Book Critics Circle Award for her memoir Minor Characters about her relationship with Jack Kerouac.
Born Joyce Glassman to a Jewish family in Queens, New York, Joyce was raised on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, just around the corner from the apartment of William S. Burroughs and Joan Vollmer Adams Burroughs. Allen Ginsberg and Kerouac were frequent visitors to Burroughs' apartment.
At the age of 13, Joyce rebelled against her controlling parents and began hanging out in Washington Square. She matriculated at Barnard College at 16, failing her graduation by one class. It was at Barnard that she became friends with Elise Cowen (briefly Allen Ginsberg's lover) who introduced her to the Beat circle. Ginsberg arranged for Glassman and Kerouac to meet on a blind date.

Hannahrain
09-26-2010, 10:02 PM
So Wordstock, (http://www.wordstockfestival.com/) a giant literary festival/book fair, is held here every October. I have never been and am under the impression it's largely writing workshops and assorted similar events that aren't really my thing, but I just looked at the roster and both David Rakoff and Kristin Hersh are going to be reading and now I'm paying attention.

SoulDischarge
09-26-2010, 10:05 PM
I didn't expect The Grapes Of Wrath to end like that, but ok.

Pixiessp
09-27-2010, 12:46 AM
Reading Earth (the book). Light reading and fun.

Alchemy
09-28-2010, 11:29 AM
A friend and advisor of mine has started a publishing house (http://www.mischiefandmayhembooks.com/). Today is the launch party.

fumfum
10-03-2010, 11:13 PM
I finished reading 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami. It was quite interesting.

I am looking forward to watching the movie norwegian woods,too.
My image of naoko is not like Rinko Kikuchi who played deaf high school girl in Babel.

PotVsKtl
10-04-2010, 02:07 PM
I finally finished Gene Wolfe's whole Solar Cycle (The Shadow of the Torturer, The Claw of the Conciliator, The Sword of the Lictor, The Citadel of the Autarch, The Urth of the New Sun, Nightside the Long Sun, Lake of the Long Sun, Caldé of the Long Sun, Exodus From the Long Sun, On Blue's Waters, In Green's Jungles and Return to the Whorl) and I'm just here to pimp it some more. I think I dragged that last 20 pages out for 3 days. Now I just want to start back at the begining.

TomAz
10-04-2010, 03:46 PM
Reading Earth (the book). Light reading and fun.

This book has been a disappointment to me so far. It is very derivative of The Onion's Our Dumb World, but not nearly as funny.

J~$$$$
10-04-2010, 03:52 PM
Hacking Work by Bill Jensen and Josh Klein. I decide to read it after watching kleins "TED"

http://www.ted.com/talks/joshua_klein_on_the_intelligence_of_crows.html

downingthief
10-04-2010, 03:55 PM
I am currently reading this:

http://www.amazon.com/Written-My-Soul-Conversations-Songwriters/dp/0809246503

I've always enjoyed hearing artists talk about how they created their work, and this book is an excellent insight to some of the most influential songwriters around.

Hannahrain
10-10-2010, 12:20 PM
National Novel Writing Month starts up again on the first. I'm considering giving it a go this year, though I'd be shocked if I actually managed to finish the whole thing. Still, anything you have at the end of the month is a kickstart to something else, right?

Rules. (http://www.nanowrimo.org/eng/hownanoworks)

minogueCOMMAk
10-10-2010, 12:23 PM
That actually sounds fun to me.

Courtney
10-10-2010, 12:34 PM
National Novel Writing Month starts up again on the first. I'm considering giving it a go this year, though I'd be shocked if I actually managed to finish the whole thing. Still, anything you have at the end of the month is a kickstart to something else, right?

Rules. (http://www.nanowrimo.org/eng/hownanoworks)

Not that I have the time, but I totally want to do this. And I probably would have the time if I just stopped posting on this board for 31 days.

1,613 words per day is tough but totally doable.

I nearly always write non-fiction, so the fiction part would be a challenge. I'm thinking a pulpy, teen novella in the vein of Gossip Girl. Because why not?

Hannahrain
10-10-2010, 12:36 PM
Maybe some sort of wager between us involving a) not posting and b) end product is in order. Let's give it some thought.

Alchemy
10-10-2010, 12:40 PM
I wanted to do the novel thing last year, but no dice... I think I wrote like five pages that ended up in the trash. I'm doing something similar to that this year though. In fact, I've just started today. I'm going to write 6 pages of a novel every day (except for Mondays and Wednesdays, because I have class on those days) until I have 300 pages. I should be finished before Christmastime, and I'll be able to spend next year revising all of it. I'll also be able to workshop about 40 pages of it before this year's over. I just leaked (via text, not urine) onto page four right now, before browsing through the message board... This is going to be quite a test...

bmack86
10-10-2010, 03:31 PM
I finally finished Gene Wolfe's whole Solar Cycle (The Shadow of the Torturer, The Claw of the Conciliator, The Sword of the Lictor, The Citadel of the Autarch, The Urth of the New Sun, Nightside the Long Sun, Lake of the Long Sun, Caldé of the Long Sun, Exodus From the Long Sun, On Blue's Waters, In Green's Jungles and Return to the Whorl) and I'm just here to pimp it some more. I think I dragged that last 20 pages out for 3 days. Now I just want to start back at the begining.

So, should I do it in this order? I just read the wiki on Gene Wolfe and he sounds interesting as all hell. I'm gonna track down whichever one you'd recommend reading first.

wmgaretjax
10-10-2010, 03:38 PM
i would appreciate your recommendation as well. sounds awesome.

roberto73
10-10-2010, 04:12 PM
National Novel Writing Month starts up again on the first. I'm considering giving it a go this year, though I'd be shocked if I actually managed to finish the whole thing. Still, anything you have at the end of the month is a kickstart to something else, right?

Rules. (http://www.nanowrimo.org/eng/hownanoworks)

I tried this last year and made it all of about five days and 25 pages before I threw in the towel (a combination of being swamped by work and losing all interest in what I was writing). I'm game to give it a shot this year, though, if I can come up with a decent idea in the next couple weeks.

downingthief
10-10-2010, 07:51 PM
National Novel Writing Month starts up again on the first. I'm considering giving it a go this year, though I'd be shocked if I actually managed to finish the whole thing. Still, anything you have at the end of the month is a kickstart to something else, right?

Rules. (http://www.nanowrimo.org/eng/hownanoworks)

I need to do this.

algunz
10-10-2010, 10:52 PM
I think about it every year. Maybe this year will be different. :cool:

Alchemy
10-11-2010, 08:08 AM
Hell, it's hard to write a novel in an entire year, even... You've got to be long-winded, recluse, or as dedicated as Jesus Christ to complete a beast in one month. The problem I always have with these sorts of projects is that I'm going in loops, writing a little bit, revising what I wrote, adding a little more, revising everything again, adding a little more, revising the entire thing again, and so on... I've never been able to just shoot through from the start to the finish.

downingthief
10-11-2010, 08:16 AM
I've narrowed down my ideas to one that I think is best. Doing something like this might be the best way for me to get it done.

chiapet
10-11-2010, 08:29 AM
Well, and practically everyone I know who's done nanowrimo has looked at as a means of whipping out a first draft of a potential novel. You've got to expect that the writing will not be your best and that if you want to do anything with it, you'll need to revise later.

MissingPerson
10-11-2010, 08:34 AM
Nothing makes me fall out of love with an idea more than actually sitting down to write it out. I can't seem to finish anything anymore. Especially since I started college, I just fell out of the habit of writing anything recreationally, it all feels like work now.

Hannahrain
10-11-2010, 08:39 AM
Well, and practically everyone I know who's done nanowrimo has looked at as a means of whipping out a first draft of a potential novel. You've got to expect that the writing will not be your best and that if you want to do anything with it, you'll need to revise later.

Yeah, I agree. I doubt I'd ever submit something written in that span of time. It's more a personal challenge.

downingthief
10-11-2010, 09:00 AM
Well, and practically everyone I know who's done nanowrimo has looked at as a means of whipping out a first draft of a potential novel. You've got to expect that the writing will not be your best and that if you want to do anything with it, you'll need to revise later.

Oh, I agree. Not expecting anything more than a first draft. But, at least I would have something to build from.

guedita
10-11-2010, 09:07 AM
I'm just going to plagiarize Gertrude Stein's Tender Buttons and see if anyone notices.

Alchemy
10-11-2010, 10:40 AM
I try to not revise so much, but it's hard to stop. I think it's because I get tired of projects very fast, and I just want to make one final draft and walk away from it.

Courtney
10-11-2010, 10:42 AM
I find that my best writing comes from being pressured under deadline, because then I tend to write fluidly in one long string of prose, instead of getting too uptight about stopping and starting and revising as I go. Of course, even my best writing is mediocre ;)

Alchemy
10-11-2010, 10:48 AM
Another thing is that I've got people like Dale Peck reading my junk. As well as workshops. They can be viscous in those workshops!

guedita
10-11-2010, 10:54 AM
I think you mean vicious, unless your workshops are held in marmalade.

Alchemy
10-11-2010, 11:00 AM
I think you mean vicious, unless your workshops are held in marmalade.

This is what I'm talking about! ;)

amyzzz
10-11-2010, 01:25 PM
I'm too busy finishing Infinite Jest to write a novel. It's been two months now, and I've just cracked page 400.

PotVsKtl
10-11-2010, 01:29 PM
God Emperor of Dune is fucking terrible. Screw the rest of this series. Gonna read Little Bee and cry into a child's eyes.

minogueCOMMAk
10-11-2010, 01:30 PM
I signed up! I am shooting to finish half of it, which I think will be an accomplishment for me, but my ultimate goal is to finish the entire thing.

Courtney
10-12-2010, 02:44 PM
Maybe some sort of wager between us involving a) not posting and b) end product is in order. Let's give it some thought.

I think this is a fabulous idea, but I also think that embarking upon this kind of commitment for November is just not doable for me, sadly. I have a lot of freelance deadlines lined up, and I need to work on doing writing that actually pays my bills. Alas, maybe next year for me. :(

But maybe there are other takers?

Still-ill
10-12-2010, 04:20 PM
God Emperor of Dune is fucking terrible.
It can't be that bad.
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t39/RetardoTronFiveThousand/1262933998961.jpg

Hannahrain
10-12-2010, 06:57 PM
http://www.arthousecoop.com/projects/sketchbookproject

Someone signed me up for this as a gift. It's sort of book-y.

PotVsKtl
10-12-2010, 07:53 PM
It can't be that bad.
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t39/RetardoTronFiveThousand/1262933998961.jpg

Acknowledged.

Courtney
10-12-2010, 09:25 PM
http://www.arthousecoop.com/projects/sketchbookproject

Someone signed me up for this as a gift. It's sort of book-y.

As someone in the art world, the idea that an artist would have to pay a fee to have his/her art exhibited makes me cringe. But it's also kind of genius as a way to finance exhibitions on a small scale.

Hannahrain
10-12-2010, 09:41 PM
I can certainly understand taking that issue with it, but to me it feels less like an art exhibit to and more like a physical way of putting a bit of yourself into an entirely different context. I'm not an "artist" and I'm not participating in it as one. I'm just a person making something that will travel alongside other things and hopefully connect with someone in another place living another life. It's like sending a message in a bottle. If they were a) making you apply for admission and/or curating something from preexisting works or predetermined artists instead of including virtually anybody who wants to be involved, b) not taking the exhibit with them to various cities and incurring all the costs involved therein, and c) not furnishing the books themselves, I might take issue as well. As things are, though, it feels less like paying to have a book exhibited and more like contributing to the cost of running the project.

bmack86
10-12-2010, 09:57 PM
Hey Pot, read the Gene Wolfes in the order you listed, or what?

PotVsKtl
10-13-2010, 05:36 PM
That's the order, although I guess Urth of the New Sun can be left out. It was written as a sequel to the first series. They're mostly sold two titles per, the first two books are only 400pg combined.

roberto73
10-19-2010, 12:43 PM
I'm almost finished with A Game of Thrones. It's taken me longer to get through than I'd like, but I've loved every second of it. I went into it expecting something very Dungeons & Dragons-y, which it's clearly not. Martin tells a hell of story, and the most admirable thing about it (or at least the thing I'm enjoying the most) is how rich the characters are. It's a virtuoso performance, and I'm looking forward to picking up the next in the series as soon as I finish this one.

I've also been switching off with some Young Adult Lit for my job: Sherman Alexie's The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games, and Laurie Halse Anderson's Speak, among others. All of them are very good, and evidence that quality YA Lit can hold its own with the best of adult literature.

Alchemy
10-22-2010, 10:25 AM
I think I want a Kindle for Christmas. I have an advisor that's extremely anti-Amazon, but being able to get a bunch of Chekhov stories in one swoop sounds awesome. Not too mention, I'm running out of space for books.

chiapet
10-22-2010, 11:40 AM
I do not use my Kindle a *ton* at this point (I just wiped a thick layer of dust off of it), but that is because I haven't had time to read in general. Overall I love it and I've had to have had to buy a book to read. Looking forward to traveling this weekend + time to read. :)

humanoid
10-24-2010, 04:11 PM
anyone have any good recommendations for buying used books online? I know, Amazon has used stuff, and half.com, and a few others, just curious to see if anyone had any good tips

I used to have a great discount book store near me that satisfied my needs, but it recently closed to my considerable dismay.

yes, i use the library on occasion, but it doesn't always do the trick

chiapet
10-24-2010, 05:29 PM
I've used Alibris which seems to be better for slightly more obscure stuff, sometimes For common books, I've had the best luck & prices with half.com.

GeezrRckr
10-24-2010, 05:56 PM
anyone have any good recommendations for buying used books online?
http://www.addall.com/

multi-site search engine.

algunz
10-24-2010, 09:25 PM
I'm about 2/3 through the Somnambulist.

Where is this going?

menikmati
10-24-2010, 09:44 PM
anyone have any good recommendations for buying used books online? I know, Amazon has used stuff, and half.com, and a few others, just curious to see if anyone had any good tips



http://www.abebooks.com/

Hannahrain
11-09-2010, 11:02 AM
I know there are a few teachers who read this thread - this might be a good book to look into for students. I'm really surprised not to have heard of it until now.

I just finished The Diary of Dawid Sierakowiak - Five Notebooks From The Łódź Ghetto. It's pretty clear from the title, but it's a set of five surviving notebooks (it's not known how many more of his didn't survive) written by an exceptionally bright and articulate teenager beginning before the start of WWII (age 15) and ultimately breaking off in 1943, a few months before his death from tuberculosis and starvation at age 19. The time between meticulously details his deterioration over the course of the war while painting a pretty vivid, acerbic picture of the corrupt political system and class animosity within the ghetto itself.

It's a very quick read - a weekend book, even - and to me almost seems like such a perfectly framed, indicative relic that it could be historical fiction. Not that I'm saying I'm doubting its veracity (any more than the little bit I tend to doubt most things, anyway). It's just a really phenomenally preserved core sample that could probably hold the attention of someone who wasn't otherwise compelled to read this sort of thing while being accessible across a pretty universal age range.

SoulDischarge
11-09-2010, 11:10 AM
I've been meaning to ask this thread, what are some good books covering economics, government, and history, both US and world? I'm tired of feeling like an idiot when it comes to these things and would like to expand my knowledge. I'm looking for books that are intended as something of an introductory course on these subjects that are compelling, insightful, well-rounded reads in addition to being informative. Kind of "books everyone should read before they die" type of shit.

brfilora
11-09-2010, 11:24 AM
I've been meaning to ask this thread, what are some good books covering economics, government, and history, both US and world? I'm tired of feeling like an idiot when it comes to these things and would like to expand my knowledge. I'm looking for books that are intended as something of an introductory course on these subjects that are compelling, insightful, well-rounded reads in addition to being informative. Kind of "books everyone should read before they die" type of shit.

The World is Flat - Thomas Friedman

The Lexus and the Olive Tree - Thomas Friedman

Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media - Noam Chomsky

Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything - Steven Levitt and Stephen J Dubner



--I wouldn't call them books you must read before you die, but they are all most certainly "compelling, insightful, well-rounded reads in addition to being informative"


EDIT: You could get by reading either of the Friedman books as they are pretty similar, if you're going to read just one, go with "The World is Flat"

MissingPerson
11-09-2010, 11:25 AM
One of my very favourite historians is Simon Schama (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Schama). I've not read his books, though I've seen the accompanying shows - I know how that sounds - but he does a terrific job of presenting previous generations as "Us, then" rather than some entirely foreign species, and his style is passionate without being too subjective.

I keep meaning to buy the books actually, but I'm pretty sure most of the documentaries are available online, and they're well worth seeing. He's very, very good at drawing a line between decisions taken two hundred years ago and the effects they have to this day. In particular "The American Future: A History", which was made immediately before Obama's election, and does that beautifully.

I don't know if you can view the trailer from the US - ironically - but it's this:

UW3fVMXg8ns

Alchemy
11-09-2010, 11:55 AM
It's been taking me an age to read through White Noise. I'm up to my neck in short stories for class, short story submissions, and novel manuscript excerpts. I think there are some great writers coming out of New York over the next few years...

SoulDischarge
11-09-2010, 11:56 AM
It took me a really long time to finish White Noise, but I enjoyed savoring it. Remember how we had that book club thing but then we didn't?

ShyGuy75
11-09-2010, 12:19 PM
I've been meaning to ask this thread, what are some good books covering economics, government, and history, both US and world?


The End of Iraq by Peter Galbraith

roberto73
11-09-2010, 12:37 PM
Review of a Holocaust book with a difficult-to-spell title

This is actually really great for me to know about. Most of the classes I teach deal with teaching either canonical or Young Adult Lit (or pairing canonical and YAL together), so it's good to know of another title that could have potential classroom use.

Also, I'm halfway through A Clash of Kings and am still loving every second of this series. I can't remember who first recommended it on here (Andrew? Pot?), but it's been a pretty great read with some terrifically complex characters ... and the quality of the writing is so much better than I was expecting.

amyzzz
11-09-2010, 04:49 PM
It took me a really long time to finish White Noise, but I enjoyed savoring it. Remember how we had that book club thing but then we didn't?

Yeah I read that for our book club. We managed to do two books before it petered out.

I'm on page 540 of Infinite Jest. At this point I'm hopin to finish it before the end of the year.

OutOfmYminD
11-09-2010, 05:05 PM
I've been meaning to ask this thread, what are some good books covering economics, government, and history, both US and world? I'm tired of feeling like an idiot when it comes to these things and would like to expand my knowledge. I'm looking for books that are intended as something of an introductory course on these subjects that are compelling, insightful, well-rounded reads in addition to being informative. Kind of "books everyone should read before they die" type of shit.

If you're interested at all in natural history or social history I suggest "Guns Germs and Steel" and "A Short History of Nearly Everything" as two books that are educational but still very readable.

menikmati
11-09-2010, 06:10 PM
Picked up "High Crimes: The Fate of Everest in an Age of Greed". Probably start it in a couple of days.

Alchemy
11-12-2010, 03:23 PM
Met with some agents/publishers today who are very excited. No celebrations yet, but possibly, be on the look out for a book by Alchemy in summer/fall 2011.

Hannahrain
11-12-2010, 03:27 PM
Please know that I am very proud of you either way.

Hannahrain
11-12-2010, 03:28 PM
Either summer or fall, I mean. Not either publishing or no publishing. You'd be like, way gross if it didn't work out.

Alchemy
11-12-2010, 03:38 PM
Unpublished? Ew. I would have to retire from writing and ask to be let back into the Polyphonic Spree (Texas' Broken Social Scene).

algunz
11-12-2010, 05:28 PM
Yeah I read that for our book club. We managed to do two books before it petered out.


I'll totally start it up again.

guedita
11-12-2010, 06:51 PM
Unpublished? Ew. I would have to retire from writing and ask to be let back into the Polyphonic Spree (Texas' Broken Social Scene).

Were you really a touring member of The Polyphonic Spree? I'll buy your old robe off you.

Alchemy
11-12-2010, 08:55 PM
Were you really a touring member of The Polyphonic Spree? I'll buy your old robe off you.

I'm afraid I was not.

amyzzz
11-13-2010, 06:18 AM
I'll totally start it up again.
I would like to do it again, but I need to finish Infinite Jest first.

Alchemy
11-18-2010, 10:45 AM
A friend of mine started a publishing collective recently, and they just released their very first book. (http://www.orbooks.com/our-books/jennyx/)

http://www.orbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/JennyX-web.jpg


The collective intends to promulgate writing unconcerned with having to please conservative editorial boards or corporate bookstore executives. It will also help writers earn a living wage without compromising their radical aesthetics.

Mischief + Mayhem’s titles will be produced only in electronic or print-on-demand editions, and will be available, initially at least, exclusively for purchase online from the publisher. This arrangement avoids the enormous waste of the current publishing system, which ships books to stores, fails to promote them, and then sees many of them returned, unsold, to the publisher.

“No book printed until it’s sold” is the unofficial motto of OR Books, which will publish the Mischief + Mayhem list. A genuinely new type of publishing company, OR sells direct to the customer in print-on-demand formats and e-books. There is no warehouse, no returns and no waste. The savings this makes possible enables unprecedented levels of marketing, both online and through regular channels. Once momentum has been created behind a title OR looks for rights deals with conventional publishing partners to make the book available in bookstores.

Courtney
11-18-2010, 10:52 AM
Can I take a moment to express how much I love the binding for the Penguin Classics series? I have been slowly collecting these, and rereading the books, and they make me so happy.

http://oliveryaphe.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/PenguinClassics.png

Hannahrain
11-18-2010, 10:57 AM
I was just admiring the Fitzgerald series longingly. Coralie Bickford-Smith is one of my low-level modern heroes.*

http://madebysix.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/cbsmith_3.jpg?w=506&h=506
http://www.hinydesign.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/Penguin03.jpg
*Translate as "people whose jobs I want."

Courtney
11-18-2010, 11:01 AM
Gah they're so pretty. I seriously want them all.

CuervoPH
11-18-2010, 02:27 PM
I second what Courtney said, and it's about time for a reread of all his books anyway.

edit: spellcheck was going to allow me to spell Courtney's name wrong, and this is unacceptable as I haven't been drinking yet tonight.

Sublime
11-18-2010, 03:20 PM
Just finished Narcissus and Goldman - if you haven't already, you have to read this book. Hesse's finest work.

amyzzz
11-19-2010, 10:59 AM
Oh Jesus. The last thing I need is more books. Those are so lovely.

I.F.A.
11-19-2010, 11:07 AM
Hesse's finest work.

Agreed.