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algunz
10-09-2008, 08:46 PM
I just finished reading Barrio on the Edge by Alejandro Morales.

It's the second time that I've read it. It's a really quick and rather naughty read. I encourage you all to go out and BUY a copy. ; )

Pixiessp
10-09-2008, 08:50 PM
I'm reading"The Year of Living Biblically" by A.J.Jacobs.

Super hilarious!!

Mr.Nipples
10-09-2008, 08:53 PM
have i ever told you guys the story about how my dad took a shit in a copy of Dan Quayles Standing Firm?

CalmerThanYou
10-09-2008, 08:57 PM
"When you live in the shadow of insanity, the appearance of another mind that thinks and talks as yours does is something close to blessed event."

One of my most favorite quotes.

splendid!

Alchemy
10-10-2008, 06:35 AM
I'm reading The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler right now for a class. It's fun.

menikmati
10-17-2008, 10:42 AM
I just got an early copy of the new book "Cobain Unseen" and I have to say this book is very cool and very creative! (even if it does come from Charles Cross - who loved to make stuff up in his previous Kurt book "Heavier Than Heaven"). This book has all sorts of unseen photographs and drawings, and all sorts of weird extras. It's kinda like a pop up book, but there are tons of replica things that you take out and hold and look at, such as:

copy of some school art certificate
thanksgiving card he made for his parents
poloroid picture of him and his cat
invisible man mask???
hand written letters (on replica college ruled notebook paper)
a CD with 8 mins of spoken word/poetry from kurt
sticker sheet
replica flyers to their shows
replica VIP pass backstage
replica typed letter to williams burrough
and more

I mean its kinda freaky/weird in a way....makes you wonder why they didnt just include a replica xray scan of his spine (they do include a picture of that!), his suicide note, and more....but I like what I see so far.

If anyone here is a Kurt/Nirvana fan, I say go pick this up.

tessalasset
10-17-2008, 10:45 AM
Can we please talk about Twilight now?

algunz
10-17-2008, 10:48 AM
I want the Cobain book for Christmas as well as the Britney Spears bio.





I just finished reading Go Ask Alice. It's a book I see a lot of my students reading, so I figured I should finally read it. Interesting and sad, but a bit juvenile. Of course that should be expected since it was supposedly written by a teenager.

CalmerThanYou
10-17-2008, 10:49 AM
I just got an early copy of the new book "Cobain Unseen" and I have to say this book is very cool and very creative! (even if it does come from Charles Cross - who loved to make stuff up in his previous Kurt book "Heavier Than Heaven"). This book has all sorts of unseen photographs and drawings, and all sorts of weird extras. It's kinda like a pop up book, but there are tons of replica things that you take out and hold and look at, such as:

copy of some school art certificate
thanksgiving card he made for his parents
poloroid picture of him and his cat
invisible man mask???
hand written letters (on replica college ruled notebook paper)
a CD with 8 mins of spoken word/poetry from kurt
sticker sheet
replica flyers to their shows
replica VIP pass backstage
replica typed letter to williams burrough
Replica Shotgun Manual
and more



fixed.

Quadromarshia
10-17-2008, 10:51 AM
I just finished reading Norwegian Wood. What a great book!

MissingPerson
10-17-2008, 11:15 AM
I just finished reading Go Ask Alice. It's a book I see a lot of my students reading, so I figured I should finally read it. Interesting and sad, but a bit juvenile. Of course that should be expected since it was supposedly written by a teenager.

http://www.snopes.com/language/literary/askalice.asp

The clue is the fact that she takes one tab - by accident - and she's Courtney fucking Love about half an hour later. We had to read it for school.

algunz
10-17-2008, 11:20 AM
Yeah and I was bothered that acid & pot were the horrific drugs, the bad guys, yet pills and speed and heroin seemed like just side notes.

Quadromarshia
10-17-2008, 11:20 AM
http://www.snopes.com/language/literary/askalice.asp

The clue is the fact that she takes one tab - by accident - and she's Courtney fucking Love about half an hour later. We had to read it for school.

Haha, the other books by that author are equally excelent:

-It Happened To Nancy (AIDS)
-Annie's Baby (preggos)
-Jay's Journal (satanism/drug use, a two-fer!)
-Almost Lost (homelessness)
-Kim: Empty Inside (eating disorders)

amyzzz
10-17-2008, 11:23 AM
Yeah and I was bothered that acid & pot were the horrific drugs, the bad guys, yet pills and speed and heroin seemed like just side notes.
LAME. :)

CalmerThanYou
10-17-2008, 11:26 AM
Go Ask Alice freaked me out.

allyjoy
10-17-2008, 11:41 AM
This is the only reason I need to never read that book:

Go Ask Alice was originally promoted as nonfiction and was published under the byline "Anonymous." However, not long after its publication, Beatrice Sparks, a psychologist and Mormon youth counselor, began making media appearances promoting herself as the book's editor.

humanoid
10-17-2008, 11:56 AM
I just read The Informers by Bret Easton Ellis. I'm not sure if I've ever liked a novel less. There are several passages in which he uses ridiculous run on sentences for over half a page or more and it becomes so aggravating. It seems that he is attempting to convey the fact that everyone is tweaking or something similar, but I could barely stand it. I almost gave up on it about 20 times, but for some reason my sense of duty compelled me to finish it. Has anyone else read it?

MissingPerson
10-17-2008, 12:22 PM
Haven't read that one, but I know what you mean about Ellis.

humanoid
10-17-2008, 12:32 PM
I wouldn't recommend it...I have yet to be impressed by him

bmack86
10-17-2008, 01:03 PM
He's never impressed me either. He likes to be shocking, but there's not a lot of substance behind that.

I just finished The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz. I never figured I'd read it since all the people who bought it at borders were the people who had no clue about books, but I thought it was a really good story, well written and very very readable. In other words, I was pleasantly surprised.

SoulDischarge
10-17-2008, 01:10 PM
Reading Less Than Zero was like drinking a bottle of non-alcoholic beer.

Pixiessp
10-17-2008, 02:48 PM
Can we please talk about Twilight now?

I changed my mind Tessa. i am going to start up with the series again.

Hannahrain
10-17-2008, 07:17 PM
I picked up Mason & Dixon today thinking that when I lose patience, I can hollow it out and keep things inside.

humanoid
10-17-2008, 07:45 PM
He's never impressed me either. He likes to be shocking, but there's not a lot of substance behind that.

I just finished The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz. I never figured I'd read it since all the people who bought it at borders were the people who had no clue about books, but I thought it was a really good story, well written and very very readable. In other words, I was pleasantly surprised.

It's easy to be shocking with no depth, and he seems to excel at it

Alchemy
10-17-2008, 07:46 PM
Pastoralia by George Saunders is, like, my favorite book.

mountmccabe
10-17-2008, 10:00 PM
I picked up Mason & Dixon today thinking that when I lose patience, I can hollow it out and keep things inside.

I really liked that book. Though, to be fair, I only read the first third of it before I took a break and forgot what was going on and quit. I really, really enjoyed it, though and want to restart.

But probably not anytime soon. I am still reading Infinite Jest and while I am making progress quicker now than a couple weeks ago there's still a lot left to go.



Pastoralia by George Saunders is, like, my favorite book.

That is a wonderful book. Have you read anything else by Saunders? I have not but I rather want to.

Hannahrain
10-17-2008, 10:39 PM
I really liked that book. Though, to be fair, I only read the first third of it before I took a break and forgot what was going on and quit. I really, really enjoyed it, though and want to restart.

But probably not anytime soon. I am still reading Infinite Jest and while I am making progress quicker now than a couple weeks ago there's still a lot left to go.

I started that a while back and lost interest after not wanting to carry it with me on a trip and therefore having taken too long of a break from it to pick it up again. I'm going to read it eventually, but I'm currently reading two books and about to start a third with a big stack of things I'm excited to read as soon as I have time, so it's going to have to wait in line at the end with a few similar entities and some old classics I haven't gotten around to yet.

I'm glad to hear you liked 100% of the 33% of Mason & Dixon you became familiar with. I like you, you like it, so the transitive property dictates that I should like it. Right? Right.

SoulDischarge
10-17-2008, 10:44 PM
I have yet to finish an entire Pynchon book. I feel ashamed. But I'll show you all once I get through War & Peace. Show you good.

miscorrections
10-17-2008, 10:49 PM
Don't bother. Do something more worthwhile, like watching Paris Hilton's My New BFF.

runbowsky
10-17-2008, 10:52 PM
currently reading House of Leaves, talk about a total mind fuck!

Alchemy
10-18-2008, 08:14 AM
currently reading House of Leaves, talk about a total mind fuck!

I have that book. Very po-mo.

KatieLyn
10-18-2008, 09:05 AM
Currently reading Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller.

thestripe
10-18-2008, 09:42 AM
I'm going to buy Neutral Milk Hotel's In the Aeroplane Over the Sea (33 1/3) today.

bmack86
10-18-2008, 04:55 PM
It's definitely my favorite of the 33 1/3 that I've read.

I plan on either watching Salo or starting Infinite Jest tonight.

wmgaretjax
10-18-2008, 05:19 PM
Currently reading Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller.

I unwittingly met that guy at an event at my school. He was kind of a dunce. A nice dunce, but a dunce none the less.

ghettojournalist
10-18-2008, 10:21 PM
right now I am reading The Monsters of Templeton by Lauren Groff. It's enjoyable so far. Nothing more than that yet.

humanoid
10-30-2008, 10:32 AM
I just read The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath, and I cannot believe it took me so long to get around to it.
I think I loved every single word of it

amyzzz
10-30-2008, 11:26 AM
That's one of my favorite books.

humanoid
10-30-2008, 11:32 AM
That's one of my favorite books.

it just became one of my favorites as well

amyzzz
10-30-2008, 11:56 AM
I just wish she'd written a few more novels before she killed herself damnit!

bmack86
11-10-2008, 09:23 PM
Invisible Jest is swiftly kicking me in the face with its brilliance. Now that the characters have been defined, things are starting to happen, and Wallace's prose is becoming apparent. His description of a woman deliberately ODing on Crack is absolutely fantastic. I felt whiteknuckled as I read it, and he shifted to the cold hard factual nature of the situation from such an airy and academic description right before that it becomes a true moment of impact. I love this book

roberto73
11-10-2008, 09:35 PM
I'm just finishing up James Ellroy's The Cold Six Thousand. It covers the aftermath of the JFK assassination, Howard Hughes' arrival in Vegas, the Viet Nam War, MLK's rise and assassination, RFK's assassination, and the Southeast Asian drug trade. You know, just a few minor issues. It's the second book in his "American Underworld" trilogy, which started with American Tabloid (dealing with Castro, the Bay of Pigs, Jimmy Hoffa, Lee Harvey Oswald, and the lead-up to the JFK assassination) and ends with next year's Blood's a Rover. Ellroy's stuff is just amazingly great – gritty and violent and hard-boiled and labyrinthine and lots of fun. He's easily one of my favorite writers.

bmack86
11-10-2008, 09:38 PM
Sounds really good. I think I might have to start in on that trilogy next.

roberto73
11-10-2008, 09:45 PM
This new trilogy is terrific, but I think it's inferior to Ellroy's "L.A. Quartet": The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere, L.A. Confidential, and White Jazz. It's stylistically similar, but the stories are on a much smaller canvas, set in L.A. in the 40's and 50's. They remind me a lot of a more violent and vulgar take on Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett. (And, for the record, the novel The Black Dahlia is infinitely superior to De Palma's film. Then again, it would be hard for it to be worse.)

thelastgreatman
11-10-2008, 11:18 PM
Sylvia Plath is fucking unreadable.

algunz
11-10-2008, 11:42 PM
I need to read The Bell Jar again. It's been too long.

Still haven't gotten around to Infinite Jest.

I have SSR (Sustained Silent Reading) this year, so I have a designated 30 minutes a day that I "have" to read. It's awesome.

humanoid
11-11-2008, 10:13 AM
Sylvia Plath is fucking unreadable.

please recommend something readable then to cleanse my mind of the filth it recently digested

rskapcat
11-11-2008, 10:19 AM
I'm excited that Sarah Vowell has a new book out. Yay! :)

sbessiso
11-11-2008, 10:41 AM
I'm sure you guys have reviewed it but it passed me. I was at the bookstore yesterday and I was totally reminded that Chuck Klosterman has his first novel out. I always buy his books but $24 was just a little painful for me.

Anyone here read it?

humanoid
11-11-2008, 10:44 AM
I'm sure you guys have reviewed it but it passed me. I was at the bookstore yesterday and I was totally reminded that Chuck Klosterman has his first novel out. I always buy his books but $24 was just a little painful for me.

Anyone here read it?

I've enjoyed his other books, but didn't know he had a novel out

is it a Hardcover only release so far?

sbessiso
11-11-2008, 10:46 AM
Yeah just hardcover. You know how it is, paperback will be out next year im sure

humanoid
11-11-2008, 10:53 AM
That always sucks when you're dying to read something...but just gotta live with it, because I can't ever justify buying a hardcover when I could get two paperbacks for the same $$

algunz
11-13-2008, 01:29 PM
Library?

menikmati
11-13-2008, 01:36 PM
do any of you ever use amazon???? Seriously, their prices are like half of what you'll find at bookstores...

humanoid
11-13-2008, 02:08 PM
Library?

I love the library, but when something is by an author I really enjoy, I try to support that person by buying their work. Many authors, even great ones, are just scraping by at times, so as a thank you for them bringing enjoyable stories into my life, I like to be supportive

wmgaretjax
11-13-2008, 02:17 PM
do any of you ever use amazon???? Seriously, their prices are like half of what you'll find at bookstores...

I really appreciate small bookstores. Non-massive chain stores that have an almost curated feel to them. It's where I pick up books I've never heard of, or get tips from employees/owners I trust. I try and buy from two local bookstores as much as possible, even though it's a little more expensive. Plus, there's something about holding a book in your hands and leafing through it before you buy it. But I'll buy from Amazon before I would go to Barnes and Noble or Borders.

wmgaretjax
11-13-2008, 02:23 PM
Invisible Jest is swiftly kicking me in the face with its brilliance. Now that the characters have been defined, things are starting to happen, and Wallace's prose is becoming apparent. His description of a woman deliberately ODing on Crack is absolutely fantastic. I felt whiteknuckled as I read it, and he shifted to the cold hard factual nature of the situation from such an airy and academic description right before that it becomes a true moment of impact. I love this book

I'm re-reading Infinite Jest right now. I'm still fucking heartbroken that he's dead.

Yablonowitz
11-13-2008, 02:45 PM
I'm re-reading Infinite Jest right now. I'm still fucking heartbroken that he's dead.

He had goddawful depression. He made a little smiley face in my copy and looking at it makes me sad.

wmgaretjax
11-13-2008, 05:07 PM
He had goddawful depression. He made a little smiley face in my copy and looking at it makes me sad.

:-( I saw him speak last year and he talked about trying to get off meds...

I don't get emotional over random people, but I felt such a strong connection to that book... It's one of those few examples where I felt like I got a really good sense of the author, simply by experiencing his work.

ghettojournalist
11-18-2008, 12:19 AM
I just bought "Joker" by Brian Azzarello (writer) and Lee Bermejo (art) and it is brilliant. So demented and well-paced. Interesting takes on the standard rogues: Penguin, Killer Croc, Riddler, Harley Quinn. It's available in hardcover and is an original graphic novel.

OutOfmYminD
11-20-2008, 09:55 PM
So I just started reading Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie. I really like his style so far even though I am barely 30 pages in I can see it becoming a page turner. Bought the book off of Amazon after I read a little bit about it on NPR's book blog.

Am also finishing a book called Kluge. It's a non fiction and it's about the faults and evolution of the human brain. I've found it kind of depressing though interesting, hopefully the last chapter leaves me on a happy note.

kroqken
11-20-2008, 09:57 PM
I like Rushdie. He was named "Humanist of the year" by the American Humanist Association.

mountmccabe
12-04-2008, 03:58 PM
I have also stalled at reading the 33 1/3 book on Horses. It was written by an English guy that specializes in 19-century literature and critical theory. That might should've given me a clue that it wouldn't quite be the lightest of reads.

bmack86
12-04-2008, 04:00 PM
yeah, that's quite a qualification

roberto73
12-13-2008, 09:25 AM
On my recent cross-country jaunt I read this

http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp292/rmonty73/foer.jpg

and this

http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp292/rmonty73/july.jpg

and now I am halfway through this

http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp292/rmonty73/boyle.jpg

Hannahrain
12-13-2008, 09:28 AM
So I just started reading Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie. I really like his style so far even though I am barely 30 pages in I can see it becoming a page turner. Bought the book off of Amazon after I read a little bit about it on NPR's book blog.


A friend gave me this book off the floor of their car the other day. I haven't started it yet, but I'm glad to hear that someone I don't know on the internet is enjoying it.

wmgaretjax
12-13-2008, 09:30 AM
I would love to know what you thought of the Safran Foer book... I enjoyed it but some of it really dragged... I might need to give it another shot though, because the parts I had trouble with (largely the stuff in the past) others lauded as the best part of the book.

roberto73
12-13-2008, 09:35 AM
I actually really liked it, although it definitely took me some time to figure out the early interludes narrated by Oskar's grandparents. Once I saw how it was coming together, I liked it a lot more, and by the end, thought it was pretty moving. What held it together for me was the character of Oskar, who reminded me far too much of myself as a 9-year-old.

I have to say, though, I'd like to see Foer try a straightforward narrative sometime. I had some of the same difficulty with his digressions in Everything Is Illuminated. The present day stuff in Eastern Europe was far more interesting to me than the episodes with his ancestors. Some of it was beautifully written, but the structure distracted me.

wmgaretjax
12-13-2008, 09:39 AM
I think that distraction is what bothered me. Like you said, it was a moving book and the main character was fantastic... I couldn't but feel it could have been pieced together in a manner that was non-linear but didn't require so much work to parse. I don't mind working for a book, I just didn't feel like the extra effort here was the best way to tell the story.

algunz
12-13-2008, 09:46 AM
I'm reading Vonnegut's Player Piano and I'm struggling. It just hasn't grabbed my interest. Can anybody recommend a Vonnegut book other than Slaughterhouse and Cradle? I read those two in high school and I recall really enjoying them, so when I pulled Piano off the shelf I thought I'd picked a winner. I'm not giving up yet, but I'm not gonna force myself to read a book.

roberto73
12-13-2008, 09:56 AM
I'm reading Vonnegut's Player Piano and I'm struggling. It just hasn't grabbed my interest. Can anybody recommend a Vonnegut book other than Slaughterhouse and Cradle? I read those two in high school and I recall really enjoying them, so when I pulled Piano off the shelf I thought I'd picked a winner. I'm not giving up yet, but I'm not gonna force myself to read a book.

Breakfast of Champions has always been my favorite. I'm not surprised you're having trouble with Player Piano. His first couple novels weren't very indicative of where he'd eventually go.

algunz
12-13-2008, 09:58 AM
Thanks.

wmgaretjax
12-13-2008, 10:00 AM
I second Breakfast of Champions, but I haven't read Player Piano so I can't comment on that.

I'm reading Infinite Jest again... About half way through now, I'm certain this is one of my favorite books. It's so damn perfect.

mountmccabe
12-13-2008, 11:17 AM
The Sirens of Titan is one of my favorites but it is also very early (isn't Player Piano his first novel?) so it might not be enough of a stylistic change.

I rather liked Galapagos; it is light and funny; it is also much later in his career.

humanoid
12-13-2008, 12:49 PM
he did improve as his career progressed, but actually Sirens of Titan and Mother Night are 2 of my favorites from him and they were #2 and 3 respectively

yes, Player Piano is his first novel

I agree, Galapagos is also a great one, and it was written in the mid eighties, 35 or so years after Player Piano, fairly impressive that much later in his career

Hannahrain
12-14-2008, 09:29 AM
I'm reading Vonnegut's Player Piano and I'm struggling. It just hasn't grabbed my interest. Can anybody recommend a Vonnegut book other than Slaughterhouse and Cradle? I read those two in high school and I recall really enjoying them, so when I pulled Piano off the shelf I thought I'd picked a winner. I'm not giving up yet, but I'm not gonna force myself to read a book.

Your avatar is going to read a whole lot differently once you've read Breakfast of Champions.

roberto73
12-14-2008, 09:36 AM
Your avatar is going to read a whole lot differently once you've read Breakfast of Champions.

Haha. So true. I hadn't even noticed that.

algunz
12-14-2008, 09:46 AM
Well, I guess I gotta read Breakfast now. I haven't given up on Player yet though. We'll see how this week goes.

bmack86
12-14-2008, 12:18 PM
Player Piano isn't as quirky and funny as the rest of his stuff. It's more of a straight dystopian novel. I liked it alright, but he works better when he's weird.

real talk
12-31-2008, 08:35 AM
A Confederacy of Dunces is finally pulling me in, a little more than halfway through. I'm shaking my fist if there's no payoff.

roberto73
12-31-2008, 08:57 AM
I just finished reading this

http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp292/rmonty73/lovely-bones.jpg

and now I am reading this

http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp292/rmonty73/theplot.jpg

amyzzz
12-31-2008, 09:00 AM
Just read this (only my book had the Kate/Leo cover from the movie). Very powerful. I can't wait for the movie!!

http://pubimages.randomhouse.co.uk/getimage.aspx?id=0099518627&issue=1&size=largeweb&class=books

MissingPerson
12-31-2008, 09:01 AM
Lovely Bones any good?

real talk
12-31-2008, 09:01 AM
I just finished reading this

http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp292/rmonty73/lovely-bones.jpg

and now I am reading this

http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp292/rmonty73/theplot.jpg

Ugh Lovely Bones was terrible.

roberto73
12-31-2008, 09:09 AM
Lovely Bones any good?

Contrary to Real Talk's review, I actually really liked it. I'm not sure I've read something that manages to capture such a pervasive sense of melancholy and mourning on every single page. I was reminded of how Cormac McCarthy's writing often makes me feel Ė uncomfortable and achy. That's a good thing.

algunz
02-27-2009, 01:35 PM
I enjoyed Lovely Bones. It was a "fun" and easy exploration of murder and family.

I'm reading A Piece of Cake by Cupcake Brown right now. Somebody mentioned it in a random, lost thread about books a while back. I remembered the cover when I saw it at the bookstore. It's one of those books that makes me want to shake people and yell, "what the fuck." I'm half way through, and I can't imagine yet it totally makes sense that the protagonist is now a lawyer at a top SF firm.

Gribbz
02-27-2009, 01:39 PM
I just finished reading Everything is illuminated and extremely loud and incredibly close.

Great reads. Especially Everything is illuminated.

Geno_g
02-27-2009, 04:19 PM
I just read The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, very good book, The Hounds of Baskerville, good old Sherlock Holmes, and The Murders of the Rue Morgue, next is The Maltese Falcon

humanoid
02-27-2009, 07:15 PM
a friend just gave me The Joke by Milan Kundera...anyone read it before?

I've been in a terrible reading funk lately and it's been upsetting me. I haven't been inspired to read anything lately, but i guess it's likely due to being back in school and having required reading.

menikmati
02-27-2009, 07:45 PM
Just read this (only my book had the Kate/Leo cover from the movie). Very powerful. I can't wait for the movie!!

http://pubimages.randomhouse.co.uk/getimage.aspx?id=0099518627&issue=1&size=largeweb&class=books

I really want to read/get this book, and I really want this cover version...but I ain't buying from Ebay-UK.

atom heart
02-28-2009, 06:50 AM
I have yet to finish an entire Pynchon book. I feel ashamed. But I'll show you all once I get through War & Peace. Show you good.

Easy. Just pick the shortest one. It'll take a day to read.
Anything longer than Lot 49 is just insufferable.

mountmccabe
02-28-2009, 08:55 AM
The Crying of Lot 49 hardly counts as a Pynchon novel. I would recommend the short story "Entropy" long before 49.


I recently finished Rendevous With Rama by Arthur C Clarke. I had not read any of his books. It was definitely hard sci fi but since it is 35 years old it is nothing like modern hard sci fi; it is closer to Asimovian puzzle stories. But it is far enough along that spectrum to be interesting.

Though it was also quite an anticlimax. I don't know that I am interested enough to read the sequels. It was easy to read, though, so I suppose if I find them for real cheap and have a long plane flight or somesuch again, I might.

algunz
02-28-2009, 09:35 PM
a friend just gave me The Joke by Milan Kundera...anyone read it before?


The only Kundera book I've read was The Unbearable Lightness of Being. I loved it. I need to read another one, so let us know what you think.

Alchemy
05-31-2009, 08:08 PM
Anybody been reading anything good?


I just finished Asylum by Patrick McGrath. It's a good psychological love story, and it did a great job of making me feel crazy in the head toward the end.

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0679781382.01._SX140_SY225_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg

I just started Shelley Jackson's The Melancholy of Anatomy. It has very surprising imagery and is a little on the po-mo side.

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_XEGpvI5wJqM/RZQJKh1JRCI/AAAAAAAAAB4/dVdg3PaQBMw/s400/The%2Bmelancholy%2Bof%2BAnatomy.jpg

humanoid
05-31-2009, 11:25 PM
The only Kundera book I've read was The Unbearable Lightness of Being. I loved it. I need to read another one, so let us know what you think.

sorry it took a while, just noticed your response...

I really enjoyed parts of The Joke There are a couple different interwoven stories that were at times slightly difficult to follow and to remember which characters were which. Most of the book is written in a highly articulate and intellectual manner which greatly contributed to my enjoyment. A few times I felt blindsided by seemingly random side stories that I couldn't quite grasp the significance of, but overall the story was interesting and well written. As the story concluded, I realized I wasn't in love with it, but that Kundera's style and ability intrigued me enough to want to read more of his work.

humanoid
05-31-2009, 11:34 PM
I just finished reading a well known classic that I had always wanted to read, but was always intimidated by the length of the novel. Over a year ago, I began The Count of Monte Cristo, but was unable to truly get into it, so i set it down. Eventually I resumed reading it, and absolutely loved it. It was one of those books that I felt like I was entering a time machine and fully experiencing the events that occurred. Truly escapist literature. I couldn't wait to keep reading it. While very vividly written, the dastardly deeds of the perpetrators, the agony of the wrongful imprisonment, and the meticulously planned revenge all come springing to life page after page. A very fun read, I was disappointed when i was finished, I didn't want it to be over!

indietron
06-01-2009, 12:10 AM
I think I'm gonna read Dune this summer.

JewFace
06-01-2009, 12:15 AM
I just finished The Sound and the Fury which was my first experience with Faulkner. Definitely one of the more challenging reads I've had, but once I was able to grasp who was narrating at each stage of the novel (I really should have grabbed some notes on this book first) I found it to be a joy. These are my next choices. Any opinions on which one I should pick up next? This would be my first experience with each of these authors.

http://www.libraries-archives.gov.mt/frak/2006_january/images/line_of_beauty.jpg

http://vivirlatino.com/i/2008/11/6a00c2252ab767f21900e398f8f4390005-500pi.jpg

http://imall.ntu.edu.sg/pic/MidnightsChildren.jpg

http://hear2me.files.wordpress.com/2009/03/atonement-ian.jpg

Still-ill
06-01-2009, 09:48 AM
I'm pretty damn excited.

http://webdoc.gwdg.de/edoc/ia/eese/artic97/mohr/mohr7.jpg

mountmccabe
06-01-2009, 10:11 AM
I just finished The Sound and the Fury which was my first experience with Faulkner. Definitely one of the more challenging reads I've had, but once I was able to grasp who was narrating at each stage of the novel (I really should have grabbed some notes on this book first) I found it to be a joy.

That is one of my favorite novels ever. Really, it is either that or Absalom, Absalom by the same author. When we set up a testing lab in Tucson I named the gigantic testing equipment pieces after characters from the book. We had a Benjy and a Caddie and a Quentin. I even got the other people what worked there to refer to them in that way.

As for the books you are considering... I haven't read any of them. There was some talk of Midnight's Children a few pages back and I know there's been talk of Ian McEwan in this thread, fyi.

mountmccabe
06-01-2009, 10:17 AM
I'm pretty damn excited.

http://webdoc.gwdg.de/edoc/ia/eese/artic97/mohr/mohr7.jpg

That book is also in my top 5 of ever. Pynchon has created his own world and beats you into submitting to it. So wonderful. I need to read it again.

And, just so I don't sound like I'm going all hyperbolic on folks this is my real top five (order not entirely certain)


William Faulkner - The Sound and the Fury
William Faulkner - Absalom, Absalom
Virginia Woolf - To the Lighthouse
Vladimir Nabokov - Pale Fire
James Joyce - Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man



I want to put Catch 22 and The Martian Time-Slip and Count Zero and Lolita and The Waves and Go Tell It On the Mountain and Blood Meridian and more on that list but there just isn't room and I'm probalby forgetting stuff as it is.

Geno_g
06-01-2009, 10:21 AM
After sitting in Ken Kesey's "The Further Bus" at the Dead show, I'm reading Tom Wolfe's Electric Kool-aid Acid Test right now, just finished seven books I was reading, feels good to just have one book going...
http://thm-a04.yimg.com/image/a9d69100754e6f42

mountmccabe
06-01-2009, 10:22 AM
Also I started The Crossing by Cormac McCarthy on the plane ride out. I loved the first part; I had a hard time putting it down. The second part has not interested me thus far.

marooko
07-24-2009, 02:21 PM
dont know if this has been asked or not, but here it goes.

you ever start getting caught up in a book (fiction) and the author just gets something totally wrong and you get pulled out of the story?

ex: the story was getting hot, the detective was about to bust in on the bad guys by herself. she's creeping along the house, nervous, scared, getting ready to do her thing. then she takes the "safety" off of her Glock...and BAM!!! Im back to reality. glocks dont have safeties.

amyzzz
07-24-2009, 02:25 PM
I've gotten annoyed with authors making up fictional Arizona towns/places, but I can't recall any specifics.

marooko
07-24-2009, 02:32 PM
just about 10 minutes ago, im a reading another book by the same author, and hes talking about a girl from Czechoslovakia. where is that now? whats that, its not anymore? huh.

higgybaby23
07-24-2009, 02:36 PM
dont know if this has been asked or not, but here it goes.

you ever start getting caught up in a book (fiction) and the author just gets something totally wrong and you get pulled out of the story?

ex: the story was getting hot, the detective was about to bust in on the bad guys by herself. she's creeping along the house, nervous, scared, getting ready to do her thing. then she takes the "safety" off of her Glock...and BAM!!! Im back to reality. glocks dont have safeties.

I'm reading Go Ask Alice for shits and giggles. Most of the book is fairly far fetched, but when the main character starts giving blowjobs for hits of acid and some pot, I had to lol and shake my head.

I knew the book was some sort of Christian propaganda, but for a real treat read the Wiki entry about the "anonymous" author.

marooko
07-24-2009, 02:40 PM
thats not too far fetched. actually hits close to home. wait....this belongs in the confessions thread.



so, i hope you guys are recommending some good books. im making good on my new years res, thats why im in here.

humanoid
07-24-2009, 02:54 PM
I'm reading Go Ask Alice for shits and giggles. Most of the book is fairly far fetched, but when the main character starts giving blowjobs for hits of acid and some pot, I had to lol and shake my head.

I knew the book was some sort of Christian propaganda, but for a real treat read the Wiki entry about the "anonymous" author.

Go Ask Alice is great for some shits and giggles....


I just read Animal Farm for the first time, I have no idea how I completely missed it in school..

MissingPerson
07-24-2009, 03:03 PM
Had to watch a Go Ask Alice morality play in school. You think the book's bad...

amyzzz
07-24-2009, 03:04 PM
What did you do in your last life, MP, because it sounds like you're already in hell.

PassiveTheory
07-24-2009, 03:22 PM
Finished re-reading American Gods 2 nights ago and now re-reading Good Omens. Gotta love these Neil Gaiman hooks I get on from time-to-time.

Alchemy
07-24-2009, 03:33 PM
I'm reading Patrick McGrath books. Excellent psychological stories about characters with mental illnesses. I finished Asylum and Spider and am now reading through Trauma. Before him, I read an excellent book about a fictional abolitionist by Stephen Wright (not the comedian) called The Amalgamation Polka.

JewFace
07-25-2009, 03:53 PM
Anyone read Netherland? My friend Nick insists I read it before moving to NY. And, yes, I know about the Obama connection.

http://webpub.allegheny.edu/employee/e/epallant/Books/images/netherland.jpg

seandlr
07-25-2009, 05:12 PM
I just recently finished Chuck P's Survivor. Not too shabby. Went to his website to learn about the book and it made it a lot better

Alchemy
07-25-2009, 05:31 PM
When/why are you moving to New York, JewFace?

benhur
07-25-2009, 09:48 PM
I'm pretty damn excited.

http://webdoc.gwdg.de/edoc/ia/eese/artic97/mohr/mohr7.jpg

wow...i thought i was the only dude that read this....wait for the two girls one cup scene lol....actually one girl one general really. you'll get the idea

im gonna check out his new book Inherent Vice which comes out august 4 i believe...supposedly it's going to be his most accessible novel so far which i must admitt would kind of piss me off. people read pynchon for the challenge.

JewFace
07-25-2009, 11:38 PM
When/why are you moving to New York, JewFace?

Alchemy, I'm moving to NY for the most cliche of reasons: to study acting at a conservatory. But, I got a full ride, so I might as well give it a shot while I still have my tits. I move to Manhattan in late August.

Oh and :thu to all the Gravity's Rainbow love. Definitely one of the more challenging reads I've had in years.

Alchemy
07-26-2009, 07:23 AM
Alchemy, I'm moving to NY for the most cliche of reasons: to study acting at a conservatory. But, I got a full ride, so I might as well give it a shot while I still have my tits. I move to Manhattan in late August.

I'll be moving to Manhattan in late August, too: to study writing at the New School. I didn't get a full ride, though. In fact, I suspect I'll be having to give "full rides" to pay off my student loans. Do you know where you're going to live?

stuporfly
07-26-2009, 07:33 AM
I've been reading...

http://i26.tinypic.com/x5zko.gif

...on the recommendation of my girlfriend. It's quite fascinating.

JewFace
07-27-2009, 01:28 AM
I'll be moving to Manhattan in late August, too: to study writing at the New School. I didn't get a full ride, though. In fact, I suspect I'll be having to give "full rides" to pay off my student loans. Do you know where you're going to live?

Congrats on the New School! How very progressive of you! LOLZ @ the "full rides". I've had a couple of unfortunate e-encounters with rather rotund, hirsute gentlemen who look like they could recall the Truman Administration. They like to boast of their "generosity". If you're in dire straits, I can put you in touch. My scholarship includes room & board so, yes, I know where I'm going to live. I will be calling the dorms right at Lincoln Center home. Upper West Side. Anyway, I doubt that book lovers are the least bit interested in my NY living arrangements, so perhaps we should continue this in PM land?

real talk
07-27-2009, 02:08 AM
http://vivirlatino.com/i/2008/11/6a00c2252ab767f21900e398f8f4390005-500pi.jpg

I'm nearly through this one. It's good writing, it's passionate with character depth and non-fiction history. Still, I feel like I need to study more Dominican-Spanish in order to get the full effect. There's a lot of offhand remarks that I want to understand.

SoulDischarge
07-27-2009, 02:53 AM
I'm in the middle of this:

http://artesonoro.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/musicophilia.jpg

The subject matter is really interesting, but the writing itself could be a bit better. Some times it feels like I'm reading the same paragraph two times in a row. Most of the stories deal with unusual circumstances, such as a man who picks up an intense interest in composing after getting struck by lightning, people with musical hallucinations, and an extreme amnesiac who can't remember more than a few seconds at a time except when he's playing music. I'll probably read Brave New World next since I've never read it before.

real talk
07-27-2009, 07:53 PM
I couldn't get into that book despite really wanting to.

marooko
07-27-2009, 08:43 PM
rt, i got a favor to ask.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-27-2009, 08:47 PM
started it last month, barely....need to really pick it up and read it for real

http://samuelatgilgal.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/atlas_shrugged1.jpg

chairmenmeow47
07-31-2009, 11:01 AM
i apologize if this has been talked about in this thread already, but does anyone have a kindle? if so, do you like it? why or why not?

mom's birthday this weekend, possible gift idea, thanks :)

RotationSlimWang
07-31-2009, 11:03 AM
started it last month, barely....need to really pick it up and read it for real

http://samuelatgilgal.files.wordpress.com/2009/04/atlas_shrugged1.jpg

No. No you don't. Ayn Rand is fucking unreadable garbage. You should burn it.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-31-2009, 11:03 AM
i don't have one but i know people who do and they love! It's really great if you read a LOT of books and are on the go a lot.

I'm presonally happy going to the Library every two weeks, but I know people who will devour like 4 books a week, so the kindle is great, and the downloads are cheap

chairmenmeow47
07-31-2009, 11:04 AM
thanks, drinkey :)

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
07-31-2009, 11:05 AM
No. No you don't. Ayn Rand is fucking unreadable garbage. You should burn it.

well, i read THE FOUNTAINHEAD last year and I loved it (at least until the last hundred pages when she decided to make the bad guys into rambling cartoonish supervillains)

RotationSlimWang
07-31-2009, 11:05 AM
In that case you should burn yourself.

downingthief
07-31-2009, 12:28 PM
I have yet to read anything by Rand. Too many of my "conservative" friends swear by her works.

marooko
07-31-2009, 12:41 PM
why do you have conservative friends?

downingthief
07-31-2009, 12:41 PM
Damn good question.

JustSteve
07-31-2009, 12:45 PM
currently reading "redemption song: the ballad of joe strummer", it's an amazing read and shows all aspects of his life - the good and the bad, not just written to put him on a pedestal.

jackstraw94086
07-31-2009, 12:47 PM
liberals who don't know any conservatives are invariably full of shit.

marooko
07-31-2009, 12:50 PM
is that how you identify yourselves, by your political opinions?

jackstraw94086
07-31-2009, 01:29 PM
I only judge people by skin color.

RotationSlimWang
07-31-2009, 01:41 PM
Please provide a ranking system of the various colors, Jack.

Courtney
08-05-2009, 02:11 PM
This rules: The Unofficial Thomas Pynchon Guide to Los Angeles (http://www.wired.com/special_multimedia/2009/pl_print_1708)

If I was still living in LA, I would want to go explore.

Stefinitely Maybe
08-05-2009, 04:57 PM
Weird, I just came in this thread to post about Atlas Shrugged. I am about 600 pages in, with another 600 to go. Loving it so far. Whatever you may think of her politics or philosophy, she's an amazing writer, with an amazing command of language.

Still-ill
08-05-2009, 05:30 PM
This rules: The Unofficial Thomas Pynchon Guide to Los Angeles (http://www.wired.com/special_multimedia/2009/pl_print_1708)

If I was still living in LA, I would want to go explore.

Thanks!

JewFace
08-06-2009, 10:35 PM
I ended up going with Alan Hollinghurst's The Line of Beauty (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Line-of-Beauty/Alan-Hollinghurst/e/9781582346106/?itm=2) which I finished last week. I found it pretty engrossing. It's set largely in London in the 1980s and is a rather damning, often funny and sometimes wistfully sad portrait of class warfare, politics and sex in the age of AIDS in Thatcher's Britain. It's beautifully written and chock full of elegantly phrased sentences that reveal multiple truths. But it's not flowery at all, every little flutter of perfectly constructed language has a real purpose and gives the reader deeper insight into the lives of the characters.

Still-ill
08-06-2009, 11:08 PM
the last couple years it seems I've read nothing but heavy-duty, difficult books to understand, or sometimes just fucking loooooooong books. A lot of stream-of-consciousness. (The whole joyce library, Pynchon, Proust, etc.) Can anyone just recommend a simple, easy (even light) read? I kind of burnt myself on reading because I associated it with a lot of work. Do not recommend Palahniuk, or I will break you.

buddy
08-06-2009, 11:17 PM
the last couple years it seems I've read nothing but heavy-duty, difficult books to understand, or sometimes just fucking loooooooong books. A lot of stream-of-consciousness. (The whole joyce library, Pynchon, Proust, etc.) Can anyone just recommend a simple, easy (even light) read? I kind of burnt myself on reading because I associated it with a lot of work. Do not recommend Palahniuk, or I will break you.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_b?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=33+1%2F3+series

i bought myself the book on elliott smith's x/o album. after 10 months of reading books related to my classes. i wanted a quick, fun read as well.

boarderwoozel3
08-06-2009, 11:19 PM
Do not recommend Palahniuk, or I will break you.

What's up with this? Just out of curiosity.

Still-ill
08-06-2009, 11:19 PM
Aww... man, I loved the loveless 33 1/3. I totally forgot about that book! I'll check out the David Bowie Low and Joy Division Unknown Pleasures volumes...

Still-ill
08-06-2009, 11:21 PM
What's up with this? Just out of curiosity.

I have some close friends who are obsessed with Fight Club. The film and the book. They're also dying to get me to read his other stuff. I just don't really enjoy his stuff... not my style, I guess...

boarderwoozel3
08-06-2009, 11:24 PM
Fair enough. Curiosity satisfied.

David Sedaris perhaps? It's mostly his life stories that may be slightly embellished at times but are pretty funny. Disfunctional family, discovering he was gay in 6th grade, growing up in the south, etc. Light, easy, enjoyable.

Still-ill
08-06-2009, 11:25 PM
Thanks. I'll check it out.

JewFace
08-07-2009, 12:06 AM
I'll second the Sedaris endorsement. Light, easy and very funny. I'd go with his best work, Me Talk Pretty One Day.

wmgaretjax
08-07-2009, 12:12 AM
I just finished Virilio's Information Bomb. I love reading his stuff because I generally disagree with him completely (at least initially), I find myself questioning my own rationale a good chunk of the time.

Gonna dive into Deleuze's 2 part set on cinema this weekend. I tried once before and hard a hard time penetrating a couple concepts he kept diving into...

atom heart
08-07-2009, 09:52 PM
If anyone's at a loss for what to read (as I am, frequently, since I decided not to walk into the young adult section of the library any more)

Here's This Recording's 100 Greatest Writers of All Time (http://thisrecording.com/today/2009/8/3/in-which-these-are-the-100-greatest-writers-of-all-time.html)

also anyone with a strong opinion will probably enjoy disagreeing with this

algunz
08-07-2009, 09:59 PM
http://i228.photobucket.com/albums/ee218/alessandragunz/496E7E30-CA96-4CDA-893E-47C3718A7B2.jpg

Still-ill
08-07-2009, 10:21 PM
If anyone's at a loss for what to read (as I am, frequently, since I decided not to walk into the young adult section of the library any more)

Here's This Recording's 100 Greatest Writers of All Time (http://thisrecording.com/today/2009/8/3/in-which-these-are-the-100-greatest-writers-of-all-time.html)

also anyone with a strong opinion will probably enjoy disagreeing with this
Wow... did I write that list?

mountmccabe
08-07-2009, 10:44 PM
If anyone's at a loss for what to read (as I am, frequently, since I decided not to walk into the young adult section of the library any more)

Here's This Recording's 100 Greatest Writers of All Time (http://thisrecording.com/today/2009/8/3/in-which-these-are-the-100-greatest-writers-of-all-time.html)

also anyone with a strong opinion will probably enjoy disagreeing with this

That list is interesting. Can't be taken too seriously but from descriptions it did give me a few names to look into.

Also the comments afterward are hilarious.

Still-ill
08-07-2009, 11:30 PM
About Sophocles
Banged many young boys in his times, the greatest writer-pedophile who ever lived.

Hah!

algunz
08-07-2009, 11:53 PM
I need to visit my dad's library and get my hands on some Gertrude Stein.

Alchemy
08-08-2009, 08:33 AM
I don't like that list. John Keats wasn't very good. Ernest Hemingway was definitely better than Keats, and Percy Shelley certainly was, too. I think Hemingway should have the #1 spot. Also, where is Jack Kerouac? And Oscar Wilde is a great writer, too.

Poo.

humanoid
08-08-2009, 11:06 AM
/\ I was surprised to not find Oscar Wilde in there as well.

Still-ill
08-08-2009, 11:22 AM
Yeah thats true, the individuals in the top ten though are absolutely perfect to my taste (possibly not the correct order, but whatever). Except for possibly Gertrude Stein whom I haven't read. I would probably switch Doestoyevsky and Dante, for Chekhov and Stein.

bleep
08-08-2009, 11:24 AM
i'm dismayed by the absence of Indian writers on that list - R.K. Narayan and V.S. Naipaul are greats in my mind.

Still-ill
08-08-2009, 11:26 AM
Yeah it has very few eastern writers. They almost should have just taken those few off, and made it "Top 100 greatest Western writers of all time".

humanoid
08-08-2009, 12:14 PM
I have yet to read anything by Rand. Too many of my "conservative" friends swear by her works.


why do you have conservative friends?

reading from only one perspective or specific ideology only helps to reinforce what you already think you know. Approaching issues from various angles helps to inform a truly comprehensive and more knowledgeable worldview.


And excluding people from your circle of friends based upon their viewpoints (unless obviously extreme) doesn't seem to be a very liberal behavior. There are great people of all affiliations, even if some of them believe some stupid things.

Still-ill
08-08-2009, 12:27 PM
Wow I'm actually excited about reading again for the first time in months. This is very good...

Alchemy
08-08-2009, 01:05 PM
Wow I'm actually excited about reading again for the first time in months. This is very good...

What is?

Still-ill
08-08-2009, 01:10 PM
What is?

The fact I'm excited about reading again....

Alchemy
08-08-2009, 01:14 PM
The fact I'm excited about reading again....

Oh, I thought you started reading something very good that made you excited to read again.

Also, Still-ill... If you are still looking for something fun to read, I'd recommend George Saunder's Pastoralia. Especially if you read David Sedaris and enjoy him, then you'd probably also like George Saunders.

Still-ill
08-08-2009, 02:01 PM
Oh, I thought you started reading something very good that made you excited to read again.

Also, Still-ill... If you are still looking for something fun to read, I'd recommend George Saunder's Pastoralia. Especially if you read David Sedaris and enjoy him, then you'd probably also like George Saunders.

Thanks alot, man.

humanoid
08-08-2009, 02:10 PM
Thanks alot, man.

a few other books that I would recommend for some entertaining reading


Absurdistan....or

The Russian Debutante's Handbook

both by Gary Shteyngart

I read Absurdistan on a train from NYC to LA and I instantly had to go find his first book...and now I'm anxiously awaiting his third, due to be released in September

bmack86
08-09-2009, 01:10 AM
That list was a fun read. I disagree with some (I think that Bukowski deserves a nod, at very least, for his embrace of the vulgar and mundane, and Burroughs should be high up for making some of the most affecting novels that make absolutely no sense logically, and, seeing as how the author noted people for single poems, how about Ginsberg?) but it was still fun to read and it made me really want to re-read The Sound and The Fury and The Biography of Alice B. Tolkas. And, I'm going to have to Kafka it up again soon. The Trial is so close to perfect that it's scary, and the Castle reads like the most terrifying ordinary day ever.

TomAz
08-10-2009, 09:34 AM
Steinbeck 40 spots above Hemingway? I don't think so. I don't consider Steinbeck to be all that important myself -- or rather his significance is more as a cultural touchstone than as a writer.

JewFace
08-10-2009, 09:37 AM
i'm dismayed by the absence of Indian writers on that list - R.K. Narayan and V.S. Naipaul are greats in my mind.

Bleep:
Any particular Indian novels you'd recommend? (I want to learn Hindi and/or Gujrati in the next couple of years, but not just yet, so English or English translations, pls)

TomAz
08-10-2009, 09:43 AM
i'm dismayed by the absence of Indian writers on that list - R.K. Narayan and V.S. Naipaul are greats in my mind.

I like Naipaul a lot. dunno if he's top 100 but I definitely like him more than several on the list.

JewFace: Naipaul writes in English. He was born in Trinidad of Indian parents but has lived most of his adult life in the UK. A House for Mr Biswas is generally considered his best novel. I have also read A Bend in the River, Half a Life, and Magic Seeds and of those three Half a Life was my favorite.

* oh and also The Suffrage of Elvira which I personally liked better than any of the others mentioned, because it's funny.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
08-10-2009, 10:30 AM
reading from only one perspective or specific ideology only helps to reinforce what you already think you know. Approaching issues from various angles helps to inform a truly comprehensive and more knowledgeable worldview.


And excluding people from your circle of friends based upon their viewpoints (unless obviously extreme) doesn't seem to be a very liberal behavior. There are great people of all affiliations, even if some of them believe some stupid things.

well said!

HorseTears
08-10-2009, 10:57 AM
JewFace, I don't really know anything about classical Indian literature, but I have read some great contemporary Indian novels. Some books to consider: (These may not be by Indian born authors, but rather by authors of Indian ancestry or ones with a strong interest in the sub-cont)
Heat & Dust by Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie
Buddha of Suburbia by Hanif Kureishi
The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga
A Fine Balance by by Rohinton Mistry

I've heard wonderful things about these, but haven't read them yet:
The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
Clear Light of Day by Anita Desai
The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai

amyzzz
08-10-2009, 11:10 AM
Steinbeck 40 spots above Hemingway? I don't think so. I don't consider Steinbeck to be all that important myself -- or rather his significance is more as a cultural touchstone than as a writer.
I like Steinbeck a lot more than Hemingway. Have you read The Winter of Our Discontent? Love that one--seems relevant today with the themes about corruption and the American Dream. I never really got into Hemingway, but then I probably haven't read much since high school.

Alchemy
08-10-2009, 11:17 AM
I like Steinbeck a lot more than Hemingway. Have you read The Winter of Our Discontent? Love that one--seems relevant today with the themes abotu corruption and the American Dream. I never really got into Hemingway, but then I probably haven't read much since high school.

Steinbeck is way boring. Read Hemingway's story "The Short Happy Life" and A Farewell to Arms, and you will see a true mastery over language.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
08-10-2009, 11:26 AM
East of Eden is one of the most captivating novels I have ever read. It is thoroughly engrossing from beginning to end (as opposed to "boring")

amyzzz
08-10-2009, 11:34 AM
East of Eden is one of the most captivating novels I have ever read. It is thoroughly engrossing from beginning to end (as opposed to "boring")
I enjoyed the hell out of that one too.

The Winter of Our Discontent made me cry at the end, and books rarely do that to me.

Alchemy
08-10-2009, 11:45 AM
I've only read The Grapes of Wrath and The Pearl, and I thought those were pretty boring, so I never picked up East of Eden or The Winter of Our Discontent. I figured The Grapes of Wrath was giving Steinbeck a fighting chance, seeing how its like a billion pages long, but maybe when I have time I'll give East of Eden a go.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
08-10-2009, 11:47 AM
i have not read Winter yet; I need to. Of Mice and Men is short and sweet, and i think is a must read for everybody as well.

higgybaby23
08-10-2009, 11:50 AM
I love Steinbeck, so anyone not impressed by him...please give him another chance. His most accessible books are Tortilla Flat and Cannery Row. I prefer Steinbeck over Hemingway much the way I prefer optimism over fatalism. Although, Hemingway should be read and respected by all.

zimmy1222
08-10-2009, 11:54 AM
Currently reading:

Rant - Chuck Palanuik...

intennnnnse..

Alchemy
08-10-2009, 12:06 PM
I hear that Palahnuik embraces the "intennnnnse" in the same way that Shamalan embraces the "twist ending." Is this true? I often hear bad things about him, but I heard that Survivor is pretty good, and I enjoyed Fight Club (although I read it a very long time ago and I might not like it today).

PotVsKtl
08-10-2009, 12:27 PM
Survivor is decent. Fight Club turned me off as soon as "I haven't been fucked like that since grade school" turned into "treat me like human butt wipe." Human butt wipe? Really Pahlahniuk?

More importantly,

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0312890176.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

wmgaretjax
08-10-2009, 12:31 PM
Survivor is a good book. The rest are passable depending on how entertained you are by his schtick.

humanoid
08-10-2009, 12:43 PM
i have not read Winter yet; I need to. Of Mice and Men is short and sweet, and i think is a must read for everybody as well.

Of Mice and Men is very good and a day or two read...very interesting as well, and similarly short, The Moon is Down. I have yet to read Winter.

humanoid
08-10-2009, 12:47 PM
Survivor is a good book. The rest are passable depending on how entertained you are by his schtick.

I enjoyed Survivor too. Thought Choke was great initially, but then lost interest fairly quickly. All of his books have their moments, but I feel he's trying too hard at times to be intense or edgy and it doesn't feel natural.He often unintentionally makes me laugh while thinking, "really? that's where he took that?"

mountmccabe
08-10-2009, 12:49 PM
East of Eden is one of the most captivating novels I have ever read. It is thoroughly engrossing from beginning to end (as opposed to "boring")

I am with that, cuz.



More importantly,

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0312890176.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

Oooh. I have been meaning to read me some Wolfe. How is it? And/or how are his other books? I actually have Nightside of the Long Sun sitting around to be read, but it is a few back in the queue.

I am going to start Against the Day shortly.



Survivor is a good book. The rest are passable depending on how entertained you are by his schtick.

I agree with this. They are all easy reads. Also it should be noted that though Inivisible Monsters was published third it was written first and it really feels like a first novel; Chuck kinda hits you over the head with everything and tells you what's going on and what that means. More than normal, at least.

Oh and the short stories in Haunted were really great but the frame was really bad.

bleep
08-10-2009, 12:53 PM
Jewface,

I second TomAzís Naipaul recs. Naipaulís non-fiction stuff are worth the read too, especially Among the Believers: An Islamic Journey.

I personally loved Arundhati Royís The God of Small Things. I read that book in my early teens; fast forward several years later, I still reminisce about the main protagonists in that story. HorseTears also recommended Mistryís work which Iím a fan of. Mistryís stories do a lovely job of capturing middle-class life in contemporary North India. Mistry also provides insight into what itís like to be a Zoroastrian Indian, something I was clueless about until reading his books. Given how dense the subject matter in A Fine Balance can be, you might want to try his collection of short stories titled Swimming Lessons: And Other Stories from Firozsha Baag instead. Itís a quick read and a good introduction to his style of writing.

R.K. Narayan is my favorite of the Indian writers because no one captures village life in Southern India better than he does. He writes simply but effectively. Iíve learned more about being South Indian from his books than any other medium.

What else can I recommend? About ten years later, Iím revisiting Vikram Sethís A Suitable Boy, a book my aunt gave me when I was in my mid-teens (wonder if my aunt was hinting at something). Itís a monstrously lengthy book. But, amongst the family sagas that Seth writes about in this novel, there is a fascinating documentation of post-Independence India.

PotVsKtl
08-10-2009, 01:08 PM
Oooh. I have been meaning to read me some Wolfe. How is it?

First I've read of him. I'm about halfway through, so essentially done with the first book of the tetralogy. Surprisingly, the best touchpoint I can think of for his style is actually Ishiguro. There's a real meandering quality to the writing that deals heavily in memory and its impact on life. It's outstanding for the genre, I can see why the series gets called out as literature rather than sci-fi/fantasy.

SoulDischarge
08-10-2009, 01:20 PM
East of Eden is one of the most captivating novels I have ever read. It is thoroughly engrossing from beginning to end (as opposed to "boring")

I agree with this; fast approx. 500 pages I've ever read. I also agree that The Pearl is fucking dull.

Alchemy
08-10-2009, 01:28 PM
I guess I just had a bad introduction to Steinbeck. I remember having to read The Pearl twice for school, and I dragged through it both times. Then I read the epic journey of The Grapes of Wrath and I didn't enjoy any bit of it. Sigh. That same year I read The Sun Also Rises and I fell in love with it. I've loved everything I've read of Hemingway's since... At least, what I've read since then: about ten or so short stories, the Old Man and the Sea, and a Farewell to Arms.

I'll give Steinbeck another shot with some more of his books. When I first read Faulkner, I did As I Lay Dying and a few short stories and I hated him too, but then I read The Sound and the Fury... I swear by that book. It's perfect.

EDIT: Though, I should say I didn't hate As I Lay Dying, but I hated the short stories I read. I just wasn't moved by As I Lay Dying.

amyzzz
08-10-2009, 01:40 PM
Oh God, The Pearl. I hated that one. I actually haven't read Grapes of Wrath yet.

higgybaby23
08-10-2009, 01:48 PM
If anyone actually reads Cannery Row, there is a sequel that is also quite enjoyable called Sweet Thursday. Take a chance on Steinbeck's shorter works but forget about The Pearl.

SoulDischarge
08-10-2009, 01:51 PM
I didn't get nearly as much from As I Lay Dying as I did from The Sound & The Fury either.

Down Rodeo
08-10-2009, 02:08 PM
What's good by Philip Roth? Not that I have time to read it now, but just for future reference.

PotVsKtl
08-10-2009, 02:14 PM
Nothing.

wmgaretjax
08-10-2009, 02:15 PM
I read American Pastoral and hated it. So I guess not that one. It reminded me of Forrest Gump in the way that it sensationally strung together hot points of american politics in the 60s/70s with the grace of a hippo.

PotVsKtl
08-10-2009, 02:16 PM
That's the only one I read as well. I am an expert.

Down Rodeo
08-10-2009, 02:19 PM
Great advice, Pot.

Courtney
08-10-2009, 02:20 PM
Philip Roth is good if you dig the whole old crotchety man/ young attractive woman dynamic. But it gets a little tiresome.

Between what I've read (The Plot Against America, The Human Stain, American Pastoral, Goodbye, Columbus and Portnoy's Complaint), I'd pick Goodbye, Columbus as the place to start. But maybe just because that's the place I started, and I actually enjoyed it enough to go out and pick up the others. I'm not sure if the same would have happened if I had started with, say, The Plot Against America.

PotVsKtl
08-10-2009, 02:20 PM
Great advice, Pot.

Good story Dickcock.

Castanets
08-10-2009, 03:58 PM
There seems to be quite a bit of hate for The Grapes of Wrath. Boring? Really? It's such a passionate defense of the poor and disadvantaged. I loved reading this novel in high school and still loved it when I recently re-read it.

I just (after over a month) finished David Foster Wallace's Infinite Jest. A wickedly funny and at times outrageous novel. Over a 1000 pages long with at least 100 pages of endnotes! The endnotes certainly added dimension to the characters and the events of each chapter, but I couldn't' help feeling at times that Wallace was really toying with the reader's patience with the cloying show-offy nature of his very funny and very clever socio-politically themed word smithing. Equal parts frustrating and engrossing. I would think Thomas Pynchon fans might enjoy this one.

wmgaretjax
08-10-2009, 04:07 PM
Infinite Jest is easily one of my favorite books. It's rare I laugh out loud while reading, but it happened every few pages in that book.

I think Grapes of Wrath is great... But I like East of Eden more.

roberto73
08-10-2009, 05:09 PM
Palahniuk's new one, Pygmy, is sort of interesting. It's written from the perspective of a teenage Northern Korean spy who's in America posing as an exchange student for the purpose of enacting a terrorist plot. The challenge in reading the book is the character's broken-English dialect, which takes some getting used to. The book doesn't stray far from Palahniuk's usual tone, but the funkiness of the dialect makes for an interesting experience.

Also, I'm a Philip Roth fan. I like Portnoy's Complaint and Operation Shylock a lot, but I agree with Pot and Jared's dislike for American Pastoral. The most recent thing I read by him is The Plot Against America. I don't usually gravitate toward historical fiction, but the book has an interesting conceit: It imagines what would have happened if the anti-Semitic, isolationist, and Nazi sympathizing Charles Lindbergh had been elected President over FDR and kept America out of WWII. It was interesting to see how plausible his historical fabrications seemed.

HorseTears
08-11-2009, 09:34 AM
Just finished Gregory David Roberts' massive Shantaram. Roberts has a compelling story and it is rather thrilling at times, but he's not a great writer. I think he should stick to drugz and South Asian underworld crime.

JewFace
08-11-2009, 10:47 AM
Bleep, Horse Tears and all:

Thanks for the English language Indian literature recommendations. I think I might start with Mistry, as I happen to be 1/4 Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) myself.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
08-11-2009, 12:08 PM
Anyone here like Bret Easton Ellis? I've read Less Than Zero, which I loved, as well as The Infomers, which was okay. I've heard really good things about Glamorama and I actually really like the film adaptation of Rules of Attraction, so i assume i'll like the book as well

humanoid
08-11-2009, 12:40 PM
Anyone here like Bret Easton Ellis? I've read Less Than Zero, which I loved, as well as The Infomers, which was okay. I've heard really good things about Glamorama and I actually really like the film adaptation of Rules of Attraction, so i assume i'll like the book as well

I liked Less Than Zero and American Psycho. The Informers might be my least favorite book I've ever read. It was too disjointed and fragmented to really get any sense of continuity while reading it. The half page long run on sentences that he employs throughout the entire book grow extremely tiresome. After reading it, I felt angry and much less inclined to read anything else of his for a long time.

bmack86
08-12-2009, 12:53 AM
I absolutely loved The Human Stain by Phillip Roth, but wasn't much of a fan of either American Pastoral or Portnoy's Complaint. The first was too overly dramatic and ridiculous and the second was so Woody Allen it made my head spin.

I have to admit, I'm very pleasantly surprised by the love for East of Eden. Besides Cannery Row, which I love for the vignettish nature and all the bizarre little asides, it's my favorite Steinbeck.

I'm reading exaggeratedly light fare right now. Book 6 of the Dark Tower series by Stephen King. I need lightness before I jump into my Civil Property and Criminal Law casebooks.

RotationSlimWang
08-12-2009, 01:22 AM
Glamorama and Rules of Attraction are his best. Informers has two absolutely great parts in it but about eight parts that are boring as all shit surrounding it. Less Than Zero is pretty brutally juvenile and goes nowhere. He's one of my favs though. Wonder when his next book is due already. Supposed to be about vampires I believe.

Gribbz
08-12-2009, 11:52 AM
What did you find juvenile about Less Than Zero? Ellis seemed like he was trying a bit too hard with Informers. Glamorama is the only Bret Easton Ellis book I haven't picked up yet.

TomAz
08-18-2009, 10:13 AM
Bleep, Horse Tears and all:

Thanks for the English language Indian literature recommendations. I think I might start with Mistry, as I happen to be 1/4 Parsi (Indian Zoroastrian) myself.

I thought the Zoroastrians were not allowed to marry outside their religion. I had a coworker once who was a Parsi and she said they were very strict about that sort of thing.

TomAz
08-18-2009, 10:15 AM
Also add me to the list of American Pastoral haters. I just found it dull and tedious.

I did enjoy The Plot Against America though.

TomAz
08-18-2009, 10:32 AM
So I've been reading Nick Hornby's Songbook in which he writes 26 essays on 31 songs. I like the way he thinks and writes about music and have been enjoying the book a lot. So much that I went ahead and put an iPod playlist of the songs together (less 2, which I've not been able to find).

Just discovered this feature on McSweeney's, as sort of an extension of the book:
http://www.mcsweeneys.net/links/song/

cool stuff.


PS if anyone can find me a copy of "Glorybound" by The Bible or "So I'll Run" by Butch Hancock and Marce LaCouture, I'd be your friend.

CuervoPH
08-18-2009, 11:36 AM
I ended up buying Songbook because I read an excerpt from his "Thunder Road" essay online. That is still one of the best music essays I've ever read.

miscorrections
08-18-2009, 11:38 AM
So I live right by the library and I think I would like to pick up a couple books. What do y'alls recommend (that I could probably find at a non-main library branch)?

TomAz
08-18-2009, 11:54 AM
John Grisham, Danielle Steele, Michael Crichton, Clive Cussler, Jackie Collins.

Hannahrain
08-18-2009, 11:55 AM
V.C. Andrews.

miscorrections
08-18-2009, 11:56 AM
Sigh.

Hannahrain
08-18-2009, 12:01 PM
Janet Evanovich?

Hannahrain
08-18-2009, 12:01 PM
The Amy Fisher autobiography?

Hannahrain
08-18-2009, 12:02 PM
The homeless man peeing in the Home and Garden section?

Courtney
08-18-2009, 12:31 PM
John Grisham, Danielle Steele, Michael Crichton, Clive Cussler, Jackie Collins.

Who's Clive Cussler? I feel that I might be missing a fundamental part of the American literature landscape.

miscorrections
08-18-2009, 12:33 PM
Thanks for being constructive and helpful, Hannah. I'll make sure to pass the homeless man on so he can pee in your home & garden.

TomAz
08-18-2009, 12:57 PM
Who's Clive Cussler? I feel that I might be missing a fundamental part of the American literature landscape.

[edit] Dirk Pitt adventure novels
(in chronological order)

The Mediterranean Caper (1973) NB: Released as "MAYDAY!" in the United Kingdom.
Iceberg (1975)
Raise the Titanic! (1976)
Vixen 03 (1978)
Night Probe! (1981)
Pacific Vortex! (1983) NB: Was written before The Mediterranean Caper.
Deep Six (1984)
Cyclops (1986)
Treasure (1988)
Dragon (1990)
Sahara (1992)
Inca Gold (1994)
Shock Wave (1996)
Flood Tide (1997)
Atlantis Found (1999)
Valhalla Rising (2001)
Trojan Odyssey (2003)
Black Wind (2004)
Treasure of Khan (2006)
Arctic Drift (2008)

***

This insider's guide offers readers a wealth of information about Clive Cussler and his fearless, globe-trotting hero, including interviews, photos, synopses, trivia, and an original short story.

With nearly 100 million copies of his bestselling books in print, Clive Cussler is an extraordinary author whose life parallels that of his fictional hero, DIRK PITT. Whether searching for famous shipwrecks or cruising in classic cars from his private collection, Cussler's spirit feeds the soul of DIRK PITT -- a hero whose adventures race along at supersonic speed. Now with this truly unique insider's guide, you can dive in and explore the worlds of both Clive Cussler, the grand master of adventure, and DIRK PITT, the world's greatest action adventure hero. Inside Clive Cussler and Dirk Pittģ Revealed you'll find: The prologue to Clive Cussler's next exciting DIRK PITT novel! An exclusive interview with Clive Cussler -- including the evolution of the DIRK PITT novels and the close ties between Cussler and his hero "The Reunion" -- an original short story in which Cussler crashes NUMA's twenty-year reunion and reminisces with DIRK PITT and all his favorite characters A brief synopsis of every DIRK PITT novel, including why Pacific Vortex! -- not The Mediterranean Caper -- should be considered the first PITT novel A concordance for the DIRK PITT novels -- complete with A-Z listings of every major character, car, ship, aircraft, weapon, locale, and more. Complete with rare photos, dedications, the Clive Cussler car collection, and advanced DIRK PITT trivia, Clive Cussler and Dirk Pitt Revealed contains a mother lode of information every fan will treasure.

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SoulDischarge
08-18-2009, 12:59 PM
I feel like a retard when I try to recommend books since my scope is pretty limited to the widely acknowledged hipster college student classics. Still, have you read A Confederacy Of Dunces by John Kennedy O'Toole? Or just pick up some true crime stuff. If you haven't already read Helter Skelter or Patti Hearst's book, those are fascinating.

real talk
08-18-2009, 01:02 PM
I love the Janet Evanovich Stephanie Plumb novels and I am not ashamed. They are like candy and are perfectly one flight's length.

Alchemy
08-18-2009, 04:39 PM
I had to read a Stephanie Plumb novel in a detective fiction class I took. I wrote an essay asking why I needed to read Stephanie Plumb when I could just watch Midnight Run. I thought my professor would get mad, because she was a big Janet Evanovich fan, but she gave me an A and said that Midnight Run is awesome.

JewFace
08-18-2009, 05:11 PM
I thought the Zoroastrians were not allowed to marry outside their religion. I had a coworker once who was a Parsi and she said they were very strict about that sort of thing.
Well, obviously my paternal grandfather didn't pay any attention to that rule.

This is actually a highly contentious issue within the community. As you're aware, "Parsi" is an ethno-religious designation. Parsis are descended from Persian Zoroastrians who fled the Muslim invasions and settled in India. Because intermarriage was forbidden, the more conservative Parsis like to assume that they're still -- centuries after landing in India -- purely Persian. Of course, this is utter rot and has proven by a limited number of DNA tests. The convervatives will point to older DNA tests which turn out in their favor. But all of that aside, how could they not expect there to be some "impurities" in the genetic line after centuries of living in India?

Anyway, there are two distinct camps of Parsis now. The more conservative ones who refuse to allow intermarriage, who will not initiate children of mixed marriages into the faith, will not initiate adopted children into the faith and will not recognize converts. I truly understand where they're coming from; if this is as an ethno-religious designation aren't we diluting its "purity" by intermarrying? Perhaps, but then we have to look at the cold hard facts. There are no more than 100,000 Parsis left in the world and the death rate far exceeds the birth rate. If we were to continue down the path that the conservatives call for, the numbers could dwindle down to as low as 20,000 by the next century and would cease to be recognized as an ethnic group and instead, I believe, would be known as a tribe.

But, there is also a more liberal wing which publicly and loudly calls for allowing intermarriage, adoption and conversion. They realize that the religion and culture will die out if it is not opened up to others.

So, yeah, even though only 1/4 of my genes are Parsi, and even though I'm not a particularly religious fellow, I still consider myself Parsi and I won't allow a few conservative, backward, aged priests tell me that I'm not. Sorry for the tangential conversation, but I just wanted to respond to TomAZ.

Back to books: I just picked up Atonement today and I can't put it down. I'm very glad I hadn't seen the film yet.

matildawong
08-18-2009, 07:18 PM
There's a really good Bonnie and Clyde bio out right now... in new releases at the library. Go Down Together -- I had no idea I'd be so interested (I got the book as a gift) but the book goes into such detail about life in the Dust Bowl during the Depression. I'm really enjoying it.

TomAz
08-19-2009, 06:53 AM
Well, obviously my paternal grandfather didn't pay any attention to that rule.

This is actually a highly contentious issue within the community. As you're aware, "Parsi" is an ethno-religious designation. Parsis are descended from Persian Zoroastrians who fled the Muslim invasions and settled in India. Because intermarriage was forbidden, the more conservative Parsis like to assume that they're still -- centuries after landing in India -- purely Persian. Of course, this is utter rot and has proven by a limited number of DNA tests. The convervatives will point to older DNA tests which turn out in their favor. But all of that aside, how could they not expect there to be some "impurities" in the genetic line after centuries of living in India?

Anyway, there are two distinct camps of Parsis now. The more conservative ones who refuse to allow intermarriage, who will not initiate children of mixed marriages into the faith, will not initiate adopted children into the faith and will not recognize converts. I truly understand where they're coming from; if this is as an ethno-religious designation aren't we diluting its "purity" by intermarrying? Perhaps, but then we have to look at the cold hard facts. There are no more than 100,000 Parsis left in the world and the death rate far exceeds the birth rate. If we were to continue down the path that the conservatives call for, the numbers could dwindle down to as low as 20,000 by the next century and would cease to be recognized as an ethnic group and instead, I believe, would be known as a tribe.

But, there is also a more liberal wing which publicly and loudly calls for allowing intermarriage, adoption and conversion. They realize that the religion and culture will die out if it is not opened up to others.

So, yeah, even though only 1/4 of my genes are Parsi, and even though I'm not a particularly religious fellow, I still consider myself Parsi and I won't allow a few conservative, backward, aged priests tell me that I'm not. Sorry for the tangential conversation, but I just wanted to respond to TomAZ.

Back to books: I just picked up Atonement today and I can't put it down. I'm very glad I hadn't seen the film yet.

very interesting. thanks for the insight.

the story I got from my former co-worker, which is consistent with yours I think, is that part of the 'deal' made when they were allowed to settle in Gujurat after fleeing Persia was that they couldn't try to convert the local population. so I guess that's where the 'conservative' position you describe came from. incidently my coworker, her husband and their family all looked Persian as hell.


Atonement: loved the book. bored by the movie.

SoulDischarge
08-20-2009, 06:42 AM
I was kind of disappointed by Brave New World. Some good ideas, but dramatically, it was not very fulfilling. I think maybe I was just expecting something different.

TomAz
08-20-2009, 07:31 AM
I was kind of disappointed by Brave New World. Some good ideas, but dramatically, it was very fulfilling. I think maybe I was just expecting something different.

did you leave a 'not' out?

downingthief
08-20-2009, 08:01 AM
Well played, Tom.

TomAz
08-20-2009, 08:08 AM
PS if anyone can find me a copy of "Glorybound" by The Bible or "So I'll Run" by Butch Hancock and Marce LaCouture, I'd be your friend.

srsly.

AlecEiffel
08-20-2009, 08:31 AM
Did anyone read the newest Paul Auster book (which is about a year old now, I guess)? Wondering if it's worth it.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
08-20-2009, 09:19 AM
So I live right by the library and I think I would like to pick up a couple books. What do y'alls recommend (that I could probably find at a non-main library branch)?
Pretty much anything by JOHN IRVING. Hotel New Hampshire and The World According To Garp are particularly amazing

SoulDischarge
08-20-2009, 09:27 AM
I've read a couple of scattered stories by Borges over the past couple of years. I tried one more today and I've decided I'm just not educated enough to tackle him yet.

miscorrections
08-20-2009, 09:34 AM
I think I'm just going to see if they have any of the Best American Non-Required Reading.

amyzzz
08-20-2009, 09:46 AM
I think I'm just going to see if they have any of the Best American Non-Required Reading.
I think I got a collection of short stories from that one year, and it sucked. At least I don't remember any of it.

roberto73
08-20-2009, 11:14 AM
I think I got a collection of short stories from that one year, and it sucked. At least I don't remember any of it.

If you went into the volume expecting short stories, that might explain why you were disappointed. That particular series focuses on essays and articles (and occasionally comic strips).

I've been working my way through Dan Simmons' The Terror for a few weeks now. It's an interesting mix of horror and historical fiction, but it's taking me forever to get through it. Not the book's fault, though; I've just been busy.

amyzzz
08-20-2009, 11:17 AM
If you went into the volume expecting short stories, that might explain why you were disappointed. That particular series focuses on essays and articles (and occasionally comic strips).
I'm pretty sure the volume i had was for short stories. This was from maybe 7 years ago though.


I've been working my way through Dan Simmons' The Terror for a few weeks now. It's an interesting mix of horror and historical fiction, but it's taking me forever to get through it. Not the book's fault, though; I've just been busy.
I LOVE THE TERROR. Dan Simmons is one of my favorite authors. I like the idea of looking through the eyes of the very first Arctic explorers. No sunglasses, no proper arctic clothing, THEY DON'T EVEN KNOW WHAT IGLOOS ARE. And of course, there's some crazy abominable snowman mixed in.

SoulDischarge
08-20-2009, 11:24 AM
What are some good horror writers besides Lovecraft and Poe?

Alchemy
08-20-2009, 11:37 AM
I've been meaning to get into Lovecraft. What's the best place to start?

amyzzz
08-20-2009, 11:38 AM
If you like your horror mixed with sexual perversion, there's Richard Laymon (The Traveling Vampire Show). Do you completely discount Stephen King?

Dan Simmons has written a couple other horror novels -- Carrion Comfort is a lot of fun -- people with the ability to control other people's bodies terrorize the world throughout the 20th century, including Nazi Germany and Hollywood in the 80's. It's a lot better than it sounds. :)

SoulDischarge
08-20-2009, 11:42 AM
I've been meaning to get into Lovecraft. What's the best place to start?

http://www.amazon.com/Best-H-P-Lovecraft-Bloodcurdling/dp/0345350804/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1250797308&sr=8-1