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wmgaretjax
10-22-2007, 08:45 AM
I'm reading David Markson's "Wittgenstein's Mistress" and it's probably one of the best books I've ever read.

atom heart
10-22-2007, 01:09 PM
I've also been working on my own novel (which has been in progress for like 3 years) and I'm about 30,000 words in

you might want to try NaNoWriMo just for the hell of it:

http://www.nanowrimo.org/

RotationSlimWang
10-22-2007, 01:13 PM
I have a signed copy of Lunar Park but I haven't read it yet. I went to see Ellis do a reading from it, and a brief Q&A, which was pretty interesting, but it still didn't sound as compelling as his earlier books.

The first third or so of Lunar Park, before it turns into a horror novel, is some of Ellis's best work from my standpoint. Him giving a somewhat fictional recap of his own life is fucking fascinating.

Mr.Wyndham
10-23-2007, 08:49 PM
I'm reading Slaughterhouse-Five by Vonnegut, which i havent read in about 5 years, always a good read.

tessalasset
10-23-2007, 11:19 PM
I had to read this in high school. I hated it. but I was like 15 so wtf did I know? yeah i had to read the giver in 6th grade and hated it so much, and for my whole life have thought i hated that book. so i intentionally read it again this year and loved it and cried.

Courtney
10-24-2007, 10:46 AM
I enjoyed A Separate Peace. But I think that has a lot to do with the similarities to my own high school. Although I think actually the fictitious "Devon School" is based on Exeter, alma mater of Win Butler among others.

I have been sort of reading Infinite Jest. Very very slowly. And I picked up Freakanomics for a quick read last week because it was lying around the house. It was amusing and quite interesting, but I have some doubts about the methodology and also I wish that the book had more of a unifying theme.

TomAz
10-24-2007, 10:55 AM
I'm about 2/3rds of the way through Chris Salewicz' excellent biography of Joe Strummer. He's just about to fire Mick Jones. what a downfall. this book is really good. sad but good.

atom heart
10-24-2007, 04:19 PM
yeah i had to read the giver in 6th grade and hated it so much, and for my whole life have thought i hated that book. so i intentionally read it again this year and loved it and cried.

I had to read that book twice. I don't know what to think of it except that it made me feel sick both times I read it. Also I was way too young to understand most of it.

caco0283
10-24-2007, 04:51 PM
I've been reading "A People's History of the United States" by Howard Zinn and also "Das Kapital" by Karl Marx

Alchemy
11-18-2007, 02:37 PM
I just finished The Road by Cormac McCarthy (writer of No Country for Old Men and All The Pretty Horses)

I enjoyed the book a lot. It was a very quick and easy read. It took me about two days to finish it, but I dedicated a few hours. It is a very dark and gloomy story about a man and his son making their way across part of the United States, in an attempt to reach the coast. Wouldn't be such a bad path, but this is in a post-apocalyptic world. It makes you wonder about the world, and what would happen if something catastrophic happened in which all plants, animals and civilization was destroyed. The sky is covered by a dark ash cloud, and you breathe in all the crap as well. Not to mention you have to watch out for any other humans. They could be good guys like the man and his son, but they might be part of bands of cannibals who hunt down other humans for food, being that there aren't many animals (there aren't many humans for that matter).

So basically it was really good and crazy, a bit scary.

wmgaretjax
11-18-2007, 02:49 PM
I just finished The Road by Cormac McCarthy (writer of No Country for Old Men and All The Pretty Horses)


i read this book last year on the recommendation of my father. this book has gotten to much press and positive critique for simply being dark and post-apocalyptic. really, it's a transparent, thinly guised fable with one-sided characters and little meaningful to say. After seeing Old Country for Old Men last night, I'm tempted to read the book, but won't because I hated this one so much. At least it was a quick read...

On a positive note, I finished Don DeLillo's Underworld and recommend it, save one reservation about it being obscenely long (800 pages). Worth checking out over the holidays if you find yourself with a little extra time to dedicate to a particularly dense, but incredibly rewarding book.

Alchemy
11-18-2007, 02:57 PM
i read this book last year on the recommendation of my father. this book has gotten to much press and positive critique for simply being dark and post-apocalyptic. really, it's a transparent, thinly guised fable with one-sided characters and little meaningful to say. After seeing Old Country for Old Men last night, I'm tempted to read the book, but won't because I hated this one so much. At least it was a quick read...

On a positive note, I finished Don DeLillo's Underworld and recommend it, save one reservation about it being obscenely long (800 pages). Worth checking out over the holidays if you find yourself with a little extra time to dedicate to a particularly dense, but incredibly rewarding book.

The story isn't about it being dark and post-apocalyptic though. It's more about the father's change in viewing the world. About shifting from being afraid of everything and taking so many precautions, to taking more risks and helping people. Compare how the father reacted when the boy thought he saw another boy to when they found the flare gun. It's also about the decision to allowing the boy to live, or killing him so that he won't suffer this new world. So much goes through the father in this story that I would not call him a one-sided character at all. He isn't just a father doing father things. I can dig it if you didn't like the book, but it was not just about two people walking around in a crappy world. Read it with the character changes in mind (specifically the father). It would only take a day or two after all. But that book has a lot to say. We had crazy discussions about it in my class with all it had to say.

wmgaretjax
11-18-2007, 03:01 PM
The story isn't about it being dark and post-apocalyptic though. It's more about the father's change in viewing the world. About shifting from being afraid of everything and taking so many precautions, to taking more risks and helping people. Compare how the father reacted when the boy thought he saw another boy to when they found the flare gun. It's also about the decision to allowing the boy to live, or killing him so that he won't suffer this new world. So much goes through the father in this story that I would not call him a one-sided character at all. He isn't just a father doing father things. I can dig it if you didn't like the book, but it was not just about two people walking around in a crappy world. Read it with the character changes in mind (specifically the father). It would only take a day or two after all. But that book has a lot to say. We had crazy discussions about it in my class with all it had to say.

all of these are focused on this notion of living in a world that is "almost" bad enough to not want to live anymore. all of it hangs on that notion, without it, the book doesn't matter. i'm not going to spoil it, but the heavy-handedness of the ending reiterates all of this. i laughed out loud, it was ridiculous and insulting. The book has some great imagery, and there are moments when actual characters almost break through, but unfortunately it's bogged down by it's inability to step past it's own contrivances.

bmack86
11-18-2007, 03:13 PM
The last good book I read was Nadja by Andre Breton. It was highly enjoyable.

Alchemy
11-18-2007, 03:14 PM
all of these are focused on this notion of living in a world that is "almost" bad enough to not want to live anymore. all of it hangs on that notion, without it, the book doesn't matter. i'm not going to spoil it, but the heavy-handedness of the ending reiterates all of this. i laughed out loud, it was ridiculous and insulting. The book has some great imagery, and there are moments when actual characters almost break through, but unfortunately it's bogged down by it's inability to step past it's own contrivances.

Well of course the book has to hang on the notion of the world being "almost" bad enough to not want to live in. That's what the book is about. The movie Titanic wouldn't matter without the sea. The important part were the decisions and thoughts of the characters. What my class and I noticed on the characters so much, is that you were able to fill in their place. It didn't matter if you had a clear picture of a character, I mean, that's part of the reason that they don't have names. You are not supposed to have a clear character. This way instead of saying, the boy is this, this and this. He does this and that. He would probably do this and blah blah. In this scenario you could be the boy. You could be the man, even if you don't know what it is to be a parent. You can't read this book waiting for McCarthy to further develop the characters and spell them out for you. Not knowing the characters is part of the point. It's that this could happen to us, and these are things we might go through. It's meaning is also not that this is what happens in that setting. The process of being more trusting, taking risks for fun (like popping flares when you should be hiding), and generally trying your best to just live a normal life are things we could do in this world as well. The book has so much to say.

wmgaretjax
11-18-2007, 03:48 PM
You seem to be misunderstanding me. This has nothing to do with wanting characters spelled out, it's about them being too simple in the first place. this flare scene that you are obsessed about is another example of a shallow attempt at subtlety. of course flares will be shot off inappropriately, because the father is intermittently yearning to get caught (how poignant). However, the good nature of the father prevails, and his son is saved. the "just don't give up" mentality is painted with such clarity it becomes a transparent mesh that is incapable of holding his story up.

Kudos for McCarthy for taking such a naive set of principles and imparting them to us in a book that "has so much to say" worthy of the Oprah Book club recognition it received.

Alchemy
11-18-2007, 05:25 PM
this flare scene that you are obsessed about is another example of a shallow attempt at subtlety. of course flares will be shot off inappropriately, because the father is intermittently yearning to get caught (how poignant). However, the good nature of the father prevails, and his son is saved. the "just don't give up" mentality is painted with such clarity it becomes a transparent mesh that is incapable of holding his story up.

Obviously you misunderstood the book. Sure the "just don't give up" mentality is obvious. I mean, that is a given part of the book. If they gave up, we wouldn't have much of a story would we? By saying that the father wants to get caught by shooting the flares tells me that the point of this story is not so transparent. If you think that it's about the good nature of the father prevailing, you misunderstood the book. If you even thought it was about the son surviving, you misread the book. There is a reason he lets the kid shoot the flare, and it's obviously so subtle that you missed it.

Don't scare people from reading the book because it is too "simple". Other people on the board should read it and decide for themselves.

wmgaretjax
11-18-2007, 05:47 PM
It IS transparent. It's the kind of things you predict a few pages into the book. It's naive to pretend that complexity is automatically attributed because motivations are confused. It's a great start, but the problem is that it stops there. It doesn't extend any further, and so the characters end up as prop-ups for immature themes (some of which you listed above) that are also not fully explored. This is futile, unless I'm willing to go back after a year and re-read it to put together some more exact examples.

What I will do instead is recommend another book:

Wittgenstein's Mistress by David Markson is an incredibly book in the vein of James Joyce and Samuel Beckett. The pseudo-narrative revolves around a woman who believes herself to be the last person on earth. The novel are her memoirs tracing her experiences alone visiting historical locations, reflecting on artists and writers, and attempting to reconstruct some events in her life. She tells many of the stories many times, and you begin to question her as certain facts change and events begin to signify different meanings. Her sanity is called in question by these occurrences, and also personally in by her in her memoirs.

The book is a fantastic deconstruction of personal memory, madness, and how culture and history inform these elements.

Best book I have read this year.

roberto73
11-22-2007, 07:36 PM
Attention, literature lovers. One of the fields I'm specializing in for my PhD exams is the modern short story, and I'm trying to choose six authors to focus on (translation: read every short story I can find). These are currently the six:

Ernest Hemingway
Raymond Carver
John Cheever
William Faulkner
Flannery O'Connor
Edgar Allan Poe

Any judgments? Any substitutions? I'm kinda thinking Donald Barthelme instead of Faulkner, but nothing's solid yet. Is there someone important I'm forgetting, someone crucial to the state of the modern short story?

Current reading: Ian McEwan's First Love, Last Rites

mountmccabe
11-22-2007, 08:46 PM
Attention, literature lovers. One of the fields I'm specializing in for my PhD exams is the modern short story, and I'm trying to choose six authors to focus on (translation: read every short story I can find). These are currently the six:

Ernest Hemingway
Raymond Carver
John Cheever
William Faulkner
Flannery O'Connor
Edgar Allan Poe

Any judgments? Any substitutions? I'm kinda thinking Donald Barthelme instead of Faulkner, but nothing's solid yet. Is there someone important I'm forgetting, someone crucial to the state of the modern short story?

Current reading: Ian McEwan's First Love, Last Rites

I don't understand your take on the word "modern" but this isn't about me.

William Faulkner is one of my personal gods. This is making me want to pick up that gigantic volume of short stories and reread it. I just adore his prose.

I would support including Barthelme but I wouldn't lose Faulkner for him; I'd probably knock out Carver or Cheever mainly because I don't know them at all. Barthelme's short stories are such a delight. Well, I found them to be delightful; I can see where their abstractness could be off putting. I've only read 60 Short Stories, though, not 40.

The only legit names I can think of to consider (since there'd be laughing if I said Philip K Dick) would be Kafka and Borges.

roberto73
11-22-2007, 09:08 PM
I don't understand your take on the word "modern" but this isn't about me.

Thanks for the suggestions, John. "Modern" generally encompasses turn of the 20th century onward. Poe sneaks in under the wire because of his unusual genre contributions. I've thought about Kafka, too, but I feel like with Poe included I've cornered the market on morbidity. Borges, however, is an interesting thought. It's been a while since I've read him, and he's probably due for revisiting.

wmgaretjax
11-22-2007, 11:33 PM
Borges and Barthelme should be on your list, methinks.

TomAz
11-23-2007, 05:07 AM
It IS transparent. It's the kind of things you predict a few pages into the book. It's naive to pretend that complexity is automatically attributed because motivations are confused. It's a great start, but the problem is that it stops there. It doesn't extend any further, and so the characters end up as prop-ups for immature themes (some of which you listed above) that are also not fully explored. This is futile, unless I'm willing to go back after a year and re-read it to put together some more exact examples.

What I will do instead is recommend another book:

Wittgenstein's Mistress by David Markson is an incredibly book in the vein of James Joyce and Samuel Beckett. The pseudo-narrative revolves around a woman who believes herself to be the last person on earth. The novel are her memoirs tracing her experiences alone visiting historical locations, reflecting on artists and writers, and attempting to reconstruct some events in her life. She tells many of the stories many times, and you begin to question her as certain facts change and events begin to signify different meanings. Her sanity is called in question by these occurrences, and also personally in by her in her memoirs.

The book is a fantastic deconstruction of personal memory, madness, and how culture and history inform these elements.

Best book I have read this year.


I am glad I avoided this discussion.

Stefinitely Maybe
11-23-2007, 05:21 AM
I have nothing new to add to this thread, except that I have been listening to the song "Put A Penny In The Slot" by Fionn Regan a lot lately, simply because it contains the following lyrics:

'For the loneliness you foster
I suggest Paul Auster
And a book called Timbuktu'

TomAz
12-28-2007, 09:01 AM
I finished All Over But the Shouting a week ago and have started in on Denis Johnson's Tree of Smoke. but as i mentioned in another thread I got Michael Chabon's Gentlemen of the Road for Christmas and it's really fun and hard to put down so I guess I'm reading two novels at once and trying not to get the plots and characters confused.

wmgaretjax
12-28-2007, 09:15 AM
I am reading Barthelmes "The Dead Father." I love it.

downingthief
12-28-2007, 09:19 AM
I just got some used copies of All the Pretty Horses, and the Crossing by McCarthy. I'll be starting those soon.

mountmccabe
12-28-2007, 09:23 AM
I am reading Barthelmes "The Dead Father." I love it.

That was a great book.


Also I really liked the one Denis Johnson book I read. I think it was called Resussication of a Hanged Man.


I have been slowly moving through Judy Budnitz's first book of short stories. I think I may quit trying soon because each time I sit down to start I fall asleep before reading a word. I like her stories but the idea of reading them is not grabbing me at this time. I think I need to switch to a novel.

Fortunately I got a couple for my birthday - Infinite Jest (DFW) and The Road (CM) and a couple for Christmas - Market Forces (RKM) and Terranesia (GE) so that's what I'm going to do.

keriann
12-28-2007, 09:38 AM
I just read Freakonomics and will now be moving on to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat.

I have about 10 books I want to read over break and none of them are fiction. This makes me feel like a terrible person.

I do have Franny and Zooey checked out from the library though.

Courtney
12-28-2007, 09:43 AM
Keriann I like your choices of books. Those are all books that I really enjoyed reading.

I read Freakanomics recently followed by Hardboiled Wonderland and the End of the World. Now I am maybe starting The Omnivore's Dilemma, which I received as a Christmas present.

full on idle
12-28-2007, 10:14 AM
I'm reading The Year of Living Biblically, "One man's humble quest to follow the bible as literally as possible." It's by this guy A.J. Jacobs and he wrote a book about reading the entire encyclopedia A-Z. It's funny and interesting. He uses like 18 different versions/translations of the bible and gets advice from a plethora of religious people, Orthodox Jews, Secular Jews Creationists, Amish, Jehovah's Witnesses, Catholics, Protestants, everybody bible related. He hasn't gotten to the new testament yet. The whole thing's written with a real sense of humor but it's also pretty enlightening.

full on idle
12-28-2007, 10:15 AM
He can't touch impure women!!!!!!!!!!!!

J~$$$
12-28-2007, 10:24 AM
That sounds like a great read foi. I bought The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference.

I also discovered that I cannot read through anything that is fictional, I get half way and just give up. I dont know why.

full on idle
12-28-2007, 10:27 AM
Just assign the characters the identities of real people in your life and pretend it's all really happening. Please make me the one that can fly.

J~$$$
12-28-2007, 10:31 AM
Just assign the characters the identities of real people in your life and pretend it's all really happening. Please make me the one that can fly.

I can do that, but then as Im reading you are always going to be flying, and it will confuse the shit out of me because then I'll think I wonder if she has ever flown to the Bahamas? Does she have to look out for planes or birds? Does she follow FAA regulations? Does she ever get tired? what if she gets tired over water? ect ect ect

Alchemy
12-28-2007, 10:33 AM
I just finished reading Brave New World for the first time. Very interesting. It is a good book. Read it if you have time to spare.

roberto73
12-28-2007, 01:06 PM
In the last month I've read the complete short stories of John Cheever, Flannery O'Connor, and Ernest Hemingway. I'm a couple hundred pages into William Faulkner's short stories. Still to come: Raymond Carver and Edgar Allan Poe. Exams in approximately seven weeks.

mountmccabe
12-28-2007, 01:10 PM
Yay Bill Faulkner.

If you feel like writing things on Cheever and/or Carver so that I know who they are and if their works might interest me I would read these things you wrote. I will completely understand if this just makes it feel like you have another assignment and that this makes you want to slice open my liver.

roberto73
12-28-2007, 03:05 PM
Yay Bill Faulkner.

If you feel like writing things on Cheever and/or Carver so that I know who they are and if their works might interest me I would read these things you wrote. I will completely understand if this just makes it feel like you have another assignment and that this makes you want to slice open my liver.

I'm enjoying Faulkner quite a bit. I hadn't read many of his stories before, and they're pretty fantastic. I'll whip up a synopsis of Cheever and Carver a little later, when I'm not attempting to entertain my teenage cousins.

miscorrections
12-28-2007, 06:12 PM
I'm reading Mutants: On Genetic Variety and the Human Body by Armand Leroi. It is incredibly interesting, and there are lots of fascinating case studies and photos.

Benis23
12-28-2007, 06:43 PM
I just read Freakonomics and will now be moving on to The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat.

I have about 10 books I want to read over break and none of them are fiction. This makes me feel like a terrible person.

I do have Franny and Zooey checked out from the library though.

I loved Franny and Zooey. I'm about to start Chuck Klosterman IV and possibly Less Than Zero by Easton Ellis.

keriann
12-28-2007, 07:27 PM
I'm reading The Year of Living Biblically

That sounds awesome.

I like that people are talking about books. I want to join a book club. I am a nerd.

miscorrections
12-28-2007, 07:28 PM
I like the idea behind book clubs but in practice it seems they seldom pan out.

keriann
12-28-2007, 07:36 PM
Yeah I have never actually partaken of one so I don't really know. They have a few at the library though that I was thinking could potentially be cool but I doubt anyone in their 20s attends them. It is probably mostly 65 year olds. And I'm sure they have interesting things to say but I sure would like to meet some literate folk who are my age.

mountmccabe
12-28-2007, 08:13 PM
Did we try to do a book club here or am I thinking of something else?

mountmccabe
12-28-2007, 08:14 PM
It would be easy to find something available free as an etext and then see how that works and then maybe expand from there if it is good.

miscorrections
12-28-2007, 08:15 PM
I like your ideas, John. Godspeed.

mountmccabe
12-28-2007, 08:16 PM
Maybe I am thinking of the bit where we sent books to randomly drawn people and Tom sent me an awful novel he didn't like and Greg didn't read the book he got from Valarie and Kristen liked the book I sent her.

keriann
12-28-2007, 08:30 PM
We did discuss starting one. I think the consensus was generally that people don't really have enough time. I really only have time this month. Then it's back to the grind.

mountmccabe
12-28-2007, 08:41 PM
Then somebody should pick something from somewhere like Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page) (or wherever) quick so we can get going!

Maybe I shouldn't pick because I'd pick something like The Queen of Spades (http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/23058) by Pushkin but it is shorter than necessary and also I don't know if anyone else wants to read Pushkin as much as I do.

algunz
12-28-2007, 08:50 PM
A book club would be great fun. I'd love to participate.

mountmccabe
12-28-2007, 08:54 PM
They have a good deal of G.K. Chesterton. I've wanted to read some of his stuff for some time. Can anyone cull the herd for me and/or other perspective readers?

Courtney
12-29-2007, 12:02 PM
Hey bookclub yay.


Then somebody should pick something from somewhere like Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page) (or wherever) quick so we can get going!.

I kinda want to read these from Project Gutenberg:

D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers
Joseph Conrad, Victory
Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim
Balzac, Lost Illusions
Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth


Not that I would be averse to Pushkin.

miscorrections
12-29-2007, 12:24 PM
I'd read all of those but the first because I'd like to read something new.

TomAz
12-29-2007, 12:44 PM
I like to read philosphy.

http://cdn.overstock.com/images/products/bnt/FC0836218051.JPG

wmgaretjax
12-29-2007, 12:53 PM
Online book club? I'd be in. And I'm down for Pushkin.

JustSteve
12-29-2007, 03:14 PM
first foray into this thread...just picked up "world without end" by ken follett on a whim at costco. no pages down, over 1000 to go. anyone read it?

algunz
12-29-2007, 07:40 PM
So, have we decided on The Queen of Spades?

Should we have it read by a certain day?

keriann
12-29-2007, 08:39 PM
Then somebody should pick something from somewhere like Project Gutenberg (http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page) (or wherever) quick so we can get going!

Maybe I shouldn't pick because I'd pick something like The Queen of Spades (http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/23058) by Pushkin but it is shorter than necessary and also I don't know if anyone else wants to read Pushkin as much as I do.

I am pretty much down for whatever.

menikmati
12-29-2007, 09:24 PM
Lemme know when you guys wanna do Goodnight, Nebraska. I'll participate for that.

algunz
12-29-2007, 09:31 PM
I just googled it, menik, and I'm totally in . . . I'm gonna go to the bookstore and buy it tomorrow.

menikmati
12-29-2007, 09:34 PM
Awesome! I've always wanted to do a group thing for this book...it's one of my favorites, and I always feel like I'm the only who's ever heard of it. Yay!

algunz
12-29-2007, 09:35 PM
I think that means that your gonna have to lead the group then.

algunz
12-29-2007, 09:37 PM
even if it's just you and me :winkiss

menikmati
12-29-2007, 09:39 PM
sounds good

Cpt. Funkaho
12-30-2007, 03:07 AM
I'm totally down for this. Is it Goodnight, Nebraska then?

Cpt. Funkaho
12-30-2007, 03:08 AM
Oh, and when is the due date for having it read? A week? Two weeks? A month?


We walruses are voracious readers; I can pretty much have it read by whenever.

thelastgreatman
12-30-2007, 03:28 AM
I like to read philosphy.

http://cdn.overstock.com/images/products/bnt/FC0836218051.JPG

Fuck those multi-book compilations. As a Calvin and Hobbes purist I always resented them--give me the originals in all their slim glory. The titles alone are justification.

Also, when I read the very last Calvin strip I teared up, no lie.

TomAz
12-30-2007, 05:50 AM
You resent a lot of pointless things, randy. just sayin'.

Cpt. Funkaho
12-30-2007, 05:51 AM
It's a magical world, Hobbes... Let's go exploring!

roberto73
12-30-2007, 06:50 AM
I would join if I weren't already up to my eyeballs in reading material. If this little book club endeavor makes it to March, I'll be a tardy participant.

BROKENDOLL
12-30-2007, 07:55 AM
Since joining this board months ago, I've read things from fictional/non-fictional characters, real-life experiences to no-life experiences, I've laughed, cried, cursed, and been left in suspense as to the next post. I feel I almost know people who I may never meet as well as those I would like to meet, or wouldn't want to ever meet. I've been educated in the latest news, drugs, sex and rock n' roll...Lord knows I've tried picking up something new to read but find myself drawn back to this in depth endless array of reading known as "The Coachella Message Board..." I highly recommend it for it's diversity of characters, plots, and subject matter! (And so far, there isn't a page anywhere up ahead that says, "The End." I like that.)

Alchemy
12-30-2007, 08:07 AM
So... I read a small book called The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemmingway. It was really nice. I wanted to make a film about it using cut out shapes of colored paper.

algunz
12-30-2007, 08:25 AM
I'm totally down for this. Is it Goodnight, Nebraska then?

In say yes, but if so - menik is in charge.

Menik, when should we have it read by? The Cpt. and I would like to know.

full on idle
12-30-2007, 09:01 AM
I am pretty much down for whatever.

Me too, tell me when you guys decide.

Hannahrain
12-30-2007, 09:08 AM
I'm in, and pro Goodnight, Nebraska seeing as how I've already got an unopened copy of it that I bought the last time we talked about it.

menikmati
12-30-2007, 09:47 AM
In say yes, but if so - menik is in charge.

Menik, when should we have it read by? The Cpt. and I would like to know.

I don't know, it's up to you guys....whenever all of you get the book I guess....I don't think it's the quickest read though, but maybe that's just me.

algunz
12-30-2007, 10:42 AM
How 'bout we plan on having it read by next month? That gives us procrastinators and "more than one book readers" plenty of time to be prepared.

January 30th is D-day?

Or is that too much time?

menikmati
12-30-2007, 10:44 AM
fine by me

algunz
12-30-2007, 10:47 AM
Okaleedokalee

Book Club book #1 = Goodnight, Nebraska by Tom McNeal

book to be read by January 30th

(or sooner if the group decides to begin discussion earlier)

mountmccabe
12-30-2007, 10:55 AM
I think this plan needs to be rethought.

Can anyone explain why we should do Goodnight, Nebraska? Please attempt to motivate me to buy and read a 336 page book I've never heard of.

Yes, it's only $4 ($0.01 + 3.99 shipping) from Amazon Marketplace and I might be able to find it for about the same at a local used bookstore... but those options are still a bigger investment in time and hassle than legally downloading a shorter book for free.

Also would it make sense to have various deadlines? How many chapters/parts/sections does the book have? There could be 3 or 4 threads for discussing the book throughout the reading process. That would make me more interested.

Courtney
12-30-2007, 11:01 AM
Maybe it would make more sense to make a multiple choice poll for this/future book choices? People could nominate books with any additional suggestions here, and then we could all vote. It seems like that might be a more egalitarian way to choose a book.

wmgaretjax
12-30-2007, 11:21 AM
let's make it a little more democratic...

algunz
12-30-2007, 11:31 AM
I think Goodnight was chosen because menik suggested it, I googled it, and it seemed like a good book. Something I could enjoy.

A poll is fine by me to make it more egalitarian.

Honestly, I'll read anything - I just love books and discussing them. Thus, I'm game for anything. If anyone wants to make some suggestions I'll put together the poll and new thread.

So far we've got McNeal and Pushkin and Courtney's following suggestions:

D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers
Joseph Conrad, Victory
Joseph Conrad, Lord Jim
Balzac, Lost Illusions
Edith Wharton, The House of Mirth

We need three more to make a 10 item poll.

wmgaretjax
12-30-2007, 11:33 AM
I'll throw in a suggestions.

"White Noise" by Don DeLillo

algunz
12-30-2007, 11:35 AM
I'll throw in a suggestions.

"White Noise" by Don DeLillo

Good suggestion. I was thinking about rereading that. I love his style.

Ok we need 2 more.

Courtney
12-30-2007, 12:19 PM
Ooh yes White Noise is a good one. I am going to rescind my previous suggestions and substitute Nabokov's Pale Fire because it looks like people are for the most part willing to buy a book or take it out from the library instead of just restricting things to choices with full text online for free.

So that means we've got:

1. Goodnight, Nebraska by Tom McNeal
2. The Queen of Spades by Alexander Pushkin
3. White Noise by Don DeLillo
4. Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov

mountmccabe
12-30-2007, 12:36 PM
Damn I love Pale Fire.

And, actually, you the full text (http://www.lib.ru/NABOKOW/palefirehtm.txt) is online for free. Sorry.


Though I suppose I should admit that that one is in Russian. The full text in the original English used to be up online but I've lost the link and can't seem to find it again.

Cpt. Funkaho
12-30-2007, 03:25 PM
all right, now we either need six more book suggestions or we can go with fewer. Which will it be?

algunz
12-30-2007, 04:09 PM
I say we've got 'til the end of today to submit anymore suggestions and then I'll just go with whatever we got and put together a thread tomorrow.

Even just 5 choices is excellent, so at least 1 more would be great.

keriann
12-30-2007, 04:37 PM
I am pro free.

I am also pro multiple deadlines and threads to allow for discussing along the way if interested. I think that would be cool.

dorkfish
12-30-2007, 05:20 PM
MASTER AND MARGARITA

dorkfish
12-30-2007, 05:26 PM
THE FOUNTAINHEAD

mountmccabe
12-30-2007, 06:13 PM
I am anti dorkfish

mountmccabe
12-30-2007, 06:14 PM
Well maybe the Bulgakov

Courtney
12-30-2007, 06:49 PM
I am starting to think we are a quite Soviet-centric board.

wmgaretjax
12-30-2007, 09:33 PM
if we are starving for another option... I've been meaning to read Murakami's "The Wind Up Bird Chronicles." It's a little lengthy though.

mountmccabe
12-30-2007, 09:34 PM
Oooh I would be happy about reading more Murakami.

PotVsKtl
12-30-2007, 09:41 PM
Wicked is a piece of shit. I should have known this when I bought it in an airport magazine shop.

Courtney
12-30-2007, 09:41 PM
The Wind Up Bird Chronicles is a really, really good book. It's probably my favorite by Murakami out of the five or so that I've read.

mountmccabe
12-30-2007, 09:44 PM
That leaves the list at:

1. Goodnight, Nebraska by Tom McNeal
2. The Queen of Spades by Alexander Pushkin
3. White Noise by Don DeLillo
4. Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov
5. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
6. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
7. The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami

And, since I don't like the idea of there being fewer than 10 choices I offer up the following additions. Please remove them if suggestions from other people come around. They all have the advantage of being relatively brief at less than 200 pages each. They also have the advantage of me already owning them.

8. Zazie in the Metro by Raymond Queneau
9. Great Expectations by Kathy Acker
10. The Name of the World by Denis Johnson

PotVsKtl
12-30-2007, 10:12 PM
People should be reading Ishiguro.

Courtney
12-30-2007, 10:38 PM
I really enjoyed Never Let Me Go and would be supportive of more Ishiguro. Actually I almost bought Remains of the Day recently, but I was put off about the blurb about some movie on the book cover.

Edit: I just looked up this movie and apparently it has a well-known cast and was nominated for quite a few Oscars and probably is something I should know about. Oops.

wmgaretjax
12-30-2007, 10:57 PM
Yeah. It's actually a great film.

I would love to read another Ishiguro novel. Maybe "When We Were Orphans..."

roberto73
12-31-2007, 05:02 AM
If people are hankering for Japanese lit, you might try Kenzaburo Oe.

algunz
12-31-2007, 11:39 AM
That leaves the list at:

1. Goodnight, Nebraska by Tom McNeal
2. The Queen of Spades by Alexander Pushkin
3. White Noise by Don DeLillo
4. Pale Fire by Vladimir Nabokov
5. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
6. The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand
7. The Wind-up Bird Chronicles by Haruki Murakami

And, since I don't like the idea of there being fewer than 10 choices I offer up the following additions. Please remove them if suggestions from other people come around. They all have the advantage of being relatively brief at less than 200 pages each. They also have the advantage of me already owning them.

8. Zazie in the Metro by Raymond Queneau
9. Great Expectations by Kathy Acker
10. The Name of the World by Denis Johnson

I'm gonna go with these 10, because we could go on and on with more suggestions.

thelastgreatman
12-31-2007, 11:41 AM
Someone wrote another book called Great Expectations? Is it as bad as Dickens?

mountmccabe
12-31-2007, 11:57 AM
If people are hankering for Japanese lit, you might try Kenzaburo Oe.

I will have to put him on the list. Any specific recommendations?

I would've put something by Yukio Mishima - like say The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With the Sea - on that list of potentials if his stuff was easier to come by.

Or maybe I would pick Spring Snow because that's the next of his I want to read but it's the start of his The Sea of Fertility tetraology that he wrote just before he killed himself and I'm not sure that makes sense for the rest of y'all.

full on idle
12-31-2007, 12:05 PM
I want to read Wind Up Bird Chronicles. And I thought Wicked was a fun read.

PotVsKtl
12-31-2007, 03:44 PM
I will have to put him on the list. Any specific recommendations?

I've finished A Personal Matter twice and still don't know how it ends. This may or may not be a recommendation.

bmack86
01-01-2008, 11:33 PM
Anyone read House of Leaves? What did you think? What's your interpretation?

prettydirtything
01-01-2008, 11:38 PM
without my contacts in, I thought this thread said "Hey, Boobs"

i am disappointed and moving on...







I will start reading books again when its not required for school.

mountmccabe
03-25-2008, 09:58 PM
What do y'all think of the presidential race?

gratytrainridesagain
03-25-2008, 10:07 PM
What do y'all think of the presidential race?

it blows dogs for quarters

PotVsKtl
03-25-2008, 11:55 PM
Cormac McCarthy is fucking boring.

Astrid
03-26-2008, 12:11 AM
he's really not. he is just subtle and detailed.

dickens is fucking boring. and steinbeck. bleh.


i just read some fucking incredible books for a class on the caribbean diaspora if anyone is looking for something to read...

lucy-jamaica kincaide
the dew breaker- edwidge danticat
carnival- robert antoni (based on hemmingway's the sun also rises)

PotVsKtl
03-26-2008, 12:20 AM
Steinbeck is interesting. McCarthy is fucking boring.

CuervoPH
03-26-2008, 04:00 AM
I want to read Wind Up Bird Chronicles. And I thought Wicked was a fun read.

I've read this twice now, but the first read was too long before the book discussion, and everyone was on book 3 when I finally picked it back up. I really like Murakami, but I think I preferred both "A Wild Sheep Chase" and "Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World" to "Wind Up Bird Chronicles". I think I want to read "Kafka On The Shore" next.

Will also look into some of the other Japanese authors mentioned above.

algunz
05-01-2008, 02:13 PM
This sounds like it could be an interesting book. Anyone interested in doing another book club? We don't have to do this one, I'm still up for White Noise.

The Film Club by David Gilmour

When David Gilmour, the Canadian film critic and novelist, told his teenage son, Jesse, that he could drop out of high school if he watched three movies a week at home under his tutelage, Jesse probably thought he was getting a good deal, and David may have believed he had a clever concept for a stunt memoir. In fact, they both got much more: Jesse received a proper (if unconventional) education, and David wrote a touching, witty story about cinema, and how fathers and sons really interact.

In the book (on sale 5/6), the pair watch hundreds of movies, everything from Absolute Power to Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, but they learn far more about each other: David watches his career slip off the rails, while Jesse struggles with his earliest romances and minimal job prospects. Eventually, they find that each man is exactly what the other needs in his life at that moment. When the project finally unravels, they’ve learned that an appreciation for art is impossible without an appreciation for their mutual fallibility.



The following is an excerpt from The Film Club (Twelve Books, 2008) by David Gilmour.


I was stopped at a red light the other day when I saw my son coming out of a movie theater. He was with his new girlfriend. She was holding his coat sleeve at the very end with her fingertips, whispering something into his ear. I didn’t catch what film they’d just seen—the marquee was blocked by a tree in full flower—but I found myself remembering with a gust of almost painful nostalgia those three years that he and I spent, just the two of us, watching movies, talking on the porch, a magic time that a father doesn’t usually get to have so late in a teenage boy’s life. I don’t see him now as much as I used to (that’s as it should be) but that was a gorgeous time. A lucky break for both of us.



When I was a teenager, I believed that there was a place where bad boys went when they dropped out of school. It was somewhere off the edge of the earth, like that graveyard for elephants, only this one was full of the delicate white bones of little boys. I’m sure that’s why, to this day, I still have nightmares about studying for a physics exam, about flipping, with escalating worry, through page after page of my textbook—vectors and parabolas—because I’ve never seen any of this stuff before!

Thirty-five years later, when my son’s marks began to wobble in grade nine and toppled over entirely in grade ten, I experienced a kind of double horror, first at what was actually happening, second from this remembered sensation, still very alive in my body. I switched homes with my ex-wife (“He needs to live with a man,” she said). I moved into her house, she moved into my loft, which was too small to accommodate the full-time presence of a six-foot-four, heavy-footed teenager. That way, I assumed privately, I could do his homework for him, instead of her.

But it didn’t help. To my nightly question “Is that all your homework?” my son, Jesse, responded with a cheerful “Absolutely!” When he went to stay with his mother for a week that summer, I found a hundred different homework assignments shoved into every conceivable hiding place in his bedroom. School, in a word, was making him a liar and a slippery customer.

We sent him to a private school; some mornings, a bewildered secretary would call us. “Where is he?” Later that day, my long-limbed son would materialize on the porch. Where had he been? Maybe to a rap competition in some shopping mall in the suburbs or someplace less savory, but not school. We’d give him hell, he’d apologize solemnly, be good for a few days, and then it would all happen again.

He was a sweet-natured boy, very proud, who seemed incapable of doing anything he wasn’t interested in, no matter how much the consequences worried him. And they worried him a great deal. His report cards were dismaying except for the comments. People liked him, all sorts of people, even the police who arrested him for spray-painting the walls of his former grade school. (Incredulous neighbors recognized him.) When the officer dropped him off at the house, he said, “I’d forget about a life of crime, if I were you, Jesse. You just don’t have it.”

Finally, in the course of tutoring him in Latin one afternoon, I noticed that he had no notes, no textbook, nothing, just a wrinkled-up piece of paper with a few sentences about Roman consuls he was supposed to translate. I remember him sitting head down on the other side of the kitchen table, a boy with a white, untannable face in which you could see the arrival of even the smallest upset with the clarity of a slammed door. It was Sunday, the kind you hate when you’re a teenager, the weekend all but over, homework undone, the city gray like the ocean on a sunless day. Damp leaves on the street, Monday looming from the mist.

After a few moments I said, “Where are your notes, Jesse?”

“I left them at school.”

He was a natural at languages, understood their internal logic, had an actor’s ear—this should have been a breeze—but watching him flip back and forth through the textbook, I could see he didn’t know where anything was.

I said, “I don’t understand why you didn’t bring your notes home. This is going to make things much harder.”

He recognized the impatience in my voice; it made him nervous, which, in turn, made me slightly queasy. He was scared of me. I hated that. I never knew if it was a father-and-son thing or whether I, in particular, with my short temper, my inherited impatience, was the source of his anxiety. “Never mind,” I said. “This’ll be fun anyway. I love Latin.”

“You do?” he asked eagerly (anything to get the focus off the missing notes). I watched him work for a while—his nicotine-stained fingers curled around the pen, his bad handwriting.

“How exactly do you seize and carry off a Sabine woman, Dad?” he asked me.

“I’ll tell you later.”

Pause. “Is helmet a verb?” he said.

On and on it went, the afternoon shadows spreading across the kitchen tiles. Pencil tip bouncing on the vinyl tabletop. Gradually, I became aware of a kind of hum in the room. Where was it coming from? From him? But what was it? My eyes settled on him. It was a kind of boredom, yes, but a rarefied kind, an exquisite, almost cellular conviction of the irrelevance of the task at hand. And for some odd reason, for those few seconds, I was experiencing it as if it were occurring in my own body.

Oh, I thought, so this is how he’s going through his school day. Against this, you cannot win. And suddenly—it was as unmistakable as the sound of a breaking window—I understood that we had lost the school battle.

I also knew in that same instant—knew it in my blood—that I was going to lose him over this stuff, that one of these days he was going to stand up across the table and say, “Where are my notes? I’ll tell you where my notes are. I shoved them up my ass. And if you don’t lay the fuck off me, I’m going to shove them up yours.” And then he’d be gone, slam, and that’d be that.

“Jesse,” I said softly. He knew I was watching him and it made him anxious, as if he were on the verge of getting in trouble (again), and this activity, this flipping through the textbook, back and forth, back and forth, was a way of diverting it.

“Jesse, put down your pen. Stop for a second, please.”

“What?” he said. He’s so pale, I thought. Those cigarettes are leaching the life out of him.

I said, “I want you to do me a favor. I want you to think about whether or not you want to go to school.”

“Dad, the notes are at my—”

“Never mind about the notes. I want you to think about whether or not you want to keep going to school.”

“Why?”

I could feel my heart speeding up, the blood moving into my face. This was a place I’d never been to before, never even imagined before. “Because if you don’t, it’s all right.”

“What’s all right?”

Just say it, spit it out.

“If you don’t want to go to school anymore, then you don’t have to.”

He cleared his throat. “You’re going to let me quit school?”

“If you want. But please, take a few days to think about it. It’s a monu—”

He got to his feet. He always got to his feet when he was excited; his long limbs couldn’t endure the agitation of keeping still. Leaning his frame over the table, he lowered his voice as if afraid of being overheard. “I don’t need a few days.”

“Take them anyway. I insist.”

amyzzz
05-01-2008, 02:19 PM
I'm in.

Cheddar's Cousin
05-01-2008, 02:51 PM
I like books...

So, I'm sitting, waiting for prince on Saturday, and reading a book. Some random guy walks by and asks, "What are you reading?"

"Hollywood...Charles Bukowski," I reply.

"I can't believe you're reading at Coachella."

"I'm waiting for Prince. What am I supposed to do?"

WTF?

TomAz
05-01-2008, 02:53 PM
I recently received a Kindle as a gift. that's that electronic book thing Amazon is selling. I considered bringing it to Coachella for situations just like you name there, but then I was afraid I'd break it or lose it.

algunz
05-01-2008, 04:06 PM
What's a Kindle?

menikmati
05-01-2008, 05:35 PM
it's like an e-reader or whatever. It's exclusive through Amazon. I thought about getting one, but I like holding actual books when I read em.

TomAz
05-02-2008, 06:30 AM
the nice thing about the Kindle is that it's lighter than a book which makes it good to travel with. Plus yuo can get stuff without actually having to drag yourself to the bookstore. Plus the books are a lot cheaper since there's no actual physical book. I dunno that I'd buy one (they're not cheap) but as a gift it's pretty cool.

Astrid
05-02-2008, 10:24 AM
my mother just sent me love is a mix tape, by robert sheffield.

i haven't started it yet, but it seems pretty interesting. sheffield (critic for the rolling stone) recounts the days of his relationship with his wife prior to her death, through a series of mix tapes.

chances are it will be sentimental drivel that i won't be able to get through, but on a brief skim i did see david bowie and nirvana...we shall see.

menikmati
05-02-2008, 11:33 AM
the nice thing about the Kindle is that it's lighter than a book which makes it good to travel with. Plus yuo can get stuff without actually having to drag yourself to the bookstore. Plus the books are a lot cheaper since there's no actual physical book. I dunno that I'd buy one (they're not cheap) but as a gift it's pretty cool.

Yeah I don't know if I'd buy one either (not for 400 bucks), but as a gift it would be cool. I should start writing books, because Amazon has some program now, where authors or anyone can publish their work for the Kindle themselves (you can write it in Word, txt files, PDF whatever - it'll convert it to the right kindle file for you), and sell it for whatever price you want, and you'll receive 35% royalties from whatever sales you make. I just need to write the next great American novel and start selling kindle versions for $10 a piece.

justbeingalish
05-02-2008, 11:39 AM
Recommended read... Mary Roach - Stiffed, The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers.

algunz
05-02-2008, 11:47 AM
Recommended read... Mary Roach - Stiffed, The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers.

My brother recommended that book to me too. Very interesting, kind of creeped me out at times though. Thank goodness for her great sense of humor.

"Upstairs is a working mortuary, and above it are the classrooms and offices of the college, one of the nation's oldest and best-respected*. In exchange for a price break in the cost of embalming and other mortuary services, customers agree to let students practice on their loved ones. Like getting a $5 haircut at the Vidal Sassoon Academy, sort of, sort of not."

downingthief
05-02-2008, 11:56 AM
I like books too much themselves. Just can't see me enjoying a Kindle.

My wife returned from her trip with the new Eric Alterman book for me. Started it last night. Called "Why we are Liberals".

Stefinitely Maybe
06-25-2008, 07:32 AM
I just finished reading "The Road". It was my first Cormac McCarthy book, and it was amazing. I'm going to read Blood Meridian next, I think.

Also, this morning I started "On Chesil Beach" by Ian McEwan (the dude who wrote 'Atonement') and it's really good so far.

I should only read books by authors who have had books made into movies, and whose last name begins with Mc.

CuervoPH
06-25-2008, 08:52 AM
Right now I am working through the "Around and About Paris" series by Thirza Vallois, because I hope to go back to Paris at some point next Fall. I will happily take any other suggestions of fiction or non-fiction books set in and around Paris.

chairmenmeow47
06-25-2008, 08:58 AM
i'm trying to finish "the commanding heights" by daniel yergin and joseph stanislaw. there's a PBS special about this as well. it's for my world political and economic systems class.

it's a bit right leaning (which i enjoy, i'm a free market advocate); however the interesting thing about the book is that i find it easier to follow than other political books because there are small tidbits about the lives of the world leaders shaping these systems, and as a behavioral science major it really helps me to remember their names and policies.

anyways, for anyone interested in history and economics, it's worth the read. most of the book focuses on some post WWI, but mainly post WWII government systems. i plan on lending this to my dad when i'm finished :)

i wish i had time to read books for fun. the return on the native by thomas hardy has been waiting to be read for like two years now :(

amyzzz
06-25-2008, 10:28 AM
I just read The Raw Shark Texts by Steven Hall, a very weird, surreal novel about language, love, and memory. I picked it up at my father-in-law's house (he has tons of books lying around) and couldn't stop reading it.

KatieLyn
06-25-2008, 11:25 AM
"Breakfast of Champions" by Kurt Vonnegut is currently what I'm reading, along with "The Host" by Stephanie Meyer, and this lovely little book of six word memoirs.

RotationSlimWang
06-25-2008, 11:33 AM
Anyone read House of Leaves? What did you think? What's your interpretation?

Interpretation? Not sure what you mean. I thought it was really brilliant but some chapters just need to be skipped entirely, and the Truant subplot went from being really great to being really tiresome towards the end. The actual discussion of what goes on in the house and with the family though is fucking genius.

Down Rodeo
06-25-2008, 01:39 PM
I just finished Blowback by Chalmers Johnson, which was an excellent analysis of American foreign policy blunders in the last half century, specifically focusing on East Asia. His conclusion is that these policy decisions will create serious "blowback" in the form of economic crises, geopolitical conflict, and even terrorist attacks. Considering it was written in 2000, I'd say it was pretty prescient.

TomAz
06-25-2008, 02:04 PM
yeah, especially considering the 'blowback' started in the 90s.

shakermaker113
06-25-2008, 02:22 PM
Anyone read House of Leaves? What did you think? What's your interpretation?

I agree w/ Randy -- not much to interpret, but parts of it were brilliant.

did anyone try reading danielewski's second book? the only time I could tell what was going on was during sex scenes. and even then it wasn't always apparent who, or what, or where, just that sex was happening.

MissingPerson
06-25-2008, 03:13 PM
Damn, I had high hopes for him. House of Leaves is brilliant, but I did notice he got a bit unsettlingly distracted during the sex scenes. And yeah, there are chapters that you can skip, but I think that's kind of part of the format. It adds to the sense of the thing being some lunatic's scrap book, they didn't know what was worth keeping, so you have to sort it out yourself.

Also, I think I should get a medal for carrying that bastard weight of a think around in my rucksack for weeks so I could read it at work. Danielewski owes me a new shoulder.

Down Rodeo
06-25-2008, 04:17 PM
yeah, especially considering the 'blowback' started in the 90s.

Yeah, but the bad shit is just starting with the coming economic meltdown.

Trick Loves The Kids
06-25-2008, 05:25 PM
Are the dune sequels worth reading? I'm like 4/5 of the way through the first book so no spoilers but I want to know if I should pick them up or if they are crap.

RotationSlimWang
06-25-2008, 05:28 PM
Is the original worth reading?

Trick Loves The Kids
06-25-2008, 05:28 PM
I'm really enjoying it so far.

wmgaretjax
06-25-2008, 05:43 PM
yeah, especially considering the 'blowback' started in the 90s.

One could argue earlier, but yeah I'd hardly call the guy prescient. I read that book a couple years back though, I thought it was pretty good.

Pixiessp
06-25-2008, 07:02 PM
I'm reading a book called "Understanding Machiavelli".
Somewhat intriguing. Read "the Prince" in college and just wanted to get in a bit deeper.

JClemy
06-25-2008, 08:34 PM
I just finished reading Snuff by Chuck Palahniuk. It was good. Finished Choke too. It was great. Can't wait for the movie!

Stefinitely Maybe
06-26-2008, 06:04 AM
Yeah I loved House Of Leaves but it's not something I need to revisit, and in hindsight it was probably a triumph of style over content.

ghettojournalist
06-26-2008, 09:17 AM
just for balance, EW's top 100 books of the last 25 years:

1. The Road , Cormac McCarthy (2006)
2. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, J.K. Rowling (2000)
3. Beloved, Toni Morrison (1987)
4. The Liars' Club, Mary Karr (1995)
5. American Pastoral, Philip Roth (1997)
6. Mystic River, Dennis Lehane (2001)
7. Maus, Art Spiegelman (1986/1991)
8. Selected Stories, Alice Munro (1996)
9. Cold Mountain, Charles Frazier (1997)
10. The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, Haruki Murakami (1997)
11. Into Thin Air, Jon Krakauer (1997)
12. Blindness, José Saramago (1998)
13. Watchmen, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons (1986-87)
14. Black Water, Joyce Carol Oates (1992)
15. A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, Dave Eggers (2000)
16. The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood (1986)
17. Love in the Time of Cholera, Gabriel García Márquez (1988)
18. Rabbit at Rest, John Updike (1990)
19. On Beauty, Zadie Smith (2005)
20. Bridget Jones's Diary, Helen Fielding (1998)
21. On Writing, Stephen King (2000)
22. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, Junot Díaz (2007)
23. The Ghost Road, Pat Barker (1996)
24. Lonesome Dove, Larry McMurtry (1985)
25. The Joy Luck Club, Amy Tan (1989)
26. Neuromancer, William Gibson (1984)
27. Possession, A.S. Byatt (1990)
28. Naked, David Sedaris (1997)
29. Bel Canto, Anne Patchett (2001)
30. Case Histories, Kate Atkinson (2004)
31. The Things They Carried, Tim O'Brien (1990)
32. Parting the Waters, Taylor Branch (1988)
33. The Year of Magical Thinking, Joan Didion (2005)
34. The Lovely Bones, Alice Sebold (2002)
35. The Line of Beauty, Alan Hollinghurst (2004)
36. Angela's Ashes, Frank McCourt (1996)
37. Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi (2003)
38. Birds of America, Lorrie Moore (1998)
39. Interpreter of Maladies, Jhumpa Lahiri (2000)
40. His Dark Materials, Philip Pullman (1995-2000)
41. The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros (1984)
42. LaBrava, Elmore Leonard (1983)
43. Borrowed Time, Paul Monette (1988)
44. Praying for Sheetrock, Melissa Fay Greene (1991)
45. Eva Luna, Isabel Allende (1988)
46. Sandman, Neil Gaiman (1988-1996)
47. World's Fair, E.L. Doctorow (1985)
48. The Poisonwood Bible, Barbara Kingsolver (1998)
49. Clockers, Richard Price (1992)
50. The Corrections, Jonathan Franzen (2001)
51. The Journalist and the Murderer, Janet Malcom (1990)
52. Waiting to Exhale, Terry McMillan (1992)
53. The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, Michael Chabon (2000)
54. Jimmy Corrigan, Chris Ware (2000)
55. The Glass Castle, Jeannette Walls (2006)
56. The Night Manager, John le Carré (1993)
57. The Bonfire of the Vanities, Tom Wolfe (1987)
58. Drop City, TC Boyle (2003)
59. Krik? Krak! Edwidge Danticat (1995)
60. Nickel & Dimed, Barbara Ehrenreich (2001)
61. Money, Martin Amis (1985)
62. Last Train To Memphis, Peter Guralnick (1994)
63. Pastoralia, George Saunders (2000)
64. Underworld, Don DeLillo (1997)
65. The Giver, Lois Lowry (1993)
66. A Supposedly Fun Thing I’ll Never Do Again, David Foster Wallace (1997)
67. The Kite Runner, Khaled Hosseini (2003)
68. Fun Home, Alison Bechdel (2006)
69. Secret History, Donna Tartt (1992)
70. Cloud Atlas, David Mitchell (2004)
71. The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down, Ann Fadiman (1997)
72. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Mark Haddon (2003)
73. A Prayer for Owen Meany, John Irving (1989)
74. Friday Night Lights, H.G. Bissinger (1990)
75. Cathedral, Raymond Carver (1983)
76. A Sight for Sore Eyes, Ruth Rendell (1998)
77. The Remains of the Day, Kazuo Ishiguro (1989)
78. Eat, Pray, Love, Elizabeth Gilbert (2006)
79. The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell (2000)
80. Bright Lights, Big City, Jay McInerney (1984)
81. Backlash, Susan Faludi (1991)
82. Atonement, Ian McEwan (2002)
83. The Stone Diaries, Carol Shields (1994)
84. Holes, Louis Sachar (1998)
85. Gilead, Marilynne Robinson (2004)
86. And the Band Played On, Randy Shilts (1987)
87. The Ruins, Scott Smith (2006)
88. High Fidelity, Nick Hornby (1995)
89. Close Range, Annie Proulx (1999)
90. Comfort Me With Apples, Ruth Reichl (2001)
91. Random Family, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc (2003)
92. Presumed Innocent, Scott Turow (1987)
93. A Thousand Acres, Jane Smiley (1991)
94. Fast Food Nation, Eric Schlosser (2001)
95. Kaaterskill Falls, Allegra Goodman (1998)
96. The Da Vinci Code, Dan Brown (2003)
97. Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson (1992)
98. The Predators' Ball, Connie Bruck (1988)
99. Practical Magic, Alice Hoffman (1995)
100. America (the Book), Jon Stewart/Daily Show (2004)

amyzzz
06-26-2008, 11:11 AM
40. His Dark Materials, Philip Pullman (1995-2000)
I guess they're allowed to include series in this? That series includes The Golden Compass (movie came out last December).

RotationSlimWang
06-26-2008, 11:14 AM
Yeah I loved House Of Leaves but it's not something I need to revisit, and in hindsight it was probably a triumph of style over content.

It's style sometimes became too much for itself, but the story at the heart of it is brilliantly told. Fantastic depiction of the family, the marriage, everything.

Also, that's the worst fucking book list I could have imagined.

roberto73
06-26-2008, 11:44 AM
Also, that's the worst fucking book list I could have imagined.

Yeah, as irritated as I got at people whining about the music list, this book list has got some serious problems. A Harry Potter title is the second-best book of the last 25 years? Seriously?

MissingPerson
06-26-2008, 11:49 AM
I love the idea of somebody having Harry Potter right next to The Road on their bookshelf.

amyzzz
06-26-2008, 11:53 AM
Yeah, as irritated as I got at people whining about the music list, this book list has got some serious problems. A Harry Potter title is the second-best book of the last 25 years? Seriously?
It should've been The Prisoner of Azkaban or The Order of the Phoenix. ;)

RotationSlimWang
06-26-2008, 11:53 AM
And absolutely no Ellis? Fuck that. Dave Eggers can go fuck himself if it means Heartbreaking breaks the top twenty but nothing from BEE does.

roberto73
06-26-2008, 12:05 PM
At least there's no Douglas Coupland.

Some of the choices just seem really arbitrary. Don DeLillo's Underworld over White Noise? Wrong. T.C. Boyle's Drop City over The Tortilla Curtain? Nope. I know it all comes down to personal preference, but still.

I do like that they included Watchmen and Sandman.

TomAz
06-26-2008, 12:14 PM
NYT had a list like that recently. Maybe there was even a thread or a post about it. Maybe it was even in this thread. I'm lazy.

Early this year, the Book Review's editor, Sam Tanenhaus, sent out a short letter to a couple of hundred prominent writers, critics, editors and other literary sages, asking them to please identify "the single best work of American fiction published in the last 25 years." [Read A. O. Scott's essay.] Following are the results.

THE WINNER:
Beloved
Toni Morrison
(1987)

THE RUNNERS-UP:
Underworld
Don DeLillo
(1997)

Blood Meridian
Cormac McCarthy
(1985)

Rabbit Angstrom: The Four Novels
John Updike
(1995)
'Rabbit at Rest'(1990)
'Rabbit Is Rich'(1981)
'Rabbit Redux'(1971)
'Rabbit, Run'(1960)

American Pastoral
Philip Roth
(1997)

THE FOLLOWING BOOKS ALSO RECEIVED MULTIPLE VOTES:

A Confederacy of Dunces
John Kennedy Toole
(1980)

Housekeeping
Marilynne Robinson
(1980)

Winter's Tale
Mark Helprin
(1983)

White Noise
Don DeLillo
(1985)

The Counterlife
Philip Roth
(1986)

Libra
Don DeLillo
(1988)

Where I'm Calling From
Raymond Carver
(1988)

The Things They Carried
Tim O'Brien
(1990)

Mating
Norman Rush
(1991)

Jesus' Son
Denis Johnson
(1992)

Operation Shylock
Philip Roth
(1993)

Independence Day
Richard Ford
(1995)

Sabbath's Theater
Philip Roth
(1995)

Border Trilogy
Cormac McCarthy
(1999)

'Cities of the Plain'(1998)
'The Crossing'(1994)
'All the Pretty Horses'(1992)

The Human Stain
Philip Roth
(2000)

The Known World
Edward P. Jones
(2003)

The Plot Against America
Philip Roth
(2004)


http://www.nytimes.com/ref/books/fiction-25-years.html

TomAz
06-26-2008, 12:18 PM
You know, I enjoy William Gibson, John LeCarre', and Nick Hornby, but I don't know that I consider them serious literature. Also, looks like that EW list limited it to only one novel per author, otherwise they're saying Jon Stewart > most of Philip Roth's work.

Down Rodeo
06-26-2008, 01:06 PM
One could argue earlier, but yeah I'd hardly call the guy prescient. I read that book a couple years back though, I thought it was pretty good.

Have you read any of his other books? I'm gonna start the next in his trilogy shortly.

Stefinitely Maybe
06-27-2008, 01:49 AM
That list is rendered null and void due to the inclusion of THE DA VINCI CODE. Fucking cunts.

amyzzz
06-27-2008, 11:03 AM
That list is rendered null and void due to the inclusion of THE DA VINCI CODE. Fucking cunts.It's Entertainment Weekly, so maybe these were more entertaining reads than scholarly novels. (assuming you are referring to the EW list)

atom heart
06-28-2008, 06:33 PM
Entertainment Weekly:consistently pissing off the discerning tastes of Coachella boardies.

mountmccabe
07-17-2008, 09:46 PM
Hey I read some books and I wanna write about them before I finish another one, dammit.

I was talking Mishima and someone here recommended Oe so I read A Personal Matter. It was good. It was uncomfortable, a lot. It is about a fairly messed up guy in his late 20s. He has a very distorted view of his life, constantly escaping into fantasy. His mind wandered in a frighteningly familiar way. Not a fun, easy read but impressive. It was published in Japan in 1964.

Then I read Teranesia by Greg Egan. It was about genetics, which Egan approached (mostly) as information theory. Egan writes hard sci-fi unlike anything else I've read. I mean, sure, it has various flaws of sci-fi (though he is a very modern, progressive writer) but it made for a good story. The ending was kinda crap, which is to say the science that drove everything went off into fantasyland but it worked, as a novel. The characters are interesting and relatively well drawn.

Now I am reading and actually have read most of Short Cuts but I'mn't gonna say anything until later if at all.

amyzzz
07-18-2008, 09:03 AM
Hey I read some books and I wanna write about them before I finish another one, dammit....Now I am reading and actually have read most of Short Cuts but I'mn't gonna say anything until later if at all.
The screenplay? I can't remember what the books of short stories Raymond Carver wrote were called, but I thought they were named something different from the movie.

wmgaretjax
07-18-2008, 09:53 AM
I just finished reading Jacques Attali's "Noise: The Political Economy of Music" and it's the best book I've ever read about music, period.

mountmccabe
07-18-2008, 10:10 AM
The screenplay? I can't remember what the books of short stories Raymond Carver wrote were called, but I thought they were named something different from the movie.

The collection of short stories I am reading is called Short Cuts, just like the movie. The copy I have does have a "now a major movie directed by Robert Altman" sticker on it but that's all the tie-in it has.

None of the short stories have been named "Short Cuts," though. And, also, thus far I can only tie two or three of them to the movie. I have a few left to read, though. And it's been 7 or 8 years since I've seen the movie.

amyzzz
07-18-2008, 10:14 AM
Ok. Maybe it's a re-release with that title then. I should buy that. Thanks for clearing that up.

Pixiessp
07-18-2008, 01:19 PM
Just finished reading "House" by Frank Peretti.
Wasn't as good as "This Present Darkness" or "Piercing the Darkness".

roberto73
07-18-2008, 07:44 PM
The collection of short stories I am reading is called Short Cuts, just like the movie. The copy I have does have a "now a major movie directed by Robert Altman" sticker on it but that's all the tie-in it has.

None of the short stories have been named "Short Cuts," though. And, also, thus far I can only tie two or three of them to the movie. I have a few left to read, though. And it's been 7 or 8 years since I've seen the movie.


Ok. Maybe it's a re-release with that title then. I should buy that. Thanks for clearing that up.

Short Cuts is a collection of the stories on which the movie was based. It's good, but if you want the full Carver experience, go with Where I'm Calling From, which has some of his best work.

I'm currently reading Will Self's The Book of Dave. Dave is a London cabbie whose son has been taken by his ex-wife. In response, he writes a bitter, bigoted, misogynist screed against contemporary life and buries it in his ex-wife's garden, hoping his son will one day find it. Instead, it's discovered hundreds of years later in post-apocalyptic London and treated as a sacred text. The book alternates between Dave's life in present-day London and the fifth century A.D. (After Dave), where we see the effect Dave's teachings have had on the people of New London. It's scabrous and biting and I'm loving every minute of it.

Hannahrain
07-18-2008, 08:13 PM
I just started one book a few days ago, and then in the past two days have found two more that I started ages ago and then proceeded to lose until now. Because of this, I'm now simultaneously reading Lamb, Timequake, and Infinite Jest. Secretly, I sort of hope that I mentally mix them up and create a giant, looming, robotlike superstory out of the three.

algunz
07-18-2008, 09:36 PM
How does one lose books?

wmgaretjax
07-19-2008, 08:00 AM
Just finished reading "House" by Frank Peretti.
Wasn't as good as "This Present Darkness" or "Piercing the Darkness".

just fuck off.

Pixiessp
07-23-2008, 09:10 PM
just fuck off.

what's this all about wimpgaretjax.

RotationSlimWang
07-23-2008, 09:22 PM
Anybody else familiar with Curtis White?

algunz
07-23-2008, 09:33 PM
No, but I googled him and I love the title. I also love that his school is in Normal. Anywho, he made me think of America by Baudrillard.

woogie846
07-24-2008, 12:35 AM
I just picked up Rickles' Book yesterday.

Stefinitely Maybe
07-24-2008, 06:41 AM
I finally read 'Bright Lights Big City' by Jay McInerney. It's really good. Characters reminiscent of a Bret Easton Ellis novel, but with a lot more heart.

wmgaretjax
07-24-2008, 07:59 AM
what's this all about wimpgaretjax.

If you want, I could arrange a book club where you and my grandmother could read Bodie Thoene together...

Algunz, "America" by Baudrillard is a great book. He also did a great series called "Cool Memories" that were basically snippets from his journal that range from fucking hysterical to incredibly poignant.

algunz
07-24-2008, 10:03 AM
I love his point of view. It's kind of sad how much I can relate. I'll have to borrow Cool Memories from my dad.

bmack86
07-24-2008, 10:33 AM
I'm reading the Plague by Camus right now. Then, I'm going to read Treasure of the Sierra Madre, and then I'm going to read some Flannery O'Connor, and then Trainspotting.

woogie846
07-24-2008, 11:11 AM
I also picked up John Hersey's Hiroshima.

mountmccabe
07-24-2008, 11:39 AM
I'm reading the Plague by Camus right now. Then, I'm going to read Treasure of the Sierra Madre, and then I'm going to read some Flannery O'Connor, and then Trainspotting.

The Plague is my least favorite Camus. I mean, sure, it shows a good deal of range but I like his more personal, character stories. I still liked it, I'm not saying stop.

And Trainspotting is a fucking fantastic book.

RotationSlimWang
07-24-2008, 11:41 AM
Skip Camus, Sierra, and O'Connor, and do yourself a favor by going and reading Trainspotting and Glue back to back. Irvine Welsh fucking owns.

mountmccabe
07-24-2008, 11:44 AM
Have you read anything else other than those two? I tried to read Marabou Stork Nightmares one time and got stuck real quick. I have Filth sitting around somewhere too but I haven't gotten to starting it.

Trainspotting was just so good I do wanna try another one.

downingthief
07-24-2008, 11:46 AM
Skip Camus, Sierra, and O'Connor, and do yourself a favor by going and reading Trainspotting and Glue back to back. Irvine Welsh fucking owns.

Camus is my favorite author. I had a copy of "The Fall" in my backpack pretty much my entire college career. Brilliant work.

RotationSlimWang
07-24-2008, 11:49 AM
I've read them all. Glue is by far the best one to do next if you haven't done so yet--it's quite possibly better than Trainspotting as a novel, a real masterwork. Marabou Stork is alright but it's definitely at the bottom of the list. Filth is good enough but not great by any means. The Bedroom Secrets Of Master Chefs is also good but not great. The Acid House and Ecstasy are both pretty decent short story compilations. But Glue is one of the only modern books I've ever really, really felt compelled to wish I could make it into a movie if only I could do it justice.

It follows a group of four or five friends (similar to Trainspotting in that regard) but over the span of 30 some-odd years. It does a brilliant job of depicting how friends just grow apart over the years, how tragedy makes it difficult for them to maintain that bond.

downingthief
07-24-2008, 11:49 AM
I'm going to be diving into the Border trilogy soon from Cormac. Had those books for awhile, and have been putting it off far too long.

mountmccabe
07-24-2008, 11:53 AM
I'm actually going to start The Crossing on the plane tomorrow, Sean.

Also thanks for the rundown, Randy. So if I choose to go with one of the ones I already have I'll pick Filth, but I'll keep an eye out for Glue.

wmgaretjax
07-24-2008, 11:59 AM
Skip Camus, Sierra, and O'Connor, and do yourself a favor by going and reading Trainspotting and Glue back to back. Irvine Welsh fucking owns.

Don't skip any of those books. Especially Camus.

I really enjoyed Glue. Much more than Trainspotting (not that I didn't like it).

algunz
07-24-2008, 12:02 PM
Funny, this is like the 3rd time this week that Glue has come up in conversation. I guess it's a sign.

amyzzz
07-24-2008, 12:08 PM
I like Flannery O'Connor quite a bit. I have a collection of her short stories. Yay.

RotationSlimWang
07-24-2008, 12:11 PM
Seriously, Glue is one of the three best books of the 90s. No bullshit.

Pixiessp
07-24-2008, 01:30 PM
If you want, I could arrange a book club where you and my grandmother could read Bodie Thoene together...

Algunz, "America" by Baudrillard is a great book. He also did a great series called "Cool Memories" that were basically snippets from his journal that range from fucking hysterical to incredibly poignant.

and if you'd like I could arrange a playdate for you and my neighbor's 2 year old.

mountmccabe
07-24-2008, 04:09 PM
I'm actually going to start The Crossing on the plane tomorrow, Sean.

Hmm. Maybe I will read The Road instead since that one got made into a movie that is coming out this winter.

I read All the Pretty Horses last fall and loved it.

MissingPerson
07-24-2008, 04:18 PM
The Road is brilliant, but for God's sake, don't combine it with anything else bleak. I read it as I listened to Saturnalia and Neon Bible, and it left me shambling around like a war veteran for weeks.

Listen to the B-52s or something instead, cancel it out.

algunz
07-25-2008, 10:09 PM
So when are we gonna do another book club?

I'm going to the bookstore tomorrow. I'd love to do Glue, but I am totally game for a different title. We talked about White Noise last time.

Mr. Dylanja
07-26-2008, 12:39 AM
Book club? How about crook club, let's get lucrative?!?

RotationSlimWang
07-26-2008, 04:14 AM
Please don't do Glue for the book club. Reading the critiques and the subsequent being driven mad in the argument to follow is just unfair to me.

algunz
07-26-2008, 10:21 PM
Oh dear, that's more than enough reason to do it. I enjoy torturing those I love.

Courtney
08-03-2008, 07:58 PM
White Noise is a book that's good enough for me to consider re-reading it.

algunz
08-03-2008, 08:10 PM
I'm reading Glue and definitely enjoying it, but it's like A Clockwork Orange - a different language that you've got to get used to and figure out. Kind of fun.



I agree. I read White Noise for a class in college. It's been 15 years and I'd totally be game to read it again. I remember enjoying it, but I don't remember much detail.

bmack86
08-03-2008, 08:28 PM
The Airborne Toxic Event

Hannahrain
08-05-2008, 02:31 AM
I bought a copy of Steve Almond's Not That You Asked as an impulse buy the other day. I haven't read much of it yet, but up to this point it's essentially been Lazlo Toth fellating Kurt Vonnegut. If I hear the term "Von-nugget" referring to a quote one more time, I'm going to induce an aneurysm.

Hannahrain
08-05-2008, 02:31 AM
And, what kind of a name is Steve Almond?

downingthief
08-05-2008, 11:48 AM
I recently finished reading Master and Commander from Patrick O'Brian. I do love me some historical fiction, and Naval history at that. This book is perfection, if that is your thing.

I offically started the Border Trilogy by McCarthy over the weekend. Pretty Horses is simply brilliant so far. His use of dialogue reminds me of Hemingway. Hemingway was great at using dialogue to create mood, and create a scene without overusing description.

Courtney
08-05-2008, 08:23 PM
The Border Trilogy is terrific. Although not as good as Blood Meridian, imo. Or maybe I'm just tainted by the memory of the movie Billy Bob Thorton made after All the Pretty Horses.

Hannahrain
09-23-2008, 09:19 AM
Yesterday was a crappy day, so I bought books. Dully's My Lobotomy, Greene's The Elegant Universe, and a copy of Brave New World.

And when I asked the guy where I would find Hyperspace, he said, "Well, if you walk down the science aisle and then disappear completely, you'll know you've found it."

TomAz
09-23-2008, 09:29 AM
And, what kind of a name is Steve Almond?

a nutty one.


ugh.

PotVsKtl
09-23-2008, 09:58 AM
Glue is almost as shitty as Filth. Irvine Welsh can shove his typographic squirting daisy up a stranger.

RotationSlimWang
09-23-2008, 10:57 AM
Glue is almost as shitty as Filth. Irvine Welsh can shove his typographic squirting daisy up a stranger.

Reprehensible.

leo01g
09-23-2008, 11:08 AM
I cant believe I haven't read this book but would anyone recommend Love in the Time of Cholera?
Randy, any suggestions on a book to read? Im also going to start to read God's Debris

PotVsKtl
09-23-2008, 11:21 AM
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n52/n264374.jpg

miscorrections
09-23-2008, 11:23 AM
I cant believe I haven't read this book but would anyone recommend Love in the Time of Cholera?

Yes.

TomAz
09-23-2008, 11:25 AM
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n52/n264374.jpg

I just bought this this weekend.

mountmccabe
09-23-2008, 11:35 AM
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n52/n264374.jpg

Oh awesome. I forgot how soon that was coming out.

If Infinite Jest doesn't pick up the pace and/or when I decide I need a break I know what book I want to go to next.

RotationSlimWang
09-23-2008, 11:40 AM
I recommend anything by Richard Russo. He just put out a new one, so far it's his standard (exceptional) scope.

leo01g
09-23-2008, 11:46 AM
cool ill hit the bookstore later today

RotationSlimWang
09-23-2008, 11:51 AM
Eh, it might not be so your speed. It's more of a middle-aged person book. You, however, should go get a copy of House of Leaves. Sounds about right.

leo01g
09-23-2008, 12:00 PM
so House of Leaves, Love in the time of cholera, and anything by russo. Randy were you referring to Ruso?

algunz
09-23-2008, 03:41 PM
Glue has picked up quite a bit. It's so sadly obvious why Randy is so connected. Can't say it's the best book I've ever read, but I'm finally enjoying it. It is quite a commitment though.

RotationSlimWang
09-23-2008, 03:44 PM
It takes a while to get into Welsh's world. There's a different language to learn to interpret--one of the reasons it might have been easier for me was I started with the copy of Trainspotting that was released to coincide with the movie, where they had a glossary in the back, before moving on to Glue. Don't follow your "sadly obvious" comment though.

If you're going to start with a Russo book, Leo, I'd say Nobody's Fool is a goodish place to begin.

algunz
09-23-2008, 03:47 PM
I can totally see your connections with Terry and Carl.

Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but I can guess that the reason you adore this book so much is that in some ways you relate to the needs and inspirations of these two characters.

RotationSlimWang
09-23-2008, 03:47 PM
That's the reason I adore any book, hoface.

algunz
09-23-2008, 03:49 PM
Yo duckbutter, that's my point.

RotationSlimWang
09-23-2008, 04:24 PM
That's the same reason anyone enjoys any book, dickbag.

algunz
09-23-2008, 04:26 PM
It's like talking to Zoltar.

roberto73
09-23-2008, 05:42 PM
I'm reading Don DeLillo's Falling Man. It's about 9/11, and it's no White Noise.

algunz
09-23-2008, 05:46 PM
I read Falling Man. I enjoyed it. Was there really a guy who did this performance art?

The description of them walking down the Trade Center and following the Seeing Eye dog made me cry. The characters were just so lost before and even more so after Sept. 11.

Hannahrain
09-23-2008, 06:55 PM
My impression so far is that The Elegant Universe might be a better read if you skip the foreword. It's a little patronizing. I intentionally dumbed this down for you, dear Reader, so that you might be able to come to grips with a a tiny, little piece of this unending hemorrhage of knowledge that secretes from my every orifice on the daily. I've included in-line warnings when I'm going to get technical, so you and your tiny little brain can choose to bypass them if you're not willing to break a mental sweat. Don't you worry your pretty little head about any of this, I've done all the thinking for you.


I might be paraphrasing just a bit.

leo01g
09-23-2008, 09:54 PM
picked up white noise and bridge of sighs

HunterGather
09-23-2008, 09:56 PM
I dont generally read books, but the ZOMBIE SURVIVAL GUIDE and WORLD WAR Z are really good reads (but i may be biased, as I'm a zombie-movie fanboy).

PotVsKtl
09-23-2008, 10:19 PM
It's good to get the opinion of a non-reader on a thread about books. Thanks for your input Breasts Avatar Man.

MissingPerson
09-24-2008, 07:26 AM
Thanks for your input Breasts Avatar Man.

Best superhero ever.

Hannahrain
09-24-2008, 07:54 AM
If anyone who doesn't suck has got a favorite Chabon to recommend me, I'd be interested in hearing about it.

roberto73
09-24-2008, 07:58 AM
Assuming I meet your stringest standards of non-suckitude, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Klay is my favorite. The Yiddish Policemen's Union is still on my "To Read" shelf, however, so I can't speak to that one.

TomAz
09-24-2008, 08:27 AM
Kavalier and Klay is outstanding.
Yiddish Policeman's Union is very good
Gentleman of the Road is fun

downingthief
09-24-2008, 08:48 AM
I finished "All the Pretty Horses" awhile back (was outstanding), and have started "The Crossing". I'm about a quarter of the way through. I should have listened to my friends a long time ago that told me to read McCarthy. Both reads are fantastic, and I cannot wait to read more.

MissingPerson
09-24-2008, 08:50 AM
Make sure to listen to B-52's or something when you read The Road, or you'll kill yourself.

algunz
10-03-2008, 01:44 PM
Ok, I finished Glue. It's amazing how much it picks up once E is involved. The end had me fighting back tears.

"Fucking radges."

RotationSlimWang
10-03-2008, 02:02 PM
Ok, I finished Glue. It's amazing how much it picks up once E is involved. The end had me fighting back tears.

"Fucking radges."

Damn skippy. How dare you doubt me, asshole.

Also: if the ending didn't make you cry you have no soul.

TomAz
10-03-2008, 07:04 PM
http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n52/n264374.jpg

so, I'm enjoying this book a lot. only 320 pages to go. i feel like a total geek but still. it's like harry potter for thinking adults.

algunz
10-03-2008, 10:19 PM
I hate thinking adults.

PotVsKtl
10-03-2008, 10:42 PM
so, I'm enjoying this book a lot. only 320 pages to go. i feel like a total geek but still. it's like harry potter for thinking adults.

If you haven't I would highly recommend following it up with Cryptonomicon. It's like the real world for thinking adults.

SoulDischarge
10-04-2008, 12:59 AM
I picked up a random short story collection of J.G. Ballard at the library today and I'm not sure if I made the right choice. This one is called "Chronopolis and Other Stories." Is there a better short story collection to start with?

Edit: Nevermind, this will do.

TomAz
10-04-2008, 03:30 AM
If you haven't I would highly recommend following it up with Cryptonomicon. It's like the real world for thinking adults.

Yeah I read that when it came out. I'm a slut for Stephenson.

amyzzz
10-04-2008, 04:54 AM
Ooh, I like Stephenson too, but I haven't read all of his books yet. I've been reading shitty mindless books for a while, so I have to work my way back up to him. (re-reading some d h lawrence right now)

Quadromarshia
10-05-2008, 07:42 AM
I'm about to pick up Story Of The Eye by Georges Bataille, on a recomendation from a friend.

CalmerThanYou
10-09-2008, 04:13 PM
Three (4) Books that Influenced me the most:

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
Desolation Angels/On the Road (both equally)
The Rum Diaries

They were all amazing in their own right...

amyzzz
10-09-2008, 04:18 PM
I like The Rum Diaries

algunz
10-09-2008, 08:42 PM
Three (4) Books that Influenced me the most:

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance


They were all amazing in their own right...

"When you live in the shadow of insanity, the appearance of another mind that thinks and talks as yours does is something close to blessed event."

One of my most favorite quotes.