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shotglass75
05-17-2008, 11:08 AM
Have always been a fan of this band. They have been a major part (at least for me) in the Chicago music scene for over 10 years now and continue to put on amazing live show and releasing great albums. New album was released this week and this is one of their most diverse and complex albums to date. "taxi cabs" is very dark and almost cryptic with it's string arrangements and the triple assault of drums on "white belt boys" is brutality at its best. They are on tour across the country right now so I highly recommend that you try and go see them.

www.localh.com
www.myspace.com/localh


Los Angeles, CA – Alternative rock mainstays Local H return with their seventh album on May 13, titled 12 Angry Months. The band’s debut on Shout! Factory, 12 Angry Months is Local H’s first new studio album since 2004’s Whatever Happened To P.J. Soles?

Written after the bitter end of a long-term relationship, the album chronicles a full year of post-breakup experiences. Each track on 12 Angry Months corresponds to a month, and deals with the range of emotions one encounters after love turns sour. Those emotions range from anger (“so, baby could you do me a favor? fall off the earth and i'll see you later”), to jealousy (“this is crazy, I can’t believe that you replaced me”), to acceptance (“you knew we’d never make it anyway”).

Highly regarded for their powerful sound and unique two-man lineup with Scott Lucas on vocals and guitar and Brian St. Clair on drums, Local H is known for derisive lyrics, heavy guitars and feedback, energetic live shows, and an active relationship with their fans. The band performs regularly, and will be on tour nationally in 2008.

In 2007 Local H showcased their typical humor when they played a show at Chicago’s Cellular Field, and fans were only granted by finding Lucas around town and proclaiming “Attention all planets of the Solar Federation - we have assumed control.” Other shows have seen the band passing out a sushi menu-type ballot to take song requests, auctioning off a concert on eBay, and performing under the names and guises of other bands, including Nirvana, Tom Petty, Led Zeppelin, and Hall & Oates.


http://www.localh.com/images/topfront_w_logo400.gif


Local H jams 13 years into 7 nights
By Mark Guarino | Special to the Tribune
May 15, 2008


If you see Scott Lucas moving slowly today, it's for good reason: Starting May 7 he performed every hit, every near-hit, every cover, every B-side and every outtake he recorded over 13 years as the frontman behind Local H. In a seven-night, sold-out residency at the Beat Kitchen that ended Tuesday with the new album, "Twelve Angry Months" (Shout! Factory), Lucas made it clear why he remains an essential component to Chicago's rock tradition: commitment and passion.

With Billy Corgan and Jeff Tweedy regaled as auteurs for their conceptual turns and twists, Lucas is Chicago's bare-knuckled rocker, slugging it out on stages from small bars to large clubs to outdoor festivals and releasing a steady run of albums that stand up against fickle pop trends. The week of shows forced a new look at a band that can often be undervalued here but whose music is consistently packed with depth, craft and true grit.

Despite playing a different album per night, the shows did not pause for reflection, especially since a significant segment of the audience looked like they didn't have their driver's licenses when the band released its 1995 debut. Opening slots provided a survey of Chicago punk past and present, including Smoking Popes frontman Josh Caterer and reunions of old-school punks Pegboy and power-pop contenders Fig Dish.

On the first night, early songs like "Manipulator" and "Grrrlfriend" capitalized on power chords, pop hooks and loud/soft dynamics. But on later nights, Lucas demonstrated his range, showing how two people can make a massive sound. Drummer Brian St. Clair, who replaced original drummer Joe Daniels in 1999, proved a perfect foil, hammering out polyrhythms but also, through immediate turnabouts, firing songs to new heights.

The new songs played Tuesday—the only night featuring additional players such as a keyboardist, bassist, guitarist and extra drummers to flesh out songs that left no room to breathe—showed how much of a craftsman Lucas has become since that first album. From power pop ("24-Hour Break-Up Session") to a psychedelic epic ("Hand to Mouth"), the songs were tightly compressed and scorched with vitriol and heartbreak.

His true colors were shown when even the leftovers and B-sides ("for hard-core losers," Lucas admitted) stood on their own to make up a night that rivaled all the others. That included his unusual cover choices, from Prince's "Purple Rain" to the Godfathers' punk anthem "Birth, School, Work, Death" to an irony-free version of "Toxic" by Britney Spears.

Lucas excelled at shrieking to accelerate songs that frequently shifted from foreboding to rage. Yet for all the chaotic moods, he and St. Clair kept a masterful grip on the music. "I'm very proud of all of you," he told the crowd at the end of the seventh night. Then he played "All the Kids Are Right," the 1998 single that became, this time appropriately, a campfire singalong.

shotglass75
05-18-2008, 04:17 PM
yep

slurpee
05-18-2008, 09:45 PM
I was so pissed I didn't see them at West Fest last summer.

Hopefully they play some smaller venues in Chicago to promote this album.

shotglass75
05-19-2008, 10:57 AM
I was so pissed I didn't see them at West Fest last summer.

Hopefully they play some smaller venues in Chicago to promote this album.

they just did 7 nights in a row at The beat Kitchen and are playing The Metro on June 22nd.

picks up chair
05-19-2008, 03:21 PM
...not really diggin the new album yet. It's good, but not "stay in my cd player for a month" good. I've considered them simply "rock" on everything they've done until now, which I would call, i dunno, something else. I need a few more listens I guess. The live shows are always good and in small venues. I'll be at the Casbah on the 4th.

shotglass75
05-19-2008, 06:52 PM
...not really diggin the new album yet. It's good, but not "stay in my cd player for a month" good. I've considered them simply "rock" on everything they've done until now, which I would call, i dunno, something else. I need a few more listens I guess. The live shows are always good and in small venues. I'll be at the Casbah on the 4th.


try to actually just listen to it. and i'm not saying that in a dickhead way. don't make it background music. I did that the first listen and completely missed everything. put on the headphones, take a drive for an hour, crank the stereo. I'm seriously considering this to be possibly their best album.

another review...

Local H saves the breakup album in '12 Angry Months'

BY JIM DeROGATIS Pop Music Critic

From Bob Dylan’s “Blood on the Tracks” to Marvin Gaye’s “Here, My Dear,” and from Liz Phair’s “Exile in Guyville” to ... well, almost everything in the Rolling Stones’ catalog, rock ’n’ roll has never suffered from a shortage of great breakup records — those “open your veins and let ’em bleed” chronicles of messy, nasty and profoundly sad romantic splits.

To this list we can now add “12 Angry Months,” the seventh album from those melodic but hard-rocking grunge veterans Local H, and one of the best that guitarist-vocalist Scott Lucas and drummer Brian St. Clair have ever given us.

“The idea was there from the very beginning: to have a breakup record in the tradition of great, angry breakup records,” Lucas says. “So I spent a lot of time listening to ‘Blood on the Tracks’ and ‘Aftermath’ by the Rolling Stones.”

The relationship in question — about which Lucas remains otherwise circumspect — actually ended several years ago, after the release of the group’s fine 2002 effort, “Whatever Happened to P.J. Soles?” A number of things conspired to delay finishing the new disc, including a switch in labels (the band is now one of the few original acts signed to catalog specialists Shout! Factory) and producer Andy Gerber having a baby.

“We put out a live record in between, and we tried to keep putting out stuff like that to keep going,” Lucas says. “But the problem was that we were making a record by ourselves. We were able to sell it to somebody eventually, but it always takes time to make money to go into the studio.”

In the meantime, friends and fans kept asking what Lucas was working on.

“I’d be like, ‘Oh, I’m working on this breakup record,’ and then it would always be, ‘Oh, you’re still going through that?’ and I’m like, ‘No! I’m not going through it! I’m just trying to make this f---ing record!’ So now I’ve got to talk about it and go on the road and sing all the songs and think about it again. And at this point, it could be about any number of relationships I’ve had.”

That might be the case, but in addition to St. Clair’s always propulsive rhythms and Lucas’ equally abrasive and catchy guitars and vocals, the songs on “12 Angry Months” connect because of the specific details of the protagonist’s grieving process, whether he is railing about the loss of some beloved albums when his partner moves out (“Where’s all my Kyuss records?/You never liked ’em until you met me!” he sings in “January: The One with ‘Kid’”), derisively mocking her new boyfriend because he’s the kind of guy who loves his car more than his girlfriend (in “March: BMW Man”), or finally accepting that the relationship was doomed from the beginning and resigning himself to moving on with his humble existence (via the magnificently orchestrated “December: Hand to Mouth”).

“That was the thing: to be as specific as possible with the details and not try to be universal, because the minute you start to try and be universal, people say, ‘Nobody has those feelings. Nobody thinks about ‘the sun, the moon, the stars’ and that kind of bull----. So the whole thing was, ‘Let’s go through specifics and stick to being really honest.’ The entire time when we were doing the vocals and working on the lyrics, I kept going, ‘Andy, I’m not sure I can sing this.’ And that was the rule: Every song should be a song that you’re afraid to have anybody listen to.”

Although Lucas remains one of the best songwriters who’ve ever called Chicago home, Local H has come to be taken for granted in some quarters, simply because of its longevity. The singer formed the band in the late ’80s with drummer Joe Daniels, becoming a duo by default because a solid bassist couldn’t be found. It debuted at the height of the alternative era with “Ham Fisted” (1995) and scored a big modern-rock hit with “Bound for the Floor” from “As Good as Dead” the following year. Unfortunately, the release of “Pack Up the Cats” (1998) coincided with the corporate merger of its record company. The disc was largely lost in the shuffle, and Daniels departed soon after its release.

Triple Fast Action veteran St. Clair came onboard, and the band continued to release worthy albums as the alternative era yielded to rap-rock and teen pop and the word “grunge” became a punch line and then the answer to a trivia question. Yet Lucas insists he has never felt boxed in — not by that admittedly meaningless genre description, or the two-man band format, or the highs and lows of the music industry.

“Basically, we do things now exactly the way we have always wanted to,” Lucas says, adding, “I’m actually enjoying everything about making music more now than I ever have.”

To that end, Lucas has not only crafted “12 Angry Months,” but a self-titled 12-inch EP by the Prairie Cartel, an electronic/industrial side project with Blake Smith of Fig Dish and Caviar. He’s been the guest bassist for the Tossers’ European tour, and he’s tinkering with the idea of a stripped-down, partly acoustic solo album. Plus, to celebrate the new disc, Local H is doing a seven-night series of all-ages shows at the intimate Beat Kitchen, performing each of its albums in its entirety on subsequent nights.

picks up chair
05-20-2008, 10:48 AM
It's in my car which is probably the best listening place available to me. I listened to it once entirely, but without repeating afterward. I kinda missed the whole "end of the 'year' starts to sound like the beginning of the 'year'" trick. So that's makes more sense. I never really needed a concept album from Local H, but I suppose it works. I quit drinking 2 weeks ago...maybe that's the problem.

shotglass75
05-20-2008, 03:51 PM
A) Get back on the sauce, that's why it's there

and 2) Most Local H albums have had a tying theme or a "concept" before. This one just seems to be more up front.

shotglass75
05-22-2008, 07:10 PM
Not to beat this over everyones head as much as possible, but this is seriously one of the best albums of the year so far. I can not stop listening to it.

shotglass75
06-02-2008, 04:50 PM
I am bumping this up because Local H will be on Last Call with Carson Daly tonight. He might be a schlub but the band is great. If your up, give them a go or Tivo yo Ho.

Also, Local H is on the West Coast the next week or so. Check their MySpace and try and go see 'em.

www.myspace.com/localh

mountmccabe
06-02-2008, 04:52 PM
I will be seeing them tomorrow night. My friend's band is one of the openers.

shotglass75
06-02-2008, 05:01 PM
Nice. You shall be properly rocked.

FakePlasticMe
06-03-2008, 09:09 AM
Just went to 3 of the 7 nights at Beat Kitchen. Saw these guys 17 times over 10 years, they were the thing to see in high school because they always did all ages shows at the Metro. Sad to say I've not been a big fan of anything post No Fun EP, but regardless of their new material, their live show is always, always amazing.

shotglass75
06-03-2008, 09:13 AM
Correction, They are on Cason Daly on Monday June, 9th.

FakePlastic, i missed the beat kitchen shows and am kicking myself for that and I'm gonna be at Glastonbury when they play the metro (oh well) anyways, listen to the new album. It seriously is the best album I think they have put out in a long time

picks up chair
06-03-2008, 10:18 AM
aside from album likes and dislikes, I am ready to be spat on by a golden shower of maker's mark tomorrow.

FakePlasticMe
06-04-2008, 08:47 AM
Correction, They are on Cason Daly on Monday June, 9th.

FakePlastic, i missed the beat kitchen shows and am kicking myself for that and I'm gonna be at Glastonbury when they play the metro (oh well) anyways, listen to the new album. It seriously is the best album I think they have put out in a long time

I have listened to it...it's just no "Pack Up the Cats."

But hey, I will support Scott and Co. forever...

SoulDischarge
06-04-2008, 12:25 PM
That cover of 'Wolf Like Me' on their Myspace really took all the life out of that song.

Xenocide
06-04-2008, 01:16 PM
Local H for Coachella '09!!!

Backwater
06-04-2008, 03:31 PM
I'm going to see them Friday for my first show ever at the Troubadour! I'm not even a big fan but I have to go there sometime.

Why do they sound so much like Nirvana? Maybe not so much their new stuff but their old stuff sounds so similair to Nirvana it's disgusting.

Is the Troubadour really that great? How excited should I be for this?

212margarita
06-04-2008, 03:52 PM
The Troubadour is really that great, i have seen some amazing shows there. You are in for a treat.

shotglass75
06-04-2008, 04:33 PM
I'm going to see them Friday for my first show ever at the Troubadour! I'm not even a big fan but I have to go there sometime.

Why do they sound so much like Nirvana? Maybe not so much their new stuff but their old stuff sounds so similair to Nirvana it's disgusting.

Is the Troubadour really that great? How excited should I be for this?

I blame the times. I think when "Ham Fisted" and "AGAD" were release record labels wanted that "Nirvana" style production and unfortunately they will never get past that comparison. I think Scott is a hell of a better singer than Cobain. Cobain was obviously great, but Scott at least has some tone in his screams. "PUTC" doesn't sound at all like Nirvana to me and I really don't think anything else does after that.



I like the Wolf like me cover. I think they took a song with a lot going on and stripped it down pretty damn well for 2 guys.

I have been saying Local H for Coachella for about 5 years now. I doubt it will ever happen but it would be great if it did.

mountmccabe
06-04-2008, 06:33 PM
Nice. You shall be properly rocked.

I was. (http://coachella.com/forum/showthread.php?p=637548#post637548)

shotglass75
06-04-2008, 06:49 PM
It's great to hear people are really enjoying this band again. Chicago and the midwest never really forgot about them but I think the two coasts got ignored for a while. I really think Shout Factory has done a great job of promoting the band. Sometime Labels aren't all bad.

Backwater
06-04-2008, 08:20 PM
I blame the times. I think when "Ham Fisted" and "AGAD" were release record labels wanted that "Nirvana" style production and unfortunately they will never get past that comparison.


That's exactly what I assumed actually, I just didn't want to talk out of my ass because I don't really know anything about the history of the band.

Unfortunately, Blink-182 plagued us with the same virus and it still hasn't gone away!

At least Nirvana was a good band.

Backwater
06-07-2008, 12:57 AM
I just got back from the Troubadour, wow what a great show! Those guys really bring it live! As I said before I'm never new to Local H so I can't give a setlist. The only songs I know of theirs are Eddie Veder and California Song and they played both. California Song was epically amazing. They played it about 30 minutes into the set and I felt like I could have left after that and still gotten more than my money's worth (only $15!) I was a little confused though that there were only two guys. It was just the guitarist/singer and the drummer. I don't know what happened to the bassist. For a duo they were outstanding. I saw the White Stripes last year at B-Roo and I thought Local H tonight was better. All in all, a great show and you're right margarita, the Troubadour rules!

Backwater
06-07-2008, 04:24 AM
I know the White Stripes comparison is odd because they're different kinds of music and a completey different venue (a farm in Tennesse vs. a small club in West Hollywood) but I'm just saying that for a band consisting of two people, Local H created more energy and conveyed it to the crowd more effectively.

shotglass75
06-08-2008, 03:09 PM
I just got back from the Troubadour, wow what a great show! Those guys really bring it live! As I said before I'm never new to Local H so I can't give a setlist. The only songs I know of theirs are Eddie Veder and California Song and they played both. California Song was epically amazing. They played it about 30 minutes into the set and I felt like I could have left after that and still gotten more than my money's worth (only $15!) I was a little confused though that there were only two guys. It was just the guitarist/singer and the drummer. I don't know what happened to the bassist. For a duo they were outstanding. I saw the White Stripes last year at B-Roo and I thought Local H tonight was better. All in all, a great show and you're right margarita, the Troubadour rules!


From Wiki

They initially searched for another bass player but couldn't find what they were looking for. So, Lucas decided to add bass pickups to his guitar so that he can essentially play guitar and bass at the same time.

shotglass75
11-23-2008, 09:09 AM
Biz-ump