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HandBanana
06-10-2011, 11:52 AM
Excepting the first one, which I covered in my post already, those are not really all that different of performances no.
Still Leo pretty much playing Leo in different clothes saying different words.

Still-ill
06-10-2011, 11:52 AM
or Garry Shandling.

Still-ill
06-10-2011, 11:53 AM
Excepting the first one, which I covered in my post already, those are not really all that different of performances no.
Still Leo pretty much playing Leo in different clothes saying different words.

playing different personas.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 11:54 AM
Excepting the first one, which I covered in my post already, those are not really all that different of performances no.
Still Leo pretty much playing Leo in different clothes saying different words.

Basketball Diaries is the same type of performance as Titanic and Aviator? Do you know what a performance is?

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 11:54 AM
Now take DeNiro in King of Comedy, Raging Bull, Cape Fear, and Goodfellas.
Shorter time span and wildly greater range.

I'm not saying Leo is terrible. But I don't agree that he's a great actor as much as a great star with limited range.

Still-ill
06-10-2011, 11:56 AM
You do have a point with DeNiro.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 11:56 AM
http://cynicritics.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/leo.jpeg

I hate it when retarded heroin addicts with OCD start bar fights.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 12:02 PM
And pot continues on trying to push a topic (Gilbert Grape) that I've already covered. With jpegs no less.
But then, youre a standard-issue contrarian message board insult twat laboring under the delusion that there isn't an absolutely identical one of you on every single message board everywhere. If it were still 2002 I might give some weight to your shit-flinging, but it would still be 3 years past expiration.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 12:04 PM
You understand that there's only one picture from Gilbert Grape, right? Let's count together on one finger.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-10-2011, 12:04 PM
I really, really enjoy Dicaprio is pretty much everything he's in, but you make a good point Jason. He's just charismatic and entertaining enough and in the films he's in are good enough that i don't care.

Like, i never hear people complaining that Woody Allen isn't a broad enough actor

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-10-2011, 12:05 PM
You understand that there's only one picture from Gilbert Grape, right? Let's count together on one finger.

to be fair, you did use the word "retarded" in the description of your last image, which is what he was referencing

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 12:05 PM
In other news, does 5:10 work for you guys, Jared and Ryan, on Sunday? There is a great bar/eatery called Elephant & Castle that a friend of mine works for that we can hip up since it's near the theater. Lots of beer on tap, some good appetizers as well.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 12:06 PM
to be fair, you did use the word "retarded" in the description of your last image, which is what he was referencing

To be fair, trying to call out a conglomeration of all of the multiple types of characters that an actor has portrayed over their career in such a way as to put in question the idea that they're one-note is not focusing on one of those chracters in particular, and a retort that consists of "but I already said Gilbert Grape was good" is fucking useless and doesn't advance the debate is any meaningful way.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 12:08 PM
In other news, does 5:10 work for you guys, Jared and Ryan, on Sunday? There is a great bar/eatery called Elephant & Castle that a friend of mine works for that we can hip up since it's near the theater. Lots of beer on tap, some good appetizers as well.

I'm good with that.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 12:10 PM
But jpegs and stale insults do advance the debate.
And what I was talking about was that yes those are different characters. Played with (again in my opinion) limited range.

PotVsKtl
06-10-2011, 12:10 PM
How does a person playing a wide range of characters display that they have limited range? You can say he's just not a very good actor, at which point you'd be wrong. Right now you're just not making any sense.

amyzzz
06-10-2011, 12:11 PM
I agree with Gabe and Ryan. I could probably say that on just about any page of this thread. Leo has really grown as an actor, especially with The Aviator and The Departed.

Starraven
06-10-2011, 12:13 PM
ha.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 12:14 PM
The character is written. It's external to the performance. It exists whether played well or not.
If I played Jake LaMotta it would suck. But the character would still exist.

HandBanana
06-10-2011, 12:15 PM
But the actor should inhabit that character. And create and flesh out character within it.
Not terribly hard to understand.

wmgaretjax
06-10-2011, 12:30 PM
I'm good with that.

i'll give a tentative yes... not entirely sure at this point.

KungFuJoe
06-10-2011, 01:29 PM
Damn Donnie Yen is on a role! You don't need subtitles to see how fantastic this looks. Let's hope the rest of the film lives up to these 8 minutes.

oHsLIpBoRqw&feature=player_embedded

This also raises my expectations for The Grandmasters.

Miroir Noir
06-10-2011, 02:06 PM
Trailer for Errol Morris' new doc Tabloid:

TWeQce0cZsE

schoolofruckus
06-10-2011, 02:28 PM
I'm pretty excited for that, even though I wasn't a fan of The Fog of War.

Miroir Noir
06-10-2011, 02:44 PM
I love Errol Morris, possibly my favorite contemporary American filmmaker, period. He spent the entirety of the Bush years wrapped up in political projects, so it will be refreshing to see him get back to eccentrics.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-10-2011, 03:21 PM
@TallGuyCM or anyone else for that matter.

I watched Syndrome and a Century the other night and loved the cinematography and for some weird reason found all the dialogue to not be boring at all, even though some of it seemed to be. Tropical Malady comes in the mail tomorrow. But my question is, does Weerasethakul always delve into the past life part of Thai life? Syndrome had a lot of scenes where the characters all talked about their possible past lives and probable reincarnated lives, and the title of his latest one is Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives... I really like his abstract style and want to know a little bit more about him since it is apparent that you are a big fan.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-11-2011, 09:30 AM
Saw Le Quattro Volte last night at the Lumiere... pretty good. Maybe it was just the way the movie was made but it had a sort of blur to the whole thing. I was sitting in the middle-middle of the theater and I find I have perfect vision but 90% of the movie had a slight blur to it. Aside from that, the fact that is it dialogueless made it appealing, and the four different "characters" each had moments of sheer grace. I'd recommend it to anyone who ISN'T tired when watching. It is a bit dull at times.

TallGuyCM
06-11-2011, 01:26 PM
@TallGuyCM or anyone else for that matter.

I watched Syndrome and a Century the other night and loved the cinematography and for some weird reason found all the dialogue to not be boring at all, even though some of it seemed to be. Tropical Malady comes in the mail tomorrow. But my question is, does Weerasethakul always delve into the past life part of Thai life? Syndrome had a lot of scenes where the characters all talked about their possible past lives and probable reincarnated lives, and the title of his latest one is Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives... I really like his abstract style and want to know a little bit more about him since it is apparent that you are a big fan.

If I recall correctly, Syndrome actually addresses the past life issue more than the other two, ironically enough. Even though Uncle Boonmee has that title, it's not as focused on in that film as you'd think. And Malady is indeed a very spiritual film, but doesn't necessarily focus on the past life thing excessively either.

But I could be way off. I watched all three of them in nearly a week's span and that was it, and that was over six months ago now.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-12-2011, 12:23 PM
X-Men: First Class really is as good as a big summer movie or superhero movie could ever be. I was prepared to like it and was optimistic based on all the good reviews, but man, it really is a fucking solid movie from beginning to end. the two leads being so good really helps it. I'll echo the statements that January Jones is just fucking awful, but she's not in it enough to really bother me. I would gladly welcome a First Class 2 to see this incarnation of the two sides in this early time period.

PotVsKtl
06-12-2011, 12:27 PM
You're like G-Men.

No, we're X-Men.

Hey movie, go fuck yourself.

buddy
06-12-2011, 04:22 PM
Saw Midnight in Paris tonight. Man, I really wanted to like this one. I'm one of those fools who follows Allen around hoping he'll have another great one in him. This film was just so forgettable. I will say that Owen Wilson was a surprisingly good stand-in for the Allen character and Marion Coitillard, as a mistress of Picasso, looked absolutely luminous every time she was on screen and it was amusing for a few minutes to see which literary or art great would show up next. There's Picasso arguing with Gertrude Stein! There's Hemingway getting soused and threatening to get into fights! I kept thinking of Purple Rose of Cairo throughout the whole thing; a film also obsessed with nostalgia and romanticism of past eras. But that film really was as charming and funny as it thought it was. Did anyone see You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger? Still haven't seen that one yet.

saw it today, and it enjoyed it for what it was. didn't really think it was trying to be charming or funny, but just simply a nostalgic trip for both Wilson's character, and the audience, as well. i can understand what Allen was going for in showing us how many times people are unsatisfied with the time or place in which we live, and that traveling to different time or place we'll never truly be satisfied, at least not for long. unless we make the change in lifestyle or thought process within ourselves. although, i could be over analyzing. definitely not classic, but enjoyable for what it was.

schoolofruckus
06-13-2011, 07:46 AM
I watched Bresson's Pickpocket on Saturday. I liked it a little more than Diary of a Country Priest, but there were still some elements that bothered me. Mainly the way the voiceover was used; despite Paul Schrader's claims otherwise on the DVD intro, I felt like it was almost always redundant and unnecessary. Still definitely worth seeing. I think I'll try Mouchette next.

I also watched Levy's Date Night later that evening. It was wholly excruciating, and that's coming from someone who has laughed at basically everyone involved at some point in the past.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-13-2011, 08:43 AM
Date Night? The one starring Fey and Carell? With a cameo by Wahlberg? Yeah, that one was kinda lame. I saw it for free at the Independent so I didn't really care if it sucked, but it was bad.

I watched Tropical Malady last night. I'm gonna have to say I did not care for it. It was sort of a mythical version of Predator with a love story. I thought that the combination of the genres (fantasy, thriller, romance) was not held together. And the fact that it went from normal life (going to the movies, falling in love, meeting a family, flirting... things of that nature) to a sort of storybook fairy tale that involved SPOILER talking primates, a shape-shifting shaman, and wall paintings illustrating what we have seen or will see. However, there were several things I enjoyed: the acting from Sakda Kaewbuadee and Banlop Lomnoi and how they turned this unlikely love story into something believable and true to life, the direction by Apichatpong Weerasethakul who still has a keen eye for human nature... in nature, AND the name drop of his 2011 film in the first half of the movie. I feel like there is a definite overarching thread that runs throughout his films and I'll only truly enjoy this thread after I have seen all his films.

Down Rodeo
06-13-2011, 09:27 AM
It really hurts me that I've been out of the country until now and haven't been able to 1) see Tree of Life or 2) join in the great dialogue about it here. That will all change once I'm back in CA next week though...

P.S. Gabe - watch Au Hasard Balthazar. You won't regret it.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-13-2011, 09:28 AM
So last night I couldn't sleep so I watched American Wedding on TBS. January Jones is in that movie as Cadence, the sister of the bandcamp girl. All I have to say is, even in a B-movie about getting laid and drunk and sabotaging the sex life of friends, she can't act worth shit. The whole time she was being hit on by Stifler and Finch and she couldn't even act her way out of the scene, it was like a car wreck every time she smiled off their advances. Maybe Mad Men was all she was made for.

schoolofruckus
06-13-2011, 12:35 PM
P.S. Gabe - watch Au Hasard Balthazar. You won't regret it.

Actually, that's a good call. Since my main issue with Diary and Pickpocket was the main character's narration, it would make sense to try one in which the main character doesn't speak. My next Netflix delivery will be this one and The Temptation of St. Tony, which I already saw and loved last October.

TallGuyCM
06-13-2011, 02:22 PM
Mouchette doesn't say a lot either fwiw.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-13-2011, 09:52 PM
I just purchased The Thin Red Line from the Criterion Collection on Blu-Ray and loved the short essay on Terrence Malick and the film itself titled "This Side of Paradise" in the liner notes. And as I was reading this I thought: Why doesn't Schoolio/Gabe start a new thread about Movie Purchases (similar to the CD/LP Purchases thread) where people discuss their movie collection (VHS, DVD, Blu-Ray) and other people talk about recently purchases movies and what owning one offers. I understand most of what they offer can be had through Netflix (commentaries, bonus features, and such) but after reading through that essay in the booklet, I know no one can get that through netflix, and so on. Just a thought. And since I'm currently in the mindset to begin a movie collection, I thought that a new thread would be the perfect place to argue and discuss which purchases are necessary/desired or which are just awful and should be avoided.

TallGuyCM
06-13-2011, 11:24 PM
In anticipation of (hopefully getting into) Drive on Friday, I watched Nicolas Winding Refn's Bronson tonight. Holy shit, what an absolutely fucking brilliant performance by Tom Hardy...it's really a shame that Refn isn't a more well-known filmmaker.

In my book, Hardy's depiction of Bronson was every bit the tour de force that much lauded (and similarly deranged) roles like Nicholson in Cuckoo and Hopkins in Silence were. And if Refn was more a prominent director in the public eye, I have a feeling that both he and Hardy would have been much more recognized for this film.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-13-2011, 11:42 PM
i absolutely adore Bronson and that adoration made me so much more disappointing in the fact that i didn't love Valhalla Rising. I still need to see the Pusher Trilogy though. I definitely want to see Drive

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-14-2011, 12:18 AM
Bronson is a great film. A truly magnificent biopic of Bronson and the craziness behind him and his career. I had no idea Refn directed this. Now I want to see all of his films.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-14-2011, 07:43 AM
I watched The Enforcer last night. I kept reading that it wasn't as good as the first 2 Dirty Harry movies, but really it's the same damn movie. And that is totally okay. I very much enjoy watching Harry Callahan scream at his boss, smash his car through building, beat the shit out of people, and chase thugs on roof tops while crazy jazz music blares in the background. What a fucking fun series of movies.

schoolofruckus
06-14-2011, 08:36 AM
Cinema Guild is becoming my new favorite indie distributor....not only did they release the beautiful Putty Hill earlier this year, but they also have the upcoming Aurora, The Turin Horse, and as of today, Nuri Bilge Ceylan's Once Upon a Time in Anatolia.

bobert
06-14-2011, 09:23 AM
Surprised by all of the love for Bronson. Interesting film in some aspects, but for the most part I thought that it tried way too hard.

schoolofruckus
06-14-2011, 09:35 AM
I agree with all the praise for Hardy - a legitimate high-voltage screen presence - but otherwise, I wasn't terribly impressed with it.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-14-2011, 09:43 AM
I guess to me, since it's basically Hardy on screen for the entire film and you spend a great deal of time inside of his head, his performance really IS the movie. It does meander around a bit, and I kind of wish they cut a bulk of his "origin" and had more of his real-life zany prison exploits in it, but all in all i really enjoyed it.

amyzzz
06-14-2011, 10:09 AM
I was so struck by how Malick was able to make a film about such monumental themes so delicate, so... intimate. I'm an older brother and so many scenes between the older and middle brother shot straight to the heart with me. The tenderness between them, the knowing looks, the undeniable bond of brotherhood, the violence of youth... it all just triggered so many memories and emotions for me; for all of the guys in my group, actually. I wish I could watch this film with my brother. I mean, I just got home and I called my brother and left him a voicemail just to tell him that I love him because I rarely do that. I can't remember a film ever having that kind of effect on me.

****SPOILERS IN THIS PARAGRAPH****This film has so many small moments amongst all the stunning shots of space and early life. The way the older dinosaur puts its paw protectively on the head of the younger dinosaur, the way the middle brother looks up from his guitar and smiles at his dad when he realizes he's accompanying him on the piano from inside the house, the apology and the acceptance after the bb gun incident. How could you heart not break after that??

And those kids? My GOD, what naturals. This film is just perfectly cast. Just... go see it.

MORE SPOILERS
Your review makes me want to see it again. I saw Tree of Life with mountmccabe on Sunday, and I agree that it was very intimate and breathtaking -- the family scenes and natural scenes had a very soothing rhythm that lulled me, which made the scenes with the boy gang torturing animals and the brothers shooting the bb gun more shocking and disturbing.

daxton
06-14-2011, 11:46 AM
Anyone seen Bunny and the Bull? I've been waiting to see it for almost a year now and just found it on Netflix instant. It's a British comedy about a neurotic young man suffering from agoraphopia who relives (without leaving his flat) a European road trip he took. I'm getting a lot of Amelie and The Science of Sleep vibes from it. But it's a bit more on the humorous side than those two.

0L9VlgJitmA

TallGuyCM
06-14-2011, 01:47 PM
I guess to me, since it's basically Hardy on screen for the entire film and you spend a great deal of time inside of his head, his performance really IS the movie.

Yes, exactly.

lunatic core
06-15-2011, 02:45 AM
NSFW
5PcAQbhnGNs

schoolofruckus
06-15-2011, 12:47 PM
I'm going to see F.W. Murnau's Sunrise tonight at Cinefamily, if anyone cares to join. There'll be a live score by Beck collaborators Brian LeBarton and Joey Waronker - pretty excited for this.

In other news, Criterion announced today that Carlos will finally be available in late September - fuck yeah. Also, apparently they've teased rather blatantly that Kieslowski's Three Colors trilogy will be added soon. I look forward to discovering all four of these films sometime soon. I need to catch up with Double Life of Veronique on Criterion BD as well.

Sebastian - I'll respond to your call for a DVD/BD purchases thread in a bit...

schoolofruckus
06-15-2011, 07:02 PM
I've been meaning to remind Los Angeles that the great City of Life and Death - an epic and compassionate story about the Rape of Nanking, or if you prefer, the Chinese Holocaust - opens at the Nuart on Friday. It was one of my best of 2009 picks after I saw it at AFI fest that year, and it's a riveting, thoroughly objective look at an event that I didn't know much about. You've got a week to find time for it.

bmack86
06-15-2011, 08:12 PM
Oh man, Sunrise is one of my all time favorite films. I can't wait to hear what you think.

schoolofruckus
06-15-2011, 10:12 PM
Gladly. Sunrise was fucking mind-blowing - an emotional mushroom cloud that has essentially redefined my perspectives on what silent films have to offer. The eerie electronic score by LeBarton and Waronker - a lot of Wendy Carlos-type shit - was hugely enjoyable; I think that I personally prefer these kinds of contemporarily-scored presentations as opposed to seeing a lot of the early 20th century films with their original scores, because those scores are often a big deterrent for me. But even if I had watched this with zero music, it would have bowled me over. It's an absolutely visionary film, but one which deals with some of the most direct - and directly affecting - emotions known to man. I was woefully underslept due to last night's Flaming Lips show, but I was riveted instantly and throughout.

Miroir Noir
06-15-2011, 10:20 PM
For me, those four Kieslowski international co-productions are the single best body of work put together by one filmmaker during the '90s, just narrowly ahead of Wong Kar-Wai's run from Days of Being Wild to Happy Together. Absolutely great filmmaking.

The real Criterion treat announced this month is that they've finally gotten around to the first two Chabrol films!

KungFuJoe
06-15-2011, 10:24 PM
The Attack the Block red band trailer helps to believe the hype.

EjK9TNj_FN0

lunatic core
06-16-2011, 07:41 AM
Watched The Bridge yesterday. It's a documentary about suicide hotspot the Golden Gate Bridge. Specifically the 24 that happened during 2004 when they were almost constantly filming the Bridge.

It's a pretty amazing film.

RedHotSgtPeppers
06-16-2011, 11:48 PM
Just saw Green Lantern.

It was fucking retarded. The special effects were horrible. The 100% CGI characters were made with computer technology comparitive to late-90's Veggie Tales. No joke. Shit story. Shit acting. It should have gone straight to DVD.

On the plus side, Tim Robbins' douchey character dies.

TallGuyCM
06-17-2011, 12:00 AM
Haha, I could have told you it'd turn out like that. Why didn't you just give one of us $12 and we could have kicked you in the balls for the same effect?

RedHotSgtPeppers
06-17-2011, 12:02 AM
I only went to spend some time with an old friend who is visiting home from West Point. I could have given two shits about seeing Green Lantern, but it was what he/the group wanted to do. So I went.

Honestly, I would have taken the kick to the balls instead of enduring that garbage.

TallGuyCM
06-17-2011, 12:04 AM
Let's just plan on doing that when you have the urge to see Transformers in a few weeks. ;)

RedHotSgtPeppers
06-17-2011, 12:10 AM
lol, sounds like a good plan. Got your steel-toed boots ready?

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-17-2011, 12:13 AM
I'm sorry, but I HAVE to see Green Lantern in the theater. It's a nerd thing.

On a completely different note, I've had Days Of Heaven sitting at my house for over a week and I'm dying to finally see it, but I haven't had a good time to be able to sit and fully appreciate it as I would like.

TallGuyCM
06-17-2011, 12:16 AM
I just watched it for the first time a few months ago, it's good to wait until the right time. And make sure the room's pitch black.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-17-2011, 12:22 AM
We're dog-sitting for my girlfriend's brother this weekend and he's got a 50"+ tv, so I'm hoping it will provide a good opportunity.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-17-2011, 12:22 AM
This sounds so oddly domesticated for me.

TallGuyCM
06-17-2011, 12:26 AM
Make sure you have the Criterion Bluray.

RedHotSgtPeppers
06-17-2011, 12:47 AM
I'm sorry, but I HAVE to see Green Lantern in the theater. It's a nerd thing.

Don't expect much.

schoolofruckus
06-17-2011, 10:48 AM
I watched Guy Maddin's My Winnipeg last night. It was a gloriously entertaining and ambiguously-dramatized portrait of Maddin's childhood and hometown, and it fits right in between my recent viewings of The Tree of Life and Voyage in Time.

Still-ill
06-17-2011, 11:27 AM
Just finished The Killing of a Chinese Bookie. Hot damn, that was fucking great. The first half didn't floor me, but the more important half did. The acting, the change of perspectives, the lighting, loved it. I need to watch A Woman Under the Influence now.

schoolofruckus
06-17-2011, 01:04 PM
Just finished The Killing of a Chinese Bookie. Hot damn, that was fucking great. The first half didn't floor me, but the more important half did. The acting, the change of perspectives, the lighting, loved it. I need to watch A Woman Under the Influence now.

Awesome. Was that your first time with Cassavetes?

bug on your lip
06-17-2011, 01:06 PM
I watched Guy Maddin's My Winnipeg last night. It was a gloriously entertaining and ambiguously-dramatized portrait of Maddin's childhood and hometown, and it fits right in between my recent viewings of The Tree of Life and Voyage in Time.


doooood..

love that movie...

it makes me so excited that Winnipeg has an NHL team again. It's like the movie got closure.

HandBanana
06-17-2011, 01:36 PM
Maddin is a hugely underrated talent.

Grandma
06-17-2011, 01:47 PM
The Green Lantern is up there with the last 3 minutes of Air Force One for the worst CGI ever used in a major motion picture. Its as if it was made on a sega saturn development kit...

5BBa51CHPtc

wmgaretjax
06-17-2011, 02:21 PM
Maddin is a hugely underrated talent.

i love maddin, but i don't think he's underrated at all. he's a total indie-darling. i'm fairly certain every maddin film i've seen in theaters (which, i believe, is all of them with the exception of dracula) has been with a sell out audience.

Still-ill
06-17-2011, 02:24 PM
Awesome. Was that your first time with Cassavetes?

Yep, I've been putting him off for a long time.

schoolofruckus
06-17-2011, 02:27 PM
doooood..

love that movie...

it makes me so excited that Winnipeg has an NHL team again. It's like the movie got closure.

I was thinking the same fucking thing!


i love maddin, but i don't think he's underrated at all. he's a total indie-darling. i'm fairly certain every maddin film i've seen in theaters (which, i believe, is all of them with the exception of dracula) has been with a sell out audience.

Yeah, I would say he's properly rated as a cinematic treasure. I've only seen Brand Upon the Brain! - on DVD, having fucked up the chance to see it live with Crispin narrating - so I think I'm going to work straight backwards to The Saddest Music in the World.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-17-2011, 02:51 PM
On a completely different note, I've had Days Of Heaven sitting at my house for over a week and I'm dying to finally see it, but I haven't had a good time to be able to sit and fully appreciate it as I would like.


I just watched it for the first time a few months ago, it's good to wait until the right time. And make sure the room's pitch black.

I watched it Wednesday night, the criterion blu-ray version on our 42" HDTV. It is good, and you can definitely see an early version of Malick's camera work in the river scenes. It's pretty lovely to see the plains of Texas in that light.

DRINKEY! DON'T READ! SPOILERS (SORT OF):

HOWEVER, the movie sort of felt like An Hour And A Half of Hell. The Blu-ray disc that Netflix sent was skipping every 5-10 minutes, the jaggedness in the storyline (typical Malick) really made it sort of a headache to keep up with, the nail-biting moments weren't nail-biting as much as lackluster, and the narration by Linda Manz was really, really cheesy and just annoying. I had a few beers in me so it may have distorted my judgment but I probably wouldn't watch this movie again. I still have a huge desire to check out Badlands but mostly 'cause of someone's recommendation on this thread.

SoulDischarge
06-17-2011, 05:19 PM
[Strong statement of approval for both My Winnipeg and Badlands]

The A.V. Club just did a New Cult Canon entry on Schizopolis, which is probably one of the top ten most entertaining and re-watchable films for me. Anyone who hasn't seen that and is a fan of anarchistic humor should do so post haste.

HandBanana
06-17-2011, 08:31 PM
Maybe my perspective on Maddin is skewed by me not living somewhere cool.

Watching this right now. A personal fave and also (IMHO) underrated.
It's very 1995 but the important stuff is pretty timeless and the concept is pretty great.


http://i.imgur.com/ecEAz.jpg

daxton
06-17-2011, 10:22 PM
^ I fucking love that movie. We briefly discussed it a while back in here, mostly due to Juliette Lewis hate (and love on my part).

iv3rdawG
06-17-2011, 10:46 PM
Drive was pretty amazing. Absolutely loved the soundtrack and the choice of music.

TallGuyCM
06-18-2011, 12:52 AM
Drive was pretty amazing. Absolutely loved the soundtrack and the choice of music.

I figured this would be the response that most people had and will continue to have. I absolutely hated it. It definitely had its moments, and at this moment in time I can't quite put into words just why I loathed it so, but I couldn't have been more disappointed with it. Especially after how much I was looking forward to it.

Ryan Gosling has gotten rave reviews for his performance, and while he was indeed very good, I wasn't overly impressed. His acting in Blue Valentine was far superior, and maybe he's just getting to that point where people praise him for anything he does, I dunno.

I did have good fortune today though, I randomly got a text from a friend asking if I wanted to hang out tonight and mentioned that I was going to try to get into the screening, completely forgetting that he works for the L.A. Times (the festival's biggest sponsor). He hooked Matt and I up with two Priority Admission passes so we were the first ones in, and got free food and alcohol in a VIP area ahead of time. So there was a silver lining at least.

schoolofruckus
06-18-2011, 08:50 PM
Wow...I'm wondering if it actually sucks or if it's Redland 2: Redland Harder.

TallGuyCM
06-18-2011, 11:15 PM
Like I said, I'll likely be in the minority of people who don't really like it. I'm sure you'll love it.

GoodGirlGalaxy
06-19-2011, 12:10 PM
Wow...I'm wondering if it actually sucks or if it's Redland 2: Redland Harder.

Haha! This reminds of Rainn Wilson's twitter a month ago. Where he had people coming up with potential Nic Cage sequel titles. It was the highlight of the week, as far as twitter goes. My favorite ones are:

Gone in 60 Seconds 2: Gone in 30 Seconds
The Passion of The Christ 2: Revenge

TallGuyCM
06-19-2011, 01:57 PM
Last night I watched a random double feature of Weekend and Grizzly Man.

The former was probably the most pretentious thing I've ever seen before, and Godard's now 1 for 4 in my book. I'm not sure I care for him as a filmmaker at all at this point. I feel I have a pretty strong stomach for heavy-handed diatribe, but parts of Weekend were completely excessive. I think now I know how Gabe feels about Haneke, in that he dislikes him largely because he feels he has no respect for his audience. That's exactly how I felt about this. The traffic jam shot and the 360 scene with the piano player were pretty remarkable, though.

Grizzly Man was good, but I think it could have been a lot more compelling. And it seemed to make Treadwell out to be too much of a nut (which he surely was), when an appreciation for what he strived for and did might have been a better route to have explored.

malcolmjamalawesome
06-19-2011, 01:57 PM
I have a theory that upwards of 90% of the time Character A tells Character B, "Wait here. I want to show you something," Character A will shortly return with an item that once belonged to one of Character A's parents.

MissingPerson
06-19-2011, 02:00 PM
I think you might be on to something. Apply for a grant immediately.

obzen
06-19-2011, 02:31 PM
lulz, Jurassic Park 4... 3D.

Gribbz
06-19-2011, 02:35 PM
3Diculous.

malcolmjamalawesome
06-19-2011, 03:15 PM
I saw X Men: First Class today. I don't want to talk about it.

obzen
06-19-2011, 03:22 PM
They really fucked it all off with the first outing, from the inaccurate story line to Magneto's daft costume.



I'd like to see them get it right next time, perhaps with X-Men: The Age of Apocalypse.

PotVsKtl
06-19-2011, 03:22 PM
Grizzly Man was good, but I think it could have been a lot more compelling. And it seemed to make Treadwell out to be too much of a nut (which he surely was), when an appreciation for what he strived for and did might have been a better route to have explored.

You're going to want to look for another director if doting montages are your thing. What was he striving for, and how should it be appreciated? He get et by the bar, story told.

malcolmjamalawesome
06-19-2011, 03:24 PM
They really fucked it all off with the first outing, from the inaccurate story line to Magneto's daft costume.



I'd like to see them get it right next time, perhaps with X-Men: The Age of Apocalypse.

I'd still go see a Dark Phoenix Saga redux if someone capable was writing/directing it.

PotVsKtl
06-19-2011, 03:26 PM
For example, Mamet writes in “The Secret Knowledge” that “the Israelis would like to live in peace within their borders; the Arabs would like to kill them all.” Whatever one’s opinion of that conflict may be, this (twice-made) claim of his abolishes any need to analyze or even discuss it. It has a long way to go before it can even be called simplistic. By now, perhaps, you will not be surprised to know that Mamet regards global warming as a false alarm, and demands to be told “by what magical process” bumper stickers can “save whales, and free Tibet.” This again is not uncharacteristic of his pointlessly aggressive style: who on earth maintains that they can? If I were as prone to sloganizing as Mamet, I’d keep clear of bumper-sticker comparisons altogether.

Please proceed to director jail.

MissingPerson
06-19-2011, 03:37 PM
I get a kick out of Magneto O' Toole on all the ads.

"De real enemy is out dere!"

obzen
06-19-2011, 04:36 PM
Of course, X-Men: The Age of Apocalypse would have to be a sort of like LOTR; three installments each clocking in at over 3 hours.


It's the only way.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-19-2011, 04:41 PM
Age of Apocalypse was exceedingly dumb in most every way.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-19-2011, 04:49 PM
My friends and I couldn't make it into the sold out Cinespia screening of Heathers at Hollywood Forever last night so we did Bridesmaids instead. God, that was enjoyable. A light, completely forgettable piece of fluff for sure. But I can't remember the last time I literally LOL'd at the movies so much. Kind of nice to see a bunch of very funny women do their things without having to play the shrew. (Well, except for poor Rose Byrne)

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-19-2011, 10:14 PM
I watched it Wednesday night, the criterion blu-ray version on our 42" HDTV. It is good, and you can definitely see an early version of Malick's camera work in the river scenes. It's pretty lovely to see the plains of Texas in that light.

DRINKEY! DON'T READ! SPOILERS (SORT OF):

HOWEVER, the movie sort of felt like An Hour And A Half of Hell. The Blu-ray disc that Netflix sent was skipping every 5-10 minutes, the jaggedness in the storyline (typical Malick) really made it sort of a headache to keep up with, the nail-biting moments weren't nail-biting as much as lackluster, and the narration by Linda Manz was really, really cheesy and just annoying. I had a few beers in me so it may have distorted my judgment but I probably wouldn't watch this movie again. I still have a huge desire to check out Badlands but mostly 'cause of someone's recommendation on this thread.

Not really spoilery at all, but I did wait until after i saw the film to read it. Sucks about the skipping, that would certainly impair the experience.

I don't have a blu ray player, but I really enjoyed the movie all the same - it's gorgeous. I really enjoyed the entirety of immensely. I liked the narration because it came off as being really real, and I thin it really sells that we see the story unfold from the youngest character's perspective. I guess I wasn't really expecting "nail-biting moments"...for what could have been a melodrama, the story is told in a refreshingly subtle way.

Also, definitely see Badlands.

M Sparks
06-19-2011, 10:46 PM
The A.V. Club just did a New Cult Canon entry on Schizopolis, which is probably one of the top ten most entertaining and re-watchable films for me. Anyone who hasn't seen that and is a fan of anarchistic humor should do so post haste.

I have not seen this in a while. I thought it was fascinating, but "rewatchable" is not a term I would have used. Maybe I should revisit.

If we had a poll for strangest film by a "mainstream" director, this would have to rank pretty damn high. Great credit sequence.

HandBanana
06-20-2011, 11:55 AM
Saw the trailer for this before Tree of Life the other night and I am sold.
I'm a big Mike Mills fan and the early word is positive.

rXUFUp6vsxg

buddy
06-20-2011, 12:02 PM
it's playing at the arclight currently

Miroir Noir
06-20-2011, 01:27 PM
I watched it Wednesday night, the criterion blu-ray version on our 42" HDTV. It is good, and you can definitely see an early version of Malick's camera work in the river scenes. It's pretty lovely to see the plains of Texas in that light.

DRINKEY! DON'T READ! SPOILERS (SORT OF):

HOWEVER, the movie sort of felt like An Hour And A Half of Hell. The Blu-ray disc that Netflix sent was skipping every 5-10 minutes, the jaggedness in the storyline (typical Malick) really made it sort of a headache to keep up with, the nail-biting moments weren't nail-biting as much as lackluster, and the narration by Linda Manz was really, really cheesy and just annoying. I had a few beers in me so it may have distorted my judgment but I probably wouldn't watch this movie again. I still have a huge desire to check out Badlands but mostly 'cause of someone's recommendation on this thread.

It was actually shot in Canada; Malick got so wrapped up in pre-production that they had to move north to find wheat fields that hadn't been harvested yet.

I've always found the voiceover in that film interesting. It certainly was not planned. If I recall correctly, Malick wanted to avoid using voiceover in Days of Heaven because he had used it so extensively in Badlands. However, as the editing process ground on, he discovered that he had edited so much of the narrative dialogue out that he needed to use voiceover in order for the plot to make sense. But not too much sense, right? It's interesting to me that Malick picked the child to do the narration: so much of that voiceover ends up being unreliable, or even inconsequential to the plot. It would have been easy to pick the Brooke Adams character to do the voiceover, after all, she survives and presumably has the most insight into the motivations of the other two main characters. But the Manz character turns out be the perfect character to comment obliquely on larger themes. I usually pick up something new from that voiceover on repeated viewings.

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 03:09 PM
I've seen three films each by Bergman and Bresson, and there are alarming parallels between my reactions to the films I chose to see. The first film I saw by each (The Seventh Seal and Diary of a Country Priest) severely disappointed, due to what I perceived as a repellent Christian perspective and grossly stagey qualities in the acting and writing. The second by each (The Virgin Spring and Pickpocket) were better in those regards, but still somewhat underwhelming. However, I recently broke through the ceiling with Bergman on Persona, and in turn, with Bresson this afternoon on Au Hasard Balthazar.

No less than a masterpiece, the film follows Balthazar, a donkey born into the somewhat-undefined care of two neighboring families over the course of a summer in the French countryside. But as the summer ends and the innocent romance between young Marie and Jacques draws to a close, Balthazar begins a long life of hardship, passed between an interconnected series of brutish owners who see him - and one another - only in terms of capacity to help them attain wealth and amusement. As you can surely imagine, it's one of the more devastating comments on human nature that has ever been put on screen.

TallGuyCM
06-20-2011, 03:42 PM
The first film I saw by each (The Seventh Seal and Diary of a Country Priest) severely disappointed, due to what I perceived as a repellent Christian perspective

I'm not sure I agree with The Seventh Seal being told from a Christian perspective. I noticed more than a few jabs at religion in it. Aside from turning the ideas of death and judgment (which many people in general seem to fear) into something almost comedic, there were a few not so devoutly Christian lines muttered by the characters in the film. The one that comes to mind is when Gunnar Bjornstrand's character says something along the lines of monkeys having very similar characteristics to humans, more or less addressing the concept of evolution.

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 03:50 PM
I'd have to see it again to argue that at length - and that just isn't going to happen absent special circumstances - but taking "jabs" at religion isn't mutually exclusive from embracing it or letting it dictate the film's viewpoint.

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 04:33 PM
In other news - Weekend is "pretentious"!? Is that just your new word for movies that are GREAT?

HandBanana
06-20-2011, 04:50 PM
If I ever get my shit together (Ill probably never get my shit together) and move to LA, I think I'll just end up living at the New Beverley all the time.

They're playin The Limey tonite. I love that flick. :(

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-20-2011, 04:52 PM
I wish our revival theaters weren't all stupid tiny and uncomfortable...but there sure are a lot of opportunities to see cool movies.

TallGuyCM
06-20-2011, 05:01 PM
In other news - Weekend is "pretentious"!? Is that just your new word for movies that are GREAT?

My new word? I haven't used it lately at all aside from describing Weekend.

Let's talk about this one for a bit. I know Jared and Patrick have also seen it and could provide some insight. But what exactly is it that gives this film any kind of merit? How is it not Godard at (from what I've seen so far) his most self-indulgent? For anyone that's seen it, what specifically did you get out of it?

suprefan
06-20-2011, 05:40 PM
an official trailer for Bellflower. FINALLY

kbZ4EtsjpYA

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 06:09 PM
My new word? I haven't used it lately at all aside from describing Weekend.

Let's talk about this one for a bit. I know Jared and Patrick have also seen it and could provide some insight. But what exactly is it that gives this film any kind of merit? How is it not Godard at (from what I've seen so far) his most self-indulgent? For anyone that's seen it, what specifically did you get out of it?

You also called Redland pretentious, so again, evidence suggests that what you really mean is that the movie in question is masterful. Of all the complaints to level at either picture, I can't see how either registers as unimportant - Weekend in particular.

It's been nearly four years since I've seen it, but here's what I had to say about it then:


Now THAT is a fucking film! A road movie in the purest sense of the word, tirelessly pitting all the participants of conflict (man, society, God, nature, and himself) against each other, "Weekend" is one of the most blistering indictments of the progression of humanity ever committed to film. A materialistic and dually unfaithful couple hits the road to go visit the woman's dying (and very wealthy) father, and ends up on what can sincerely be described as the highway to hell. Surrounded by violence, chaos, and lunacy to the most extreme degree, they encounter a series of brutal auto wrecks, roadside bandits, militant liberal philosophers, and finally a cannibalistic militia.....Godard's disapproving eye catches the apocalypse in all its pending absurdity. The film is a glorious, experimental, anarchic mess, shot primarily in a series of lengthy dolly pans and consistently informed by Godard's trademark punk-rock narrative aesthetic. I'd only previously seen "Breathless" - which, for all its stylistic innovation, seemed more a triumph of form over content. This one, however, is a most harmonious marriage between the two.

Funny enough, Jared responded to this by recommending Time of the Wolf. I think you're right about yourself taking Godard the same way I've taken Haneke based on our respective short samples, but to me, Weekend was wildly enjoyable while being a serious expansion of my horizons. This is one I really need Criterion to trick out and make available for me to purchase.

Down Rodeo
06-20-2011, 06:13 PM
I'm really glad to hear you liked Au Hasard Balthazar, Gabe!

And on another topic, I really like Weekend but I had some major problems with it right after I saw it, too. Godard was really aggressive in putting all his intellectual pre-occupations on display in that one.

schoolofruckus
06-20-2011, 06:20 PM
an official trailer for Bellflower. FINALLY

kbZ4EtsjpYA

I can't fucking wait to see this....and I just realized that USC screening is only a week from today. The next couple of weeks are going to be crazy for me:

Wednesday - Attack the Block (LAFF)
Thursday - La Dolce Vita (Egyptian)
Friday - Entrance (LAFF)
Saturday - Another Earth / The Future (LAFF)
Monday - Bellflower (USC)
Tuesday - Ziggy Stardust / Velvet Goldmine (New Beverly)
Thursday - Pink Floyd THE WALL (Egyptian)

Plus I'd like to squeeze in Monte Hellman's Road to Nowhere somewhere in there...

TallGuyCM
06-20-2011, 06:24 PM
See, I'm not nearly at the point in my experience with film yet where I walk away from something and realize that the intent of it was to be a "blistering indictment on the progression of humanity." Heavy stuff like that flat out goes over my head.

wmgaretjax
06-20-2011, 09:09 PM
Haneke and Godard share a lot in common. Although I think Godard's recent stuff is far more difficult (and... if you must... "pretentious") than anything Haneke has done.

TallGuyCM
06-21-2011, 01:12 AM
Throughout Weekend, it was obvious that Godard was pointing out the emptiness of people obsessed with material possessions (a la the scene where the woman freaks out because the designer hand bag is being burned in the car crash), but any further criticism of humanity as a whole was lost on me.

TallGuyCM
06-21-2011, 01:16 AM
I finally got around to watching the Criterion Bluray of Malick's The New World tonight that I've had at home for over a month. To no surprise, this completed the trifecta (along with The Thin Red Line and Days of Heaven) of the most visually profound movie experiences I've had in a home setting. Completely astounding.

It's been a definite blessing in disguise that it had taken me this long to get around to watching Malick's films for the first time. Having seen them all in the past few months in the absolutely flawless Bluray format was just perfect.

Having said that, to this day the most jaw dropping visuals I've seen have been the beginning and end of Silent Light...

SoulDischarge
06-21-2011, 07:12 AM
I would never argue that Weekend isn't self-indulgent. I just don't see that as an automatic flaw. It's been years since I've seen it, but I was taken with its anarchic spirit and self deprecating humor. It seems to be making serious points, only to totally mock them the next second. When considering my opinion on film, you should always remember I'm extremely fond of fascinating messes and imaginative semi-failures. I should really re-watch Weekend.

As for Au Hasard Balthazar, I think that may be the single most boring film I've ever seen. After reading up on it, I kind of began to understand why it was so well regarded (especially Ebert's Great Movies write up), but I think I was just distracted by the simplicity of it. This happens a lot to me with great classic art films. I can appreciate what they're going for and the craftsmanship and etc., but a lot of times they don't connect on a personal level and sitting through them feels like teeth pulling. I think I'm just too restless for great movies any more, which is why I barely watch anything but TV on DVD. I bet when I'm 40, I'm going to see a major resurgence in my film addiction.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-21-2011, 07:26 PM
Oh man, Class of 1984 is such a wonderfully trashy critique of due process. It's 1/3 over the top after school special cautionary tale, 1/3 political satire, and 1/3 violent revenge film, filled to the brim with spectacularly evil punk rockers. Featuring an amazingly insane appearance by Roddy McDowell, a chubby young Michael J. Fox, and a ridiculous theme song by Alice Cooper. This movie is so good.

schoolofruckus
06-21-2011, 08:12 PM
I rewatched The Temptation of St. Tony last night. Everything I said back in October holds true - it's a truly awe-inspiring satire of human virtue based on Dante, turning the glacial, observant visual rhythms of Bela Tarr into a perfect vessel for bleak visual comedy. On Netflix now. Watch.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-21-2011, 09:37 PM
I've seen three films each by Bergman and Bresson, and there are alarming parallels between my reactions to the films I chose to see. The first film I saw by each (The Seventh Seal and Diary of a Country Priest) severely disappointed, due to what I perceived as a repellent Christian perspective and grossly stagey qualities in the acting and writing. The second by each (The Virgin Spring and Pickpocket) were better in those regards, but still somewhat underwhelming. However, I recently broke through the ceiling with Bergman on Persona, and in turn, with Bresson this afternoon on Au Hasard Balthazar.



Have you seen Bergman's Smiles of a Summer Night? Such a sweetly melancholic film. At times boisterously funny, at others arch and wry. Danger lurking beneath the froth and fizz. I haven't quite seen that sense of late summer ennui captured on film like this. It probably seems "light" next to some of his weightier films dealing with grand existential crises. If I'm remembering it correctly, the great stage director Hal Prince, when adapting the film for the stage said he wanted the whole play to have a feeling of whipped cream with razor blades and the original movie has that feeling for me as well.

buddy
06-22-2011, 02:39 AM
just saw The Red Shoes, and i can't say enough that's already been said before. the sequence of the the red shoes opera is one of the best i've seen. it's beautifully shot, and well executed, among the other elements which take place within the film. i now understand the praise it's been given by directors such as Scorsese, etc. it's a shame it took me this long to see it. fantastic film.

wmgaretjax
06-22-2011, 07:55 AM
I think you're right about yourself taking Godard the same way I've taken Haneke based on our respective short samples, but to me, Weekend was wildly enjoyable while being a serious expansion of my horizons.

I really struggle with the rampant tendency for people to dismiss intellectual or difficult cinema as pretentious or self-indulgent in a snap judgment (yes, I would characterize a single viewing of many of these kinds of films as snap). Folks like Haneke and Godard are incredibly honest in their desire to engage the audience on a very taxing level. There is no bait and switch at play that should take anyone by surprise. That said, is there really anything wrong with spending years of your life making a film and to then require an audience to watch it two or three times before getting a good grasp on it? I don't believe that Haneke or Godard are making films solely for themselves (on the contrary, they have frequently addressed the integral role the audience plays in the creation of their films). Similarly, "pretentious" has become a meaningless word that is all too frequently used to promote a kind of lowest common denominator populism. /rant not directed at anyone in particular

Miroir Noir
06-22-2011, 08:36 AM
Your point is especially timely since so much of the film critic intelligentsia is having this precise conversation right now due to the recent "cultural vegetables" piece published in The New York Times Magazine and some of the more dismissive responses aimed at The Tree of Life.

Weekend never clicked for me. From an aesthetic and historical standpoint, it may be the most important film that he ever made. Unquestionably, it was a turning point for his filmmaking; I think there's little doubt that he was absolutely serious with those final title cards at the end of the film. The problem for me is not so much that the film gets swallowed up in its own ideas and alienation effects, but more that those ideas just aren’t all that interesting forty years later. The politics and radicalism seem so dated and forced. For me, it pales next to something like Masculin, féminin.

wmgaretjax
06-22-2011, 08:43 AM
The problem for me is not so much that the film gets swallowed up in its own ideas and alienation effects, but more that those ideas just aren’t all that interesting forty years later. The politics and radicalism seem so dated and forced. For me, it pales next to something like Masculin, féminin.

I think this is where the interesting discussion begins. It is supremely difficult to make radically political films that are timeless... I will, I'm currently very busy, make an argument for Weekend being one of those films once I get a chance to watch it again.

I have spoken a lot about "4" (Chetyre) a lot before (watch it on Netflix). I believe it to be a perfect example of a film that is deeply entrenched in period-specific political issues that transcends... but... it's only 6 years old. So I might be wrong.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 08:56 AM
Well spoken.

Personally, I rarely use the word "pretentious" because I don't like the connotations that come with it - some of which you refer to, others being raised in this ridiculous "cultural vegetables" debate. I can fully accept that films like The White Ribbon may very well take a long marination period over multiple viewings in order to begin to make sense, which puts them at a series of disadvantages. I don't consider myself to be afflicted with the impatience that is so prevalent in a lot of contemporary film viewing culture, at least not in the sense that I'm incapable of enjoying a slow or difficult film. My personal obstruction is that I have such a lengthy list of important cinema that I have yet to experience that it's difficult for me to give that sort of attention to a film that doesn't dig its hooks in at least somewhat after one viewing. Watching Time of the Wolf and The White Ribbon, there were moments that I found compelling, but at no point was I closer to "must see this again" than "can't fucking wait for this to end". When I still have literally thousands of films on my list to see - including majority or complete filmographies from people like Dreyer, Ozu, Kurosawa, Herzog, Fellini, Kieslowski, etc. - it's difficult if not impossible to sign up for 2-3 viewings of even the films I treasure most.

That said - I also have a personal policy to not give up on difficult filmmakers after only a handful of films that haven't worked for me. I basically HATED The Seventh Seal, but I kept trying Bergman every now and then, which led me to Persona. I didn't care much for Robert Altman until I saw McCabe and Mrs. Miller. I'm sure at some point I will watch Cache and/or The Piano Teacher because I can't accept not understanding why Haneke is considered a genius by someone like you (not to mention many, many others).

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 08:57 AM
I think this is where the interesting discussion begins. It is supremely difficult to make radically political films that are timeless... I will, I'm currently very busy, make an argument for Weekend being one of those films once I get a chance to watch it again.

I have spoken a lot about "4" (Chetyre) a lot before (watch it on Netflix). I believe it to be a perfect example of a film that is deeply entrenched in period-specific political issues that transcends... but... it's only 6 years old. So I might be wrong.

That's funny - 4 is the next film coming to my house.

wmgaretjax
06-22-2011, 09:19 AM
My personal obstruction is that I have such a lengthy list of important cinema that I have yet to experience that it's difficult for me to give that sort of attention to a film that doesn't dig its hooks in at least somewhat after one viewing.

Ah... I suspect you and I will struggle with this until the day we die.

Also, I'm glad you liked Persona. If it was going to be any Bergman film, it would be that one.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 09:24 AM
When I still have literally thousands of films on my list to see - including majority or complete filmographies from ... Ozu

Godspeed.

TallGuyCM
06-22-2011, 09:33 AM
I really struggle with the rampant tendency for people to dismiss intellectual or difficult cinema as pretentious or self-indulgent in a snap judgment (yes, I would characterize a single viewing of many of these kinds of films as snap).

I don't like the overuse of the word "pretentious" either, but sometimes there's no better way to describe something. I mainly reserve it for a response to something that comes off as no less than completely masturbatory, which (be it right or wrong) is the very impression that Weekend and, yes, Redland left me with.

That said, I watched the original Funny Games last night and liked it better than the American remake. The two films are very similar scene for scene, with the main difference that I noticed (without giving anything away) was in the original there were these long, extended shots of grief after the first big tragedy that I found to be very effective. Somehow, the whole premise of the film is a bit easier to believe taking place in Germany than it is here, haha.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 09:34 AM
One of my obstacles with Ozu - who is in the "complete filmographies yet to explore" column - is that I don't know where I should start; the other filmmakers listed have at least one film apiece in my queue. The house is now taking recommendations.

TallGuyCM
06-22-2011, 09:38 AM
Don't know if this is the best recommendation, but Bill Hader had a top 10 list on Criterion's site a few months ago and he said that Good Morning is one of his favorite movies. Take that for what it's worth though.

SoulDischarge
06-22-2011, 09:38 AM
I try to avoid the pretentious criticism as well, but there's one film I think it fits 100%: Nadja.

SoulDischarge
06-22-2011, 09:39 AM
I always hear Tokyo Story for Ozu, but I've yet to watch it.

Miroir Noir
06-22-2011, 09:51 AM
Tokyo Story is the standard Ozu entry on all time top ten lists. Late Spring is a good choice as well.

wmgaretjax
06-22-2011, 09:56 AM
I vote for Good Morning. Tokyo Story is a natural recommendation as well.

Down Rodeo
06-22-2011, 11:00 AM
It's usually a good idea to start with the most well-regarded film in any director's filmography...so in that case, I think Tokyo Story is the most logical starting point. That and Late Spring are the only Ozu films I've seen though.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 11:27 AM
Trailer for Cronenberg's A Dangerous Method is out there now...
uZ7JKmcLTsI

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 11:30 AM
Troubling.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 12:11 PM
Yeah, that does not look good at all. That trailer plus Keira Knightley - who's basically only ever in trash apart from Atonement - are serious reason for concern. But ultimately Cronenberg, the subject matter and the male actors are enough to get me in the door.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 12:34 PM
Yeah, that does not look good at all. That trailer plus Keira Knightley - who's basically only ever in trash apart from Atonement - are serious reason for concern. But ultimately Cronenberg, the subject matter and the male actors are enough to get me in the door.

I pretty much agree with all of this.

Miroir Noir
06-22-2011, 01:07 PM
It's probably worth considering that neither of the last two Cronenberg films ended up being nearly as conventional as their trailers and advertising made them out to be.

Vasoline Groove
06-22-2011, 01:29 PM
The trailer looks interesting enough to me. Its definitely a subject that I'm intrigued about but I didn't know who Cassel was supposed to be. I looked it up and he's supposed to be Otto Gross, who seemes like someone a great movie could be made about.

I just think the period music makes it seem like a cheesy version of a Merchant Ivory film.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 01:32 PM
It's probably worth considering that neither of the last two Cronenberg films ended up being nearly as conventional as their trailers and advertising made them out to be.

Definitely worth considering. I had a similar thought....

KungFuJoe
06-22-2011, 01:32 PM
None of you fuckers are going to catch Detective Dee or The Yellow Sea at LAFF this week?

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 01:52 PM
I should probably try both of those, but I have a really hard time making it to big action films under most circumstances (although one of the circumstances in which I relent is "the movie has Transformers in it").

I'm seeing Attack the Block tonight. I hate that most of the films that caught my eye on the LAFF guide are those that already have distribution, but that's just the way it happened.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 02:11 PM
Now that it's safe, did anyone see Sucker Punch? The connective tissue was rancid and bubbling but the fantasy action sequences were absolutely masterful. Someone needs to give Snyder a project about mute ninjas.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 02:18 PM
I just can't do that one. Snyder is ABSOLUTELY a filmmaker that I've decided I can't get behind.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 02:20 PM
Unfortunately I even found the action sequences boring. Sucker Punch even as a really dumb action movie was incredibly disappointing on every level for me.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 02:33 PM
I don't know how to be bored by giant samurai with gatling guns.

More importantly, the fight choreography was world-class.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 02:38 PM
The first fight sequence was indeed brilliant. I got bored because of the same video game like formula that was given to each subsequent action scene, punctuated by the laborious explanations of the quests before each one. they just got less and less exciting with each go-around. The scale of the zombie nazi fight was pretty great, and the dragon was top notch though. The whole thing just became too repetitive in the end for me.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 02:42 PM
I get that. It really was the first sequence that surprised me, easily the best choreographed and executed Western fight scene I've seen in years. It's a real shame Snyder apparently writes at a 4th grade level.

KungFuJoe
06-22-2011, 04:01 PM
I suppose I should rent Sucker Punch and give it a go. I just got Green Hornet in the mail. I wonder which is the better of the two?


In other news, I wish I was in NYC for the NYAFF yet again, if only to see ZU up on the big screen.

PzveuOoPpYg

TallGuyCM
06-22-2011, 04:32 PM
None of you fuckers are going to catch Detective Dee or The Yellow Sea at LAFF this week?

This is what I'm seeing in the next week or so:

6/23 - Another Earth - LAFF
6/25 - The Future - LAFF
6/25 - The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman - LAFF
6/27 - Bellflower - USC

I'd like to see one or two things on Friday at the fest as well, any recommendations?

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 04:45 PM
When do you people find time for drinking?

TallGuyCM
06-22-2011, 04:50 PM
I just can't do that one. Snyder is ABSOLUTELY a filmmaker that I've decided I can't get behind.

Are you sure? The guy that gave us Watchmen and then followed it up with THIS?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/8/8e/Legend_of_the_Guardians_Poster.jpg

Seriously, what the fuck was that? I literally laughed out loud every time I saw a billboard for it when I was driving around.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 04:59 PM
It was a children's film based on a critically acclaimed series of books. Dude's got kids.

MissingPerson
06-22-2011, 05:01 PM
They're going to grow up with really fucked up ideas about both women and men.

HandBanana
06-22-2011, 05:02 PM
Holy crap. I had no idea he did that owl thing.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 05:03 PM
The trailer with that 30 Seconds to Mars song was epic.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-22-2011, 05:07 PM
Holy shit, Zack Snyder has 7 kids

HandBanana
06-22-2011, 05:13 PM
It's not a popular viewpoint I know, but I actually really liked Watchmen even though I absolutely understand that it doesnt work.
But its an interesting failure (at least on some levels) to me.
I dont tend to watch it as a full film, instead dipping into it for a few scenes and just enjoying the sprawl of it all a bit. It's got an icy tone to it and an atmospheric quality that I enjoy and there's some really terrific set pieces in there. And some pretty bad ones too.

higgybaby23
06-22-2011, 05:29 PM
Just watched Man On Wire. Possibly the most inspirational film I've ever seen.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 06:23 PM
This Attack the Block screening is nuts. It's not packed yet, bit the energy in and around this place is as feverish as anything I've seen in 6+ years of doing LAFF or AFI. That includes the Fountain premiere and that first-anywhere screening of The Fighter.

schoolofruckus
06-22-2011, 06:28 PM
When do you people find time for drinking?

When we're not watching Sucker Punch.

Miroir Noir
06-22-2011, 07:38 PM
I spent probably 90% of The Watchmen wanting more Nixon. Yep, that's the kinda person I am -- boobs and explosions everywhere, and I am jonesing for more screen time for the fucking Nixon caricature.

PotVsKtl
06-22-2011, 07:50 PM
When we're not watching Sucker Punch.

Oh, the accuralarity.

TallGuyCM
06-23-2011, 02:01 AM
It's not a popular viewpoint I know, but I actually really liked Watchmen even though I absolutely understand that it doesnt work.
But its an interesting failure (at least on some levels) to me.
I dont tend to watch it as a full film, instead dipping into it for a few scenes and just enjoying the sprawl of it all a bit. It's got an icy tone to it and an atmospheric quality that I enjoy and there's some really terrific set pieces in there. And some pretty bad ones too.

And it also has the worst and most tasteless use of music I've ever seen in a film.

schoolofruckus
06-23-2011, 07:28 AM
Attack the Block kicked a lot of ass. Like the films Edgar Wright has directed (he's an executive producer on this one), it's exactly the kind of conventional genre cinema that works for me - clever, character-driven, and deft at using formula to play with and against expectations. This movie follows a gang of South London teenagers whose otherwise normal night of robbing and causing mischief is interrupted by an alien invasion that seems to be targeted directly at them. The acting is fantastic, and one of the film's biggest strengths is that it allows the kids to feel both genuinely dangerous and genuinely teenaged at the same time. It's entertainment of the highest and purest form.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 07:38 AM
And it also has the worst and most tasteless use of music I've ever seen in a film.

Oh don't worry, the use of music in Sucker Punch was much worse.

HandBanana
06-23-2011, 07:44 AM
Yeah, Snyder has a hard time grasping much outside of the purely visual (he doesnt seem to understand subtext, nuanced characterization even in it's most overt ways, leaden music cues, etc) but theres something fascinating about the mess that is the Watchmen movie. Maybe it's just the source material showing through, but its such an odd animal. Particularly for a Big Hwood Blockbuster style film.

Grandma
06-23-2011, 08:07 AM
NO GODDAMNIT...

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/50125

schoolofruckus
06-23-2011, 08:08 AM
Oh don't worry, the use of music in Sucker Punch was much worse.

Unless "Hallelujah" is playing while the orderlies rape the little girls, I have to declare this impossible.

schoolofruckus
06-23-2011, 08:10 AM
NO GODDAMNIT...

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/50125

I can't wait until Jared weighs in on this...

garynvegas
06-23-2011, 08:25 AM
NO GODDAMNIT...

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/50125

I had the same thought when I read this last night. I was really hoping that Elba would get it.

HandBanana
06-23-2011, 08:29 AM
I love Elba and would have loved to see him take the role, but I think for a Tarantino flick this is probably a better fit in his usual odd cultural-pastiche aesthetic.
Tarantino knows what he's doing.

PotVsKtl
06-23-2011, 08:30 AM
Wait, what? I heard Tarantino was doing a Django film and assumed it was going to be a spaghetti Western. What's this slave bullshit?

wmgaretjax
06-23-2011, 08:44 AM
I can't wait until Jared weighs in on this...

huh... i have not liked a single film with him in it... but I guess I can kind of see it working... if anyone can do it, it'd be tarantino.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 08:46 AM
Unless "Hallelujah" is playing while the orderlies rape the little girls, I have to declare this impossible.

A really terrible cover of Where Is My Mind during a montage in which a character is going crazy and subsequently being admitted into an insane asylum is pretty high up there

PotVsKtl
06-23-2011, 08:50 AM
The music choices in Sucker Punch were absolutely abyssmal and, as noted, completely literal. Seriously, Snyder has got to be at least 2/3rds mentally retarded.

schoolofruckus
06-23-2011, 08:52 AM
Wait, what? I heard Tarantino was doing a Django film and assumed it was going to be a spaghetti Western. What's this slave bullshit?

It's basically a spaghetti Western that takes place in the world of slavery. Instead of a "Western", he's calling it a "Southern".


huh... i have not liked a single film with him in it... but I guess I can kind of see it working... if anyone can do it, it'd be tarantino.

I've liked a few films he's been in and I thought he was particularly good in Collateral. But this should definitely be his shining moment. I was reluctantly on board with the Will Smith idea, but this is much better to me.

I'm not reading Django in advance, but everything I've seen suggests that Idris Elba is far too physically imposing to make sense in the role.


A really terrible cover of Where Is My Mind during a montage in which a character is going crazy and subsequently being admitted into an insane asylum is pretty high up there

I stand corrected. I don't know if that's "worse", but I can wholly agree that it's comparably retarded.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 09:53 AM
Blaring white rabbit during one of the hallucination battle scenes was up there too.

M Sparks
06-23-2011, 12:06 PM
NO GODDAMNIT...

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/50125

Ugh.

Sleepingrock
06-23-2011, 02:49 PM
I just watched Bananas, and I think it is one of the first Woody Allen film's I have watched. Are all of his productions in the same style, and where should I start (Annie Hall?). He is quite a quirky fellow.

SoulDischarge
06-23-2011, 03:05 PM
All of his films before Annie Hall are goofy comedies in the same vein as Bananas. Then he started splitting his time between more serious comedy/dramas and trying to imitate Ingmar Bergman. Some time in the 90s he went back to doing trivial comedies, but they aren't as good as his early ones for the most part. Annie Hall is a great place to start.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 03:29 PM
Woodie Allen has a LOT of movies. I think I've seen nearly 30 of them and that's like half?

If you like Bananas, also check these out:
Sleeper
Love And Death
Zelig

And then after you've seen Annie Hall, which is must see, definitely check out:
Crimes & Misdemeanors
Deconstructing Harry
Play It Again, Sam
Hannah And Her Sisters
Bullets Over Broadway
Mighty Aphrodite
Radio Days
Sweet & Lowdown

TallGuyCM
06-23-2011, 03:41 PM
No Manhattan recommendation?

KungFuJoe
06-23-2011, 03:54 PM
This is what I'm seeing in the next week or so:

6/23 - Another Earth - LAFF
6/25 - The Future - LAFF
6/25 - The Seduction of Ingmar Bergman - LAFF
6/27 - Bellflower - USC

I'd like to see one or two things on Friday at the fest as well, any recommendations?

Sorry, not sure what would be good on Friday. Hope Another Earth is worth missing the awesomeness that will be the Detective Dee screening tonight at the Ford.

Also, psyched for Attack the Block even more so now that it seems to live up to the hype.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-23-2011, 06:30 PM
No Manhattan recommendation?

You know what, I forgot about Manhattan, that's a great one. Husbands & Wives would go on my list too.

TallGuyCM
06-24-2011, 01:11 AM
I really liked Another Earth tonight at LAFF. It didn't try to hide the fact that it didn't have the biggest budget, and the way it was shot was almost amateurish. But Brit Marling's performance was outstanding, and with the whole sci-fi story as an almost subplot the main focus of the film was the relationship between Marling and the man whose family she killed in a car accident.

I found the film to be very captivating, the music was really good, and overall it left me feeling very satisfied.

Premium Roast
06-24-2011, 05:21 AM
last two Allen movies I've seen have been pants. Do not recommend 'Stardust Memories', or 'Sleeper', which indeed is sleep inducing. May try tonight for 'Midnight in Paris' at the Santa Ana Regency 3.

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 06:57 AM
I had to kill some time in the Valley last night, and after seeing Attack the Block, I figured this was as good a time as any to check out Super 8. The two movies have a lot of similarities - each one is about a group of teenagers faced with the invasion of an "other" that threatens their tight-knit community - and pleasantly, they also have a lot of the same strengths. In its own Middle American way, Super 8 excels at creating believable, compelling and often touching relationships among its central adolescents - an always difficult feat, and one that makes this film worth seeing. As for the creature elements....there are some nice set pieces here (even the absurd train wreck is not without its thrills), but it's mostly silly and routine, lacking not only the sense of danger that Attack the Block expertly provided, but also the imagination (both in creature design and their characterization). It's very puzzling to me how a major Hollywood blockbuster (which, despite its modest $45 million budget, this certainly is) would match its low budget counterpart on all the intangible human qualities while falling short in the area where it should have some significant financial advantage: the ability to inspire unabashed awe.

In other words, Super 8 is a complete failure as a Spielberg homage, but as a result, it's a very fine movie. Although JJ Abrams needs to fuck off with the lens flare already.

canexplain
06-24-2011, 07:06 AM
I had to kill some time in the Valley last night, and after seeing Attack the Block, I figured this was as good a time as any to check out Super 8. The two movies have a lot of similarities - each one is about a group of teenagers faced with the invasion of an "other" that threatens their tight-knit community - and pleasantly, they also have a lot of the same strengths. In its own Middle American way, Super 8 excels at creating believable, compelling and often touching relationships among its central adolescents - an always difficult feat, and one that makes this film worth seeing. As for the creature elements....there are some nice set pieces here (even the absurd train wreck is not without its thrills), but it's mostly silly and routine, lacking not only the sense of danger that Attack the Block expertly provided, but also the imagination (both in creature design and their characterization). It's very puzzling to me how a major Hollywood blockbuster (which, despite its modest $45 million budget, this certainly is) would match its low budget counterpart on all the intangible human qualities while falling short in the area where it should have some significant financial advantage: the ability to inspire unabashed awe.

In other words, Super 8 is a complete failure as a Spielberg homage, but as a result, it's a very fine movie. Although JJ Abrams needs to fuck off with the lens flare already.


In a review I read of the movie it stated that: "8 MM is an old technology for making films.” Do younger people really not know what 8 MM is? I am thinking they do but who knows. Cr****

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 08:19 AM
last two Allen movies I've seen have been pants. Do not recommend 'Stardust Memories', or 'Sleeper', which indeed is sleep inducing. May try tonight for 'Midnight in Paris' at the Santa Ana Regency 3.

I can't even remember anything about Stardust Memories so I agree with you there, but Sleeper is pretty damn funny. I'm not nearly as much of a fan of Allen's slap sticky stuff, but this one has some pretty high points. It's really goofy though.

Miroir Noir
06-24-2011, 08:50 AM
I liked Stardust Memories; it was way more effective than some of his other "remake on a masterpiece from the arthouse canon" films. Crimes and Misdemeanors and Hannah and Her Sisters are my two personal favorites.

amyzzz
06-24-2011, 08:51 AM
I Although JJ Abrams needs to fuck off with the lens flare already.
What the fuck is up with that? It's just annoying.

HandBanana
06-24-2011, 08:56 AM
I thought the preponderance of lens flare in Star Trek was an aesthetic choice. Ya know: shiny, future, all that.

But it rarely made sense in Super 8. Why would a dirt hill at 3am cause a lens flare to occur?

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 09:15 AM
It was a story choice in Super 8, heralding the presence of the alien anytime it was near. That doesn't mean it's not lame and irritating.

amyzzz
06-24-2011, 09:16 AM
I remember being annoyed by it in Star Trek as well.

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 09:47 AM
It was annoying in Star Trek as well. It was an aesthetic choice, but one used to attempt a "cinematic" quality that was otherwise lacking in the TV-level compositions and action sequences. Part of why I responded positively to Super 8 is that it at least looked like a movie.

Miroir Noir
06-24-2011, 09:49 AM
Whenever I see lens flares, I automatically think of Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda.

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 09:57 AM
I usually think of Apocalypse Now. Between yours and my examples, we've clearly demonstrated that lens flare is not inherently objectionable. It's just bad when it's the only noteworthy element of a shot.

PotVsKtl
06-24-2011, 09:58 AM
In a review I read of the movie it stated that: "8 MM is an old technology for making films.” Do younger people really not know what 8 MM is? I am thinking they do but who knows. Cr****

No, they do not. They have absolutely no reason to possess this knowledge.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 09:59 AM
Everything i know about 8MM comes form the film of the same name.

SoulDischarge
06-24-2011, 10:20 AM
There is nothing wrong with Stardust Memories. Shut up.

M Sparks
06-24-2011, 10:36 AM
Seriously, no one mentioned Take The Money And Run in a discussion of early Woody movies? Admittedly, I haven't seen it in ages, but that was my gateway movie.

Also, it's incredibly stupid and dated, but there are some hilarious segments in Everything You Always Wanted To Know About Sex

Drinky hit most of the best later stuff, but Small Time Crooks was good fun.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 10:36 AM
There are still a good 30 Woody Allen movies I need to see.

Miroir Noir
06-24-2011, 11:38 AM
No refunds (http://www.theawl.com/2011/06/the-tree-of-life-no-refunds-sign)

amyzzz
06-24-2011, 11:39 AM
HAHAHA That's awesome. About 20 people walked out of the show I saw.

PotVsKtl
06-24-2011, 11:48 AM
This movie. This great evil. Where does it come from? How'd it steal into the world? What seed, what root did it grow from? Who's doin' this? Who's killin' us? Robbing us of life and light. Mockin' us with the sight of what we might've known. Does our ruin benefit the earth? Does it help the grass to grow, the sun to shine? Is this darkness in you, too? Have you passed to this night?
No refunds.
...

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 12:32 PM
8X_Ot0k4XJc

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-24-2011, 12:54 PM
Woodie Allen has a LOT of movies. I think I've seen nearly 30 of them and that's like half?

If you like Bananas, also check these out:
Sleeper
Love And Death
Zelig

And then after you've seen Annie Hall, which is must see, definitely check out:
Crimes & Misdemeanors
Deconstructing Harry
Play It Again, Sam
Hannah And Her Sisters
Bullets Over Broadway
Mighty Aphrodite
Radio Days
Sweet & Lowdown

These are great recommendations. In addition to MSparks' suggestion of Small Time Crooks (one of his flat out funniest films), I would add...

The Purpose Rose of Cairo (skip his new film and see this instead; much better nostalgia trip)
Manhattan Murder Mystery (a great mix of madcap and cerebral Woody)
Scoop (possibly the last film he'll play a major role in and great fun despite the mixed reviews)
Alice (my favorite Allen film, though most people consider it to be a minor work. His final film with Mia Farrow. Everything in this film just glows. It's whimsical, funny, sweet and melancholy. Just pure magic.)



There is nothing wrong with Stardust Memories. Shut up.

I love Allen, but this one leaves me flat as well.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 01:21 PM
Wow, I highly disliked Alice and Scoop did nothing for me. Manhattan Murder Mystery is fun, but it's problematic. Purple Rose is very high on my must-see list.

If you want to watch something interesting (not necessarily good), probably one of Allen's most minor works is Anything Else
http://l.yimg.com/eb/ymv/us/img/hv/allposters/34/1808406634p.jpg

Not only is it a by-the-number regurgitation of things Allen had done before, it's almost bewildering watching Biggs and Ricci stumble through the dialogue. In retrospect, I enjoy it mostly on that aspect alone. When Allen casts somebody else to play himself (in this case Biggs) and himself as a supporting character, it's generally zanier than his normal roles, so that's a bit fun too.

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-24-2011, 01:38 PM
Wow, I highly disliked Alice and Scoop did nothing for me.
Yeah, I sometimes think I'm the only person in the world who adores Alice. It feels like a valentine to Farrow and to Manhattan, but not as explicitly as Annie Hall or Manhattan are. Scoop is a minor film to be sure, but I laughed heartily throughout.


Manhattan Murder Mystery is fun, but it's problematic.
Well, sure. This could be said of many of his films, though. I still think that when it comes to Woody, if the "fun" outweighs the "problematic" it's worth it.



Purple Rose is very high on my must-see list.
Such a lovely film. Can't wait for your review!


Oh, and? Slamming Alice but recommending Anything Else? Really? I know that was a qualified recommendation, but still. That film is just odious.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 01:41 PM
Well yeah, hahaha, Anything Else is terrible, but it's worth a watch for hardcore Allen fans as a curiosity alone.

I went into Alice really wanting to like it and found it really difficult to sit through

Vasoline Groove
06-24-2011, 01:46 PM
HAHAHA That's awesome. About 20 people walked out of the show I saw.

Thats hilarious. The couple right in front of us and the guy next to us left in the middle of the movie. I thought it was a great movie but maybe a little too long. The creation of the earth scenes were magnificent though. I think I want to buy it on blu-ray just so I can rewatch those scenes over and over and supply my own soundtrack.

buddy
06-24-2011, 01:51 PM
looking at Allen's body of work it's amazing how much quality stuff he's done, and still does, such as Midnight In Paris. just the fact that there's so many different recommendations says a lot.

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 01:52 PM
Thats hilarious. The couple right in front of us and the guy next to us left in the middle of the movie. I thought it was a great movie but maybe a little too long. The creation of the earth scenes were magnificent though. I think I want to buy it on blu-ray just so I can rewatch those scenes over and over and supply my own soundtrack.


You could just play these videos (http://nyerges.com/video/) - Autumnal was actually sampled by Malick during that sequence - and do the same thing. Or if you need a BluRay, the Stan Brakhage anthology from Criterion would probably do the trick.

Grandma
06-24-2011, 01:58 PM
I refuse to give my money to ANY theater that doesn't grant me the choice of a refund due to a bad show

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-24-2011, 02:00 PM
looking at Allen's body of work it's amazing how much quality stuff he's done, and still does, such as Midnight In Paris. just the fact that there's so many different recommendations says a lot.

So true. He's ridiculously prolific which isn't to say that he hasn't released his fair share of sub-par work. Drinkey's list reminded me about Deconstructing Harry which I don't think I've seen since the late 90s. That film is just tremendous fun. Woody got crazy with the "experimental" editing on that one too. I love that he was still willing to try new things in the autumn of his life.

You ended up enjoying Midnight in Paris, right? I really wanted to like that one, but beyond a decent Owen Wilson and a luminous Marion Cottillard (like, seriously, how gorgeous was she in that film?), I thought it had little else to recommend it.

buddy
06-24-2011, 02:10 PM
yeah, i wrote a response to it, and you awhile back. where i explained my thoughts, etc., but i'll just say i enjoyed it for much more than just wilson and cotillard, and you're right she is gorgeous.

Miroir Noir
06-24-2011, 02:21 PM
I refuse to give my money to ANY theater that doesn't grant me the choice of a refund due to a bad show

I don't understand this mentality. They should refund you if there is a technical problem that disrupts or ruins the show, but why is the theatre liable to you in the event that you simply didn't like the movie?

atom heart
06-24-2011, 02:26 PM
Zack Snyder is directing the new Superman movie. Patently uninteresting combination.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 02:27 PM
I don't understand this mentality. They should refund you if there is a technical problem that disrupts or ruins the show, but why is the theatre liable to you in the event that you simply didn't like the movie?

Yeah, that is outright dumb. the theater had nothing to do with your decision to purchase the ticket to that movie.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 02:28 PM
Zack Snyder is directing the new Superman movie. Patently uninteresting combination.

Old news, but yeah. There's been a lot of bizarre casting announcements trickling out.

HandBanana
06-24-2011, 02:32 PM
Yeah, that is outright dumb. the theater had nothing to do with your decision to purchase the ticket to that movie.

There was an adorable elderly couple behind us at our screening and the old man was explaining things to the old woman from time to time.

Somewhere around the middle he plainly said to her "I just have no idea whats going on"

RageAgainstTheAoki
06-24-2011, 02:42 PM
Ha! Same thing happened at the Arclight, but our old couple just got up and left about 1/3 of the way through.

TallGuyCM
06-24-2011, 02:43 PM
You could hear a fucking pin drop at our showing on opening night, the most polite crowd I've been around in a long time at the most important time.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 02:44 PM
I used to go see a lot of artsy fartsy films at a Laemmle's theater In Pasadena down here and for some reason the majority of the audiences for these films were 60+ and there were usually at least a dozen of them chattering incessantly throughout the movies. It caused me to pretty much just wait to see most independent movies on dvd.

Vasoline Groove
06-24-2011, 03:06 PM
You could just play these videos (http://nyerges.com/video/) - Autumnal was actually sampled by Malick during that sequence - and do the same thing. Or if you need a BluRay, the Stan Brakhage anthology from Criterion would probably do the trick.

Cool. Thats some good stuff.

I'm always looking for something visual to put on the screen when I'm listening to music. Just added the Brakhage anthology to the queue.

Grandma
06-24-2011, 03:18 PM
I don't understand this mentality. They should refund you if there is a technical problem that disrupts or ruins the show, but why is the theatre liable to you in the event that you simply didn't like the movie?

This is what I was referring to. If the film itself is beyond the pale shit, you should've known better beforehand. If the showing is ruined because of a technical malfeasance, some dipshit parent decides to bring their kids because they couldn't find babysitting or theres some loudmouth jackass/jackasses who decide to play commentator, i will demand a refund before investing anymore of my time. The way alot of these smaller theaters word that rule makes it appear very general which is what I don't agree with.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-24-2011, 03:21 PM
Oh yes, by all means you should be able to get a refund if your experience is impaired.

Premium Roast
06-24-2011, 04:34 PM
'Crooks' is really funny and recommended, but the real question of interest to certain folks is whether Allen is a good lover. Someone told me "I bet he is a tiger in bed", but I can't see it....he's too small. I wouldn't want to fuck him.

MissingPerson
06-24-2011, 04:58 PM
If the showing is ruined because of a technical malfeasance, some dipshit parent decides to bring their kids because they couldn't find babysitting or theres some loudmouth jackass/jackasses who decide to play commentator, i will demand a refund

Hold on. The theatre is not responsible for this kind of disruption - why should they be financially liable?

schoolofruckus
06-24-2011, 05:14 PM
Hold on. The theatre is not responsible for this kind of disruption - why should they be financially liable?

They have some responsibility to enforce a policy that prohibits it. If you report a disruptive audience member (doesn't matter whether it's talky kids or someone who thinks it's okay to text) and the theater doesn't do anything about it, then you're being deprived of what you paid for. Theaters run those "don't be an asshole" ads before each film for a reason.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-25-2011, 09:20 AM
My girlfriend and I saw Super 8 last night and we both LOVED it! I totally fell in love with all of those kids! I want to watch more of their non-alien fighting adventures. Seeing the final version of their own film during the credits was a real treat as well.

I do agree about lens flares...while it usually doesn't bother me a ton, it was outright distracting this time.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 09:55 AM
Nice...now make sure you see Attack the Block when it lands in July.

Jen and I watched Contact for the first time in 6 years last night. I'm going to say that not only is it on my shortlist of favorite movies, but it's maybe the boldest Hollywood film of the past several decades. Warner Bros. released some really risky fare in the 70s (The Devils, Performance, A Clockwork Orange), but Contact is a whole other type of risk - a big summer alien film from a director coming off of the Oscars and box office of Forrest Gump that essentially seeks the common ground between secular science and religious faith. It's every bit as high-reaching as The Tree of Life, and just as successful.

Drinkey McDrinkerstein
06-25-2011, 09:56 AM
I don't think I've seen Contact since it was in the theater! I liked it then, but it would probably mean a lot more to me now...how old was I even when that came out, 14, 15?

EDIT: I was 15 - wow, can't believe that movie came out that long ago

wmgaretjax
06-25-2011, 10:11 AM
i think Contact is a good film. but it still leans heavily on hollywood story telling techniques (and mediocre acting from a ton of the supporting cast) that make it much less effective than it could have been.

obzen
06-25-2011, 10:19 AM
Contact is one of my favorite films, I didn't think anyone even remembered that flick.







The very beginning of the film is pretty neat.

SoulDischarge
06-25-2011, 10:36 AM
I never saw it, I always just figured it was straight out trash. I'll have to check it out some time.

All this talk about Woody Allen made me realize I hadn't seen some of his most loved films, so I watched Hannah & Her Sisters. It was pretty charming all around, although I definitely feel like it was nothing he hadn't covered before. The stuff with Michael Caine didn't completely work for me, probably because of the florid dialogue and I felt like there was a little bit of male fantasy wish fulfillment in how quick the affair happened, but everything else was great. It doesn't get much better than Allen trying to convert to Catholicism.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 10:42 AM
i think Contact is a good film. but it still leans heavily on hollywood story telling techniques (and mediocre acting from a ton of the supporting cast) that make it much less effective than it could have been.

The conventional aspects actually make me like it more. Specifically, I like seeing that this view of the universe - and this truly curious approach to science fiction - can exist in a decidedly mainstream movie.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 03:58 PM
Another Earth was a source of major ambivalence for me. The premise was fantastic, the film builds a terrifically chilly atmosphere (courtesy of some strong underlit photography and the portions of the score that are electronic), and I thought the ending was satisfying in the scope of the film's limited financial resources. But some of the execution is just terrible; Brit Marling's performance is decent, but every other actor in the film is somewhere between "incompetent" and "contemptibly incompetent". Marling's script is another major issue - there are some quality moments, but in addition to an abundance of awkward dialogue, there's a choice made in the film's central relationship that I found egregiously absurd, and severely undercutting whatever emotional inertia the film had fought so hard to build.

This is definitely worth checking out, but I can't help but feel disappointed.

wmgaretjax
06-25-2011, 04:33 PM
The conventional aspects actually make me like it more. Specifically, I like seeing that this view of the universe - and this truly curious approach to science fiction - can exist in a decidedly mainstream movie.

I guess... It's heartening in a way... but it feels like a lost opportunity. It's easy to imagine the film being as brilliant as Solaris at moments...

JebusLives
06-25-2011, 05:02 PM
Jen and I watched Contact for the first time in 6 years last night. I'm going to say that not only is it on my shortlist of favorite movies, but it's maybe the boldest Hollywood film of the past several decades. Warner Bros. released some really risky fare in the 70s (The Devils, Performance, A Clockwork Orange), but Contact is a whole other type of risk - a big summer alien film from a director coming off of the Oscars and box office of Forrest Gump that essentially seeks the common ground between secular science and religious faith. It's every bit as high-reaching as The Tree of Life, and just as successful.

Thing is, the book was much more about finding religious beauty within science. Carl Sagan was of course an atheist, but in my mind the best at evoking a sense of wonder from mundane reality. The ending was also a total cop-out... book had a much more satisfying conclusion, albeit a math-y one. Hollywood still did a good job with it, but it wasn't as daring as I'd hoped. Having said that, today it would never even get made.

Far as good hard-science movies, the only one i've seen recently that was any good was Moon.

sbessiso
06-25-2011, 05:05 PM
Zack Snyder is directing the new Superman movie. Patently uninteresting combination.

I weep for Kal-El.

schoolofruckus
06-25-2011, 05:22 PM
Thing is, the book was much more about finding religious beauty within science. Carl Sagan was of course an atheist, but in my mind the best at evoking a sense of wonder from mundane reality. The ending was also a total cop-out... book had a much more satisfying conclusion, albeit a math-y one. Hollywood still did a good job with it, but it wasn't as daring as I'd hoped. Having said that, today it would never even get made.

Far as good hard-science movies, the only one i've seen recently that was any good was Moon.

See, I don't think Moon is all that advanced in terms of it's science. It's about cloning, but there's really no exploration of it - it's just a guy dealing with his personal reality.