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Yablonowitz
02-11-2008, 08:41 AM
I watched Bringing Out the Dead today. This has to be one of the most underrated movies Scorsese has ever done. I thought it was great, but it gets very little praise and if I remember correctly, did poorly in theaters. It's similar in theme and style to Taxi Driver, and it has some pretty brilliant sequences in it. It's worth checking out if you haven't seen it yet.

Oh yeah, according to Wikipedia, "Bringing Out the Dead" gets little acclaim primarily because it sucks big hairy scab-ridden donkey balls.

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 08:49 AM
Bringing Out the Dead is the only narrative Scorsese film I haven't seen. I really dislike Nicholas Cage, despite Raising Arizona.

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 08:50 AM
Who fucking cares?

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 08:51 AM
Delete.

schoolofruckus
02-11-2008, 09:18 AM
I just looked over Scorsese's filmography, and I'm kind of shocked to realize that I've only seen just over half of his 20 narrative features. The unseen:

Who's That Knocking At My Door?*
Boxcar Bertha
Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore*
New York, New York
King of Comedy
After Hours*
The Color of Money
The Age of Innocence
Kundun


Which ones are absolutely essential?


* - Denotes that I own it but have not yet watched.

thestripe
02-11-2008, 09:25 AM
The Color of Money is classic.

whynotsmile99
02-11-2008, 09:25 AM
i just watched John Carptenter's "They Live" the other night. GOd I loved it so much. Probably one of the best, awesomly bad 80s movie i've ever seen.

I started watching right when he found the glasses. Need to see the begining stuff. I must say, it started pretty creepy. Loved the black and white. I thought it was going to be a pretty intense sci fi conspiracy movie with heavy satire, but went the way of the bad action film. I can't say I fault it because it was still the most entertaining thing I've seen in a while.

That fist fight was ridiculous and I busted out laughing when Rowdy Roddy Piper busted out the wrestling moves.

Bank shoot out was awesome and totally pointless.

damn I loved this movie

whynotsmile99
02-11-2008, 09:30 AM
I just looked over Scorsese's filmography, and I'm kind of shocked to realize that I've only seen just over half of his 20 narrative features. The unseen:

Who's That Knocking At My Door?*
Boxcar Bertha
Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore*
New York, New York
King of Comedy
After Hours*
The Color of Money
The Age of Innocence
Kundun


Which ones are absolutely essential?


* - Denotes that I own it but have not yet watched.

I'm embarassed to say I have both Scorsesse box sets with a lot of those films in there and have yet to watch them all. Kundun I remember being absolutly enthralled with. it's not like a lot of other Scorsesse films. Very beautiful movie.

wmgaretjax
02-11-2008, 09:34 AM
Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore and The Age of Innocence are great. Kundun and King of Comedy are passable.

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 09:38 AM
I just looked over Scorsese's filmography, and I'm kind of shocked to realize that I've only seen just over half of his 20 narrative features. The unseen:

Who's That Knocking At My Door?*
Boxcar Bertha
Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore*
New York, New York
King of Comedy
After Hours*
The Color of Money
The Age of Innocence
Kundun


Which ones are absolutely essential?


* - Denotes that I own it but have not yet watched.

Who's That Knocking At My Door?*
Essential. This is, thematically, essentially a Mean Streets prequel. Also Scorsese's first feature.

Boxcar Bertha
Depends. I like this movie more than most critics seem to. It's often surprisingly mean-spirited. A Roger Corman production, with bonus real on-camera David Carradine intercourse.

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore*
Essential. Ellen Burstyn is great and the film is pretty unique in Scorsese's career; a small, focused drama.

New York, New York
Fuck Liza Minnelli. Trying to watch this made me nauseous.

King of Comedy
Most people will tell you this is essential. It's an interesting character for DeNiro but the movie didn't do much for me.

After Hours*
Essential. A comedy featuring Cheech and Chong directed by Scorsese? Fuck you.

The Color of Money
The peak of Scorsese's career. There will never be a better movie about Tom Cruise dancing around a pool table.

The Age of Innocence
I don't really remember this movie.

Kundun
I don't really remember this movie.

C DUB YA
02-11-2008, 09:44 AM
I just looked over Scorsese's filmography, and I'm kind of shocked to realize that I've only seen just over half of his 20 narrative features. The unseen:

Who's That Knocking At My Door?*
Boxcar Bertha
Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore*
New York, New York
King of Comedy
After Hours*
The Color of Money
The Age of Innocence
Kundun


Which ones are absolutely essential?


* - Denotes that I own it but have not yet watched.


After Hours and Color of Money

roberto73
02-11-2008, 09:57 AM
I'm not as well-versed in Scorsese's earliest films, but of his later stuff, I think King of Comedy and The Color of Money are worth a look, with After Hours and The Age of Innocence being essential.

Down Rodeo
02-11-2008, 10:29 AM
Yeah, Scorsese is my favorite director and I'm ashamed to admit I haven't seen most of those films either. I vaguely remember seeing The Color of Money, and thinking it was pretty good. I've heard The Age of Innocence is excellent and will watch it very soon.

Oh, and I should remind everyone that Raging Bull is one of the best films ever made, period. Taxi Driver, too.

schoolofruckus
02-11-2008, 11:08 AM
I saw The Color of Money on TV when I was a kid. I remember thinking it was cool, but I can hardly count that as something I've seen.

I'm glad that the three I own are considered essential/borderline essential by most. I will probably give Boxcar Bertha a shot as well, if for no other reason than to find out why Cassavetes told him it was a piece of dogshit.

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 11:15 AM
From watching the Scorsese on Scorsese doc on the Departed DVD I got the sense that it wasn't so much that Cassavetes said the finished product was dogshit, but that as a whole Scorsese should be doing more personal films. When you contrast Boxcar Bertha with Who's That Knocking At My Door, it's an obvious step down. It's a fucking Corman B movie.

Somewhat Damaged
02-11-2008, 01:03 PM
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1182611/bio

I produced this guy's 2nd short film, Children of the Arcana. He's had the same trivia information -- "one of the youngest Hollywood directors" -- for the past 5 years or so. Does anyone else think he's a douche or am I just an asshole?

schoolofruckus
02-11-2008, 01:50 PM
"what bugs me about directors is their inherent ability to be the opposite of who they really are. When directors try to be weird (when they are not) or vice versa, they lose the beauty in the person they really are. That's why most films are just an ugly metaphor of the directors who deny the true beauty in their original talent"

+

http://ia.imdb.com/media/imdb/01/M/==/QM/zc/TM/yg/zM/wc/TZ/tF/kX/nB/na/B5/lM/B5/VN/5k/DM/1Y/DO/xM/TM/B5/VM._SY400_SX600_.jpg

=

Yeah, no. You're right.

thefunkylama
02-11-2008, 02:14 PM
i'm pretty sure that person is afraid of stabbing themselves with their own hair.


Ok so when I go onto my website that I have rented dvd's sent to me from, I tend to just add whatever movies that seem interesting. I suspect I may have added the film "The Lost Boys" without thinking it through all the way, because the description reads as follows:


"After moving to Santa Carla, California with his older brother Michael and mother, Sam starts to suspect that Michael has fallen in with a cult of punked out biker vampires."

Should I bother? Should I just send it back without watching it? It doesn't sound like something remotely anywhere near good, by which I mean something I would like.


Speaking of things I like, I really liked the movie Delicatessen (came out 1991). It's a French film directed with the same guy who did Amelie, another film I love. Has anyone else seen it?

wmgaretjax
02-11-2008, 02:18 PM
Not a big "The Lost Boys" fan, but I love "Delicatessen" I was really happy when it finally got a region 1 release.

thefunkylama
02-11-2008, 02:20 PM
Here's imdb's list of plot keywords for Lost Boys:


Plot Keywords:

Teen Angst (http://www.imdb.com/keyword/teen-angst/) / Wine (http://www.imdb.com/keyword/wine/) / Spear Through Chest (http://www.imdb.com/keyword/spear-through-chest/) / Teenager (http://www.imdb.com/keyword/teenager/) / Dysfunctional Family (http://www.imdb.com/keyword/dysfunctional-family/)

Wine and Spear Through Chest. Throwing back the little fish seems like the best course of action.

amyzzz
02-11-2008, 02:21 PM
DEATH BY STEREO

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 02:21 PM
iOk so when I go onto my website that I have rented dvd's sent to me from, I tend to just add whatever movies that seem interesting. I suspect I may have added the film "The Lost Boys" without thinking it through all the way, because the description reads as follows:

Should I bother? Should I just send it back without watching it? It doesn't sound like something remotely anywhere near good, by which I mean something I would like.

Lost Boys is essential '80s viewing.



Speaking of things I like, I really liked the movie Delicatessen (came out 1991). It's a French film directed with the same guy who did Amelie, another film I love. Has anyone else seen it?

City of Lost Children.

amyzzz
02-11-2008, 02:21 PM
I liked that movie when I was 13.

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 02:22 PM
Here's imdb's list of plot keywords for Lost Boys:



Wine and Spear Through Chest. Throwing back the little fish seems like the best course of action.


No, fuck you. You will watch Lost Boys. I want a report next week.

thefunkylama
02-11-2008, 02:24 PM
alright, I guess that means I have to stop using it as a candle holder. I was going to make a mobile out of it next, but if you insist!


I'll watch it after I get back from urgent care.

full on idle
02-11-2008, 02:25 PM
I wouldn't be who I am today without the repeated viewings of the Lost Boys.

Fucking saxophone man, it still haunts me.

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 02:29 PM
Haha you need so much care it's urgent.

schoolofruckus
02-11-2008, 02:30 PM
Lost Boys FUCKED ME UP when I saw it at the tender age of 8.

I have not seen Delicatessen yet, but Pot's right - City of Lost Children is fucking great. I would also highly recommend A Very Long Engagement.

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 02:31 PM
While I would inform you that A Very Long Engagement is a jumbled mess.

full on idle
02-11-2008, 02:32 PM
Movies that fucked me up because I watched them when I was too young
Cybil
Scarecrow
Night of the Living Dead
Watership Down

wmgaretjax
02-11-2008, 02:34 PM
Watership Down

holy shit yes.

kreutz2112
02-11-2008, 02:36 PM
Boys in da hood fucked me up when I was a little kid. i watched it when I was like 6.

PotVsKtl
02-11-2008, 02:37 PM
I saw most of Wizard of Gore when I was about 8 at my brother's birthday party.

full on idle
02-11-2008, 02:38 PM
I was watching Boyz in da Hood when the news broke that Kurt Cobain died. In Florida, with a sunburn.

amyzzz
02-11-2008, 02:38 PM
Exorcist fucked me up.

kreutz2112
02-11-2008, 02:43 PM
I need to watch Boyz n the hood again. I think I would find it much more entertaining and culturally significant now (of course). Anyway, I thought every black person was going to kill me if I looked at him wrong for like a year after I watched that. Keep in mind I lived in the most mormon suburb of SLC you could imagine so black people were hard to come by.

Down Rodeo
02-11-2008, 03:19 PM
I was very disturbed by Labyrinth as a child.

roberto73
02-11-2008, 04:32 PM
I wouldn't be who I am today without the repeated viewings of the Lost Boys.

Fucking saxophone man, it still haunts me.

The saxophone man! Forget Coreys Feldman and Haim. He's the true star of the movie.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v475/insomniacmonty/lost_boys_sax1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v475/insomniacmonty/saxman2.jpg

Thank you, Joel Schumacher. You are truly the unsung hero of American cinema.

amyzzz
02-11-2008, 04:56 PM
My church youth group used to play that music by The Call at our Wednesday night meetings. I think that was the name of the band with the saxophone man.

Down Rodeo
02-13-2008, 11:02 AM
I saw Breathless last night. It was cool, but nothing spectacular. I don't really see what the big deal is about Godard yet.

schoolofruckus
02-13-2008, 01:51 PM
I saw Breathless last night. It was cool, but nothing spectacular. I don't really see what the big deal is about Godard yet.

I didn't after seeing Breathless, either. It was a huge stylistic leap in 1959, but it's not all that impressive once you get past the surface. But take the advice that I was given (and heeded) - hold out until you see Week-End and Masculin Feminin at least before you form an impression of him.

schoolofruckus
02-13-2008, 01:52 PM
I watched The Assassination of Jesse James By the Coward Robert Ford again last night. And while I'm pretty sure that There Will Be Blood is still my favorite film of last year, this one is seriously on its heels. I'd almost forgotten how funny it was.

mountmccabe
02-13-2008, 08:32 PM
The last three movies I've seen where all rather slight and dumb.

T3: Rise of the Machines a week ago. It seemed really, really short even though it's the same length as the original. The ending seemed like throwing in the towel, especially after how T2 ended. They had to, I suppose, if they were going to make another one. Anyway watching it was made bearable by the RiffTrax commentary which was about average for them, I'd say.

The other afternoon I watched Idiocracy. This voice over filled satire is about how everything is becoming stupid and crass and demonstrates this by being incredibly stupid and crass. Their point was exceedingly superficial and they offered no novel solutions. It was imaginative and at times humorous but mostly it was annoying.

Tonight I saw Jumper. It is based on a 1992 sci-fi novel I have not read. It is about a young man that can teleport himself at will. He becomes decadent and lives alone and doesn't even realize it. There is the smallest measurable amount of character development over the course of a brisk 90 minutes. It was somewhat interesting even though it does most everything you think it would (except for the lack of character change) and little else. Hayden Christensen basically plays Hayden Christensen, often in full whiny brat mode. Liman has directed much better films before.

wmgaretjax
02-13-2008, 08:46 PM
jesus christ I'm sick of this guy... David Gordon Green has not lived up to any of the potential he exhibited with his debut.

bmack86
02-13-2008, 08:57 PM
I saw Be Kind Rewind last night on campus at UCLA. I didn't expect a whole lot, but I was laughing the whole way thru. It was, on one level, an entirely predictable story about how, with ingenuity and the help of friends, you can do anything, but there was much more humanity to it than one of those normal films. Also, it was really, really funny. I was laughing through most of it because of the insane, absurd humor that Jack Black and Mos Def throw out repeatedly. Much better than it looked initially.

breakjaw
02-14-2008, 02:12 AM
That sax guy was Tina Turner's sax guy for the Private Dancer tour in like,1984.Don't ask how I know,I just do,OK?!

triceratops oatmeal
02-14-2008, 02:25 AM
I was never a huge fan of David Gordon Green, but I'll definately be peeping Pineapple Express. looks funny.

breakjaw
02-14-2008, 02:36 AM
I just looked over Scorsese's filmography, and I'm kind of shocked to realize that I've only seen just over half of his 20 narrative features. The unseen:


Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore*

King of Comedy
After Hours*

The Age of Innocence


Absolutely Essential!

Age of Innocence for Day-Lewis alone.After-Hours is the ultimate paranoid fantasy movie ( a genre I particularly enjoy,see Three O'Clock High and The Neighbors also)
King Of Comedy for DeNiro brilliance
and Alice is a good Seventies realism flick.I haven't seen it in thirty years,though,from when it first showed on the first form of cable TV,something called Cineamerica,around the same time they were showing The Towering Inferno and The Drowning Pool.Elliot Gould was still a big deal.

C DUB YA
02-14-2008, 07:20 AM
INDY 4 trailer up in HD!

http://movies.yahoo.com/feature/indianajones.html;_ylt=AsY7qv8MSH6wl3g1GC6bw55fVXc A

whynotsmile99
02-14-2008, 07:35 AM
INDY 4 trailer up in HD!

http://movies.yahoo.com/feature/indianajones.html;_ylt=AsY7qv8MSH6wl3g1GC6bw55fVXc A

i'm excited. that looked good

Young blood
02-14-2008, 07:37 AM
YES!

C DUB YA
02-14-2008, 07:39 AM
I am very excited!

Something about that music always gets me. May 22 won't get here soon enough!

Stefinitely Maybe
02-14-2008, 07:47 AM
I am as excited as Ronnie in a room full of schoolgirls.

triceratops oatmeal
02-14-2008, 07:54 AM
That looks a lot better than what I was expecting. Cate Blanchett looks great & Ray Winstone kicks ass. This should be another fun one.

C DUB YA
02-14-2008, 08:08 AM
Anyone seen ZODIAC? I just got it in the mail from netflix.

canexplain
02-14-2008, 08:16 AM
C dub, my gal watched Zodiac and said it was pretty suspenseful, I fell asleep but not because of the movie …We saw 3 10 to Yuma with Crowe and bales …. Good western …. Saw No Reservations (the cooking movie) last night, not as light as we thought it would be ….
And over the weekend I watched Across the Universe … that movie sort of got to me because it was like a story of my life at that age … even down to the organization the dude belonged to, I think in the movie it was the SDD ? … well I worked with the SDS until they seriously started talking about blowing up corporations which I didn’t agree with, being a pacifist …I had a 50 passenger school bus too, painted red as a barn, but on the back it said in big letters “Church of the Nazareth” we thought that might keep the establishment off our butts …. It was pretty cool with beds and a small kitchen, the works ….. Oh and btw, I was never as good looking as that gang of kids …. Fun times … x****

triceratops oatmeal
02-14-2008, 09:27 AM
did you enjoy "Across The Universe"? I loved it, but I've also noticed that some people who lived during those times seem to appreciate it more.

Down Rodeo
02-14-2008, 10:10 AM
Anyone seen ZODIAC? I just got it in the mail from netflix.

Yeah, a lot of people on here loved Zodiac, myself included. One of the best movies of 2007 that doesn't get the praise it deserves.

Down Rodeo
02-14-2008, 10:11 AM
I finally saw The Lives of Others last night. That movie was amazing, probably one of the best I've seen in the last few years.

canexplain
02-14-2008, 10:14 AM
did you enjoy "Across The Universe"? I loved it, but I've also noticed that some people who lived during those times seem to appreciate it more.

i treated the flick mostly as a music movie, although there was some plot ... i loved the movie, yes because it brought back those turbulent times which made you feel alive every morning you woke up ... x****

C DUB YA
02-14-2008, 10:14 AM
I really enjoyed Across the Universe - but I also really enjoy Beatles music in most forms.

amyzzz
02-14-2008, 03:36 PM
I finally saw Juno yesterday. I liked it a lot, and I cried maybe 3 or 4 times, and I also got the sweats in the scenes with Jason Bateman and Ellen Page. Uncomfortable scenes make me sweat--what can I say. It was a sweet movie, and actually a perfect movie to see with my husband the day before Valentine's Day (we played hooky yesterday).

downingthief
02-14-2008, 06:38 PM
My church youth group used to play that music by The Call at our Wednesday night meetings. I think that was the name of the band with the saxophone man.

Actually, the Call did the song originally, but saxaphone man did a cover of it. He also played sax and keys with Tina Turner in the 80's.

Don't ask me how I remember all this crap...

downingthief
02-14-2008, 07:09 PM
Ok...movies.

So, I broke out the next installment of my Kubrick Collection; A Clockwork Orange. It's been probably close to 6-7 years since I have seen it last. It was like meeting up with an old, but severly disturbed friend.

I may have to move Clockwork up on my all time Kubrick list (ok, maybe not...I'm still partial to Strangelove). The "singing in the rain" scene has to rank up there with one of the most disturbing and wicked of all time. Love the opening shot...the pan out on Alex stays with you for days.


Next up...rented some movies over the weekend.

Elizabeth, the Golden age was...well, ok. Blanchett was good, as usual. But I never felt lost in her character as I was in the first movie. I needed to feel empathy, and fear her, at the same time...never got to that point.

Across the Universe. Loved it. I found myself being amazed at how good the Beatles songs were. I mean, I KNEW they were incredible songs. Some of the best of all time. But, seeing them in this new form breathed new life into the songs. Really enjoyed the look of the movie, as well.

schoolofruckus
02-14-2008, 10:23 PM
Indy IV looks like it could be a blast, but I also feel that - as with the trailers for Die Hard IV - it's making a distinct statement that it's going to be a more new-school affair and less in the everyman, street-level vein of the earlier films. All that Tarzan swinging whip shit seemed designed to debunk the talk of Harrison Ford being too old for this shit. Either that, or Spielberg's developed a huge Spider-man fetish recently. But Blanchett does look like she'll be a kick and my hopes for this are now renewed.

Pineapple Express on paper sounds, to me, like a potentially genius film. An action-comedy about potheads played by Apatow graduates and filtered through the poetic eye of David Gordon Green? Sounds like my kind of ride. Alas, neither the extended clip from a couple months ago nor this new trailer - both of which were red-band - seem to be all that interesting either in terms of comedy or photography. I'm sure I'm still going to see this, but I hope it's not a blown opportunity.

I watched My Own Private Idaho again tonight. No "potentially" or "could be" about this one - it's just a flat-out masterwork.

PotVsKtl
02-14-2008, 11:04 PM
But the exploding car.

amyzzz
02-15-2008, 06:02 AM
I watched Raiders of the Lost Ark recently, and I was sad to discover that it all seemed so dated now. I loved it as a kid.

downingthief
02-15-2008, 07:25 AM
I watched Raiders of the Lost Ark recently, and I was sad to discover that it all seemed so dated now. I loved it as a kid.

It will never feel dated to me. Simply the best adventure movie of all time. Period, the end.

roberto73
02-15-2008, 07:30 AM
It will never feel dated to me. Simply the best adventure movie of all time. Period, the end.

I agree. But I also admit that my judgment could be clouded by sentimentality. Raiders is the movie that got me hooked on movies in the first place, so I'm willing to overlook some of its flaws.

PotVsKtl
02-15-2008, 09:00 AM
It was dated when it was made. That's kind of the idea.

canexplain
02-15-2008, 09:03 AM
It was dated when it was made. That's kind of the idea.

smart ass lol .... i watched Murder on the Orient Express last weekend knowing i hadnt seem it since it came out ... i even forgot the ending which is good cuz it surprised me .... not a bad flick ... x****

kreutz2112
02-15-2008, 09:28 AM
I saw Definitely Maybe yesterday. I went in thinking I was going to hate it, but i actually liked it. It never got boring and the acting wasn't half bad. I liked it.

PotVsKtl
02-15-2008, 09:33 AM
I watched half of Before the Devil Knows Your Dead. Marisa Tomei's breasts delivered an excellent performance.

roberto73
02-15-2008, 09:54 AM
I finally saw The Lives of Others last night. That movie was amazing, probably one of the best I've seen in the last few years.

I'll jump on the Lives of Others bandwagon, too. I've had it sitting on my shelf since October and finally watched it this morning. Really great, although I thought the multiple codas at the end were only slightly less ridiculous than the false endings in Lord of the Rings. Otherwise, I thought it was a terrifically nuanced view of these characters, and much more complex than I was expecting. It's such a shame that Ulrich Mühe, who played Wiesler, died shortly after the film was released. His performance was the standout in a uniformly strong cast.

wmgaretjax
02-15-2008, 09:55 AM
I watched half of Before the Devil Knows Your Dead. Marisa Tomei's breasts delivered an excellent performance.

yeah, her tits and Hoffman were great. Too bad the movie sucked.

I agree with Roberto... Minus the ending it's an incredible film. The ending was totally forgivable, albeit frustrating.

Down Rodeo
02-15-2008, 11:42 AM
I loved the ending. Every once in a while there needs to be a redemptive conclusion to a movie. Not all of them have to end on a depressing note.

PotVsKtl
02-15-2008, 11:43 AM
Yes, but they don't have to suddenly turn the movie into schmaltzy bullshit either.

wmgaretjax
02-15-2008, 11:47 AM
Yes, but they don't have to suddenly turn the movie into schmaltzy bullshit either.

bingo. Redemption doesn't require saccharine sentimentality.

Down Rodeo
02-15-2008, 03:48 PM
Agreed, but I don't think the ending of Lives of Others was "schmaltzy". It was touching, but in a more restrained, realistic way.

Neutral Milk Hotel
02-15-2008, 06:40 PM
http://www.somethingawful.com/d/news/diablo-cody-screenplay.php?page=1

wmgaretjax
02-15-2008, 08:39 PM
Agreed, but I don't think the ending of Lives of Others was "schmaltzy". It was touching, but in a more restrained, realistic way.

It's not that it was unbelievable or unrealistic, it was in the portrayal.

roberto73
02-16-2008, 06:49 AM
King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters is a must-see. I didn't know much about it other than the basic premise, but man oh man was I surprised. It was weirdly inspirational, despite the collection of sad, scary people on display. I can't quite figure out how the movie managed to make me care about the quest for the Donkey Kong world record, but I was as involved in this story as I've been in just about anything else I've seen recently. I think there's just something relatable about the poor guy who loses his job, seeks the record, and then falls prey to this bizarrely Machiavellian gang of nerds who want to deny him his success. It's a helluva great time.

mountmccabe
02-16-2008, 08:17 AM
I saw Blade Runner: The Final Cut last night. I am not sure I appreciated it.

They overdid the sharpness and resaturation and whatnot making it look fake in a George Lucas sort of way. They added back in a few exceedingly brief scenes of violence... which doesn't amount to much, really. There are some bad voice dubs too. But worst of all they went to the "I want more life, father" version of Roy's line during the deicide. Fuck that.

Still one of my favorite movies of all time but I'm starting to think it isn't aging well. It felt a little unintentionally clumsy at times. Then again, it's an odd balance and maybe it's just this cut that sucks. I need to rewatch my VHS copy of the Director's Cut sometime soon.

Yablonowitz
02-16-2008, 08:40 PM
I can't find Gabe's original diatribe against Juno, but I think he's blown an overreaction gasket.

It wasn't perfect, but it was a hell of a lot better than what I was expecting. I wouldn't give it a best picture nomination or anything. But it was well done overall. The story was organic and it had a touch of sentimental sweetness to it. But it wasn't overplayed. And Michael Cera is the most lovable creature on Earth.

schoolofruckus
02-17-2008, 04:50 AM
http://www.somethingawful.com/d/news/diablo-cody-screenplay.php?page=1

Thank you for posting this. I meant to put it up earlier.

For those that don't blindly follow links - this is a "leak" of the new script by Diablo Cody (writer of the infamous Juno). And it made me laugh harder than anything I've encountered in the last few months.

schoolofruckus
02-17-2008, 05:11 AM
In other words, I just watched Juno. And now I have to write the review I've been afraid I was going to have to write ever since I saw the fucking trailer, and that I was really hoping to avoid when the lights went down tonight at The Landmark.

In my opinion, the hype here was all for naught. This is an empty, insincere film that - for all the verbal showmanship - is so poorly-written as to be stunning. There's a great deal of funny lines or exchanges that are entertaining as unto-themselves bon mots, but I didn't get any of the humanity or warmth or even grudging respect towards the characters that would be absolutely necessary to make a film this precious work. It's frustrating too, because you can tell that there's a lot of talent here both in the cast (obviously) but also in the pen of the infamous Diablo Cody. I was really hoping that she'd at least somehow justify all her relentless self-promotion, but all this film did was confirm that it exists to mask severe deficiencies in her work. The script shipwrecks and abandons some truly fine acting work on the parts of Ellen Page, Jennifer Garner, Allison Janney, and especially Michael Cera (the only one whose character is written to be even remotely authentic) by foisting upon them characters that are one-dimensionally and irritatingly flip as often as they're funny (nevermind being endearing). This is amateur cinematic conversation at its complete and total nadir.

I'm sorry I have to be saying all this; part of the reason the movie angered me is that I found large bits of it to be funny (or at least amusing), but the pervasively-bloggy banter and half-hearted attempts at emotional resonance kept nagging at me that I was watching a film that should have been much, much better. Maybe if someone had pulled the wunderkind aside and told her that Tarantino she ain't....I don't know. I'm done talking about this because I'm not here to beat up on someone personally, and that's all too easy to do given the unfortunately predictable results.

This might be the most precise review I've ever written. Although I'm trying to remember the "large funny bits" I spoke of, and all I can think of are the Sonic Youth joke and the oh-so-Freudian "I try really hard, actually" line.

Benis23
02-17-2008, 08:59 AM
This might be the most precise review I've ever written. Although I'm trying to remember the "large funny bits" I spoke of, and all I can think of are the Sonic Youth joke and the oh-so-Freudian "I try really hard, actually" line.

I agree entirely with your review. It felt like a lame Wes Anderson rip-off that was a little too satisfied with itself. I liked the music and some of the exchanges, but overall I found it more annoying than amusing.

Ardentbiscuit
02-17-2008, 09:35 AM
I have a question. I saw the trailer for 10,000 BC and it showed an ancient civilization with buildings and pyramids.

My question is, what civilization is this? 10,000 BC is before the earliest civilizations, and if it existed where are the ruins??

Or is this movie just a crazy fantasy film and shouldn't be taken too seriously?

roberto73
02-17-2008, 09:45 AM
I have a question. I saw the trailer for 10,000 BC and it showed an ancient civilization with buildings and pyramids.

Or is this movie just a crazy fantasy film and shouldn't be taken too seriously?

It's from the director of Independence Day, Godzilla, and The Day After Tomorrow. Oh, and the Dolph Lundgren/Jean-Claude van Damme spectacular, Universal Soldier. I believe that should answer your question.

Ardentbiscuit
02-17-2008, 09:53 AM
It's from the director of Independence Day, Godzilla, and The Day After Tomorrow. Oh, and the Dolph Lundgren/Jean-Claude van Damme spectacular, Universal Soldier. I believe that should answer your question.


enough said, no wonder..

Neutral Milk Hotel
02-17-2008, 10:00 AM
I’m kind of ashamed now, but I can’t imagine I’m the only person who preemptively dismissed Atonement with the “English Patient” excuse (and as a side note, is the movie actually good? It seems to me that every time I hear about it it’s not that The English Patient itself was bad, it’s that The English Patient wasn’t as good as Fargo. But I digress.) It seems to me that that film started a turning of the tides (or maybe it was already there, who knows). Now there’s a certain aura around adaptations of prestigious Brit lit, an expectation for sophistication and poise at the expense of raw humanity.
So then, I have to say it was quite a surprise to me that Atonement, an extraordinary achievement, is actually something of an anti-Romantic Epic. The plot, by now, is probably familiar to most, if not all of you. Briony Tallis (Saoirse Ronan), a 13-year-old girl with literary aspirations, misinterprets the nature of the relationship between her older sister (Keira Knightley), and a servant’s son (James McAvoy), and, fueled by her own hormonal desires and insecurity, tells a lie that reverberates through the years and destroys all three of these lives.
It’s a powerful story, well told, but I’d like to focus on Joe Wright’s directing and, in a minute, the ending. My friend Sky Hirschkron express surprised at the neurotic style of Wright’s directing on this project, and I tend to think that’s what gives this film its immediacy. A lot of historical films fall into the trap of regarding their subjects as beautiful artifacts, be they people or battles or objects, etc. Wright is completely engaged with his characters. It’s probably why the first third of the film, the part where the things are misunderstood and the lies told, is also the most alive. The country estate vibrates with psychosexual energy and social tension. A large part of this is Saoirse Ronan. Knightley and McAvoy are very good, but Ronan is fascinating in a way I’m not sure has to do with her performance. Her piercing blue eyes, the mole on her cheek, the spindly arms and legs that evoke a praying mantis; young Briony is a completely captivating character, and the most involving parts of the film are those that focus on her.
By contrast, the Dunkirk scenes are disconnected and dreamlike. Some might call them plotless, but it makes sense. By all conventional logic, Cecilia and Robbie should have gotten married and had children and Briony finds success as a playwright and everyone is happy etc. etc. etc. It’s how these things are expected to work out. But the expected way was destroyed when Briony tells her lie, so it follows that the plot only drives the movie up through the fateful mistruth, and then becomes looser and more episodic. Even the shores of Dunkirk are presented with a detached eye. Here, as established by that extraordinary unbroken shot every review about the film has already mentioned, war is established as a grotesque carnival of both the horrific and the mundane.

SPOILERS BELOW:





And then, of course, we have the ending. The thing about the film that’s so brilliant is its restless, peering intelligence; it deconstructs itself as it goes along. At the end of the film, the older Briony says “So, my sister and Robbie were never able to have the time together they both so longed for... and deserved…But what sense of hope or satisfaction could a reader derive from an ending like that? So in the book, I wanted to give Robbie and Cecilia what they lost out on in life.” But the final shots of Robbie and Cecilia in romantic bliss (in front of that postcard house, to boot) aren’t satisfying, they’re sad and ludicrous. In a sense, McEwan and Wright call the bluff of countless mediocre period romances. As a film, it works in a specific way. A bevy of potential clichés are trotted out—the couple separated by adversity, war, betrayal, a bitter rivalry, etc.—and then the ending has us question the value of every single one of them. Even beyond Briony’s fictionalization of her story’s conclusion, we’re invited to consider even McEwan’s and Wright’s fictionalization of this entire story, and to ask ourselves which kind of truth is more important, the emotional or the factual. Most fiction would suggest the former, but Atonement challenges this assumption. It’s not another The English Patient. A wolf in sheep’s clothing, it asks the questions most costume dramas wouldn’t dare thinking about.

9.4/10

roberto73
02-17-2008, 10:07 AM
I'm really glad you liked it, NMH. A few pages back I was lamenting how it had been mismarketed – aimed at the Merchant/Ivory crowd, when it's so much darker and more complicated than your standard costume drama. I think your review is spot-on, and I'd like to think its Oscar nomination means more people will give it a chance.

I remember Stef or SonofHal (I think) writing about Atonement months ago when it was first released in England, and saying how unexpectedly great it was. It really is a surprising film in a lot of different ways, and as much as I enjoyed it at the time, it grew on me even more in the days that followed.

mountmccabe
02-17-2008, 10:10 AM
So the Mesa Community College International Film Festival is running next week Tuesday through Saturday. It is free. This is a bad week for me but I may be able to skip out to catch one or two of the films. They are all by Krzysztof Zanussi. I don't know who that is and haven't seen any of these films. Can anyone offer comments/recommendations?

19th - The Constant Factor (1980)
20th - Wherever You Are (1988)
21st - The Silent Touch (1992)
22nd - Life As A Fatal Sexually Transmitted Disease (2000)
23rd - Persona Non Grata (2005)

For other folks in the area the films show each night at 7 pm at Arizona Mills. Also Zanussi will there each night for a Q & A.

schoolofruckus
02-17-2008, 10:24 AM
I'm really glad you liked it, NMH. A few pages back I was lamenting how it had been mismarketed – aimed at the Merchant/Ivory crowd, when it's so much darker and more complicated than your standard costume drama. I think your review is spot-on, and I'd like to think its Oscar nomination means more people will give it a chance.

I remember Stef or SonofHal (I think) writing about Atonement months ago when it was first released in England, and saying how unexpectedly great it was. It really is a surprising film in a lot of different ways, and as much as I enjoyed it at the time, it grew on me even more in the days that followed.

It was Stef. His review was one of the best I've ever read here.

NMH's latest is another. That was flat-out perfect.

I saw The English Patient a long time ago and I remember thinking it was good. Its biggest crime definitely seems to be that it won the Oscar in the same year as Fargo.

Neutral Milk Hotel
02-17-2008, 10:26 AM
Wow, thanks.

ivankay
02-17-2008, 11:28 AM
I have a question. I saw the trailer for 10,000 BC and it showed an ancient civilization with buildings and pyramids.

My question is, what civilization is this? 10,000 BC is before the earliest civilizations, and if it existed where are the ruins??

Or is this movie just a crazy fantasy film and shouldn't be taken too seriously?

Although there is nothing that is accepted by the main stream, there are curiosities that point to advanced civilizations going back beyond the Egyptians that built the pyramids. Some of the man made holes (for planting posts) near Stone Henge are suspected to date back to 8000 BC. Then there are the underwater structures of Yonaguni (http://www.morien-institute.org/yonaguni.html). Those are being placed in the 10,000 BC range because of the estimated time that area would have been above the sea. Some theorist even have the early verions of the Sphinx going back that far. None of these are accepted to the point where you will hear them in a classroom, but the grumblings are out there abount certain physical evidence being older than history says it is.

Oh yeah, don't forget Conan.

Courtney
02-17-2008, 12:04 PM
I finally saw There Will Be Blood yesterday. I'm still processing, but I wasn't as impressed as seems to be the general consensus here. It all felt a bit overwrought and heavy-handed, to me. It wasn't a bad movie, but after reading some of the comments here, I was expecting better.

boarderwoozel3
02-17-2008, 12:38 PM
Daniel Day-Lewis' decent into madness was incredible.

PotVsKtl
02-17-2008, 06:06 PM
http://www.aintitcool.com/node/35655

What?

PotVsKtl
02-17-2008, 10:36 PM
I'm stating categorically that Atonement is the first modern take on a period piece without a hint of irony. Prove me wrong and earn yourself a signature welt.

full on idle
02-17-2008, 11:10 PM
That and Juno are first on my netflix when I'm done with the wire.

schoolofruckus
02-18-2008, 12:18 AM
I'm stating categorically that Atonement is the first modern take on a period piece without a hint of irony. Prove me wrong and earn yourself a signature welt.

I take it you're not in the mood to give out a signature welt? You speak the truth. It's what made the movie sing.

schoolofruckus
02-18-2008, 12:22 AM
http://www.aintitcool.com/node/35655

What?

This is highly interesting. I'm glad the clip didn't get yoinked before I got to check it out.

The look of the film is cool shit. All of Moriarty's talk about reshoots and James Gandolfini's voice being changed is a bit disconcerting, but I have no doubt this will be as awesome as we all expect it to be.

Mr.Nipples
02-18-2008, 12:25 AM
remember jumanji...let them take their time...

thelastgreatman
02-18-2008, 12:33 AM
remember jumanji...let them take their time...

This is like a Zen koan.

wmgaretjax
02-18-2008, 10:31 AM
I have no clue what to think after watching that clip.

Neutral Milk Hotel
02-18-2008, 11:40 AM
This is highly interesting. I'm glad the clip didn't get yoinked before I got to check it out.

The look of the film is cool shit. All of Moriarty's talk about reshoots and James Gandolfini's voice being changed is a bit disconcerting, but I have no doubt this will be as awesome as we all expect it to be.

Actually it turns out the leaked footage was just a screen test, hence the lack of Gandolfini. I had a chance to see this last November but I blew it, now it's hitting me pretty hard.

HowToDisappear
02-18-2008, 03:51 PM
We saw Across the Universe last weekend, and I must say, we really enjoyed it. I think they did a pretty good job of incorporating the songs into the predictably thin plotline. Some forced or clichéd moments to be sure, but definitely forgiveable. Breathe easy, Beatles fans, this is not another abomination like Sgt. Pepper's.

The film looks great, and happily, all the principals can sing, which is most helpful in a musical. (That was my major complaint with Sweeney Todd. The art production was stunning, but Johnny Depp and Helena Bonham-Carter simply cannot sing.)

schoolofruckus
02-18-2008, 07:56 PM
I watched Quiet City tonight. It's a suuuuuper shoestring, mumblecore movie about a young woman who arrives in New York City to visit a friend; that friend flakes on meeting up with her, so the guy she has asked for directions offers to let her stay with him. They spend the next few days wandering around the city and getting to know each other. It's like an even lower-key, New York-based version of Before Sunrise - and also bears a strong aesthetic kinship to Mutual Appreciation - but it's far more visually striking than either of those films. If you're down with minimalism, this one's great.

Down Rodeo
02-18-2008, 09:51 PM
I watched Touch of Evil last night. What can I say, it's a brilliant movie. Orson Welles is fat as hell, and he does an awesome job playing a crooked cop. It's a bit hilarious watching Charlton Heston play a Mexican, but the movie's greatness overshadows it. Hell, just the film's opening tracking shot is worth watching. Orson Welles = genius.

bballarl
02-18-2008, 10:06 PM
I have no clue what to think after watching that clip.

Yeah. Me too.

PotVsKtl
02-18-2008, 10:26 PM
Atonement. Best film of 2007.

Wheres the beef?
02-18-2008, 10:28 PM
I watched The Fugitive last night from 3:30-5am.

triceratops oatmeal
02-19-2008, 10:44 AM
I watched Rocket Science last night from 3 - 430 am. There was a copy of it laying around at work. So, last night I decided to take it home with me. Popped it in the dvd player at 3 am thinking it would be a good flick to fall asleep to. This was not to be. I enjoyed the film enough to stay up for the whole thing. It was a bit overbearing at times, yet pretty damn funny & charming throughout. If you enjoyed Juno there's a good chance you will enjoy this film too. They're pretty much on the same level, but I think Rocket Science might be slighly better.

corbo
02-20-2008, 09:11 AM
i saw jules and jim this past weekend.
can someone enlighten me as to why this is considered a masterpiece?
at least...thats what the person who recommended it to me made it out to be.
the narrator rushes through a ridiculous plot about this grandiose harlot and
these two friends who fall head over heels for her as if she was some goddess and continue to try and please her despite the fact that she is a total bitch. please. and the war scenes were fucking laughable.

TomAz
02-20-2008, 09:47 AM
Ok...movies.

So, I broke out the next installment of my Kubrick Collection; A Clockwork Orange. It's been probably close to 6-7 years since I have seen it last. It was like meeting up with an old, but severly disturbed friend.

I may have to move Clockwork up on my all time Kubrick list (ok, maybe not...I'm still partial to Strangelove). The "singing in the rain" scene has to rank up there with one of the most disturbing and wicked of all time. Love the opening shot...the pan out on Alex stays with you for days.


Interesting coincidence. I watched this movie last week as well, probably the first time in 15 years for me.

I reached a very different conclusion from yours. I've moved ACO down to near the bottom of my Kubrick list. Below Barry Lyndon, even.

My main problems were the acting and the storyline. It's not a comedy but I found it impossible to take seriously as a drama. Other than that it was fine.

roberto73
02-20-2008, 10:05 AM
I watched Rocket Science last night from 3 - 430 am. There was a copy of it laying around at work. So, last night I decided to take it home with me. Popped it in the dvd player at 3 am thinking it would be a good flick to fall asleep to. This was not to be. I enjoyed the film enough to stay up for the whole thing. It was a bit overbearing at times, yet pretty damn funny & charming throughout. If you enjoyed Juno there's a good chance you will enjoy this film too. They're pretty much on the same level, but I think Rocket Science might be slighly better.

I think Rocket Science is absolutely better than Juno. I've been hesitant to express my love for this movie too strongly on here because I know the allergic reaction some people have to quirk – even well-placed and effective quirk – but I saw this in the theater and again recently on DVD, and I think it's great. I never get the feeling that its quirkiness is simply adornment – like I often felt in Juno and Lars and the Real Girl and even The Darjeeling Limited. Maybe it's that I relate too much to the protagonist, but I really do think Rocket Science holds up as one of the best movies of last year.

At the other end of the spectrum, I watched Kevin Bacon in Death Sentence last night. It's exactly as bad as you think it is.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 10:10 AM
Interesting coincidence. I watched this movie last week as well, probably the first time in 15 years for me.

I reached a very different conclusion from yours. I've moved ACO down to near the bottom of my Kubrick list. Below Barry Lyndon, even.

My main problems were the acting and the storyline. It's not a comedy but I found it impossible to take seriously as a drama. Other than that it was fine.

... the fuck is wrong with you?


I went and saw The Strangers on Monday because nothing else that even seemed potentiall good was playing. I don't think I've seen anyone mention it in the thread, so I'm gonna do a review.

It was quite a good movie, although it was written by a playwright, perhaps adapted from a play, and thus there are a lot of scenes written for stage acting, which is to say overacting. Thankfully, Philip Seymor himself is one of the two main characters (Laura Linney being the other, who's adequate) and thus keeps the boring scenes still interesting to watch and the melodramatic scenes not too irritating. It's quite quippy when it's not being dramatic--if you're at all into plays there's a lot of in-jokes as both the brother and sister protagonists are playwrights--and is good at quipping.

It is also, however, largely about an unfunny subject matter--the brother and sister of an abusive, alcoholic father are called after years without any contact with their dad to be told that he's developed dementia. So they come home and have to wrestle with the issues of caring for people too old/insane to care for themselves, which can be really tiresome fucking issues to watch on screen. I might have related to it a bit more than most would because I know my mother went through this exact shit with her parents, it was a two year long debacle that if I wrote it up would probably be a better movie than this. But, it's unfair to judge this movie against something I would write, as they all lose in that battle.

So if you're really into plays and the writing thereof or you can relate/are interested at all/are remotely tolerant of watching a story that includes a lot of screen time about how shit sucks when you get old and sucks even more if you're the child and you have to decide how much of your playwright's income (read: diddly-squat) you're willing to spend on a nursing home to take care of the man who never took good care of you... by all means, go out and see it. You'll love it.

If you're not any of those things, you better be really into patriarchal relationships and dry wit about stuff you'd probably hear on Frasier (except Frasier played out like a fucking Marx Bros. movie for some reason). Or you better have such good taste that you can get into any movie, but don't go see it if old people with dementia give you the creeps. Cause they kinda do it to me, and if I didn't personally relate to it the skin-crawling factor I get from the subject probably would have overridden its humor.

But I'm saying all this as someone who can't bear to watch that Gilbert Grape movie because down syndrome makes me so fucking uncomfortable.

It gets a B.

roberto73
02-20-2008, 10:12 AM
I went and saw The Strangers on Monday because nothing else that even seemed potentiall good was playing. I don't think I've seen anyone mention it in the thread, so I'm gonna do a review.

Good review, except it's called The Savages. Unless there's another movie with an identical plot that goes by a different name. Kinda like Dante's Peak and Volcano.

TomAz
02-20-2008, 10:14 AM
... the fuck is wrong with you?


I can understand why that movie is so appealing to you, Randy. the whole 'rebel-boy-manipulated-by-the-state' thing is right in your wheelhouse. hell it could be your autobiography.

amyzzz
02-20-2008, 10:14 AM
Good review, except it's called The Savages. Unless there's another movie with an identical plot that goes by a different name. Kinda like Dante's Peak and Volcano.
Wow. Lay off the e, Randy.

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 11:17 AM
I can understand why that movie is so appealing to you, Randy. the whole 'rebel-boy-manipulated-by-the-state' thing is right in your wheelhouse. hell it could be your autobiography.

That's a really easy way of relegating A Clockwork Orange to the scrap heap. It deserves far better than that in spite of your problems with its tonal juxtaposition.

wmgaretjax
02-20-2008, 11:20 AM
But I'm saying all this as someone who can't bear to watch that Gilbert Grape movie because down syndrome makes me so fucking uncomfortable.


You should watch "Who Is It?" If you ever get the chance.

downingthief
02-20-2008, 11:29 AM
Interesting coincidence. I watched this movie last week as well, probably the first time in 15 years for me.

I reached a very different conclusion from yours. I've moved ACO down to near the bottom of my Kubrick list. Below Barry Lyndon, even.

My main problems were the acting and the storyline. It's not a comedy but I found it impossible to take seriously as a drama. Other than that it was fine.

What problems did you have with the acting? I thought Malcolm was absolutely perfect in that role. So much so, one can argue that he basically played "Alex"-like throughout his career.

You are not the first person I have heard say they liked the look and feel of the movie more than the story. I love the story personally.

And, you are right about it not being a comedy, or a drama. But, that is part of its appeal. It can't be pigeonholed into a genre.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 11:44 AM
Good review, except it's called The Savages. Unless there's another movie with an identical plot that goes by a different name. Kinda like Dante's Peak and Volcano.

Fucking A, I knew something was going wrong while I was typing that.


I can understand why that movie is so appealing to you, Randy. the whole 'rebel-boy-manipulated-by-the-state' thing is right in your wheelhouse. hell it could be your autobiography.

Granted, sure, it's very accomodating to my sensibilities. I still don't understand how you can have the complaints you claim to have. The acting is all fucking great--Alex, Dim, the parole officer or whatever he is in the beginning is fantastic at menacing friendly. The story does take backseat to the style, but that's what happens when Kubrick unleashes his full abilities. ANY story would get drowned out under the crushing effect of that man's command of music, tone, and visuals. The story is still solid enough, why does it rate lower because it's a more visceral experience?

Part of the reason Kubrick is the fucking man--and Clockwork is a great example of it--is that he's SO FUCKING GOOD at creating overwhelming mood and tone that he's one of the few that could get away with no story if he wanted to. The Shining doesn't have much of a story, and neither does Full Metal really. But this doesn't change the fact that all three are among the top fifty movies of all time.

Scenes like the Singin In The Rain sequence are a perfect example of why Stanley owns all. No one had the balls to do juxtaposition like that back then. Seriously, below Barry Lyndon? That's not remotely possible, I don't believe you.


Wow. Lay off the e, Randy.

Staying up all night is the problem, the e is fine.


You should watch "Who Is It?" If you ever get the chance.

Are there retards in it? if so, I will avoid it at all costs. Actually, just the fact that you recommend it means I had better avoid it at all costs.

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 12:14 PM
You should watch "Who Is It?" If you ever get the chance.

*What

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 12:30 PM
Granted, sure, it's very accomodating to my sensibilities. I still don't understand how you can have the complaints you claim to have. The acting is all fucking great--Alex, Dim, the parole officer or whatever he is in the beginning is fantastic at menacing friendly. The story does take backseat to the style, but that's what happens when Kubrick unleashes his full abilities. ANY story would get drowned out under the crushing effect of that man's command of music, tone, and visuals. The story is still solid enough, why does it rate lower because it's a more visceral experience?

Part of the reason Kubrick is the fucking man--and Clockwork is a great example of it--is that he's SO FUCKING GOOD at creating overwhelming mood and tone that he's one of the few that could get away with no story if he wanted to. The Shining doesn't have much of a story, and neither does Full Metal really. But this doesn't change the fact that all three are among the top fifty movies of all time.

Scenes like the Singin In The Rain sequence are a perfect example of why Stanley owns all. No one had the balls to do juxtaposition like that back then. Seriously, below Barry Lyndon? That's not remotely possible, I don't believe you.


I don't agree at all that the story in Clockwork Orange takes a backseat to the style. The filmmaking is overpowering, absolutely - but what makes Clockwork Orange a masterwork isn't the bombastic visuals or music or comedy (if you're a sick fuck - which I am). It's the allegory on free will, and how much we're going to allow in order to protect it and continue to be entitled to it. The question of whether it's better to be virtuous but soulless.....or evil with integrity. That's what gives the film resonance. The complexity of that dilemma is equalled by the dichotomic reactions we have towards Alex as our protagonist. He charms and appalls in equal measures, and it's a struggle to figure out which quality wins out.

Please, marvel at the film's technical prowess all you want....lord knows it's an all-time great in that aspect. But let's never forget that this is a deep, powerful, intellectually and emotionally challenging work that has a very real - and always relevant - philosophical question at its core.

PotVsKtl
02-20-2008, 12:52 PM
* Courtesy of Burgess
** Missing the final chapter

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 12:53 PM
Gabe, you're talking about theme, not story. Tom's right--the story is pretty sparse. It's not that it's not a good story, it's just that there's not a lot of developments in the plot. Alex gets betrayed, Alex gets conditioned, Alex gets released, Alex gets revenged, Alex gets cured. Having a philosophical question and a "story" aren't really the same thing. And this isn't my usual bullshit about story with you, I'm just saying--there's not a lot you can point to in terms of plot points in the flick. Same thing with The Shining, same thing with Full Metal.

downingthief
02-20-2008, 01:13 PM
But, can't plot development be thematically based?

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 01:16 PM
Um... well, no, not really, but even then you're still not changing the argument. The developments in the theme are pretty few and far between too. There's basically five, maybe seven big tentpole changes in the direction of the theme and the actual plot itself, that's all. That's true of most movies, but there's usually a lot of connective tissue inbetween providing a link of causes and effects that lead each situation to the next. You don't really have that in Clockwork. It just kinda has sections of different tone and mood, but broad sections, when Kubrick really drowns you in the note he's decided to be hitting for the next 20 minutes.

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 02:13 PM
Gabe, you're talking about theme, not story. Tom's right--the story is pretty sparse. It's not that it's not a good story, it's just that there's not a lot of developments in the plot. Alex gets betrayed, Alex gets conditioned, Alex gets released, Alex gets revenged, Alex gets cured. Having a philosophical question and a "story" aren't really the same thing. And this isn't my usual bullshit about story with you, I'm just saying--there's not a lot you can point to in terms of plot points in the flick. Same thing with The Shining, same thing with Full Metal.

I personally don't think a story needs to be told in plot points. And I promise this isn't my usual bullshit, either. I personally feel like I've gone for a ride inside Alex's life story every time that movie ends. If you reduce it down to the major "events" - sure, it sounds thin. But there's plenty of storytelling going on in between those points.

Take, for example, the scene where he comes home to dad and mum after getting out of jail - not included in your breakdown of the major happenings in the story. You're telling me that scene wasn't telling Alex's life story? That this scene with his parents, and the conflicts they themselves undergo in their feelings towards him, don't spin a great deal of this young man's progression through life? You can chalk that up as character development - but what is character development if not further weaving off-screen story into the world that we're enveloped in?

wmgaretjax
02-20-2008, 02:14 PM
Holy Shit. Randy and I agree on a couple movies.

TomAz
02-20-2008, 02:23 PM
jeezus look what I started. sorry ma.

let me say first off I freely admit I am an amateur and not as scholarly or as well-viewed as most of you. i'm just a guy who watches movies sometimes.

I personally do not find ACO's plot to be all that compelling because it seems thin or facile to me. Gabe I think you hit the nail on the head with "The question of whether it's better to be virtuous but soulless.....or evil with integrity" -- and to that I add, why are those the only two choices available?

Randy your point about Kubrick's juxtaposition is a good one, and I agree he is in full command of his forces. But compare the "singing in the rain" scene to the "going to the chapel" scene in Full Metal Jacket. The difference to me is that in FMJ I actually gave a shit about the characters and so the juxtaposition was more than just a bit of cleverness -- it actually carried real power.

which leads me to the acting. maybe the overacting was intentional, an artistic statement that was supposed to add to the atmosphere or something. No one had any depth, it all came across like an extended skit. maybe there's supposed to be some sort of existential distance implied there? it's beyond me. The characters are all caricatures. A prison guard who looks and screams like Hitler... how novel.

mostly though, the movie just doesn't seem to me to be very good storytelling. there is not a single character I can think of where I can even begin to understand why they are doing whatever they're doing. (well, the government minister. there's one.) Why is Alex violent? Why does he like Beethoven and only Beethoven? Why do they drink milk? Why did his droogs go along with him for so long and then suddenly turn on him? Why does the guy in the wheelchair pretend not to know who Alex is rather than have his bodyguard beat the crap out of him then and there? etc. I scratch the surface.

And the string of coincidences -- Alex is back out on the street, "cured", and immediately runs into the drunk bum he beat up, and when the bums are beating him up the cops come but it's Dim, and they take him out and beat him up and dump him right near the house with the guy in the wheelchair? i mean, really??

anyway , have at it.

PotVsKtl
02-20-2008, 02:25 PM
Burgess.

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 02:35 PM
I personally do not find ACO's plot to be all that compelling because it seems thin or facile to me. Gabe I think you hit the nail on the head with "The question of whether it's better to be virtuous but soulless.....or evil with integrity" -- and to that I add, why are those the only two choices available?

In real life, they're not. This particular novel (thank you, Pot) and film decided to tackle that specific question.


mostly though, the movie just doesn't seem to me to be very good storytelling. there is not a single character I can think of where I can even begin to understand why they are doing whatever they're doing. (well, the government minister. there's one.) Why is Alex violent? Why does he like Beethoven and only Beethoven? Why do they drink milk? Why did his droogs go along with him for so long and then suddenly turn on him? Why does the guy in the wheelchair pretend not to know who Alex is rather than have his bodyguard beat the crap out of him then and there??

There are things suggested as to Alex's violent nature - possible parental neglect; potential working-class frustration; a society that seems to be generally decaying - but really, the point is not why he's violent. Do you care about about the motivations of a violent person when they're being violent in your midst? I would wager not - your primary concern is how to handle them. Same with this story.

His droogs follow him for the same reasons that we as viewers do - they're not sure how they feel about him. Sometimes he's repulsive; other times he's extremely charismatic. They also happen to directly benefit from the crimes he leads them into. One day, they tire of his undesirable qualities, after years of brushing them aside. Have you never seen someone do that in a relationship before? I never once thought this was unbelievable.

The writer - already having an opinion on the treatment that was administered to Alex - decides that rather than just get revenge on him in the most primally satisfying way, they should exploit him in the name of their political motives.

Does his taste for milk and/or Ludwig van feel that unrealistic that it needs to be explained?


And the string of coincidences -- Alex is back out on the street, "cured", and immediately runs into the drunk bum he beat up, and when the bums are beating him up the cops come but it's Dim, and they take him out and beat him up and dump him right near the house with the guy in the wheelchair? i mean, really??

I can see this bothering some people. But that's where you either choose to accept the film as an allegory, and let it make those points without having to adhere to complete and total believability, or you decide that it's garbage and turn it off.

wmgaretjax
02-20-2008, 02:38 PM
Burgess.

probably...

TomAz
02-20-2008, 02:41 PM
Does his taste for milk and/or Ludwig van feel that unrealistic that it needs to be explained?


well, yeah, I guess so, because without explanation my gut reaction is to see it as affectation rather than anything substantive. (Kubrick's affectation, that is, not Alex's).

wmgaretjax
02-20-2008, 02:47 PM
well, yeah, I guess so, because without explanation my gut reaction is to see it as affectation rather than anything substantive. (Kubrick's affectation, that is, not Alex's).

or maybe... everyone with a soul's affection?

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 02:50 PM
I always just figured that milk is the fashionable way to take drugs in this film's society. I have no idea where Beethoven came from.



I know, I know.....Burgess.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 03:04 PM
I personally don't think a story needs to be told in plot points. And I promise this isn't my usual bullshit, either. I personally feel like I've gone for a ride inside Alex's life story every time that movie ends. If you reduce it down to the major "events" - sure, it sounds thin. But there's plenty of storytelling going on in between those points.

Take, for example, the scene where he comes home to dad and mum after getting out of jail - not included in your breakdown of the major happenings in the story. You're telling me that scene wasn't telling Alex's life story? That this scene with his parents, and the conflicts they themselves undergo in their feelings towards him, don't spin a great deal of this young man's progression through life? You can chalk that up as character development - but what is character development if not further weaving off-screen story into the world that we're enveloped in?

Gabe, we don't disagree on the powerful nature of the story told--all I said was that there is relatively little "story" in the sense of plot. And there IS less in the way of plot than most movies. This is no way takes away from what a great movie it is. It's just told more through tone and mood, visually and aurally but not necessarily in the form of actual events. This is not a complaint about the movie--Kubrick makes it work, to such a degree that it's at least 50 percent definitely in my top ten.


jeezus look what I started. sorry ma.

let me say first off I freely admit I am an amateur and not as scholarly or as well-viewed as most of you. i'm just a guy who watches movies sometimes.

I personally do not find ACO's plot to be all that compelling because it seems thin or facile to me. Gabe I think you hit the nail on the head with "The question of whether it's better to be virtuous but soulless.....or evil with integrity" -- and to that I add, why are those the only two choices available?

Randy your point about Kubrick's juxtaposition is a good one, and I agree he is in full command of his forces. But compare the "singing in the rain" scene to the "going to the chapel" scene in Full Metal Jacket. The difference to me is that in FMJ I actually gave a shit about the characters and so the juxtaposition was more than just a bit of cleverness -- it actually carried real power.

which leads me to the acting. maybe the overacting was intentional, an artistic statement that was supposed to add to the atmosphere or something. No one had any depth, it all came across like an extended skit. maybe there's supposed to be some sort of existential distance implied there? it's beyond me. The characters are all caricatures. A prison guard who looks and screams like Hitler... how novel.

mostly though, the movie just doesn't seem to me to be very good storytelling. there is not a single character I can think of where I can even begin to understand why they are doing whatever they're doing. (well, the government minister. there's one.) Why is Alex violent? Why does he like Beethoven and only Beethoven? Why do they drink milk? Why did his droogs go along with him for so long and then suddenly turn on him? Why does the guy in the wheelchair pretend not to know who Alex is rather than have his bodyguard beat the crap out of him then and there? etc. I scratch the surface.

And the string of coincidences -- Alex is back out on the street, "cured", and immediately runs into the drunk bum he beat up, and when the bums are beating him up the cops come but it's Dim, and they take him out and beat him up and dump him right near the house with the guy in the wheelchair? i mean, really??

anyway , have at it.

See, this is what I'm talking about--Tom is technically quite right. But that's the thing about Clockwork--it's an allegory. Like you said Gabe, it's more of a philosophical and ethical dilemma illustrated through this twisted future than it is a story about characters that feel... REAL.

Do I feel for Alex the way you described, Gabe? Sure I do. But I also am something of a violent psychopath, or was when I was a teenager, so I ought to naturally be connecting to it more than you. But all these questions/points Tom makes can't really be dismissed--in fact, they remind me a lot of things my father used to complain about with certain movies. Not sure if Clockwork was one although I'd have to imagine it was. He certainly did when my brother and I laughed at the torture scene in Reservoir Dogs. And that's this problem:

It's very difficult to truly empathize with the events of Clockwork. For starters, Alex and his droogs are about as severe a case of anti-heroes as we can get. And Tom's analysis of the absurdly convenient, contrived circumstances under which Alex receives his penance is entirely accurate--this is where you have you see the film (never read the book) as being an allegory, and not really a "plot" "story."

Compare it to Shakespeare is the best way I can explain how to try to swallow the grievances you have, Tom. I personally hate Shakespeare--if he'd had Kubrick directing maybe his shit would be tolerable--but the role of the plot is no more half assed or contrived than Hamlet, Macbeth, etc.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 03:06 PM
Also, personally I think we'll all be a little surprised how similar drugs of the future are to their milk bars in a lot of ways. Some day ecstasy will be served mixed with red bulls in special bars in Amsterdam. Actually, wait, they practically already are in Amsterdam. Well, then here soon.

TomAz
02-20-2008, 03:08 PM
Compare it to Shakespeare is the best way I can explain how to try to swallow the grievances you have, Tom. I personally hate Shakespeare--if he'd had Kubrick directing maybe his shit would be tolerable--but the role of the plot is no more half assed or contrived than Hamlet, Macbeth, etc.

I'm just comparing it to Dr. Strangelove. which you know is about as perfect as a movie can get.

well actually I was comparing it to the rest of his movies too. I mean, I'm not saying ACO is bad. It's not like it's Titanic or something.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 03:10 PM
It's up there. Goddammit that man made too many movies that ought to all be in the top 20. Comparing it to Strangelove is such ridiculous apples and oranges though Tom, c'mon. I still don't see how Barry Lyndon can rate over it. If these are your feelings, you have to levy a serious distaste for 2001 as well, 'cause there ain't dick that happens in that movie.

TomAz
02-20-2008, 03:12 PM
I like 2001 just fine.

and Barry Lyndon is not that bad.

those two movies are very pretty.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 03:15 PM
You don't find Clockwork to be pretty? I mean, it's not conventionally pretty, but visually captivating?

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 03:16 PM
Gabe, we don't disagree on the powerful nature of the story told--all I said was that there is relatively little "story" in the sense of plot. And there IS less in the way of plot than most movies. This is no way takes away from what a great movie it is. It's just told more through tone and mood, visually and aurally but not necessarily in the form of actual events. This is not a complaint about the movie--Kubrick makes it work, to such a degree that it's at least 50 percent definitely in my top ten.



See, this is what I'm talking about--Tom is technically quite right. But that's the thing about Clockwork--it's an allegory. Like you said Gabe, it's more of a philosophical and ethical dilemma illustrated through this twisted future than it is a story about characters that feel... REAL.

Do I feel for Alex the way you described, Gabe? Sure I do. But I also am something of a violent psychopath, or was when I was a teenager, so I ought to naturally be connecting to it more than you. But all these questions/points Tom makes can't really be dismissed--in fact, they remind me a lot of things my father used to complain about with certain movies. Not sure if Clockwork was one although I'd have to imagine it was. He certainly did when my brother and I laughed at the torture scene in Reservoir Dogs. And that's this problem:

It's very difficult to truly empathize with the events of Clockwork. For starters, Alex and his droogs are about as severe a case of anti-heroes as we can get. And Tom's analysis of the absurdly convenient, contrived circumstances under which Alex receives his penance is entirely accurate--this is where you have you see the film (never read the book) as being an allegory, and not really a "plot" "story."

Compare it to Shakespeare is the best way I can explain how to try to swallow the grievances you have, Tom. I personally hate Shakespeare--if he'd had Kubrick directing maybe his shit would be tolerable--but the role of the plot is no more half assed or contrived than Hamlet, Macbeth, etc.

How do you know I wasn't a violent psychopath as a teenager?

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 03:18 PM
How do you know I wasn't a violent psychopath as a teenager?

I don't. But I got 500 that says the difference between what you were that you say constitutes a violent psychopath and what I was are worlds apart.

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 03:20 PM
You're right. My adolescent escapades would make you look like the kid from "Boy Meets World".

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 03:20 PM
Hahahahahahahahahahahaha... wait, which kid? Cause the one was pretty tough.

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 03:25 PM
Touche. Ryder Strong 4 Lyfe.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 03:27 PM
I was talking about the bully actually. You know, with the badass hair like Mark in the early seasons of Roseanne?

full on idle
02-20-2008, 03:30 PM
hahahaha

full on idle
02-20-2008, 03:30 PM
hahahahahahaha

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 03:31 PM
So do tell, Gabe--like did you buy animals from the pet store just to torture them and shit? Pour lighter fluid on them, get a torch lighter... what?

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 05:01 PM
I didn't do that one. My brother and his friends did, however, making a running torch out of a mouse or two in their day.

Beef Jerky
02-20-2008, 05:03 PM
Wow, I didn't realize how long this thread was.

bballarl
02-20-2008, 05:03 PM
I always dominate Oscar pools when I play, despite being dumb as fuck when it comes to movies. Let's have a Coachella Oscar Pool. Anyone? Anyone?

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 05:04 PM
Hahahaha, I've never referred to it as a running torch.


Alright, now how about people? I'll lay my cards on the table if you want to lay yours. =)

amyzzz
02-20-2008, 05:07 PM
I don't really care about the oscars this year.

bballarl
02-20-2008, 05:07 PM
Neither do I. But we should still do a board Oscar pool.

schoolofruckus
02-20-2008, 05:32 PM
I care about the Oscars this year more than most. I'm down to do a pool.

I fold, Randy.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 05:35 PM
Hehehe, okay. But if we ever hit the bar, we gotta have our little version of the scars scene in Jaws with teenage psychopathic violence.

wmgaretjax
02-20-2008, 05:54 PM
I saw "4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days..." Holy shit. I'm tempted to say this film wins out as the best of 2007. I haven't left a film feeling so overwhelmed since... the Russian film "4." The scene at the dinner table is absolutely insane.

I don't want to talk about this movie at all right now, because everyone should see it without knowing anything about it. It's simple, but it caries it's weight. As soon as it leaves theaters I'll post a full review.

PotVsKtl
02-20-2008, 07:30 PM
Is it an ambush?

PotVsKtl
02-20-2008, 07:31 PM
Yeah retire this thread.

thelastgreatman
02-20-2008, 07:33 PM
Wait, what retired it, Mr. v. Skittles?

PotVsKtl
02-20-2008, 07:37 PM
200 is enough.

Down Rodeo
02-20-2008, 10:07 PM
I was going to weigh in on the Clockwork Orange debate real quick. Basically, 2001 has almost no plot and it's one of the 5 best movies ever made, so Clockwork can certainly have a weak plot and still be awesome. Which it is.

downingthief
02-21-2008, 07:05 AM
2001 is up next for me in my Kubrick collection. Probably will watch it tonight.

Strangelove is still my favorite Kubrick movie (and one of my all time faves). I do agree with Tom with that opinion. Clockwork for me is a close second, though. Alex to me is one of the best characters ever created on film. Period.

Yablonowitz
02-21-2008, 07:20 AM
I was going to weigh in on the Clockwork Orange debate real quick. Basically, 2001 has almost no plot and it's one of the 5 best movies ever made, so Clockwork can certainly have a weak plot and still be awesome. Which it is.

2001 has always put me the fuck to sleep.

thelastgreatman
02-21-2008, 07:32 AM
2001 is one of his weakest unless you're seeing it in a theatre. Sorry, that movie only works as an orchestral piece, it does not translate to TV screens worth fuck.

Young blood
02-21-2008, 07:49 AM
I downloaded the Incredible Film Music Box, The - City Of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra just so I could crank that score from 2001 in my car.

schoolofruckus
02-21-2008, 08:23 AM
Yeah retire this thread.

Never. If I don't have this thread, then I got nothin'.

triceratops oatmeal
02-21-2008, 02:45 PM
Never. If I don't have this thread, then I got nothin'.

200 pages deep. I'm sure it could afford to be reset at some point.

thelastgreatman
02-21-2008, 02:49 PM
I was gonna say--Pot trying to kill the thread seems like a direct affront to Gabe's board life. He so rarely ventures out from this sanctuary. What the fuck, v. Skittles--you want Gabe to be HOMELESS? HUH?

schoolofruckus
02-21-2008, 03:10 PM
He's just pissed because Where The Wild Things Are is apparently a catastrophe.

Yablonowitz
02-21-2008, 03:28 PM
He's just pissed because Where The Wild Things Are is apparently a catastrophe.

I don't see any way it won't be.

PotVsKtl
02-21-2008, 03:58 PM
All I'm saying is start a new thread. You can slather your imoniker all over it if you're so desperate to rub your junk on the tubes.

wmgaretjax
02-21-2008, 05:07 PM
Has anyone seen the movie "The Reflecting Skin" it sounds like an American "Leolo" and a friend recommended it to me but I can't seem to track down the R2 DVD. It sounds like a great Don DeLillo inspired experience.

ShyGuy75
02-21-2008, 05:37 PM
Atonement. Best film of 2007.

Into the Wild kills it.

wmgaretjax
02-21-2008, 05:45 PM
Into the Wild kills it.

Ugh...

ShyGuy75
02-21-2008, 05:51 PM
Ugh...

*hands wmgaretjax a tissue*

phxunderground
02-21-2008, 06:11 PM
I saw "4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days..." Holy shit. I'm tempted to say this film wins out as the best of 2007. I haven't left a film feeling so overwhelmed since... the Russian film "4." The scene at the dinner table is absolutely insane.

I don't want to talk about this movie at all right now, because everyone should see it without knowing anything about it. It's simple, but it caries it's weight. As soon as it leaves theaters I'll post a full review.

Yeah, I really want to see this film. Unfortunately, I will probably have to wait till DVD as I live in Phoenix Metro Area and sometimes we don't always get the foreign films. Then again we did get La Vie En Rose when it first came out. Hmm...let's hope this hits one of the art theatres around my side of the world.

ShyGuy75
02-22-2008, 05:34 PM
Did Amy Smart get nominated for an Oscar for her performance in Crank?

wmgaretjax
02-22-2008, 08:40 PM
I watched the 3 burials of mequilades estrada. Not a bad film. There were some meandering moments, and some really poignant ones. worth checking out.

Down Rodeo
02-23-2008, 12:09 AM
I watched the 3 burials of mequilades estrada. Not a bad film. There were some meandering moments, and some really poignant ones. worth checking out.

Word. Great movie.

whynotsmile99
02-23-2008, 01:00 PM
I just watched Across The Universe.

This has to be my least liked film of 2007. I'm sure there were worse movies out last year, but damn did I hate this movie.

The Jimi Hendrix guy was really good and Strawberry Fields Forever worked reasonably well, but everything else in this movie just didn't work at all. Revolution and I want to Hold Your Hand were downright terrible. The plot was a mess.

I'm going to play Half Life 2 until I get Bono's Ken Kesey out of my head.

fatbastard
02-23-2008, 01:16 PM
The opening skit on the Spirit awards with Dennis Hopper was funny.

tessalasset
02-23-2008, 04:02 PM
Once won in the Best Foreign Film category at the 2008 Independent Spirits Award!!!

wmgaretjax
02-23-2008, 04:44 PM
Once won in the Best Foreign Film category at the 2008 Independent Spirits Award!!!

that's a fucking travesty. I can admit that the film is cute and entertaining, but seriously...

tessalasset
02-23-2008, 04:45 PM
:laughyou

Neutral Milk Hotel
02-23-2008, 06:13 PM
Loved Be Kind Rewind. More thoughts later.

schoolofruckus
02-24-2008, 08:49 AM
Once is good shit. I wouldn't have picked it to win Best Foreign Film over 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days., but I'm happy with it getting a little bit of accolades.

However, the Independent Spirit Awards have been forever sullied by giving their Best Film award to Juno, over the likes of Diving Bell and the Butterfly, I'm Not There, and Paranoid Park (Gus Van Sant's newest, which I have 100% faith will be great).

roberto73
02-24-2008, 10:12 AM
However, the Independent Spirit Awards have been forever sullied by giving their Best Film award to Juno, over the likes of Diving Bell and the Butterfly, I'm Not There, and Paranoid Park (Gus Van Sant's newest, which I have 100% faith will be great).

Let's not be hyperbolic, Gabe. I agree that Juno shouldn't have won, but "forever sullied"? That's as over-the-top as Jared saying Once's win is "a fucking travesty." I know we love our movies, but we're not talking about Good Luck Chuck winning Best Picture at the Oscars, for instance. Actually, better thought: Let's wait and see how Juno does at the Oscars tonight, and then we can start talking about sullying and travesties.

bmack86
02-24-2008, 10:34 AM
Loved Be Kind Rewind. More thoughts later.

I second that. Saw it two weeks ago, and it was fantastic.

wmgaretjax
02-24-2008, 11:41 AM
Let's not be hyperbolic, Gabe. I agree that Juno shouldn't have won, but "forever sullied"? That's as over-the-top as Jared saying Once's win is "a fucking travesty." I know we love our movies, but we're not talking about Good Luck Chuck winning Best Picture at the Oscars, for instance. Actually, better thought: Let's wait and see how Juno does at the Oscars tonight, and then we can start talking about sullying and travesties.

hahahaha. Being hyperbolic is the way we make ourselves feel like our opinions matter. I totally forgot the oscars were tonight...

keriann
02-24-2008, 12:38 PM
I just watched Across The Universe.

This has to be my least liked film of 2007. I'm sure there were worse movies out last year, but damn did I hate this movie.

Seconded. I wanted to like it, I really did. I am usually a fan of musicals, too. But this was just BAD. So bad. I laughed out loud at some of the dramatic scenes. It had the potential to be another Moulin Rouge but it took itself too seriously for the cheesiness to be passable. Oh, god, bad.

Also I am glad to hear some of you liked Be Kind Rewind. It really want that to be good.

schoolofruckus
02-24-2008, 01:27 PM
Let's not be hyperbolic, Gabe. I agree that Juno shouldn't have won, but "forever sullied"? That's as over-the-top as Jared saying Once's win is "a fucking travesty." I know we love our movies, but we're not talking about Good Luck Chuck winning Best Picture at the Oscars, for instance. Actually, better thought: Let's wait and see how Juno does at the Oscars tonight, and then we can start talking about sullying and travesties.

I bet Good Luck Chuck is made with more integrity than Juno is, albeit with considerably less skill.

If the Independent Spirit Awards had a category for Best Movie That Puts "Indie" In Quotes And Sells It With Spite, I'd be cool with Juno winning. But they don't, and so they gave it Best Film over at least two - maybe three - masterpieces. That gives me something to think about when considering their award winners in the future.

Of course, I read a statistic this morning that - in the more than 20 years that the Indies have been awarded - they have never had an Oscar nominee that has lost the Best Film Indie to a film that wasn't Oscar nominated. There have been years where there were no Oscar nominees in the Indies' final five. But most of the time, whatever "litlte" film the Oscars have in the race is the film that wins here. "Independent" Spirit, indeed.

suprefan
02-24-2008, 02:23 PM
It will probably win for best original screenplay, so lil stripper Diablo Cody will give some speech about how much it means to her etc etc. So where is our like Oscar pool/prediction? Gabe, Im looking at you to start this.

Mr.Nipples
02-24-2008, 02:28 PM
who gives a shit if she was a stripper...

canexplain
02-24-2008, 02:40 PM
we just watched michael clayton, watched american gangster yesterday, going to try and squeeze in the jessse james movie or vally of eligh sp,, ... x****

Neutral Milk Hotel
02-25-2008, 12:52 AM
As much as I had my problems with Juno, I remember reading an article a few years back about the Blacklist, which was this list some agency made of the most praised films that hadn't been picked up by a single studio, and Juno was on there. Actually, fuck that. It doesn't matter if she struggled. The whole point of independent films is the exciting and the new, and Juno is nothing more than a placeholder for the current trends of the Sundance crowd. I still liked it, but when movies like Juno win the Spirit Awards, what's the point? This is an $130 million grossing crowd-pleaser. Not saying that profit should have anything to do with how they make their decisions, but I thought the whole idea was to celebrate the little films, the ones everyone hasn't already heard of. Whatever.

Also, I wrote some thoughts on facebook on There Will Be Blood, which I haven't yet written about, and Michael Clayton, which I just saw. So:

There Will Be Blood:

I'd like to quote a review of the film I saw on flixter, a review that really kind of haunted me:

" I believed the lonliness of his character. I believed in the love for his son. I believed in the good intention under the business man."

Many view it as the story of a monstrous villain, and while Daniel Plainview is no saint, I get the sense that Anderson's intent was to find the human in the capitalist, not the other way around. This (mis?)interpretation of the film may be why some have recently said Day-Lewis's work is over-the-top and simplistic, but try to look at it as the presentation of a man who's good and evil qualities are always raging against each other, and his extraordinary achievement makes itself apparent. To look at Plainview as a villain, to simplify him that way, is to cut yourself off from some of the most meaningful elements of the film. Really, the relationship between Plainview and his adopted son, HW, is the most important part of the film, and it's a relationship built on love. Plainview argues that he keeps the boy around as a business tool, but it doesn't really make that much sense. Would having a cute boy really help him buy land that much? None of the other oil tycoons in the film are seen to be running around with adorable human props, and the film doesn't suggest that they're any better off or worse off than Plainview is. No, he hungers for human connection, even if he can't admit it to himself. It's the same reason he opens up his supposed half-brother Henry, even if he hasn't shown trust to anyone else, even his trusted advisors. There's a scene with Plainview and Henry on the beach, where he talks about the Peachtree Dance, a local custom from their childhood, and about how when he was a boy he wanted to by a great house and fill it with children. In this scene we see the real Plainview, the Plainview who isn't possessed by competition and ambition (after all, he's mapping out the path his pipeline will take to the sea--his life's work is more or less complete). The conversation on the beach is even more telling than the "I look at people and I see nothing worth liking" rant he has a scene later, for it shows us the vulnerable, human side of Plainview, a side that has been too often ignored in critical interpretation of the film. An understanding of his desire for human connection, of indeed the "good intention under the businessman", makes the film that much more powerful and affecting. It may be true that, in the end, Plainview's demons consume him, but that doesn't mean it was an inevitability, "drilling down to a single point" as Jim Emerson put it in his blog.

SPOILERS

As for the final scene, that's for another note entirely, but watching the film a second time it almost felt, in this weird twisted way, heroic. It's hard to explain why, but try to imagine it as almost a perverse, deranged mirror image of the final exchange between George Clooney and Tilda Swinton in Michael Clayton.

END SPOILERS

Michael Clayton:

I'll need to see it again, but it's very good. Lots of people have cited the moral, character-driven dramas of the 1970s, and they're right. It's nice to see a thriller that's about one man's moral conundrum, and not about a murder or a monster, etc. Gilroy's directing isn't showy, but it's very successful. Great acting from the leads, especially Wilkinson. This is a film of uncommon intelligence, and while it might not reach the artistic heights of No Country for Old Men or There Will Be Blood, it ably stands in their company. I would also say, that in a year of films that know exactly when to end, this is a sterling example. Gilroy understands that the true story if Michael Clayton's moral awakening, and not whether or not justice is served to the corrupt company (it is called Michael Clayton, after all). I was exhilarated by the ambiguousness of the last shot, and its haunting quality. The scene with the three horses is also a marvel of great writing and craftsmanship.

And, why not, more on Juno!!!

Of all the BP nominees, I've had more arguments about this one than any other, and it's hard to really classify my response. Back in early December, when I saw it for the first time, I ended up giving it a positive review. I think it still deserves that positive notice, but I should also note some problems with it that I didn't mention in my initial review. Ultimately, the main problem is almost that this is a Best Picture nominee. It just wasn't designed to withstand the level of scrutiny that accompanies that honor; I'm sure Diablo Cody would agree with me. She has a distinctive voice, yet, but she hasn't yet learned how to employ that voice with moderation; if you took all of the weirdest lines and characters from films of the Coen Brothers and put them all in one thing, it would be kind of similar. The result is that there's this kind of, I guess same-ness in the characters. Not only does Juno talk like Juno, but Juno's parents talk like Juno, Juno's best friend talks like Juno, the wacky drugstore clerk talks like Juno. And it's not that they all just talk in this general way, no, they all have the same "voice". The other problem is that the film is on unsteady ground, plotwise. Characters are brought onscreen just for punchline value (I realize it's unfair to criticize a comedy for this practice, but the problem is that Juno wants us to believe it's taking place in some semblance of the real world), and we're never made to understand the experience of pregnancy for this 16-year-old. It's never more than something that's there, and for a film that's supposed to be about the wages of maturity, you'd think they would put more emphasis on how having a living being inside her affected Juno, both physically and emotionally. Still, like I said before, it's worth seeing. Suddenly, in the last half hour, the movie just works. I think the reason is that it kind of abandons its illusions of authenticity and becomes a kind of twee fantasy. Ideas like the mailbox full of Orange tic tacs and Paulie Bleeker running across town to be at the hospital because he knew Juno was giving birth might not be particularly believable, but they are sweet and charming. And the Moldy Peaches duet that closes the movie is sufficiently winning. I give a lot of credit for the success of these assorted successes to director Jason Reitman. He may not do much with the film on the stylistic side of things, but he knows how to direct actors, and how to put a film together. His warm humanism fills in the gaps left by Cody's ubersnark, and it's mainly because of him that what could have been a train wreck is turned into a pleasant, if overwritten, little movie. Major credit also to Jennifer Garner, JK Simmons, and Allison Janney, good actors who find the beating hearts in their characters. As for Page, I like how Dennis Cozzalio put it in his blog "Sergio Leone and the Infield Fly Rule", suggesting that the success of Page's performance depends on how much you like the character she's playing. So, for me: kind of. Bateman's also good, even if the character he's playing is an example, not a human being.

triceratops oatmeal
02-25-2008, 01:12 AM
who gives a shit if she was a stripper...

seriously. Vigo Mortensen used to sell chipwhiches on street corners in Queens or some shit.

One of my best friends was an "exotic dancer" & an extremely talented opera singer.

Cpt. Funkaho
02-25-2008, 01:16 AM
As much as I had my problems HOLY SHIT I'M GOING TO WRITE WAR & PEACE NOW

tl;dr

schoolofruckus
02-25-2008, 09:02 AM
I have to say, I'm pretty happy with how the Oscars turned out. It feels wrong that PTA went away empty-handed - as much as the triumph of Daniel Day-Lewis' performance is his to share - and I would have loved for Diving Bell to steal just one of its categories, but the Coen Bros. are as due for a coronation as anyone in American film. It's easy to say Roger Deakins got robbed - he had maybe the finest year of anyone in filmmaking last year - but every film in the Cinematography field was phenomenal AND visually stunning, so it's hard to argue with any of them winning. The Best Original Screenplay category was doomed to weakness in this otherwise-strong year, so I took the Juno win for granted; since every film on my top 10 outside of the criminally neglected 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days. had some basis in previously-published literature, the compromise of letting Cody up on the podium in exchange for no further Juno celebration was permissible. I found out on Friday that one of my friends is related to the subjects of the short documentary Freeheld, so its victory means I am now 3-for-3 when I have a personal connection to an Oscar-nominated short film. And I was thrilled with the love shown to Once - the performance, the award, and then the make-up acceptance speech for Marketa (which, rumor has it, was strongly suggested backstage by Colin Farrell).

wmgaretjax
02-25-2008, 09:18 AM
Margot at the Wedding is REALLY great. I can't believe that was Nicole Kidman, I've never seen her in a movie where she became the character so fully. Maybe it was the accent. I just loved all the actors so much, it all felt so legitimate.

Yay! This movie is not getting enough recognition. It's really fantastics.

Oh, and as far as Across the Universe is concerned, my vote is skip it.

TomAz
02-25-2008, 09:32 AM
I have to say, I'm pretty happy with how the Oscars turned out. It feels wrong that PTA went away empty-handed - as much as the triumph of Daniel Day-Lewis' performance is his to share - and I would have loved for Diving Bell to steal just one of its categories, but the Coen Bros. are as due for a coronation as anyone in American film. It's easy to say Roger Deakins got robbed - he had maybe the finest year of anyone in filmmaking last year - but every film in the Cinematography field was phenomenal AND visually stunning, so it's hard to argue with any of them winning. The Best Original Screenplay category was doomed to weakness in this otherwise-strong year, so I took the Juno win for granted; since every film on my top 10 outside of the criminally neglected 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days. had some basis in previously-published literature, the compromise of letting Cody up on the podium in exchange for no further Juno celebration was permissible. I found out on Friday that one of my friends is related to the subjects of the short documentary Freeheld, so its victory means I am now 3-for-3 when I have a personal connection to an Oscar-nominated short film. And I was thrilled with the love shown to Once - the performance, the award, and then the make-up acceptance speech for Marketa (which, rumor has it, was strongly suggested backstage by Colin Farrell).

may I also say you looked absolutely stunning in that midnight blue swooshie dress with fur trim Gabe. You really outclassed all the girls.

downingthief
02-25-2008, 10:03 AM
Yay! This movie is not getting enough recognition. It's really fantastics.

Oh, and as far as Across the Universe is concerned, my vote is skip it.

Am I the only one that liked it? I thought it was very well done.

C DUB YA
02-25-2008, 10:19 AM
I wouldn't say Across the Universe is skippable bad at all - I thought it was OK, sure, corny in areas (BONO), but overall a interesting idea that succeeds... and I HATE musicals.

I thought the art direction was rather strong except for some of the riot and psychadelic scenes... supporting cast of singers are very good. Evan Rachel Wood has a very good voice and the Jim Sturgess was surprisingly good in the lead.

Obviously, the music within is pretty great, its the parts the tie them together that need fixin.

amyzzz
02-25-2008, 10:39 AM
Am I the only one that liked it? I thought it was very well done.My husband and I both loved Across the Universe and bought the DVD. We watched it again last week. It's a good trip movie, Jacob says. I like the reworking of the songs (maybe I'll like the beatles someday), and it was visually stunning.

HowToDisappear
02-25-2008, 10:42 AM
Am I the only one that liked it? I thought it was very well done.

I really enjoyed it. So did my husband.

I say go for it, FOI.

noisemachine
02-25-2008, 10:47 AM
I haven't seen "Across the Universe", but I will recommend that anybody who likes the Beatles and enjoys a good visual experience should see the LOVE cirque du soleil show in Las Vegas.

amyzzz
02-25-2008, 10:49 AM
I totally want to see that. I saw some kind of documentary on it, and I also saw the Grammy's performance--looks pretty cool.

canexplain
02-25-2008, 10:52 AM
My husband and I both loved Across the Universe and bought the DVD. We watched it again last week. It's a good trip movie, Jacob says. I like the reworking of the songs (maybe I'll like the beatles someday), and it was visually stunning.

yep a few peeps said that was the worst movie they saw last year ... i say to each his own of course ... i enjoyed it a lot, but maybe cuz it was been there done that and it brought back memories ...x****

Yablonowitz
02-25-2008, 11:02 AM
yep a few peeps said that was the worst movie they saw last year ... i say to each his own of course ... i enjoyed it a lot, but maybe cuz it was been there done that and it brought back memories ...x****

You've been across the universe?

whynotsmile99
02-25-2008, 11:06 AM
Maybe I was just being grumpy because I just had my wisdom teeth removed and was vomiting blood and stomach bile, but I really, really hated the movie.

I thought all of the productions, aside from Strawberry Fields Forever were flat out bad. Every single Beatles song I liked they just ruined, with I Wanna Hold Your Hand and Come Together being the worst offenders. I actually love musicals and ATU did a terrible job at tying all the songs with the plot together. The story itself was just a inspid bucket of 60's cliches and characters that was more laughable and confusing than anything else.

I thought the trailer for the movie looked great and trippy but I even thought the bulk of the production design was a bit flat. Coming from the person that gave the world the incredible Titus, it was certainly dissapointing.

The guy in the lead was ok, but Evan Rachel Wood didn't do much to stand out. Like I said, Hendrix guy was great, Janis girl wasn't bad either. Prudence's character was hilarious.

ATU came across the cast of High School Musical doing a 60's movie. Buffy's musical was more sincere than this

D92Lyxj7U7Q

1XWM2LhVOKc

PotVsKtl
02-25-2008, 11:08 AM
You know what's awesome? Musicals made entirely of songs without any narrative content.

canexplain
02-25-2008, 11:10 AM
You've been across the universe?

in my head i have :) x****

TomAz
02-25-2008, 12:06 PM
I may have to because I love Beatles songs so much.

rQgQblgKw8U

the best part is when the BeeGees pick up the coffin and start singing "Carry That Weight".

thestripe
02-25-2008, 12:58 PM
Full
There are a few scenes that are pretty unbearable, like the opening scene, and the Dear Prudence scene. Overall it's average, watch it on a rainy day or something.

ghettojournalist
02-25-2008, 09:45 PM
i finally saw "Persepolis" and i was impressed. i did not expect such a pop-savvy, humorous bent to be added to this tale. i loved this film.

i have to give credit to "Across the Universe" for broadening the appeal of The Beatles, but it seemed worse than "Dreamgirls", so i'm staying away.

wmgaretjax
02-25-2008, 09:46 PM
broadening the appeal of The Beatles

I'm not sure anyone saw it that didn't already love the Beatles.

keriann
02-25-2008, 11:20 PM
Like, skip it altogether bad? I'm depending on you girl.

I seriously thought it was the worst movie I'd seen in a long time. I am sincerely amazed any of you were able to stomach it. But hey, since other people liked it, why not give it a chance.

It is amazing how many great songs the Beatles wrote.

Also I agree that Margot at the Wedding felt so real. I really liked that about it.

amyzzz
02-26-2008, 03:01 AM
I'm not sure anyone saw it that didn't already love the Beatles.
I don't love The Beatles. They're OK. ;)

ghettojournalist
02-26-2008, 06:59 PM
I'm not sure anyone saw it that didn't already love the Beatles.

a lot of young'uns saw it that didn't have a proper grasp on The Beatles yet.

at least in my neck of the woods.

whynotsmile99
02-26-2008, 09:38 PM
This poster deserves a nice, hearty fail.

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i277/MartinBlank9mm/Part%203/indy4-26feb-shia-poster.jpg

theburiedlife
02-26-2008, 10:00 PM
... but have you seen the trailer? It looks amazing.

VVHubr4s7P0

Also, just for laughs, the new Pineapple Express Trailer was released.

SLfSLyojje0

whynotsmile99
02-26-2008, 10:18 PM
some friends of mine saw Pineapple Express at a screening months ago and said it was amazing. They described it as half best stoner comedy ever and half Resevoir Dogs

theburiedlife
02-26-2008, 10:22 PM
I think the industry is starting to realize how much more comedic and creative potential Marijuana has over Alcohol.

In terms of writing material.

Ardentbiscuit
02-27-2008, 12:16 AM
I had totally forgotten about this tv show until someone did this you tube video...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5geC6TcKM7U

thelastgreatman
02-27-2008, 12:33 AM
... but have you seen the trailer? It looks amazing.

VVHubr4s7P0

Also, just for laughs, the new Pineapple Express Trailer was released.

SLfSLyojje0

Is that the giant warehouse that they put the Ark in? Kinda looks like it.

Also, Seth Rogen might be my favorite person ever.

rage patton
02-27-2008, 12:39 AM
I saw Charlie Bartlet tonight. It was good. That is all.

theburiedlife
02-27-2008, 12:40 AM
Is that the giant warehouse that they put the Ark in? Kinda looks like it.

Yeah its strikingly similar. They also referenced that warehouse on the poster I received at Comic-con.

Lemme take a picture with my shitty camera phone.

http://www.tmobilepictures.com/photos/photo31/f6/78/a916f6e57d7c.jpg?_rh=r8o84u1svbe9wvnmzjq2fw8g

breakjaw
02-27-2008, 12:57 AM
One of the crates in that preview reads "Roswell,New Mexico".Does this mean there is a vestige left from the crappy "Indiana Jones and the Little Green Men" script?

schoolofruckus
02-27-2008, 10:14 AM
The trailer for Charlie Bartlett annoyed the Holy Fuck out of me. Mainly that kid....from a glance, he seems like an absolutely atrocious actor. The over-annunciation and absolute lack of comfort with lines like "Well, duh, dude, this place sucks" would probably piss me off in the first 3 minutes of the film. Despite the always-welcome presence of Robert Downey Jr., I will not be giving it a shot.

I have heard that Kingdom of the Crystal Skull involves both the Raiders warehouse AND little green men. I'm open to either idea if they're handled in an intelligent/organic way. But this is not official info - I found out absolutely zero in the way of concrete dish when they shot here in September.

That Pineapple Express trailer was funnier than the others I'd seen. Fingers still crossed.

noisemachine
02-27-2008, 10:31 AM
This is an older one but I just watched this last night:
http://thecia.com.au/reviews/k/images/king-of-kong-a-fistful-of-quarters-poster-0.jpg
I loved it. A great non-depressing documentary in a time when it seems like 90% of the documentaries getting any attention are on the Iraq war or something politically based. I highly recommend it to anyone, especially if you love old arcade games.

theburiedlife
02-27-2008, 11:04 AM
Really? I thought it was terrible.

Well, ok maybe I'm being too harsh but it think the movie drones on about how miserable of lives those two contestants have (the judges also). The movie isn't sure whether or not it wants to be critical of the efforts by people who still play D.K. (who try and gain some sort of false justification to how they have wasted their lives) or if it actually embraces it.

The only thing I felt after the movie was the need to do something productive after watching the epic failure of the saga that is competitive arcade gaming.

PotVsKtl
02-27-2008, 01:56 PM
Really? I thought it was terrible.

Well, ok maybe I'm being too harsh but it think the movie drones on about how miserable of lives those two contestants have (the judges also). The movie isn't sure whether or not it wants to be critical of the efforts by people who still play D.K. (who try and gain some sort of false justification to how they have wasted their lives) or if it actually embraces it.

The only thing I felt after the movie was the need to do something productive after watching the epic failure of the saga that is competitive arcade gaming.

I think you're letting your own opinions color your commentary. I didn't get any condescension towards the characters out of the doc, at least as it relates to the overall subject of gaming. They were certainly nerds, but that's their own doing.

wmgaretjax
02-27-2008, 02:04 PM
Yeah, on the contrary I actually thought the doc was quite tender.

noisemachine
02-27-2008, 03:16 PM
The movie isn't sure whether or not it wants to be critical of the efforts by people who still play D.K. (who try and gain some sort of false justification to how they have wasted their lives) or if it actually embraces it.



I don't think it does either, and that wasn't really the point anyways. I think it does a great job of presenting the subject matter and following the rivalry of the two main characters. It builds suspense at the right moments and presents fairly the two main parties. Its left up to the viewer to make judgments about the players' lifestyles, etc.

PotVsKtl
02-27-2008, 03:31 PM
EBM854BTGL0

whynotsmile99
02-27-2008, 04:33 PM
I watched King of Kong yesterday as well and loved it. Thought it was really well done. If you have the dvd, you must watched the extended Mr. Awesome interview on the special features.

That guys insane. I love him. He talks about posting his phone number and address in Playgirl magazine and all these gay guys that called him up, including a big hollywood actor he will name when his comic book comes out

edit: what do you know, thanks youtube!

x3gW_91bjkg

theburiedlife
02-27-2008, 04:35 PM
I think you're letting your own opinions color your commentary.

No you're right. I'm a nerd and it was still hard to watch, i couldn't help myself.

theburiedlife
02-27-2008, 04:37 PM
I guess I'm just prone to documentaries actually having a slant on their subject matter that when one comes out that seems void of it I substitute my own.

BTW, the hot sauce guy beat Wiebe again. I checked Twin Galaxies.

schoolofruckus
02-27-2008, 04:38 PM
It looks like Where the Wild Things Are has really been delayed until October of 2009. Everyone try to remain calm.

theburiedlife
02-27-2008, 04:40 PM
I heard they might shoot a PG/13? movie, because it is too dark for children. I'm flustered how Hollywood is convinced that converting dark material into family fun films is a good idea.

Jerm05
02-27-2008, 05:17 PM
This poster deserves a nice, hearty fail.

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i277/MartinBlank9mm/Part%203/indy4-26feb-shia-poster.jpg

shia looks like corey feldman

downingthief
02-27-2008, 07:41 PM
rQgQblgKw8U

the best part is when the BeeGees pick up the coffin and start singing "Carry That Weight".

Damn. I remember seeing this in the theaters.

noisemachine
02-27-2008, 07:51 PM
I watched King of Kong yesterday as well and loved it. Thought it was really well done. If you have the dvd, you must watched the extended Mr. Awesome interview on the special features.

That guys insane. I love him. He talks about posting his phone number and address in Playgirl magazine and all these gay guys that called him up, including a big hollywood actor he will name when his comic book comes out

edit: what do you know, thanks youtube!

x3gW_91bjkg

Yeah, that is hilarious. There are a lot of great extended interviews, extra scenes and special features on the disc. Theres one that shows Steve, the director and a few others from the film doing Q&A sessions at various film festivals which was fun. On the "The Saga Continues" feature it says someone is working on a film script that follows the story. I would be interested to see if that is still in the works.