PDA

View Full Version : Schoolio's Movie Corner



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 [13] 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123

menikmati
10-07-2007, 04:32 PM
I bought The Goonies today, and I got The Jungle Book a few days ago.

full on idle
10-07-2007, 06:07 PM
Were you born when the Goonies came out? Love that movie.

I watched Zodiac and it was good. I loved the shots of the city, especially the time lapse shot of the transamerica pyramid going up. Also, the Chronicle building is right by my work so I recognized the street shots there too. They did good. I love Mark Ruffalo. The end.

roberto73
10-07-2007, 09:14 PM
I saw The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford today. I don't have much to add to what's already been said here, except to concur that it's really fucking great. Pitt and Affleck are terrific, and I was pretty happy to see Paul Schneider in such a prominent role. I've been a huge fan of his ever since David Gordon Green's All the Real Girls, and I'd love for this movie to catapult him onto the radar of other directors. Deakins' cinematography steals the show, though. Beautiful.

I also saw Into the Wild. I wanted it to knock me on my ass. It was good, but not ass-knockingly good. I thought structurally it was a little clumsy. Kraukauer makes it work in the book to cut back and forth between McCandless' time in Alaska and his journey through the West, but it doesn't always seem too fluid in the film. Like Assassination, there's some beautiful photography on display here, but I also got a little tired of the preponderance of slow-motion shots of Emile Hirsch either a) frolicking in the water all hunk-like, or b) starving. Hirsch is pretty great, though, doing some serious Christian Bale-style deterioration and making McCandless as sympathetic as he needs to be so half the audience doesn't see him as just some asshole kid who had daddy issues. Sean Penn made a strong movie, but I felt like it's haunting where it could have been revelatory.

Oh, and Across the Universe is the biggest mess since Apocalypse Now. That is all.

menikmati
10-07-2007, 09:24 PM
Were you born when the Goonies came out? Love that movie.

I'm not THAT young am I? It came out in 1985. I remember watching it all the time growing up.

wmgaretjax
10-07-2007, 09:55 PM
Try Into Great Silence

schoolofruckus
10-08-2007, 07:29 AM
See fucking Control already.

It's a stunning piece of work - a flawlessly acted study of deterioration in its own right. Ian Curtis may not have had as extravagant a backstory as other previously-biopic'ed rockstars like Jim Morrison, but his life as presented here is all the more tragic because the suffering he withstands is so ingrained in his personality as to be inexplicable. The black-and-white photography is every bit as tremendous as you would expect. The music scenes do a tremendous job of presenting Joy Division's music in all its moody glory, and showing the depths of despair that Curtis had to get to in order to perform. The sequence depicting the last 24 hours or so before Curtis kills himself is stunningly powerful - simply, patiently, and absolutely authentically nailing every last inch of the meltdown.

bug on your lip
10-08-2007, 07:39 AM
Fruck !

i want to see this movie so bad, & nowhere nears me yet

schoolofruckus
10-08-2007, 07:53 AM
If it makes you feel better, it's nowhere near anybody yet; last night's screening was just a sneak preview at the Cinematheque here. It opens in New York this weekend and in Los Angeles on 10/19. It's being distributed by the Weinstein Company though (as opposed to a small distributor), so I bet it hits most major cities across the country.

bug on your lip
10-08-2007, 07:56 AM
i just watched the trailer and now feel even worse

it looks stella

wmgaretjax
10-08-2007, 08:38 AM
See fucking Control already.


AH! Too much cool stuff is going on in the next couple months!

I'm seeing Brand upon the Brain this thursday. I'm excited, everyone here that worked on it has been waiting a long time for it to be brought here. It's playing at our local Cinerama theater with all the live antics, including Guy Maddin himself as the narrator. I'm pumped.

RotationSlimWang
10-08-2007, 09:24 AM
Oh, and Across the Universe is the biggest mess since Apocalypse Now. That is all.

I've seen the documentary so I'm familiar with what a disaster of a shoot Apocalypse was... but I don't think I've ever heard the movie itself referred to as a mess, let alone a mess the size of which one uses as a reference point. You didn't mean it like that, right?

wmgaretjax
10-08-2007, 09:26 AM
I read it that way too, I think Apocalypse Now is over-rated, but certainly not a disaster.

Has anyone seen the new Coppola trailer?

http://www.apple.com/trailers/sony/youthwithoutyouth/

who knows... He hasn't done anything good in a LONG time.

RotationSlimWang
10-08-2007, 10:54 AM
Apocalypse is easily in the all-time top ten. Jesus, people.

wmgaretjax
10-08-2007, 11:00 AM
Apocalypse is easily in the all-time top ten. Jesus, people.

That's what I mean about over-rated. While it might make the bottom end of a top-100 list, there is very little in the film that would allow it to push it's way into the top 10.

It's a great film. No doubt.

RotationSlimWang
10-08-2007, 11:36 AM
Charlie don't surf = automatic top ten

roberto73
10-08-2007, 01:24 PM
I love Apocaypse Now, Randy. But I also think it's a huge, sprawling, chaotic mess of a movie. That's one of its charms. As I was watching Across the Universe, I was reminded of Apocalypse in the sheer scope of what it tries to do, and how sloppily it does it. In the end, Universe's quality isn't anywhere close to that of Apocalypse's, but I can't think of any recent movies that try to do something this bold.

wmgaretjax
10-08-2007, 01:42 PM
I love Apocaypse Now, Randy. But I also think it's a huge, sprawling, chaotic mess of a movie. That's one of its charms. As I was watching Across the Universe, I was reminded of Apocalypse in the sheer scope of what it tries to do, and how sloppily it does it. In the end, Universe's quality isn't anywhere close to that of Apocalypse's, but I can't think of any recent movies that try to do something this bold.

There is nothing "bold" about Across the Universe. It's a traditional musical that pretends to be experimental, but rather, is simply a mess of a movie that relies far too much on it's trite plot. There are some visually interesting moments, but they are far from novel or compelling.

RotationSlimWang
10-08-2007, 02:16 PM
Apocalypse only felt sloppy to me at the end. The rest of it is the highest form of a road movie--or if you prefer, a Homer-esque Odyssey through a world that does a brilliant job of building a sense of utter chaos and madness in the viewer like few things else I can call to mind. It almost rivals the written effectiveness of Catch-22 at truly immersing the audience in the insanity of war. Yes, it does rather fall apart at the end--we've all probably seen Heart of Darkness, they didn't know how the fuck to end it, they let crazy-ass Marlon just ramble and ramble, etc.--but it still manages to crescendo into as unnerving an experience as anything else on celluloid.

Look, the motherfucker outdid Full Metal Jacket. He bested KUBRICK. Give the man his due, faults and all.

wmgaretjax
10-08-2007, 02:25 PM
Look, the motherfucker outdid Full Metal Jacket. He bested KUBRICK. Give the man his due, faults and all.

Why the hell are you comparing those movies. They share nothing in common besides being about the Vietnam War. That's like trying to compare Paths of Glory with Grand Illusion.

He gets due... Just not a top 10 spot (for Godfather either).

RotationSlimWang
10-08-2007, 02:52 PM
Um... actually I think they share some pretty similar themes besides just being set in Nam, although being set in Nam is reason enough for me. But they're about men driven to insanity by the complete absence of any moral compass, and they're executed rather pointedly to try to drag the viewer along with the characters into said insanity.

Not for Godfather I might bump to top twenty. You're a wacky cat though, Jared. It's not like Apocalypse is some cookie-cutter formula or anything. It's fucking lunacy.

schoolofruckus
10-08-2007, 04:09 PM
I fall somewhere in between Randy and Jared on Apocalypse Now - which is to say that I also love it. I think it's absolutely as good as Randy describes it, but I don't think it's quite top 25 for me (it narrowly missed my list when we all made them back in February or so). Looking now, I had The Godfather 1 & 2 at #22, and I would probably have Apocalypse in the high 20's/low 30's.

wmgaretjax
10-08-2007, 05:37 PM
nah, I think I'm being read wrong. I love the film. I simply think it's out-trumped by far too many other films to sit in the top 10. Great film. Not denying that. Love it. </>

RotationSlimWang
10-08-2007, 05:47 PM
I think I might be partial to Apocalypse Now because I have this thing in me that wants to experience shit like that. Like I'd risk my life to go through something that absolutely insane just to possibly come back out with the knowledge of what it's like to have seen that deeply into the proverbial "heart of darkness." But I hate humidity and heat, so instead of Nam or Iraq I just went to Newark and Camden and ended up knowing the taste of a gun barrel more than a couple times. In retrospect, I have to wonder what else could have possibly been driving me to that lifestyle. I mean the money and drugs were great, but I was 17, 18 fucking years old, and having my jaw pried open and a Glock shoved almost down my throat by a man I didn't doubt was capable of pulling the trigger... cringing from my teeth scraping against the metal... and for some fucking reason I WENT BACK. I could've bailed on all of that shit so easily, but for some reason that feeling that I'd been completely at the mercy of God's will for me to live or die made me go back. I wanted it more. Some of us want to get back in the jungle. =)

Or maybe I just liked having phallic things forced in my mouth--before one of you wags can get to it.

schoolofruckus
10-08-2007, 07:35 PM
No, Jared, I got the impression you thought it was great. I was just saying that everything Randy said about it was right, but I also have other films I would place above it on my all-time list - great though it is.

In other news, I found out when I'm seeing Southland Tales and 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days:

AFI Film Fest schedule for all the L.A. cats. (http://filmguide.afifest.com/tixSYS/2007/filmguide/title-detail.php)

wmgaretjax
10-08-2007, 07:52 PM
In other news, I found out when I'm seeing Southland Tales and 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days:
[/URL]

lucky bastard. not that I have to tell you... but, let us know what you think.

KungFuJoe
10-09-2007, 05:10 PM
No, Jared, I got the impression you thought it was great. I was just saying that everything Randy said about it was right, but I also have other films I would place above it on my all-time list - great though it is.

In other news, I found out when I'm seeing Southland Tales and 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days:

AFI Film Fest schedule for all the L.A. cats. (http://filmguide.afifest.com/tixSYS/2007/filmguide/title-detail.php)

Thanks for that link gabe. There are plenty of films on this schedule that I can't wait to see. I love the AFI Fest! Juno would be up there on my list, but for the price I can wait for that one to open elsewhere. You know I'm all over Secret Sunshine & Mad Detective. As well as Southland Tales, Margot at the Wedding, and 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days. And possiby the the Diving Bell & the Butterfly, among others. If you want to catch one of these screenings together let me know.

I am sad to see Across the Universe getting so much flack from people here. However I do understand why people would say it's a bit of a mess and the story may be a bit trite, as wmgaretjax puts it. I totally disagree that it's a traditional musical though. Not that I think it's wholly original, but it's certainly something that has not really been done before, although it is kind of a cross between Hair & Moulin Rouge. If you liked either of those films I suspect you can still enjoy this one. For me, I am more of an visual & aural person, so I can forgive a lot when it comes to story. Hence why I am madly in love with Zhang Yimous HERO. I think Across the Universe is more along this type of film, sans the martial arts of course. I really loved the way the Beatles music was incorporated into the film (minus Helter Skelter) & the performances by the actors. I found the visuals to be really stunning as well. I don't know what else to say to support this film. It may not be the greatest thing ever, but if you feeling in the mood for a bit of a feel good romance, while listening to classic Beatles tunes reshape by some beautiful new voices and watching some beautiful visuals then go see this film. It's really not all that bad.

wmgaretjax, enjoy Brand! Upon the Brain. I'm jealous you're getting to see it with Guy Maddin reading the narration! You're in for a treat. A friend of mine met Guy Madden at a screening at the Aero a while back & had nothing but great things to say about the man. Aparrently, he is a very down to earth genuine person, so I suggest trying to meet him after the perfomance if you're a fan. My pal shot the shit with him for well over a half hour & chewed his brain on many things film related. Interesting cat. Lovely filmmaker. Let us know what you think.

oh, and canexplain, thanks for bringing up Bandits. I love this film too. It's very underrated & features one of my favorite Cate Blanchett performances ever.

wmgaretjax
10-09-2007, 06:31 PM
yeah joe, he's nice, but neurotic. I met him on the set of the film ;-)

one of the reasons I'm way pumped to see it.

KungFuJoe
10-09-2007, 06:59 PM
yeah joe, he's nice, but neurotic. I met him on the set of the film ;-)

one of the reasons I'm way pumped to see it.


If I'm not mistaken that was filmed at a Studio in Seatle right? Do you work/live there? Sounded like an effing great place to make films!

wmgaretjax
10-09-2007, 08:26 PM
If I'm not mistaken that was filmed at a Studio in Seatle right? Do you work/live there? Sounded like an effing great place to make films!

yeah it was filmed with The Film Company in Seattle. I'm a student up here finishing up my undergraduate. It's a good film making community here, but it can be a little incestual. That's why BUtB was great, since it was an outside project.

mountmccabe
10-09-2007, 11:13 PM
And possiby the the Diving Bell & the Butterfly, among others.

I just got back from this.

Some French journalist and editor for Elle had a stroke and was left paralyzed so he wrote a book about it. The movie is about, his life after waking up from having his stroke. It was extremely well done. I am not sure what I can say without giving stuff away. It's not like there're big spoilers I'm afraid of giving away... it'sn't that kind of movie.

It isn't terribly pretty, partially because much of it is shown from his perspective and he has vision issues. It isn't a particularly happy movie but it is warm and rich and beautiful and strong. It is touching but I don't think it ever gets over sentimental.

It has a lot of humor to it and also a lot of blinking.

bballarl
10-09-2007, 11:29 PM
Yeah doesn't he communicate his memoir through blinking?

schoolofruckus
10-10-2007, 07:11 AM
Last night, Jennie and I watched "Mutual Appreciation", the second and most recent film from a young American independent filmmaker named Andrew Bujalski.

The film is a unique synergy between the sensibilities of John Cassavetes and Cameron Crowe, with a visual hint of Stranger Than Paradise - a naturalistic look at twentysomething New Yorkers and the romantic confusion between a musician and his friend's girlfriend. It's an honest, deceptively simple film that looks with insight and humor at a situation that it would be extremely easy to find oneself in. This isn't the kind of film where anything happens; it's all about observing these people, as the conversations and character interactions unspool with the rhythms of real life. According to Wikipedia, the main character is the singer of a band called Bishop Allen, and the music he plays in the film are his songs in real life. I've never heard this band before, but the songs in the movie were surprisingly pretty good. This would be a great gateway film if you're trying to get someone into naturalistic cinema.

mountmccabe
10-10-2007, 07:34 AM
According to Wikipedia, the main character is the singer of a band called Bishop Allen, and the music he plays in the film are his songs in real life. I've never heard this band before, but the songs in the movie were surprisingly pretty good.

Yablo has talked about them quite a bit.

Hannahrain
10-10-2007, 07:36 AM
Shouldn't one of you old-timers go start york707 a birthday thread? I'd do it, but we haven't ever really interacted.

mountmccabe
10-10-2007, 08:23 AM
I was slowly working into it with the baiting and such. It's a spektakula of sorts.

full on idle
10-10-2007, 09:08 AM
I see what you were doing.

What a clash of destinies! Gabe reviews the Bishop Allen movie on York's birthday! SpekTACULAAAAAAaaa

bug on your lip
10-10-2007, 09:08 AM
don't use my words in vain fringe

full on idle
10-10-2007, 09:29 AM
Your mom's fringe.

mountmccabe
10-10-2007, 10:59 AM
Yeah doesn't he communicate his memoir through blinking?

Yes.



don't use my words in vain fringe

If I weren't committed to the York spektakula this'd be my new sig.

Jenniehoo
10-10-2007, 01:48 PM
Hey, why does John get to be Dark Lord?

mountmccabe
10-10-2007, 02:28 PM
I was pretty convinced you were knocked up when I first saw your current member title.

Jenniehoo
10-10-2007, 03:30 PM
That's something a dark lord would say.

PotVsKtl
10-10-2007, 03:36 PM
I watched about half of the shorts on Best of RESFEST Vol. 1. They fucking sucked. END OF FUCKING STORY.

wmgaretjax
10-10-2007, 07:24 PM
I watched about half of the shorts on Best of RESFEST Vol. 1. They fucking sucked. END OF FUCKING STORY.

i hate the resfest videos.

mountmccabe
10-10-2007, 08:51 PM
One last thing - make sure you do see Hotel Chevalier in conjunction with this movie, preferably right before heading out to the theater. You could get Darjeeling without it, absolutely....but when you see it, and the way it enhances the film, you'll know you would have been missing something to do so. If any of you haven't seen it, go on the iTunes store and search for it. It's free and it should be easy to find.

I just saw Darjeeling and Hotel Chevalier ran just before. Is this not how it was at your screening? They ran the whole thing, complete with credits and then the Fox Searchlights bit came up.

I enjoyed it quite a bit. I'mn't sure what I could say beyond what Gabe said, though. It is the story of three brothers who're carrying around a lot of baggage. At times I was a little concerned that it would go a trite, overly easy route but it pushed on.

And I need to rewatch his other movies to see if they all felt this filmed. I know Gabe was saying that the sets and locations felt more natural but the camera-work was at times almost distractingly artificial. I can't but believe that the slight bumpiness to the long pans, along with the stops and starts, were designed but I'm puzzled as to why.

But yeah, good stuff.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-11-2007, 06:06 AM
Went to the cinema in with my girlfriend last night and ended up seeing "The Heartbreak Kid", which was the cinematic equivalent of candy floss; perfectly enjoyable once in a while but certainly not something I'd want to endure too often. Also, bad for your teeth.

On walking to my seat, there was a sign on the door saying "WARNING: THERE IS A PIGEON IN SCREEN 2". Thing is, the sign was taped ON TO THE DOOR OF SCREEN 2, so you only saw it as you were about to go in to see the film, and you'd already bought your ticket, so it was too late to turn back. What are you supposed to do with that information then? I mean, I empathise with the owners of the cinema - it must be a nightmare trying to get a pigeon out of the room, and I've got no idea how you'd even begin to tackle such a problem - but surely they could give their customers a bit more notice? Are you allowed to go back to the front desk and say "Look, I want a refund, I'm not watching 'The Heartbreak Kid' if there's a fucking pigeon present" or what? Me, I sat there in silence, looking anxiously around for an errant pigeon in the rafters, but I couldn't spot him / her / it at all. I felt relieved I didn't have any popcorn, though. If I was a pigeon trapped in a cinema I'd swoop down and steal people's popcorn, you see. Or shit on their heads. Luckily that didn't happen, though, and I left the cinema without having been the latest victim of a fly-by pigeon attack. Thank God I hadn't gone to see "The Birds", though.

amyzzz
10-11-2007, 06:33 AM
I've just gone back 3 or 4 pages. Has anyone seen Eastern Promises? I liked it quite a bit. Had to close my eyes during the steam room scene. Fine acting by Viggo.

roberto73
10-11-2007, 07:40 AM
I've just gone back 3 or 4 pages. Has anyone seen Eastern Promises? I liked it quite a bit. Had to close my eyes during the steam room scene. Fine acting by Viggo.

I'm seeing Eastern Promises tomorrow.

The Darjeeling Limited is on the menu today, which I'm seeing just before I take my girlfriend to see the musical Wicked for her birthday. I'm hoping the movie will give me enough to think about so that I'm able to blissfully ignore what's on stage.

amyzzz
10-11-2007, 07:48 AM
I read the book Wicked. It was rather horrible.

mountmccabe
10-11-2007, 08:18 AM
On walking to my seat, there was a sign on the door saying "WARNING: THERE IS A PIGEON IN SCREEN 2".

I kinda wanna put signs like that in random places. I don't want to put pigeons or whatever listed animal in the listed place but yeah.

schoolofruckus
10-11-2007, 08:20 AM
John - I did see Chevalier in the cinema right before Darjeeling, but I thought it was only playing that way because it was an advance, Wes Anderson-attended preview. Did you see it that way at a normal screening? I'd be thrilled if they were playing the short and the feature together at every engagement. And the reason why I remarked on the film's feel of authenticity is precisely because that's in relation to previous Wes Anderson films. I would dare say he makes some of the most carefully-composed films of anyone in the world right now; that's most people's problems with Royal Tennenbaums and especially Life Aquatic is that they feel like museum exhibits, and that the artificiality renders them devoid of emotion. I completely disagree for the record - and found both films as engaging on a character level as they are stylistically - but that's why I think this film will bring back people who haev turned against him recently.

Amy - I haven't seen Eastern Promises yet, but I plan on doing so very, very soon.

mountmccabe
10-11-2007, 08:25 AM
John - I did see Chevalier in the cinema right before Darjeeling, but I thought it was only playing that way because it was an advance, Wes Anderson-attended preview. Did you see it that way at a normal screening? I'd be thrilled if they were playing the short and the feature together at every engagement.

I was at an advance, non-Wes Anderson attended preview. At least I don't have any reason to think he was there.

And I agree; it makes a good introduction to the film. So I'm assuming the 91 minute running time for Darjeeling only count Part 2? Because even adding the 13 minutes of Chevalier you've still got just a standard length running time.

schoolofruckus
10-11-2007, 08:36 AM
Also, I saw an Antonioni double-header last night at the New Beverly - Il Grido, which I hadn't seen previously, and Zabriskie Point, which I caught on video and wanted to see in the theater and in CinemaScope.

Il Grido was decent....certainly not bad, but probably the least impressive Antonioni film I've ever seen. It's about a guy who, after seven years and one daughter, is dumped by his lover - a married woman who has recently found out that her husband has died abroad - and flees the town with child in tow. They proceed to wander from place to place, with Dad trying to figure out where and how to put their life back together, all the while meeting various different women along the way. Some of these scenes are engaging, but the film's overall progression is extremely conventional by Antonioni standards. I was also pretty tired during this screening, and thus my patience wasn't at its most plentiful. However, the blistering ending redeems everything, and thus, I'm going to need to watch this one again.

Zabriskie Point was, of course, glorious....I loved it on video, but in the cinema it was another world. Marvelous early Pink Floyd score, gorgeous compositions, angry condemnation of the corporatization of America, and one of the most weirdly cathartic endings in film. Can someone please snap up the DVD rights and put this out already? It's an MGM release, so I'm guessing either Sony (new owners of MGM) or Warner Bros. (former owners of MGM home video releases) have it; unfortunately these are the two studios most adverse to selling their titles to Criterion.

schoolofruckus
10-11-2007, 08:43 AM
I was at an advance, non-Wes Anderson attended preview. At least I don't have any reason to think he was there.

And I agree; it makes a good introduction to the film. So I'm assuming the 91 minute running time for Darjeeling only count Part 2? Because even adding the 13 minutes of Chevalier you've still got just a standard length running time.

Okay. See, I've been told that they were going to do the double-bill thing at different individual showings around the country (not necessarily ones that Wes will be there for), but not in general release. You're right, though - Darjeeling is short enough that they should be packaging them together always. At least Wes' standing deal with Criterion guarantees that Chevalier will be available on the DVD.

breakjaw
10-11-2007, 09:51 AM
Forgive me if this has already been posted,but there was an excellent article in the NY Times about I'm Not There:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2151/1509596764_c75214735b_o.jpg (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/07/magazine/07Haynes.html?_r=2&oref=slogin&pagewanted=all&oref=slogin)
I think I want to see this now more than any other film I can think of.

full on idle
10-11-2007, 10:20 AM
Me too, Breakjaw. We're going to Darjeeling tonight though. I am excited.

breakjaw
10-11-2007, 10:29 AM
If you go to the article,make sure and watch the slideshow.It's narrated by Haynes,with great pictures of Dylan and stills from the movie.The 8 1/2 reference is funny.

dorkfish
10-11-2007, 03:58 PM
Um, Greg, we talked about that movie 15 pages ago...

schoolofruckus
10-12-2007, 07:07 AM
I've been excited to see Juno when it comes out this winter, but I've also been a little trepedatious. It's got signs of being this year's quirky indie-comedy-with-heart that everyone flocks to in order to feel like their hip with non-studio fare. These films can be good (Little Miss Sunshine), mediocre (Garden State), or terrible (Napoleon Dynamite), but I can't think of one I would actually consider great. Nevertheless, it does have an appealing cast, with Ellen Page (the two-faced, nut-slicing teen fromHard Candy) and Michael Cera (no introduction necessary) as two teenagers who accidentally conceive and must now figure out a course of action. It's also got Jason Bateman and Dwight from "The Office".

Anyway, here's the trailer - judge for yourself.

http://www.apple.com/trailers/fox_searchlight/juno/trailer/

Stefinitely Maybe
10-12-2007, 07:09 AM
+5 for using the word trepidacious.
-5 for saying Napoleon Dynamite was terrible.

wmgaretjax
10-12-2007, 10:04 AM
Brand Upon the Brain was mindblowing.

Guy Maddin narrating it himself was fantastic. I have nothing bad to say about this film. It's damn near perfect, and the live presentation is something that will stick with me through future viewings.

See this movie.

KungFuJoe
10-12-2007, 10:57 AM
Brand Upon the Brain was mindblowing.

Guy Maddin narrating it himself was fantastic. I have nothing bad to say about this film. It's damn near perfect, and the live presentation is something that will stick with me through future viewings.

See this movie.

I wish the tour would continue & Guy Maddin would return to L.A. with it again. It truly was a wonderful experience. Although i've seen other films by Guy, it was unlike anything I have ever seen before. It's no question to me that he is the most daring & interesting film maker working today. Now I'm jealous. I want to see it again!

KungFuJoe
10-14-2007, 04:25 PM
Just got back from Darjelling Limited. It was ok. I enjoyed it for the most part, but it's definately my least favorite of his films. For those that don't know, Hotel Chavelier was not playing before hand, so definately watch it online before you head out to see this flick. They showed a brief advert for the websit before the film started though. That's it.

Benis23
10-14-2007, 10:19 PM
I agree - Darjeeling is also my least favorite of Wes Anderson's films so far. It was stylish, artistic and intermittently funny, but I really felt like the plot was thin and the characters were underdeveloped. By the end of the movie, I was getting tired of that quippy, absurd dialogue that has nothing to do with the plot or the characters.

full on idle
10-14-2007, 11:00 PM
I would peg the "quippy dialogue" as style, but I didn't go to film school.

PotVsKtl
10-15-2007, 09:52 AM
Darjeeling is all style. Good style. The lessons are trite and the emotions are totally surface. This is intentional. I mean seriously, "I still have a lot of healing to do?" You think Anderson doesn't know what a ridiculous line that is? It's a modern screwball comedy, basically. Overlapping dialogue, etc. Try to tell me I'm wrong. Your whole face is a gutter.

Yablonowitz
10-15-2007, 11:03 AM
+5 for using the word trepidacious.
-5 for saying Napoleon Dynamite was terrible.

-10 for suggesting Napoleon Dynamite was anything but terrible.

full on idle
10-15-2007, 11:10 AM
Darjeeling is all style. Good style. The lessons are trite and the emotions are totally surface. This is intentional. I mean seriously, "I still have a lot of healing to do?" You think Anderson doesn't know what a ridiculous line that is? It's a modern screwball comedy, basically. Overlapping dialogue, etc. Try to tell me I'm wrong. Your whole face is a gutter.

Can we at least say a modern screwball comedy with a heart of gold.?

Because, come on.

Yablonowitz
10-15-2007, 11:12 AM
No way Pot would approve "heart of gold" as a descriptor to any movie. Not without sarcasm.

mountmccabe
10-15-2007, 11:19 AM
I've been excited to see Juno when it comes out this winter, but I've also been a little trepedatious. It's got signs of being this year's quirky indie-comedy-with-heart that everyone flocks to in order to feel like their hip with non-studio fare. These films can be good (Little Miss Sunshine), mediocre (Garden State), or terrible (Napoleon Dynamite), but I can't think of one I would actually consider great. Nevertheless, it does have an appealing cast, with Ellen Page (the two-faced, nut-slicing teen fromHard Candy) and Michael Cera (no introduction necessary) as two teenagers who accidentally conceive and must now figure out a course of action. It's also got Jason Bateman and Dwight from "The Office".

Anyway, here's the trailer - judge for yourself.

http://www.apple.com/trailers/fox_searchlight/juno/trailer/

Since Yabs is resurrecting old business I figured I'd follow suit. That trailer has a song by Kimya Dawson in it! Also I'mn't sure I'm expecting much out of this. Ellen seems mostly tried throughout the trailer... though maybe that's because of the pregnancy.

Also I saw Little Miss Sunshine last week for the first time. It was OK. It had some decent parts but it only once rose above what it was and actually had me excited.

Dwayne was a mostly ridiculous set up of a character; Nietzsche had nothing to do with anything; it was never worked in. Same with Frank and Proust. Nietzsche just stood for angst and Proust for weirdness. That sort of thing bugs me; there's nothing organic about it.

PotVsKtl
10-15-2007, 12:07 PM
http://thewallofsound.files.wordpress.com/2007/05/heartofgold-tm.jpg

Benis23
10-15-2007, 12:23 PM
Your whole face is a gutter.

What does that mean?

KungFuJoe
10-15-2007, 12:25 PM
Darjeeling is all style. Good style. The lessons are trite and the emotions are totally surface. This is intentional. I mean seriously, "I still have a lot of healing to do?" You think Anderson doesn't know what a ridiculous line that is? It's a modern screwball comedy, basically. Overlapping dialogue, etc. Try to tell me I'm wrong. Your whole face is a gutter.


I agree with you Pot, but that was somewhat of my problem with the film. It was focused a little too much on the style & less on the characters. Sure, it's a modern day screwball comedy, but it tries to be much more than that. It succeeds for the most part, but falls flat a lot along the way. It's not that I didn't like it, but at times it seemed as if I was simply watching cardboard cutouts of these characters dancing across a painted background and that is why I liked it less than his previous works. Granted, I will probably grow more fond of this film upon additional viewings because Anderson's style is so unique and charming. However, all this talk of screwball comedies kind of makes me want to just go and watch silly films like this one.

ZeovwuGknkw

RotationSlimWang
10-15-2007, 12:35 PM
Wow Joe, I haven't seen or thought about Brain Donors in a coon's age, but it's the only instance of Three Stooges-esque humor that I actually enjoyed.

full on idle
10-15-2007, 12:39 PM
http://thewallofsound.files.wordpress.com/2007/05/heartofgold-tm.jpg

Dig it, Yablo. I'm pretty sure this means I win.

KungFuJoe
10-15-2007, 01:02 PM
Wow Joe, I haven't seen or thought about Brain Donors in a coon's age, but it's the only instance of Three Stooges-esque humor that I actually enjoyed.


Neither have I, but for some reason it came to mind today. my friends & I use to quote the shit out of this flick when we were youngens. John Tuttoro cracked my shit up.

J~$$$
10-15-2007, 02:08 PM
Im going to see a movie about a Font tonight.

Courtney
10-15-2007, 02:10 PM
Helvetica hells yes.

J~$$$
10-15-2007, 02:12 PM
Its hosted by the director.

Courtney
10-15-2007, 02:13 PM
Awesome.

Also if anyone has a lot a lot of free time, please tell me which of these 193 films (http://hawaii.bside.com/?_view=_films) to go see.

J~$$$
10-15-2007, 02:22 PM
emo.
Flight of the Red Balloon.

I would like to see these.
I Love Hip Hop in Morocco
DMZ

That film fest looks cool.

Courtney
10-15-2007, 02:33 PM
Hey cool thanks. I kinda want to see everything, which might pose a problem.

J~$$$
10-15-2007, 02:37 PM
The Kite Runner

Sweet I heard those kite fights are insane.i5S47aSlezs&mode

Courtney
10-15-2007, 02:44 PM
I pretty much hated that book and I'm holding my grudge when it comes to the movie. The book was a piece of emotionally manipulative, cloying sap.

TomAz
10-15-2007, 02:45 PM
I pretty much hated that book and I'm holding my grudge when it comes to the movie. The book was a piece of emotionally manipulative, cloying sap.

The first 3/4ths of the book are good, I thought. but the last bit.. one plot twist after another, one convenient coincidence after another.. I hear ya.

J~$$$
10-15-2007, 02:58 PM
This one sounds really interesting too...

Wonders Are Many: The Making of Doctor Atomic

wmgaretjax
10-15-2007, 03:04 PM
See The Man From London, I cannot stress this enough.

Others: Control (Joy Division biopic) and Nomad Tx (nomadic music documentary I saw, that was quite good)

But please, see The Man From London... Relay what you think here if you do. Bela Tarr is one of the greatest living film makers.

mountmccabe
10-15-2007, 03:27 PM
I vote for Control.

And also The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. It was directed by Julian Schnabel! It's the only film at the fest that I've actually seen. This festival is much, much bigger than the SIFF. So basically you win.

And Eraserhead. It has John Goodman in it.

They've got Helvetica which does look interesting.

Also Invisible City. It is a documentary about people making documentaries about Singapore.

Jenniehoo
10-15-2007, 05:20 PM
And Eraserhead. It has John Goodman in it.

Is this funny?

schoolofruckus
10-15-2007, 06:35 PM
"Control" is, I can guarantee you, one of the best movies you'll see this year. Especially if you like Joy Division.

"The Man From London" has to be awesome. I wish a US distributor would buy it already.

"Eraserhead" for nostalgic fun.

I heard "Jellyfish" was good.

Skip "DMZ" and just watch "JSA", which is about the same shit and is almost certainly better.


I watched Kubrick's "Lolita" last night. I liked it, but it was definitely second-tier by his standards. Still somewhat twisted considering the censorial constraints under which it was made. Peter Sellers is awesome.

roberto73
10-18-2007, 08:27 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v475/insomniacmonty/JohnRamboPoster-thumb.jpg

Shame it's being released too late for Oscar consideration ...

TomAz
10-18-2007, 09:21 AM
I watched Kubrick's "Lolita" last night. I liked it, but it was definitely second-tier by his standards. Still somewhat twisted considering the censorial constraints under which it was made. Peter Sellers is awesome.

I watched that a few weeks ago. you really can feel the censor's presence. but both Sellers and Mason are brilliant in it, I thought.

Down Rodeo
10-18-2007, 10:51 AM
I watched Bergman's Wild Strawberries last night. It's an excellent, contemplative movie. For those who haven't seen it or heard of it, it's about an old professor who travels to receive an honorary degree and along the way, he encounters people that bring back memories and hallucinations from his past. He realizes that he's made choices that have given his life very little meaning, and he's afraid he may have squandered his opportunities to make things right. At the end, he makes peace with his past and seems to redeem himself. Overall, it was very insightful and serious in typical Bergman fashion. The man was a genius.

KungFuJoe
10-18-2007, 11:54 AM
Awesome.

Also if anyone has a lot a lot of free time, please tell me which of these 193 films (http://hawaii.bside.com/?_view=_films) to go see.


Asian Cinema is my forte and I'm sad to admit I have not heard of any of the films listed in the Extreme Asia section. I can offer my thoughts though if you are interested in Asian Cinema.

I would definately go see EPITAPH! imo, South Korea is the most exciting region producing films these days. This film looks to keep that tradition going. Apparently one of the directors was AD for Park Chan-Wook on Oldboy & Sympathy for Mr Vengeance, two films that would make my top ten list for films made in the past decade. It certainly looks like he has learned from one of cinemas masters and being that we are approaching Halloween this appears to be a film you do not want to miss. Especially if you are a horror fan. G2bvDeG8ojI

2. Invisible Target, on the other hand, will probably be cheesy as hell since it's directed by Benny Chan and one of it's stars is Nicolas Tse (consider him the Freddy Prince Jr. of China w/ slightly more talent and a lot more charisma). However, if your in the mood for a mindless adrennaline pumping action film this should be the one since it stars one of the greatest young martial artists working today, Wu Jing. I would go see this for sure, but that's me. It could be fun with the right crowd.

the other films in this series sound fairly interesting to me as well, but I have no comments to offer on them. One thing is for certain though. Now that I've learned about Epitaph I am actively seeking it out and will hopefully find myself a copy before the end of the month.

PotVsKtl
10-18-2007, 11:58 AM
Fucking nice. Thanks Joe.

KungFuJoe
10-18-2007, 12:15 PM
no prob. As I'm reading more into this fest I see it very heavily features Asian cinema. One of it's Gala's is the John Woo produced remake of his film "Bullet in the Head" entitled "Blood Brothers". As much as I fear the worst for this film I would be very interested in seeing it.

chrislasf
10-18-2007, 12:52 PM
Oh Richard Kelly thinks he can take on Mr Magoriums Wonder Emporium, does he? WE'LL SHOW HIM!!!



Southland Tales Delayed Again
Rafe Telch
Cinemablend
October 17, 2007

Richard Kelly fans have been waiting for the next film from the Donnie Darko director for a while now. Itís been over a year since his next picture, Southland Tales was screened at Cannes to mixed reviews, sending it back to the editing room for another pass. It appears weíre going to have to wait a little bit longerÖ thankfully only one more week though.

Kelly announced on his MySpace blog that Southland Tales has been pushed back another week, from November 9th to November 16th (actually the 14th in New York and L.A. with a wide expansion on Friday). The reason given is that this is a strategic move that would help the film. Basically theyíre saying, it canít take on Vince Vaughn in Fred Claus but they hope it can beat an animated Beowulf and Dustin Hoffman in Mr. Magoriumís Wonder Emporium.

Hopefully this one week move will be the last one for Southland Tales. Iíve been waiting for quite a while to see Kellyís next picture and Iím tired of waiting. Frankly, a lot of us are. Thankfully, some advance screenings are being set up in select cities and universities, with a schedule promised by Kelly soon.

full on idle
10-18-2007, 12:58 PM
fucking Fred Claus.

chrislasf
10-18-2007, 01:12 PM
PG and shit. Fuck a PG movie.

PotVsKtl
10-18-2007, 01:14 PM
PG and shit. Fuck a PG movie.

I'd like to see you say that to Gremlins' face.

Tylerdurden31
10-18-2007, 01:16 PM
Days of Being Wild...never seen it...have wanted to. Worth seeing?

chrislasf
10-18-2007, 01:20 PM
I aint scared....

XACDNcj50Zk

KungFuJoe
10-18-2007, 10:31 PM
Days of Being Wild...never seen it...have wanted to. Worth seeing?

It's worth seeing if you're a fan of Wong Kar Wai's, but more importantly his films In The Mood For Love & 2046. If you haven't seen either of those films I would reccomend watching In The Mood For Love first, then going back to Days of Being Wild & finishing off with 2046. I say this because I think it took me like 4 tries to actually make it through the whole Days of Being Wild film. It bored me to tears. It's not bad per se, but very slow. Not that the others move fast, but this one is also less visually stimulating than the others. Drink enough coffee.

Courtney
10-19-2007, 04:18 PM
emo.
Flight of the Red Balloon.

I would like to see these.
I Love Hip Hop in Morocco
DMZ

That film fest looks cool.


See The Man From London, I cannot stress this enough.

Others: Control (Joy Division biopic) and Nomad Tx (nomadic music documentary I saw, that was quite good)

But please, see The Man From London... Relay what you think here if you do. Bela Tarr is one of the greatest living film makers.


I vote for Control.

And also The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. It was directed by Julian Schnabel! It's the only film at the fest that I've actually seen. This festival is much, much bigger than the SIFF. So basically you win.

And Eraserhead. It has John Goodman in it.

They've got Helvetica which does look interesting.

Also Invisible City. It is a documentary about people making documentaries about Singapore.


"Control" is, I can guarantee you, one of the best movies you'll see this year. Especially if you like Joy Division.

"The Man From London" has to be awesome. I wish a US distributor would buy it already.

"Eraserhead" for nostalgic fun.

I heard "Jellyfish" was good.

Skip "DMZ" and just watch "JSA", which is about the same shit and is almost certainly better.


Asian Cinema is my forte and I'm sad to admit I have not heard of any of the films listed in the Extreme Asia section. I can offer my thoughts though if you are interested in Asian Cinema.

I would definately go see EPITAPH! imo, South Korea is the most exciting region producing films these days. This film looks to keep that tradition going. Apparently one of the directors was AD for Park Chan-Wook on Oldboy & Sympathy for Mr Vengeance, two films that would make my top ten list for films made in the past decade. It certainly looks like he has learned from one of cinemas masters and being that we are approaching Halloween this appears to be a film you do not want to miss. Especially if you are a horror fan. G2bvDeG8ojI

2. Invisible Target, on the other hand, will probably be cheesy as hell since it's directed by Benny Chan and one of it's stars is Nicolas Tse (consider him the Freddy Prince Jr. of China w/ slightly more talent and a lot more charisma). However, if your in the mood for a mindless adrennaline pumping action film this should be the one since it stars one of the greatest young martial artists working today, Wu Jing. I would go see this for sure, but that's me. It could be fun with the right crowd.

the other films in this series sound fairly interesting to me as well, but I have no comments to offer on them. One thing is for certain though. Now that I've learned about Epitaph I am actively seeking it out and will hopefully find myself a copy before the end of the month.

Hey thank you for the recommendations Justin, Jared, John, Gabe and Joe. Sadly Flight of the Red Balloon, Control, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly and Helvetica all conflict with prior commitments. And Eraserhead I've already seen and is excellent. But I got tickets to The Man From London and Epitaph, so yay! Also a few others. Will report back.

KungFuJoe
10-19-2007, 10:16 PM
No problem Courtney. I hope Epitaph is good. I haven't found a copy of it yet for myself to watch, but did snag one of Invisible Target and am about to watch that. I was going through the list of films playing at your fest, it's got a great lineup. Definately report back.

One film that's playing there that opens in L.A. next week is "Finishing the Game", Justin Lin's new film about the search for the new Bruce Lee in order to finish Game of Death. I think this film looks hilarious and am very happy to actually be excited to see another film by Lin. After the success of "Better Luck Tomorrow" (which i loved) Hollywood kind of gobbled him up and had him churn out less interesting films in "Annapolis" & "Fast & the Furious Tokyo Drift". I don't blame him for taking those paychecks, but it's really nice to see that he might be returning to form.

schoolofruckus
10-20-2007, 09:11 AM
I do blame him. I may never watch another film he does.

At least he seems to have abandoned the horribly ill-advised idea of remaking "OldBoy" in English.

bballarl
10-20-2007, 09:46 AM
Gabe:

Name five movies I should see that are considered classics. Let's say, one from each decade from the 60s till the current one. I have seen very few of the so-called classics, though I have seen "The Godfather" and its sequels.

schoolofruckus
10-20-2007, 10:24 AM
I'm going to keep this to English-language films. Let me know if you want foreign entries.

60's: Blow-Up

(Note: I think you would really love this movie. It's based in mod London and it's got a score by Herbie Hancock).

70's: Taxi Driver

(This one was the hardest of all. "A Clockwork Orange" is my favorite movie, and I could have easily gone with "Straw Dogs", "Killing of a Chinese Bookie", "A Woman Under the Influence", "Network", "Annie Hall", "Apocalypse Now", or a hundred others. But I'm giving you "Taxi Driver" because it was one of the first 70's films I saw.)

80's: Do the Right Thing

90's: Buffalo '66

(Obviously.)

00's: Mysterious Skin

(I'm trying to pick one I doubt you've seen. This isn't the best movie of the decade, but it's a fantastic film that I think you should see.)

mountmccabe
10-20-2007, 10:28 AM
I have only seen two of those.

bballarl
10-20-2007, 10:29 AM
Maybe you should watch some too. Then we can have a panel discussion.

KungFuJoe
10-20-2007, 10:58 AM
I do blame him. I may never watch another film he does.

At least he seems to have abandoned the horribly ill-advised idea of remaking "OldBoy" in English.

Fair enough. I usually would feel the same way, but as much as I liked "Better Luck Tommorrow" I never thought of him as being the next Coen Brothers or Jarmusch. Sure he sold out where as he could have kept it real like David Gorden Green, but I'm not actually trying to defend him here. I'm just saying I respect the way he broke into the biz and can forgive a ***** for making some cash. His new film looks fun and I'm looking foward to seeing it.


ps: Good nod to "Straw Dogs" Gabe. That is an incredible film! did you hear there wer talks about a remake of that as well? That would be far worse than an Oldboy remake.

PotVsKtl
10-20-2007, 11:31 AM
I am inserting myself into this game as the coordinator of round two action. In round two we include a backup "If You Haven't Seen This Already I Ought To Slap You But I Guess Just Watch It Instead You Pusillanimous Jerkoff" title. There is also an unlockable hidden bonus in each stage.

Sixties: Bonnie and Clyde
Backup: Night of the Living Dead
Bonus: True Grit

Seventies: Chinatown
Backup: Saturday Night Fever
Bonus: Bad News Bears

Eighties: Elephant Man
Backup: Sid and Nancy
Bonus: The Last Dragon

Nineties: Short Cuts
Backup: Ed Wood
Bonus: Gummo

Oughts: (disqualified)
Backup: Secretary
Bonus: Hedwig & the Angry Inch

mountmccabe
10-20-2007, 11:44 AM
Here I have already made it to the backup everywhen but the 80s. And the 90s I'm up to the bonus round.


Also I agree Andrew. Also I feel we need to audition more for our panel.

full on idle
10-20-2007, 11:51 AM
I want to watch movies.

menikmati
10-20-2007, 12:02 PM
Thirties: Our Daily Bread, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, King Kong

Forties: Citizen Kane, The Grapes of Wrath, My Darling Clementine

schoolofruckus
10-20-2007, 01:09 PM
Fair enough. I usually would feel the same way, but as much as I liked "Better Luck Tommorrow" I never thought of him as being the next Coen Brothers or Jarmusch. Sure he sold out where as he could have kept it real like David Gorden Green, but I'm not actually trying to defend him here. I'm just saying I respect the way he broke into the biz and can forgive a ***** for making some cash. His new film looks fun and I'm looking foward to seeing it.


ps: Good nod to "Straw Dogs" Gabe. That is an incredible film! did you hear there wer talks about a remake of that as well? That would be far worse than an Oldboy remake.

I know some people who think David Gordon Green sold out by doing "Undertow". Fucking ridiculous. All of the stuff I've seen by him so far is terrific. His new one - "Snow Angels" - got picked up by Warner Independent and according to their website, it will be out in March. And have you heard about the one he just finished shooting? "The Pineapple Express", a stoner action-comedy written by and starring Seth Rogen and James Franco. I can't WAIT to see what that will be like.

And yes, I have heard (with great displeasure) about the "Straw Dogs" remake. Actual quote from Rod Lurie, the fool who is going to attempt to write and direct it:


"It's an interesting film, isn't it? But it was pretty much killed by a two-second moment on screen where his wife is being raped and she smiles. That was the end of that movie. You can be certain that she's not going to be smiling in the rape in my film. I was a critic for years, and very often our reviews will say, 'Well, if he had done this, it would have been a better film.' I look at 'Straw Dogs' as a very imperfect movie. It's a little bit slow and it's themes are a little bit murky. There are some amazing moments and it's a very satisfying movie, but you sort of look at what can be improved upon now. It may seem very arrogant to say, 'We can improve upon Peckinpah.' I can never improve upon the best of Peckinpah. I would never remake 'The Wild Bunch' but this is a film that I think he was a little lazy on, and it's a fascinating story. What I really want to do is make a movie about what it means to be a bully, how easy it is to become a bully, and how decency is defined I think by not being a bully when you have the opportunity to be one."

Translation: This is going to be an unqualified disaster.

Courtney
10-20-2007, 01:20 PM
So basically Rod Lurie wants to make a Straw Dogs without misogyny or sadism? That seems to negate a whole hell of a lot of what the original film hinges on. And will most likely make for a less effective film.

That said, Straw Dogs is the only film that I actually physically could not sit and watch all the way through in one go because I found it so disturbing. I'm not sure I would want to see it again in any form.

Yablonowitz
10-20-2007, 06:38 PM
Sorry to interrupt this foreign film, art house masturbation discussion thread - but Michael Clayton may well be the best big studio movie out this year. I just saw it and I don't see any mention in the last five pages, so I'm mentioning it now. Some very fine acting and interesting storytelling with a heart of fucking gold, you cocksuckers. Tom Wilkinson is so fucking good in this. And I've slowly grown to really love George Clooney. I don't think he has a great deal of range, but he plays his usual character type expertly. Anyway, I'd like to end this with a fuck you to anyone who says anything bad about it.

Fuck you.

PS - Rented Zodiac and thought it was nearly as good of a major studio production as Michael Clayton.

PPS - Fuck you again.

Yablonowitz
10-20-2007, 08:00 PM
I'd like to further add that I will watch any movie with Sydney Fucking Pollack in it no matter how shitty it is. God damn. Sydney Pollack. Talk about fucking presence. Why he wasted so much of his years directing is beyond me.

roberto73
10-21-2007, 10:01 AM
You're not alone, Yablo. I loved Michael Clayton. For me, it'll be up there at the end of the year with The Assassination of Jesse James and (I'm assuming) No Country for Old Men.

I'd also like to recommend Gone Baby Gone. I didn't have many expectations going in, so maybe that's why I was so pleasantly surprised. Along with Jesse James, this movie should firmly extablish Casey Affleck as a first-class actor, and it's also an extremely promising directorial debut from brother Ben. What really sets it apart is that it's one of the only major Hollywood movies I can think of that presents a serious and unsolvable moral dilemma, and actually depicts both sides of the issue so that they seem equally plausible, equally "right." If there's a fault, it's that the acting veers at times toward the melodramatic and over-the-top, especially from Ed Harris. I'd chalk that up to Ben's own acting experience, and wanting to give the actors room to move, but not yet having the directorial experience to know when (or how) to rein them in. It's a small problem, though, in an otherwise first-rate film.

Yablonowitz
10-21-2007, 10:21 AM
You're not alone, Yablo. I loved Michael Clayton. For me, it'll be up there at the end of the year with The Assassination of Jesse James and (I'm assuming) No Country for Old Men.

I'd also like to recommend Gone Baby Gone. I didn't have many expectations going in, so maybe that's why I was so pleasantly surprised. Along with Jesse James, this movie should firmly extablish Casey Affleck as a first-class actor, and it's also an extremely promising directorial debut from brother Ben. What really sets it apart is that it's one of the only major Hollywood movies I can think of that presents a serious and unsolvable moral dilemma, and actually depicts both sides of the issue so that they seem equally plausible, equally "right." If there's a fault, it's that the acting veers at times toward the melodramatic and over-the-top, especially from Ed Harris. I'd chalk that up to Ben's own acting experience, and wanting to give the actors room to move, but not yet having the directorial experience to know when (or how) to rein them in. It's a small problem, though, in an otherwise first-rate film.

Yesterday I was trying to decide between Michael Clayton and Gone Baby Gone. Sounds like there wasn't a "right" decision. Hopefully, next week, I'll catch Gone, Baby, Gone. Speaking of Ben Affleck, I've sort of come to a realization that he's more talented then I've given him credit for. God knows why he choose so many shit movies to be in and got involved in a stupid media circus, but he's underappreciated. The wife and I caught the fairly blase Hollywoodland and I was surprised how good of a performance Affleck gave in that. Adrian Brody was rather forgetful, as was the main story itself but Affleck really kept it from totally sucking. Anyway, if you're stuck watching that movie, at least try to appreciate Benny Boy's performance.

RotationSlimWang
10-21-2007, 10:46 AM
I retained faith in Affleck through all his shitty movies. The guy is a fuckload smarter than his body of work gives him credit for. I would also support a presidential bid from him--like the dude's style.

roberto73
10-21-2007, 11:14 AM
It's good to hear the two of you say that. I've been a fan since Chasing Amy, and always felt like people were judging his choices and not his talent. And that extends to all the shit he got during the J.Lo. years, which seemed to be completely disproportionate to the things he was actually doing.

wmgaretjax
10-21-2007, 11:20 AM
Sorry to interrupt this foreign film, art house masturbation discussion thread - but Michael Clayton may well be the best big studio movie out this year.

Cool. That makes my decision for what to see tonight. Thanks for the recommend mom.

RotationSlimWang
10-21-2007, 11:29 AM
He was great in all of Smith's movies, Chasing Amy will always have a special place in my mind for some reason though. Gotta give him a lot of credit for however large of a part he had in writing Good Will Hunting though--although it's a feel-good whatever flick, it's fucking well done and particularly well written. Writing counts for everything.

bmack86
10-21-2007, 11:46 AM
Andrew, if you want to borrow Gabe's recs from 60s, 70s and 80s, lemme know.

bballarl
10-21-2007, 11:52 AM
Sounds good. I will probably borrow a couple at a time.

schoolofruckus
10-21-2007, 12:03 PM
Count me as a member of the "In Affleck We Trust" club. I was thisclose to making "Changing Lanes" my 00's choice because it's criminally underrated.

In somewhat-Affleck-related news - I just watched "To Die For" as one of the final pieces in my bid to see the entire Van Sant catalog. Nicole Kidman was good. The movie as a whole was interesting and entertaining, and not without teeth in its portrayal of the desperate-for-attention syndrome. It wasn't great, and it wasn't anywhere near as good as the best stuff Gus has done (including "Good Will Hunting"), but it was solid for what it was.

I may watch "Deliverance" this afternoon if I feel like it.

bmack86
10-21-2007, 12:12 PM
Deliverance is a good flick.

wmgaretjax
10-21-2007, 12:37 PM
50s: Pickpocket by Robert Bresson

60s: Weekend by Jean luc Godard

70s: Mirror by Andrey Tarkovsky

80s: Paris, Texas by Wim Wenders

90s: Eyes Wide Shut - Kubrick

00s: Werckmeister Harmonies by Bela Tarr

good sampling, stuff other people left out.

PotVsKtl
10-21-2007, 01:23 PM
Foreigner.

RotationSlimWang
10-21-2007, 02:05 PM
Eyes Wide Shut? What the fuck? Goddammit Jared, why do you have to do shit like this to me? Kubrick fucking hated how that turned out.

PotVsKtl
10-21-2007, 02:12 PM
Kubrick was dead before it was finished jackass.

RotationSlimWang
10-21-2007, 02:26 PM
R. Lee Ermey would never lie. http://film.guardian.co.uk/news/story/0,,1888077,00.html


Stanley Kubrick regarded Eyes Wide Shut as a "piece of shit" that had been ruined by the interference of its A-list stars, a friend of the director claimed this week. The character actor R Lee Ermey starred in Kubrick's 1987 film Full Metal Jacket and remained in close contact with the director until his death in March 1999. He described the film-maker as a "shy, timid" man who was effectively bullied by his stars, Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman.

Cruise and Kidman wrecked Eyes Wide Shut, Kubrick claimed


Staff and agencies
Thursday October 5, 2006
Guardian Unlimited


Kubrick was apparently disgusted with Eyes Wide Shut

Stanley Kubrick regarded Eyes Wide Shut as a "piece of shit" that had been ruined by the interference of its A-list stars, a friend of the director claimed this week. The character actor R Lee Ermey starred in Kubrick's 1987 film Full Metal Jacket and remained in close contact with the director until his death in March 1999. He described the film-maker as a "shy, timid" man who was effectively bullied by his stars, Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman.

Article continues

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"Stanley called me about two weeks before he died," Ermey told Radar Online. "We had a long conversation about Eyes Wide Shut. He told me it was a piece of shit and that he was disgusted with it and that the critics were going to have him for lunch. He said Cruise and Kidman had their way with him - exactly the words he used."
Eyes Wide Shut marked Kubrick's return to film-making after a 12-year hiatus. The film was in the final stages of post-production when he died at his home in Hertfordshire. It was finally released to mixed reviews and middling box office.

Asked why Kubrick had allowed himself to be strong-armed by his stars, Ermey said, "He was kind of a shy little timid guy. He wasn't real forceful. That's why he didn't appreciate working with big, high-powered actors. They would have their way with him, he would lose control and his movie would turn to shit."

During the film's production, Cruise and Kidman were full of praise for the director's methods and claimed that the finished film was exactly as he would have wanted. Discussing the experience of working with Kubrick, Kidman insisted that "it was incredibly rewarding, and I'd do it again in a heartbeat."

Deviate_420
10-21-2007, 02:34 PM
Dead Man is by far one of the best movies to come out in the last 20 years. I think that is is Johnny Depp's best film and it is absolutely brilliant, check it out. Randy, you would appreciate it,

wmgaretjax
10-21-2007, 02:39 PM
hahahahaha. Sorry Randy, but ermey is full of shit. Kubrick was anything but timid on his film sets, he regularly had singular visions that he wouldn't budge for anyone. talk to anyone else who worked with him. He was dead before the film was finished editing.

I almost put Dead Man in for the 90s slot.

Oh, and I believe Eyes Wide Shut to be one of the most underappreciated films of all time.

Yablonowitz
10-21-2007, 02:44 PM
I'd love to see the 4' 8" Tom Cruise pussy whipping Kubrick. "Don't fucking tell ME what to do. I've seen your e-meter and I WILL tell xenu if you don't let me go to that orgy!"

RotationSlimWang
10-21-2007, 02:51 PM
Eyes Wide Shut was fucking unwatchable. Also, Jim Jarmusch is godawful. I watched about 30 minutes of Dead Man before bailing on it. Watch Arizona Dream instead.

wmgaretjax
10-21-2007, 03:04 PM
Eyes Wide Shut was fucking unwatchable. Also, Jim Jarmusch is godawful. I watched about 30 minutes of Dead Man before bailing on it.

that's it. you are a fool.

RotationSlimWang
10-21-2007, 03:09 PM
I am a fool much as you are an art ***. Not that there's anything wrong with that--wanting to have sex with other art is just fine.

schoolofruckus
10-21-2007, 03:31 PM
I don't like Dead Man, either. It's beautiful to look at, but it's got one of those annoying Johnny Depp performances that I just can't roll with.

Eyes Wide Shut is hot shit, though. I can't wait to see the uncut DVD that comes out this Tuesday.

wmgaretjax
10-21-2007, 06:00 PM
I don't like Dead Man, either. It's beautiful to look at, but it's got one of those annoying Johnny Depp performances that I just can't roll with.

Eyes Wide Shut is hot shit, though. I can't wait to see the uncut DVD that comes out this Tuesday.

i didn't know about this. nice surprise.

PotVsKtl
10-21-2007, 07:20 PM
The only difference is more orgy in the orgy scene.

RotationSlimWang
10-21-2007, 07:22 PM
Mmm... more orgy.

Just not the guys who covered Blue Monday, please.

schoolofruckus
10-21-2007, 09:16 PM
The only difference is more orgy in the orgy scene.

That is true. It would have been more proper to call it "free of strategically-placed digital guys in capes" rather than "uncut", as I believe it won't actually be longer than the original version. Either way, I'm happy that it's finally being done.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-22-2007, 01:08 AM
I've never seen Eyes Wide Shut.

I really like Jim Jarmusch. Night On Earth, Broken Flowers and Mystery Train are my personal favourites, but Down By Law and Coffee and Cigarettes are nice, too.

I watched The Fountain on Saturday. Really really liked it. Don't understand why it got such a bad rap.

Also, I just heard that they're doing a remake of Hitchcock's "The Birds". What for!?

tessalasset
10-22-2007, 07:34 AM
I just watched The United States of Leland last night. It was good. Ryan Gosling really is a great actor. So I moved Murder by Numbers to number 1 in my queue. after that - Goosebumps feat. Gosling.

Also I watched The Interpreter on Saturday night and I realized I really really like Sean Penn. Mystic River is up on my queue now.

Yablonowitz
10-22-2007, 08:17 AM
I just watched The United States of Leland last night. It was good. Ryan Gosling really is a great actor. So I moved Murder by Numbers to number 1 in my queue. after that - Goosebumps feat. Gosling.

Also I watched The Interpreter on Saturday night and I realized I really really like Sean Penn. Mystic River is up on my queue now.

Any bets on when Tessa's Ryan Gosling obsession will end?

2 more years?

Might Casey Affleck kick Gosling out of the golden ring?

These questions haunt me.

full on idle
10-22-2007, 08:33 AM
Mystic River is really good. I didn't like the Interpreter. I haven't heard of Goosebumps.

Broken Flowers was frustrating.

Mr.Nipples
10-22-2007, 08:39 AM
I'd love to see the 4' 8" Tom Cruise pussy whipping Kubrick. "Don't fucking tell ME what to do. I've seen your e-meter and I WILL tell xenu if you don't let me go to that orgy!"

this makes me want to break my policy on quoting people on the board...

full on idle
10-22-2007, 08:42 AM
Why is that your policy?

Why did you ask PF to make your title "beef supreme"?

Mr.Nipples
10-22-2007, 08:58 AM
Why is that your policy?
because I love you all the same and dont want to pick favorites...

Why did you ask PF to make your title "beef supreme"?
thats a question ill answer once the BMOTW thread gets revived in december or whatever...

breakjaw
10-22-2007, 09:11 AM
The most entertaining thing about Eyes Wide Shut is that for a minute I thought that it was Pee Wee Herman playing the hotel desk clerk.I saw the movie in the theater,and considered contacting Kubrick's estate for a refund...

full on idle
10-22-2007, 09:15 AM
because I love you all the same and dont want to pick favorites...

thats a question ill answer once the BMOTW thread gets revived in december or whatever...


1. Don't be ridiculous, Cousin Larry, the correct answer for proper board assimilation is: Yablo is your favorite.

2. There will be no BMOTW revival. And even if there is, it will suck, so just answer now.

Down Rodeo
10-22-2007, 10:20 AM
I finally saw Rushmore last night and really liked it. I think it's probably the best Wes Anderson movie I've seen, which doesn't include Bottle Rocket or Life Aquatic. His style gets a little annoying at times and things don't always come together, but I thought Rushmore was tied together coherently at the end. Good stuff.

tessalasset
10-22-2007, 11:44 AM
I haven't heard of Goosebumps.

blasphemy



Yabs, I liked him alright in Jesse James but he was such a pipsqueak. Do you have any Casey movie recommendations that might sway me away from Goslingland? Cause right now....god damn.

RotationSlimWang
10-22-2007, 11:44 AM
Gosling's the man, Tessa. Rock on with it.

Mr.Nipples
10-22-2007, 01:29 PM
1. Don't be ridiculous, Cousin Larry, the correct answer for proper board assimilation is: Yablo is your favorite.
You're putting me on the spot...

2. There will be no BMOTW revival. And even if there is, it will suck, so just answer now.
I like eating at yoshinoya beef bowl...its cheap and filling and delicious...

downingthief
10-22-2007, 01:47 PM
Oh, and I believe Eyes Wide Shut to be one of the most underappreciated films of all time.

Completely agree. I cannot wait to see the special release of this.

wmgaretjax
10-22-2007, 02:04 PM
blasphemy



Yabs, I liked him alright in Jesse James but he was such a pipsqueak. Do you have any Casey movie recommendations that might sway me away from Goslingland? Cause right now....god damn.

his performance in Jesse James has been the best of the year so far (the only contender I see in sight is Daniel Day Lewis).

Check out "Gerry."

tessalasset
10-22-2007, 02:13 PM
Oh he was definitely great in the movie, but in terms of making a Land named after him, he's not even close to Mr. Gosling.

schoolofruckus
10-22-2007, 07:33 PM
Ryan Gosling apparently quit the Peter Jackson movie of "Lovely Bones" yesterday.

I dislike "Mystic River" more and more every time I see it, but I did like Sean Penn in it. Nowhere near as good as his work in "21 Grams" though.

Michael Bay is producing a remake of "The Birds" in much the same way that he produced remakes of "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" and other horror films I can't be bothered to look up. Why? I don't know. Why does Michael Bay do most of the shit he does? I liked the "South Park" parody of him last week though.

RotationSlimWang
10-22-2007, 07:51 PM
Speaking of Mystic River, apparently Ben Affleck must have liked it a lot, 'cause Gone Baby Gone starts out as a very funny movie about child abduction for about an hour and a half, then fucking unravels in the last half hour into an overblown and annoying moral quagmire that felt like it needed Sean Penn overacting all up in its ass. Still probably worth seeing if you find Bostonians cursing as hilarious as I do, but God did that ending ever get on my fucking nerves.

PotVsKtl
10-22-2007, 09:32 PM
Well Hitchcock did want a final scene in The Birds with them escaping, driving away from the town and straight into the Golden Gate Bridge covered in birds. So at least there's some semblance of a reaon to make it bigger.

schoolofruckus
10-22-2007, 09:59 PM
And then the birds go "CROSH!" and the Golden Gate bridge is like "ROSH!!" "CROSH!!!!" And then a semi crashes into it like "BROSH!!!! CROSH!!!!! BU-BROSH!!!!!"

chrislasf
10-23-2007, 10:12 AM
And then the crow with marbles in its mouth tells Jessica Tandy to get her hat.

Courtney
10-23-2007, 11:49 AM
Epitaph was enjoyable. It was a straightforward gothic horror film, centering around the supernatural events of Asaeng Hospital in WWII-era Korea. The plot weaves together the concurrent stories of three couples. While the stories do not ever converge, the multiple flash-backs and flash-forwards never seemed overly-convoluted. The first story involves Masao, a young medical intern stationed in the morgue, who in the midst an impending arranged marriage finds himself strangely drawn to the stunning corpse of a young woman killed in a double suicide. The second story revolves around a husband and wife pair of doctors at the hospital who find themselves faced with a disturbing series of murders of Japanese soldiers. The third story involves a young girl, Asako, who arrives at the hospital miraculous untouched save for nightmares and aphasia, after a bloody car-wreck that left everyone else killed.

This is a film at its heart about human connection. About how the lives of people, sometimes strangers, become inextricably linked through unexpected occurrences. But it is also about the immense sadness that comes from being denied such a connection. And the extreme lengths that people go to obtain it. At times it did get a bit formulaic with horror genre conventions -- making use of bad bloody makeup, or borrowing from the very distinctive score of Fellini's Psycho, for example -- which resulted in laughter from a good segment of the audience. But overall it was still scary enough to make me wish that I didn't have to walk back to my car in the dark alone, so it wasn't entirely laughable. There was also some nice cinematography throughout with carefully constructed mis-en-scene. The acting was also excellent, with subtle performances that grounded what could have otherwise been an over-the-top storyline.

KungFuJoe
10-23-2007, 12:22 PM
Glad you at least enjoyed Epitaph somewhat. I look foward to seeing it.

I watched Invisble Target the other night. what a waste of time. I can't believe I almost made that sound like it could be good. There was a lot of action and Wu Jing is a bad ass, but it's a generic action movie, way to ridiculous, overdramtic and long. Double dose of crap.

Also, saw 30 Days of Night over the weekend. Big dissappointment. I had fairly high hopes for this one. Thought it could be as scary as The Descent and possibly the best vampie movie since Near Dark. I was wrong. It was enjoyable at parts and the acting was good. Even some of the concepts were great, but they could have done it soooo much better. It almost redeemed itself in the end, but fell very flat. I wish it had gone in a different direction and that the vampires had more personality. I'd say wait for the rental or go to a matinee at an AMC theater and pay 6 bucks like moi.

schoolofruckus
10-24-2007, 02:03 PM
"No Country For Old Men" is playing the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica on Wednesday 11/7. I bought my ticket already.

full on idle
10-24-2007, 02:14 PM
You should just drive over to Austin and see it tonight.

Courtney
10-24-2007, 06:11 PM
Glad you at least enjoyed Epitaph somewhat. I look foward to seeing it.

Yeah I did enjoy it. Thank you for recommending it to me! Also I get the sense from other people that this is the sort of film that you might enjoy more if you are more fluent in horror film convention and especially in relation to asian cinema. It definitely seemed like the director could have been referencing things that I might not have picked up on.

Courtney
10-24-2007, 06:42 PM
I am seeing at least six films this week because of the Honolulu International Film Festival. And I'm already three behind on writing up any sort of commentary, so this might not happen, but we'll see. In any case, I am pleasantly surprised with the quality of the films I have seen so far, and especially at the relative lack of red tape at the festival. It's a pleasant change from Los Angeles, where they sometimes put up the velvet ropes for as little as a Sunday matinee.

On Monday I saw Irina Palm, a drama by the German director Sam Garbarski. The film features Marianne Faithfull as Maggie, a middle-aged London widow whose grandson, Ollie, is dying of cancer. Maggie, having been turned down from every bank for loans and faced with the direst of circumstances for her deteriorating grandson, sees a sign on a Soho boutique window stating "hostess wanted" and enters to once more test her quickly running out luck.

The boutique turns out to be "Sexy World," and the shop-owner Miki (played by Miki Manojlovic) who is impressed by Maggie's soft hands, offers her a job. Maggie quickly becomes much in demand, acquiring a stage name (Irina Palm) and a long line of customers to her booth for hand jobs through a hole in the wall. The film deftly walks the line between comedy and tragedy, and while at times the premise of a 50 year-old suburban housewife wanking away in a London strip club seems ridiculous, the pervading sadness of the story coupled with Marianne Faithfull's skilled performance creates a poignant and satisfying film. Irina Palm seems at surface to follow in the footsteps of other british indies like The Full Monty and Calendar Girls with a plot that has the unlikeliest of characters in financial strains and comically sexually exploiting themselves as a solution. But unlike these earlier films, Irina Palm never gets too silly about the horrible circumstances at hand. The realism is further emphasized by a somber score and a general graying of the color scheme of the film (although honestly, this could in part just be London weather).

I really liked Irina Palm, and hope it gets wider distribution. It seems like this is a film that could do quite well with wider audiences.

mountmccabe
10-24-2007, 09:28 PM
(although honestly, this could in part just be London weather)

Ahaahahaha

schoolofruckus
10-24-2007, 09:33 PM
If there's a moment where Irina rips off her face and reveals herself to actually be David Bowie, I see a $200 million domestic haul. If not, it will probably be this year's "Waking Ned Devine" at best.

Chris and I just watched "Eastern Promises". It was a classy rendering of a most sordid tale, in which a midwife (Naomi Watts) investigates the past of a 14 year old prostitute who has just died while giving birth. She goes in looking to find the baby's family, and instead finds herself involved in the inner workings of a Russian crime family. The narrative takes all its pleasure in unspooling things very gradually, until a convoluted plot suddenly adds up to something more simple than it maybe should have been. I do like the suggestion of more story to come as the movie is winding down - it lends a sense of substance to material that is otherwise pretty straightforward. But really, I don't give a fuck about any of this, and neither will anyone who sees the movie, because it's basically just an excuse to pit a fully nude Viggo Mortensen against two hulking Russian thugs in a steam room knife fight. Every review I've read mentions this scene, and for good reason; if David Cronenberg were to confess on his deathbed someday that he basically thought up the knife fight and then hired the writer to script the rest of the movie around it, I wouldn't register so much as a batted eye. The movie as a whole is good, but this scene is definitely the best reason to watch it.

Yablonowitz
10-24-2007, 09:37 PM
Did you guys sit next to each other or did you have the homophobic buffer seat between you?

schoolofruckus
10-24-2007, 09:48 PM
Homophobic buffer seat. Although seriously, when you're in a movie theater and there's room to spread out, why the fuck not sit a seat apart so you don't have to share armrests and leg room? I'm a tall drink of water here.

full on idle
10-24-2007, 10:55 PM
I saw that movie like a month ago.

roberto73
10-25-2007, 06:19 AM
I completely forgot to report on the Q&A with Cronenberg following the screening of Eastern Promises I saw. One of the most interesting things he said is that in Steve Knight's original screenplay, Viggo's character shares his secret with Naomi Watts' character halfway through the movie, and the rest of the film would have been a big, Bourne-style chase.

Also revealed: Viggo has no genitalia, and it had to be CGI'ed for the steam room scene.

Courtney
10-25-2007, 10:38 AM
If there's a moment where Irina rips off her face and reveals herself to actually be David Bowie, I see a $200 million domestic haul. If not, it will probably be this year's "Waking Ned Devine" at best.

Haha yes. I guess by wider distribution, I meant any distribution at all.

Courtney
10-25-2007, 10:40 AM
Also Lars And The Real Girl and The Darjeeling Limited both open here this weekend. I need to go back and read this thread to see if they are worth seeing.

PotVsKtl
10-25-2007, 10:40 AM
Phantasm is such a piece of shit.

RotationSlimWang
10-25-2007, 10:41 AM
Homophobic buffer seat. Although seriously, when you're in a movie theater and there's room to spread out, why the fuck not sit a seat apart so you don't have to share armrests and leg room? I'm a tall drink of water here.

We like to call the empty seats inbetween each other "hetero seats." Not that much different, but brevity is wit.

Courtney
10-25-2007, 10:46 AM
It starts rolling out this Friday in Los Angeles and maybe some other cities. It'll be in most major cities by the end of the month.

And for those who may be growing tired of Wes-world - in spite of respect for his previous films as well as his overall skill set - The Darjeeling Limited should be right in your wheelhouse. Don't get me wrong, the film still has its fair share of slow motion dollies and 60's pop songs and immaculately-composed static shots that are production-designed within an inch of life. But Wes has also shed some of his more superfluous idiosyncrasies this time out, and the result is maybe his strongest visual narrative, as well as his most earnestly emotional film since Rushmore. Now, I grant that maybe some people don't go to Wes Anderson films for emotional substance, particularly when it stands in for distant, dryly-rendered comedy, but I've always felt that there was far more heart and humanity to his films than he gets credit for - which is part of what I love about them. And this one is more than worthy of that canon.

After the sweeping ensembles of The Royal Tennenbaums and The Life Aquatic, Darjeeling is a welcome return to the more intimate style of storytelling that Wes used earlier in his career - the scope is small, the running time is quick (a brief-but-not-criminally-so 91 minutes), the funny bits are more knowingly amusing than laugh-out-loud raucous. The film focuses exclusively on the three brothers - Francis (Owen Wilson), Peter (Adrian Brody), and Jack (Jason Schwartzman) - who are brought together somewhat against their wills to take the purposeful journey across India on the film's titular locomotive. They've drifted apart over the course of the previous year due to family tragedy and the circumstances of their own lives, the causes of which are sometimes explored, sometimes left mysterious, and - in Jack's case, with the "Hotel Chevalier" short - sometimes dramatized elsewhere. Francis, being the older brother and ringleader, has pre-organized the trip to an almost suffocating degree, and it's clear right away that it's being performed by the other two brothers out of a sense of obligation rather than any real desire to be there. The way the film establishes the characters and their dynamics is a model of efficiency, and each actor brings a distinct voice and a diversity of personality to his character; love them or hate them, you can't always say that about all of Wes Anderson's films.

Anyway - I'm going to cut the plot synopsis off before it gets going. The point is - this may be familiar Wes territory as far as subject and many of the usual style elements, but it's also a strong new direction for him in other ways. I mentioned earlier the production design, always the #1 harbinger of Wes' authorship in his films. It's still as heavily orchestrated as ever here, but for the first time since Bottle Rocket, it doesn't feel the slightest bit like a movie set. I've never been to India, couldn't tell you shit about it, but as presented here - it feels authentic. I also loved the multitude of passages with no dialogue. Again, I feel like this film terrifically does away with expository dialogue in as many situations as possible, preferring instead to let the exotic surroundings and the actions of the characters peel away the emotional layers.

I've compared the film to every one of Wes' other films in the course of this review, but the truth is, I don't know where it stands in relation to his erstwhile output. It could be, by default, my least favorite of his five films due to my love for the other four; it could be as high as #2 (I can't imagine he'll ever top Rushmore). Only years of further viewings - the benefit of which all his other stuff has - will tell. But I do know that this is both a satisfyingly recognizable member of his familial filmography, and a unique child in its own right.

One last thing - make sure you do see Hotel Chevalier in conjunction with this movie, preferably right before heading out to the theater. You could get Darjeeling without it, absolutely....but when you see it, and the way it enhances the film, you'll know you would have been missing something to do so. If any of you haven't seen it, go on the iTunes store and search for it. It's free and it should be easy to find.

This sounds awesome. I'm still a little unclear on whether Hotel Chevalier is automatically part of all the screenings or whether I need to see it separately.

schoolofruckus
10-25-2007, 11:30 AM
Actually, I heard that Fox finally decided that Wes Anderson fans are as intelligent as the average family of children who see Pixar films in theaters, and are thus capable of processing both a short film and a feature film in one sitting. "Hotel Chevalier" should be rolling out in general release with "Darjeeling", starting sometime soon.

Still watch it online beforehand, just in case.

CuervoPH
10-25-2007, 11:50 AM
The theater near me finally got Darjeeling Limited, but the running time is listed as 1 hr 31 mins. I'm assuming this means the version here will not have Hotel Chevalier running beforehand.

corbo
10-25-2007, 12:56 PM
i finally got around to see darjeeling limited tuesday.
i was dissapointed. it was an ok movie and ranks at the bottom
of the other anderson films. his directing style is getting repetitive
and boring.

Courtney
10-26-2007, 02:04 AM
On Tuesday I saw the documentary All In This Tea, as part of the Honolulu International Film Festival. I left the theater thinking it was somewhat interesting but not the most well put-together of films. However the more I think about it, the more I think that my initial reaction may have been too kind and really it was just pretty crappy.

The documentary, directed by Les Blank and Gina Leibrecht, has an interesting premise: the dying art of hand-crafted Chinese tea manufacture, and the attempt to introduce American markets to these high-end teas before they become extinct. However, the film's glorification of tea "adventurer" David Lee Hoffman as he treks through rural Chinese highlands in search of the perfect cup comes off as more of an infomercial for his import business than as an exploration of the current climate for tea production and consumption.

Towards the end of the film, one of the featured tea experts stands in front of a class and says something like, "what we want from tea is a drink to write poetry and make love to." Sadly, the film did not live up to the hyperbole.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-26-2007, 03:44 AM
I have a question: is Ken Park (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Park) available on general release in the USA yet? That Wiki article would suggest not, but that would surprise me. I downloaded it a few years ago and burned it to DVD, and it's probably my favourite Larry Clark film. I think it's really good, although obviously an acquired taste, and very graphic.

schoolofruckus
10-26-2007, 05:36 AM
I don't think it is. I bought a Russian-distributed DVD off of eBay 4 years ago because I was convinced that it would never be released here, and I thought that would be my only way to see it. It's actually my least favorite Larry Clark film - and the one most interested in navel-gazing over actually trying to be insightful about the characters - but I remember thinking I wanted to watch it again because I felt like it maybe had more complexity than it seemed. But I have yet to do that.

wmgaretjax
10-27-2007, 02:28 AM
My favorite Larry Clark film is the docu-short in Destricted.

I saw "Control" tonight. If anything, it's a fucking gorgeous film. I'm always skeptical of films shot on black and white nowadays, it always seems like a trope. But Anton Corbijn new what he was up to. The acting is also superb, very few complaints. Particularly from the two leads. Ian Clark was personified perfectly in the film, the live performance sections are unbelievable. As far as the film as a whole goes... I really don't like biopics, but I enjoyed this film. I didn't love it, but it is probably my favorite recent film of the genre. I'm not a huge Joy Division fan, and I can imagine being one would make this film a lot better. Definitely worth checking out on the big screen as a result of the cinematography.

schoolofruckus
10-27-2007, 02:18 PM
I just watched "Deliverance". I have to say, it was really not that good. The premise was cool, I liked the photography....but the performances and the dialogue were pretty poor. It never really occurred to me before, but Jon Voight is a pretty bad actor. It shouldn't be surprising, given the exhibited talent of his offspring, but I just never really realized it before.

mountmccabe
10-27-2007, 02:34 PM
I finally watched The Wild Bunch last night. I got it on VHS for $0.95. It doesn't seem like it was from 1969. It does feel two and a half hours long, though. It was good. It made me think of Cormac McCarthy novels.

Courtney
10-27-2007, 04:14 PM
My favorite Larry Clark film is the docu-short in Destricted.

I saw "Control" tonight. If anything, it's a fucking gorgeous film. I'm always skeptical of films shot on black and white nowadays, it always seems like a trope. But Anton Corbijn new what he was up to. The acting is also superb, very few complaints. Particularly from the two leads. Ian Clark was personified perfectly in the film, the live performance sections are unbelievable. As far as the film as a whole goes... I really don't like biopics, but I enjoyed this film. I didn't love it, but it is probably my favorite recent film of the genre. I'm not a huge Joy Division fan, and I can imagine being one would make this film a lot better. Definitely worth checking out on the big screen as a result of the cinematography.

I sadly missed Control last night at the film festival because I had to go to bed early to do stuff this morning. Yes I realize how lame that sounds. But I would like to see it eventually. Moreso after reading your comments.

Also I feel like being a huge fan of the band (Joy Division in this case, but I also mean for other similar films about different bands) oftentimes hinders ones enjoyment of the film more than it helps it. The more you know, the easier it is to be highly critical and such.

Down Rodeo
10-27-2007, 04:24 PM
Two days ago, I watched The Good, the Bad and the Ugly for the first time. What an outstanding movie that is. I never watch Westerns, but Sergio Leone made one badass Western right there. The movie is so stylized, and the score by Ennio Morricone is excellent. I can see why it's Quentin Tarantino's favorite movie.

And last night, I watched La Dolce Vita, which was also excellent. I would be interested in hearing other people's opinions on it. I had never seen a Fellini movie before, but I can see why he's so revered.

schoolofruckus
10-27-2007, 07:02 PM
I just got done watching Jean-Luc Godard's "Weekend". Umm.....



WOW!!!



Now THAT is a fucking film! A road movie in the purest sense of the word, tirelessly pitting all the participants of conflict (man, society, God, nature, and himself) against each other, "Weekend" is one of the most blistering indictments of the progression of humanity ever committed to film. A materialistic and dually unfaithful couple hits the road to go visit the woman's dying (and very wealthy) father, and ends up on what can sincerely be described as the highway to hell. Surrounded by violence, chaos, and lunacy to the most extreme degree, they encounter a series of brutal auto wrecks, roadside bandits, militant liberal philosophers, and finally a cannibalistic militia.....Godard's disapproving eye catches the apocalypse in all its pending absurdity. The film is a glorious, experimental, anarchic mess, shot primarily in a series of lengthy dolly pans and consistently informed by Godard's trademark punk-rock narrative aesthetic. I'd only previously seen "Breathless" - which, for all its stylistic innovation, seemed more a triumph of form over content. This one, however, is a most harmonious marriage between the two.

bballarl
10-27-2007, 07:05 PM
Anyone seen "Dan In Real Life"? My friend interned on the set last year and was at the premiere on Wednesday. I have heard it has been getting great reviews.

PotVsKtl
10-27-2007, 07:12 PM
Dan in Real Life appears to be another self-conscious quirkfest.

I highly recommend Masculin Feminin as your next Godard.

bmack86
10-27-2007, 07:20 PM
Masculin Feminin is a really cool movie.

wmgaretjax
10-27-2007, 07:44 PM
Now THAT is a fucking film! A road movie in the purest sense of the word, tirelessly pitting all the participants of conflict (man, society, God, nature, and himself) against each other, "Weekend" is one of the most blistering indictments of the progression of humanity ever committed to film. A materialistic and dually unfaithful couple hits the road to go visit the woman's dying (and very wealthy) father, and ends up on what can sincerely be described as the highway to hell. Surrounded by violence, chaos, and lunacy to the most extreme degree, they encounter a series of brutal auto wrecks, roadside bandits, militant liberal philosophers, and finally a cannibalistic militia.....Godard's disapproving eye catches the apocalypse in all its pending absurdity. The film is a glorious, experimental, anarchic mess, shot primarily in a series of lengthy dolly pans and consistently informed by Godard's trademark punk-rock narrative aesthetic. I'd only previously seen "Breathless" - which, for all its stylistic innovation, seemed more a triumph of form over content. This one, however, is a most harmonious marriage between the two.

There are a few movies that I will always remember as having changed my entire perspective on film. This is one. I'm very glad you enjoyed it Gabe.

I would also suggest "Vivre Sa Vie" along with Pot's suggestion.

Also, another great post-apocalyptic film is Haneke's "Time of the Wolf."

Courtney
10-28-2007, 01:15 AM
Masculin Femin is very good.

This past Wednesday I saw the documentary Wie man sein Leben kocht (How To Cook Your Life). It was shot primarily at zen buddhist centers in San Francisco and Germany, and addresses the question of how zen buddhism can inform the act of cooking and by extension all acts of life.

The documentary primarily features the zen master/teacher Edward Brown, and so it has the potential to become the sort of egotistical glorification that was the downfall of a documentary I saw earlier this week (All In This Tea). But Wie man sein Leben kocht escapes this fate by virtue of its warm but flaws-and-all depiction of Brown and the zen students featured. I quite enjoyed this film.

schoolofruckus
10-28-2007, 11:46 AM
I sadly missed Control last night at the film festival because I had to go to bed early to do stuff this morning. Yes I realize how lame that sounds. But I would like to see it eventually. Moreso after reading your comments.

Also I feel like being a huge fan of the band (Joy Division in this case, but I also mean for other similar films about different bands) oftentimes hinders ones enjoyment of the film more than it helps it. The more you know, the easier it is to be highly critical and such.

That's true in many cases when it comes to movies based on real people. I believe Hannah intensely disliked "Factory Girl" because she felt it misrepresented the Andy Warhol universe. And I can't imagine any real Johnny Cash fan appreciated seeing his life story turned into a relationship melodrama in "Walk the Line".

"Control" is another matter, though. It bleeds authenticity. I'm not an expert on Joy Division, but I am a pretty big fan, and I thought they nailed it. Perfectly represented Ian Curtis and the place where his music came from. One of my favorite aspects is that, even though the movie is based on the book that his widow wrote, they don't demonize his mistress. She's portrayed pretty objectively.

Courtney
10-29-2007, 11:51 AM
Ok now I REALLY need to see Control.

Last Thursday as part of the film festival, I saw The Savages. It's a Tamara Jenkins film (she also directed Slums of Beverly Hills) featuring Laura Linney and Philip Seymour Hoffman as siblings who are called back into an estranged family situation to take care of their dying father (played by Philip Bosco). I thought it was very good.

It's not a happy film by any stretch, but it does a beautiful job of capturing the story. Jenkins is at her strongest when directing the over the top, surrealist retirement community of Sun City, Arizona that opens the film. Its perfectly manicured bright green lawns and perfectly orderly synchronized swimming practice were effectively terrifying as some sort of utopian vision gone wrong. And the acting chops of both Linney and Hoffman really carry the film as it gets into darker territory once they move their father into a nursing home in Buffalo, New York. Hoffman plays a scatter-brained mid-level professor who in his struggle to finish his book project is slowly losing his girlfriend of three years. Linney plays the pill-popping, equally emotionally-unavailable mistress of a married man who clings onto the dream of becoming a successful playwright while plodding away in an unfulfilling job.

Hoffman's character says to Linney's half way through the film, "We're doing the right thing, Wen. We're talking better care of the old man than he ever did of us." And indeed, this is a film about taking care of people. About children taking care of dying parents, and grown children struggling to take care of their own disappointing lives in the wake of a parent who did not. The film's poignancy is its understated examination of characters who, in the process of reconnecting with their dying father, also are working to reconnect with what matters in their own lives and starting to take the steps necessary to ensure that they do not end up like him.

I might be a little biased because I'm generally pretty infatuated with Philip Seymour Hoffman, but yeah, good film. I think Fox is distributing this one, and they were crazy strict about searching bags for video cameras and other recording devices, so I would guess that it is getting distributed in the near future.

wmgaretjax
10-29-2007, 11:54 AM
Hey Courtney, thanks for the updates. giving good fodder on movies to check out in the future. I'm a bit of a hoffman fan myself, so I'm excited for that one.

Did you see The Man from London by any chance? Did I somehow miss your review?

Courtney
10-29-2007, 11:58 AM
Hey thanks for reading by self-indulgent reviews.

And yes, I did see The Man from London. I saw enough films so that I have a bit of a backlog on the write-ups. But wow, yeah. Thank you for recommending it. I will write more about it.

Stefinitely Maybe
11-01-2007, 07:15 AM
Went to see Saw 4 last night. It didn't change my world or anything, but it was good Halloween entertainment - iIt satisfied the part of me that likes to see people being tortured / killed / having their faces sliced off / whatever. If you liked the previous Saw movies, you'll like it. If you didn't, you won't.

Yablonowitz
11-01-2007, 09:15 AM
Went to see Saw 4 last night. It didn't change my world or anything, but it was good Halloween entertainment - iIt satisfied the part of me that likes to see people being tortured / killed / having their faces sliced off / whatever. If you liked the previous Saw movies, you'll like it. If you didn't, you won't.

Everytime I read something about the Saw movies, it's related to the UK in some way. I don't know if that's chance or if it's a genuine phenomenon out there. I'm feeling anti-British today for absolutely NO reason. Deal with it, Stefan. If that's your real name.

On an unrelated matter, I read a review of The Future is Unwritten and am convinced it's a documentary that I must see.

Here's the review:

by Andrew O'Heir
Nov. 1, 2007 | Look, I'm the wrong person to bring any objectivity to Julien Temple's movie "Joe Strummer: The Future Is Unwritten." It partly concerns the pop culture of my own teenage years, always a treacherous zone for any critic (or any other human being). Furthermore, it's about a rock musician I once worshiped and then abandoned, and discovered again much later, who is now dead. So Temple's film will inevitably be viewed by people of roughly my age and with roughly my background as a kind of generational myth, which is likely to irritate the crap out of everyone else.

Still, insofar as I can drag myself back from raving fandom to some kind of detachment, I think "The Future Is Unwritten" -- which is Temple's preferred title; the distributors have added "Joe Strummer" over his objections -- is the most powerful documentary I've seen all year, and one of the two or three best films ever made about an artist or musician. It marks both the high point and something like the moral justification of Temple's career, which includes big-money music videos for the Rolling Stones, David Bowie, Janet Jackson, Tom Petty and many other artists, as well as a pair of splendid documentaries about the Sex Pistols and the 1977-78 punk revolution ("The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle" in 1980, and "The Filth and the Fury" in 2000).

Strummer, of course, was the lead singer and rhythm guitarist of the Clash, the Pistols' biggest rivals on the London punk scene. As Temple explained when I met him at Sundance last winter, he met Strummer in 1976 when the band was formed, and shot black-and-white footage of their first recording session in a studio at his film school. (That session produced the single versions of "White Riot" and "I'm So Bored With the USA," among other Clash songs.) One of the first things we see in "The Future Is Unwritten," in fact, is the 23-year-old Strummer spitting the lyrics to "White Riot" into the mike, without the musical track attached. It's an electrifying moment, rock history in the making.

Although Temple's movie is indeed a history of how Strummer, his songwriting partner Mick Jones, and the rest of the Clash rose from being London punk avatars to international superstars -- and then fell into the gradual, bitter and ironic decay that goes along with that -- it's also something much more important. Always a master of discovering and manipulating footage from various sources, Temple has assembled an extraordinary archive of film and video that documents and illustrates various aspects of Strummer's life and career.

Temple has found home movies of the London squatter scene where Strummer, then known as Woody Mellor, first made his reputation, and early, grainy videotapes of Strummer's pre-Clash band, a hippie-ish R&B assemblage called the 101'ers (who had gotten pretty damn good before he abruptly broke them up and turned his back on his squatter pals to become a punk icon). To capture the decrepit and claustrophobic atmosphere of England in the years of Strummer's childhood -- he grew up as John Graham Mellor, the privileged kid of a British Foreign Office diplomat -- Temple borrows bits of a legendary BBC adaptation of George Orwell's "1984" (starring Peter Cushing) and the animated version of Orwell's "Animal Farm."

Several of the doodles and cartoons with which Strummer filled his notebooks are turned into charming little animations, demonstrating that this driven and almost monomaniacal character had a whimsical side. Even the central weakness of most documentaries concerned with recapturing the past, the inevitable talking-head reminiscences, are handled marvelously. Temple assembles many of Strummer's old friends and colleagues from various periods of his life around campfires in London, New York, Los Angeles and elsewhere, in tribute to the campfires Strummer himself hosted at British raves late in his career.

At first, it bugged me that Temple never identifies these interviewees on the screen. Sometimes it's obvious, as when a decrepit-looking Mick Jones cheerfully admits to being a massive pothead, or when Clash drummer Topper Headon, looking like an aging accountant in a dusty-pink pullover, discusses his lengthy heroin addiction and his ejection from the band. And you're probably going to recognize Bono and Johnny Depp and Martin Scorsese. But there are moments when you sit there wondering: Isn't that that British artist who saws pigs in half, whatever his name is? (Damien Hirst, and yes, it is.) Is that Anthony Kiedis of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, or just some schmo who resembles him? Is that really what Steve Jones of the Sex Pistols looks like today?

It's still a debatable decision, but I relaxed about it. I don't actually think Temple is challenging his viewers: Are you hip enough to identify some minor rock celebrity of years gone by? His idea is more that Strummer's hippie ex-girlfriends and 101'er bandmates have just as much to tell us as Jim Jarmusch and Courtney Love do, and in some cases more. There's a tremendous dignity and pathos in the spectacle of all these middle-aged survivors, many of them quite a bit worse for wear, gathered together to remember a maddening, prodigious and contradictory person they loved very much.

Joe Strummer yearned for fame, and in the process of seeking it left many of his oldest friends feeling betrayed. He made some of the most memorable and influential records in rock history, although his musical talent was modest, at best. He yearned to use his fame and his bully pulpit to spread a political and social message, modeling himself self-consciously after Woody Guthrie. While he succeeded in doing that, far beyond what many people recognized at the time, he also fell into virtually all the familiar traps of rock stardom -- and could only weep bitterly when he heard American troops blasting "Rock the Casbah" as they bombed Baghdad during the first Gulf War in 1991.

Temple's film is a passionate testament to his own conflicting emotions about Joe Strummer, and the ultimate evidence of that emotion lies in its powerful combination of cinematic craft and honesty. "The Future Is Unwritten" never shirks from the less attractive sides of Strummer's personality, nor from the petty hypocrisies and pseudo-Stalinist conformity of the punk revolution itself. It doesn't look away from aging and death, which have begun to loom pretty large for those of us who can actually remember the 1970s. It doesn't look away from the beautiful, ravaged faces of its interviewees, as they were and as they are.

I look at them and see fragments of myself, both as the middle-class dad I am now and as the 16-year-old kid in pursuit of something (I didn't know what, and I probably still don't) who once cut school on a California winter afternoon to go meet Joe Strummer in the import section of a record store, and have him scrawl his autograph across the sleeve to "White Man in Hammersmith Palais." Not many other people showed up at Tower Records that day, and as I told Temple, Strummer spent several minutes chatting kindly with me and my friends. "Of course he did," he smiled. "He needed you."

Maybe he did, but as Temple's wonderful movie reminded me, we needed him more. Whatever Joe Strummer's flaws as a man, a musician and a political thinker, he tried to use the machinery of pop culture against itself, tried to invent himself as a new kind of celebrity who could be both useful and human. I still don't know if it's possible, but it was a good idea.

wmgaretjax
11-01-2007, 09:46 AM
Yeah, i saw The Future is Unwritten at SIFF this year. It was amazing. Check it out for sure.

amyzzz
11-01-2007, 10:25 AM
I saw the trailer for Atonement before Across the Universe, and my husband does not believe a guy could enjoy that movie (sorry Stef). Maybe they need a more kick-ass trailer.

TomAz
11-01-2007, 10:31 AM
I just finished Chris Salewicz's outstanding Strummer bio. Julian Temple, Damien Hirst and Jim Jarmusch were all over it. Some of Joe's party buds.

bballarl
11-02-2007, 11:45 PM
I just watched "Pollock". It was really really good. Marcia Gay Harden and Ed Harris both give exceptional performances. Pollock's most fucked up moments are hard to watch. Absolutely brilliant, but a complete trainwreck of a man.

schoolofruckus
11-03-2007, 01:42 AM
I have a couple reviews from the AFI festival...

"Sigur Ros - Heima". Basically it's sort of Sigur Ros' version of "Rattle and Hum", mixing tour footage with re-inventions of some songs and some other interviews that magnify the band's sense of importance. The key difference is that they are in their home country here (whereas U2's film focused on them journeying across America), and the whole thing is more of a love-in than the controversial road movie that "R&H" was. The performance footage is stunning, as is the use of the landscapes of Iceland to emphasize the kind of imagery that Sigur Ros' music puts into one's mind. The sound recording is exceptional as well; it's not often that a concert film leaves your ears ringing the way the epic performance of "Untitled #8" does here. I saw this each of the last two nights, both times with the band playing acoustic renditions of "Agaetis Byrjun", "Untitled #4", and another song that I think might be a re-tooled version of "Von". Their sound translates to unplugged versions better than I would have imagined.

Now on to one of the most delightfully bizarre films I've ever seen....

"Southland Tales".

It is the work of a fucking madman.

I think we all know what it's sort of about. In a post-terrorist attack America that has been strangled by an extrapolation of the Patriot Act, around the 4th of July in 2008, the film's canvas (it doesn't feel right to call it a story) weaves together an amnesiac action star (The Rock), who should be married to the Republican presidential candidate's daughter (Mandy Moore) but who is romantically involved with an enterprising porn actress (Sarah Michelle Gellar); an equally dazed police officer (Seann William Scott) who is being manipulated by neo-Marxist terrorists (played by various former "SNL" castmembers); a scientist (Wallace Shawn) who has invented a new form of aquatically-derived energy; and a military sharpshooter (Justin Timberlake) who mans a sniper's rifle from the top of a shack on Venice Beach.

By now - judging from the content as well as the rambling form of my one-sentence synopsis - you should know whether or not you want to see this movie. But I assure you - if it sounds so far like something tame and familiar, then you're in for a huge shock. This shit is all over the place from the jump, a sensory overload the likes of which I have rarely seen attempted (much less pulled off successfully), and it's simultaneously glorious and head-shaking. The film offers a reasonably helpful prologue to explain the set-up, and by the end things finally start to approach coherence, but getting there is going to definitely thin out the film's detractors from its pack of supporters. It would be a lot more difficult, however, if there wasn't so much fun to be had along the way - the film's visual scheme is high energy and inventive; the Moby score is every bit as satisfying as I could have hoped for in establishing a menacing, beautiful ambience; and best of all, there's a genuine sense of joy and enthusiasm in the way this saga spills. The casting of all these pop actors - one of dozens of head-scratching concepts that have been thrown at the flypaper that is this film - is both a benefit and a detriment; the performances could definitely have been better as a whole, but in something this anarchic, it somehow feels right to have "stars" instead of serious actors. I can't comment much on the political message (except to say that it's very clear where Richard Kelly's coming from), because piecing together the puzzle left no surplus of effort for analyzing the subtext, but I can say that I had a ton of fun with this movie and I will absolutely be seeing it again - probably many times. Kelly's films may not pay off entirely on first viewing, but they absolutely have the invaluable ability to make you want to revisit them and see what more you can get.

I will be very interested in monitoring the reactions to this film. I know that all opinion is subjective (though I do think that there is such a thing as an inarguably good film regardless of taste), but this film - more than most - is going to put people on opposite ends of the solar system. Some of you are going to just fucking despise it, to the point that you may physically harm me if you see it based on my review. Others will probably hail it as a masterwork. I'm not sure it's quite that, but it's definitely closer to it than not. Bottom line is that, if nothing else, the conviction and spirit of this kind of film must be heartily saluted.

tessalasset
11-03-2007, 01:55 AM
ok i wanna see it.

schoolofruckus
11-03-2007, 02:02 AM
I'm definitely going to see it again when it's in theatres. But promise not to punch me if you get out of the movie and are like, "WHAT. THE. FUCK."

amyzzz
11-03-2007, 05:49 AM
That sounds like a total mindfuck. I'm in.

KungFuJoe
11-03-2007, 08:06 AM
I'm glad you got to see Southland Tales at AFI Gabe and am kind of sad now that I have to wait for it to hit theaters. Doesn't it open in LA soon though? I've been too busy working to help finish my friends film, working my real job & moving my apartment. I think I'm going to catch 4 Months, 3 weeks & 2 Days on Monday before I go to work. That will probably be the only screening I'm able to catch at AFI this year. oh well .... I'm pretty sure you're seeing that tonight, so I hope to hear good things.

Courtney
11-03-2007, 10:08 AM
I just watched "Pollock". It was really really good. Marcia Gay Harden and Ed Harris both give exceptional performances. Pollock's most fucked up moments are hard to watch. Absolutely brilliant, but a complete trainwreck of a man.

I kind of hate that film. It perpetuates the ridiculous artist-as-mad-genius myth, understating the incredible importance of both Clement Greenberg and Lee Krasner for Pollock's success. Although I'll give it credit for Peggy Guggenheim -- after reading her autobiography, the film seems pretty much spot-on there.

Plus! Wtf! That film made it seem like Pollock has some strike of genius and completes most of his paintings in maybe one night, max. From various personal accounts, photographic evidence and also x-ray scans of underpaintings, art historians universally agree that Pollock took months, sometimes years, to finish his well-known works.

Courtney
11-03-2007, 10:10 AM
I realize that inaccurate details do not necessarily make every historically-based film a "bad film." But the way that this one dramatizes stuff is pretty heinous imo.

Courtney
11-03-2007, 10:47 AM
Did you see The Man from London by any chance? Did I somehow miss your review?

Oops I forgot to finish talking about The Man from London.

Ok I saw this film as part of the Honolulu International Film Festival at the recommendation of wmgaretjax. It's a Bela Tarr film about money, death and the bitter everyday life of the working class in a small port town.

I think the film festival didn't do a very good job of explaining what the film was going to be like in the program guide or something. While the theater was maybe half full at the beginning of the screening with maybe 50 people, so much of the audience walked out that by the end we were down to a scattering of only fifteen people. I sort of reminded me of the time in class when my professor thought it would be a good idea to screen the entirety of Warhol's The Life of Juanita Castro in lieu of canceling class because she was going to be away at a conference. That did not make her very popular.

But so yeah, at The Man from London screening, people were whispering to themselves and giggling and checking their Blackberries (Blackberrys?) and who knows what. I think this was mostly because of the combination of the slowness of the film coupled with the lack of dialogue. In our culture of American Idol and Jim Carrey comedies, maybe people expect to have entertainment shoved down their throat with such force that they barely have time to pause and think about it let alone process or digest it. So if you're watching a black and white film where the camera is panning with the speed of a tortoise across the back of the character's balding, unmoving head, and no one is saying anything for twenty minutes, people are going to get a little uncomfortable.

But the film's speed (or well the lackthereof) is also its strength. Bela Tarr takes the stark, simple locations of the film and inhabits them with worn, wrinkled characters, casting it all in intense chiaroscuro to create a sort of timeless, striking beauty. And when the characters do choose to speak, the dialogue is so pared to the essence of the plot that you have to appreciate its efficiency and sheer effectiveness.

Tilda Swinton appears as the mother, alongside an otherwise seemingly entirely Hungarian cast with which I was unfamiliar. Say what you want, but seeing Swinton back-to-back last weekend in The Man from London and Michael Clayton -- that woman can act!

I enjoyed The Man from London for its pared-down efficiency and visual beauty, but I can understand how this may not be the film for everyone, especially if you're not expecting it.

wmgaretjax
11-03-2007, 10:53 AM
Oops I forgot to finish talking about The Man from London.

Ok I saw this film as part of the Honolulu International Film Festival at the recommendation of wmgaretjax. It's a Bela Tarr film about money, death and the bitter everyday life of the working class in a small port town.

I think the film festival didn't do a very good job of explaining what the film was going to be like in the program guide or something. While the theater was maybe half full at the beginning of the screening with maybe 50 people, so much of the audience walked out that by the end we were down to a scattering of only fifteen people. I sort of reminded me of the time in class when my professor thought it would be a good idea to screen the entirety of Warhol's The Life of Juanita Castro in lieu of canceling class because she was going to be away at a conference. That did not make her very popular.

But so yeah, at The Man from London screening, people were whispering to themselves and giggling and checking their Blackberries (Blackberrys?) and who knows what. I think this was mostly because of the combination of the slowness of the film coupled with the lack of dialogue. In our culture of American Idol and Jim Carrey comedies, maybe people expect to have entertainment shoved down their throat with such force that they barely have time to pause and think about it let alone process or digest it. So if you're watching a black and white film where the camera is panning with the speed of a tortoise across the back of the character's balding, unmoving head, and no one is saying anything for twenty minutes, people are going to get a little uncomfortable.

But the film's speed (or well the lackthereof) is also its strength. Bela Tarr takes the stark, simple locations of the film and inhabits them with worn, wrinkled characters, casting it all in intense chiaroscuro to create a sort of timeless, striking beauty. And when the characters do choose to speak, the dialogue is so pared to the essence of the plot that you have to appreciate its efficiency and sheer effectiveness.

Tilda Swinton appears as the mother, alongside an otherwise seemingly entirely Hungarian cast with which I was unfamiliar. Say what you want, but seeing Swinton back-to-back last weekend in The Man from London and Michael Clayton -- that woman can act!

I enjoyed The Man from London for its pared-down efficiency and visual beauty, but I can understand how this may not be the film for everyone, especially if you're not expecting it.

Thanks Courtney! Bela Tarr isn't always easy to swallow, but his films are beautiful, and more often than not, incredibly powerful. I'm excited to see this one, I didn't realize Swinton was in it. She's amazing.

Courtney
11-03-2007, 11:00 AM
Yeah Swinton was amazing. Although it was a little weird because they had obviously dubbed her lines using a native Hungarian speaker and there was quite the disconnect between her lips on screen and the audio track. It didn't work so well.

Edit: I should also say that I can see how the dubbing is symbolic. The film's themes circle around ideas of man as being fundamentally alone, unable to communicate or feel deep emotional attachment to other people. So maybe it was intentionally bad in that sense. But I'm still not buying it.

wmgaretjax
11-03-2007, 11:11 AM
Yeah Swinton was amazing. Although it was a little weird because they had obviously dubbed her lines using a native Hungarian speaker and there was quite the disconnect between her lips on screen and the audio track. It didn't work so well.

Edit: I should also say that I can see how the dubbing is symbolic. The film's themes circle around ideas of man as being fundamentally alone, unable to communicate or feel deep emotional attachment to other people. So maybe it was intentionally bad in that sense. But I'm still not buying it.

Tarr also comes from Fellini's school of dialogue. basically, get the performace the way you want it, and if you need to, add dialogue later. So all of his films have dubbing. It can be really obnoxious at times, but I think the pay off is worth it if you can muster up enough suspension of disbelief.

mountmccabe
11-03-2007, 12:07 PM
I think we all know what it's sort of about. In a post-terrorist attack America that has been strangled by an extrapolation of the Patriot Act, around the 4th of July in 2008, the film's canvas (it doesn't feel right to call it a story) weaves together an amnesiac action star (The Rock), who should be married to the Republican presidential candidate's daughter (Mandy Moore) but who is romantically involved with an enterprising porn actress (Sarah Michelle Gellar); an equally dazed police officer (Seann William Scott) who is being manipulated by neo-Marxist terrorists (played by various former "SNL" castmembers); a scientist (Wallace Shawn) who has invented a new form of aquatically-derived energy; and a military sharpshooter (Justin Timberlake) who mans a sniper's rifle from the top of a shack on Venice Beach.

Wow. This... wow. I had heard bits but... yeah.

Basically, yay.



So if you're watching a black and white film where the camera is panning with the speed of a tortoise across the back of the character's balding, unmoving head, and no one is saying anything for twenty minutes, people are going to get a little uncomfortable.

But the film's speed (or well the lackthereof) is also its strength. Bela Tarr takes the stark, simple locations of the film and inhabits them with worn, wrinkled characters, casting it all in intense chiaroscuro to create a sort of timeless, striking beauty. And when the characters do choose to speak, the dialogue is so pared to the essence of the plot that you have to appreciate its efficiency and sheer effectiveness.

This also sounds awesome. An entirely different strain of awesome, but, yeah.


Please Phoenix get these movies.

schoolofruckus
11-03-2007, 01:30 PM
I'm glad you got to see Southland Tales at AFI Gabe and am kind of sad now that I have to wait for it to hit theaters. Doesn't it open in LA soon though? I've been too busy working to help finish my friends film, working my real job & moving my apartment. I think I'm going to catch 4 Months, 3 weeks & 2 Days on Monday before I go to work. That will probably be the only screening I'm able to catch at AFI this year. oh well .... I'm pretty sure you're seeing that tonight, so I hope to hear good things.

Yeah, "Southland" opens in LA on 11/14 and 11/16 for many major markets. I bet it will get a decently wide release.

I am seeing "4 Months..." in about 4 hours. God, I'm fucking excited. If it's as good as "The Death of Mr. Lazarescu", I might have a new pet genre (Romanian neorealism) to go fanboy on.

"The Man From London" has yet to be bought by an American distributor, but I feel quite confident it'll play here either this year (hopefully) or next. It sounds incredible, and every bit the worthy follow-up to "Werckmeister Harmonies".

Courtney
11-03-2007, 03:24 PM
Sorry to interrupt this foreign film, art house masturbation discussion thread - but Michael Clayton may well be the best big studio movie out this year. I just saw it and I don't see any mention in the last five pages, so I'm mentioning it now. Some very fine acting and interesting storytelling with a heart of fucking gold, you cocksuckers. Tom Wilkinson is so fucking good in this. And I've slowly grown to really love George Clooney. I don't think he has a great deal of range, but he plays his usual character type expertly. Anyway, I'd like to end this with a fuck you to anyone who says anything bad about it.

Fuck you.

PS - Rented Zodiac and thought it was nearly as good of a major studio production as Michael Clayton.

PPS - Fuck you again.

I saw Michael Clayton last weekend and thought it was quite good. I hadn't read any reviews and it isn't the type of thing I'd generally choose (it was my father's choice) but I was pleasantly surprised.

Tilda Swinton was glorious as the evil big business lawyer par excellence. And I find George Clooney terribly appealing when he loses his show business sheen of movies like Oceans Eleven in favor of somewhat dumpy, middle-aged relatable characters ŗ la Syriana.

I'm not quite sure what was gained through the choice of opening the film with a dramatic scene near the climax of the plot, and then following with the back story until the movie caught up. Granted, it served as an effective hook, especially with the addition of Tom Wilkinson's superb monologue playing over the scene. But I think perhaps something was lost by showing George Clooney exiting the car in the first five minutes.

Nevertheless, there was enough of an additional plot twist that the film did keep the audience guessing until the very end, which is probably what I enjoyed most about the film.

Courtney
11-03-2007, 03:27 PM
"The Man From London" has yet to be bought by an American distributor, but I feel quite confident it'll play here either this year (hopefully) or next. It sounds incredible, and every bit the worthy follow-up to "Werckmeister Harmonies".

I have not seen any other Bela Tarr films. If I wanted to explore further, would Werckmeister Harmonies be a good choice, or is there a more logical entreť into his oeuvre?

wmgaretjax
11-03-2007, 04:35 PM
I have not seen any other Bela Tarr films. If I wanted to explore further, would Werckmeister Harmonies be a good choice, or is there a more logical entreť into his oeuvre?

Yes, and then onto "Damnation" and "Satantango."

Honestly, "Werckmeister Harmonies" is continually moving up my all time favorite movies list (and is currently living in the top 5). Best film of the last 10 years. Hands down.

I'm gonna nerd out for a second. If you can, check out the Artificial Eye release of the film, although it is Region 2 (so you need an all region DVD player, or VLC on your computer). The Facets is really bad quality, but still worth it if that's all you can get your hands on. Enjoy.

Yablonowitz
11-03-2007, 06:05 PM
[QUOTE=Courtney;331726] But I think perhaps something was lost by showing George Clooney exiting the car in the first five minutes.
[QUOTE]

Could not disagree with you more. What at first had seemed like an inexplicably fortuitous coincidence at the beginning was shown through the film's exposition of the events leading up to it to have meaning and served as the motivating factor to Clooney's decision making at the end.

schoolofruckus
11-03-2007, 09:27 PM
Sorry to interrupt this Michael Clayton masturbation discussion thread - but I saw a couple of capital-fucking-E exceptional films at the Arclight this afternoon/evening.

I've said before that Ben Affleck is good for one unqualified triumph about once every 5 years. The last one was Changing Lanes in 2002. The latest one is Gone Baby Gone. This outstanding crime film actually follows the template of Narc - another of my favorites from '02 - by starting out as a skillful, hard-boiled mystery and gradually involving into a complex moral dilemma with a shattering finale. The movie - based on a novel by the same guy whose novel was the basis for Mystic River - is about a private detective couple (the officially en fuego Casey Affleck and the lovely Michelle Monaghan) who reluctantly decide to investigate the disappearance of a young girl whose mother is....well, a coke whore. To rehash any further plot elements would be to reduce this film to the scrap heap of police procedurals. Here's what you need to know: the younger Affleck gives another tremendous performance on the heels of his turn as the coward Robert Ford, and the rest of the talented cast (Ed Harris, Morgan Freeman, Amy Ryan) match him beat for beat. The film offers its fair share of Boston wiseguy attitude, and it definitely delivers the goods that you would demand from a missing persons thriller....that is, until that glorious change-up of an ending that elevates top-shelf pulp into haunting greatness (and yes, I'm sure that quote-whoring Peter Travers has used that very sentence at some point in the past). Best of all - the elder Affleck acquits himself beautifully in the director's chair. From nailing the nuances of sniffing around the neighborhood to showing the discipline to let the film's themes linger as the house lights come up (at the expense of frustrating the audience), Ben turns in an enormously impressive debut that will do wonders for erasing the memories of him dancing animal crackers on Liv Tyler's chest and running around with Jenny from the block.

Not to be outshined by the slate of its host theatre, the AFI fest (off to a blazing start) offered up what will surely be the crowning achievement of the festival: 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days. Taking place over the course of one day, this harrowing and unforgettable film - set in 1987 Romania - follows Otilia, a young college student who endeavors to help her roommate Gabita get an illegal abortion. Gabita is far too young to understand either the procedure or the logistical difficulties in undertaking it, and thus Otilia is forced to be the one to both take care of her and (in most cases) to bear the consequences of her friend's helplessness. It's a stark and defiantly neorealist drama that never once takes a shortcut to drive its themes home. The handheld camera follows Otilia through nearly every painstaking detail of this poorly-conceived plan, and the girl who plays her (Anamaria Marinca) carries the film like platinum from a quarry. I'd praise her performance, but no compliment can really enhance the scope of her achievement. She (and really, every actor in this cast) don't have even the slightest semblence of artifice - this is their world, and we're just dropping by.

I really don't know what else to say. If you like heavy real-time dramas and have a truly strong stomach (I have to stop and re-emphasize this - you need serious intestinal fortitude for this one), then this film will rock your fucking world. If not, pay to go see it anyway so that it at least makes money off of you being wrong.

roberto73
11-03-2007, 09:30 PM
Gabe, I'm glad you like Gone Baby Gone. I've been hyping it to everyone I know.

I saw the most recent cut of Blade Runner yesterday. Not much new to say about the plot, dialogue, etc., but it was my first time seeing it on the big screen, and the visuals are glorious.

SojuGorae
11-03-2007, 09:46 PM
Saw 3:10 to Yuma(illegal copy of course) yesterday and was quite impressed. I would have preferred unknown actors for the film, but regardless it's the best film I've seen all year. Though I've heard and read some tremendous praise for Michael Clayton and Gone Baby Gone.

One of the things that suck about being abroad is you miss so many good movies.

wmgaretjax
11-03-2007, 09:47 PM
I'm jealous Gabe, who the fuck knows when that movie will make it to Seattle.

Movies to see in the next week:
Michael Clayton
Darjeeling Limited
Blade Runner New Cut
Wristcutters
Before the Devil Knows You're Dead
Gone Baby Gone


shit... and I have so much work to do. and I just moved into my new place. fuck films ;-)

schoolofruckus
11-03-2007, 11:02 PM
Jared, I bet 4 Months makes it to Seattle sometime in early February; after all, it's not opening anywhere until January 25th. It's easily got to be the frontrunner for the best foreign film Oscar, and it did win the Palme, so it's not like IFC is going to bury it. Once those year-end accolades start piling up, arthouses across the country are going to be fighting each other for prints.

Before the Devil Knows You're Dead is probably next up on my list. Either that or Into the Wild. And of course, I have No Country For Old Men on Wednesday. If I'm feeling brave, I'll hit the WB screening of Fred Claus *shudder* on Thursday.

mountmccabe
11-03-2007, 11:26 PM
I keep seeing mentions of Things We Lost In The Fire and I think I want to see it but then I realize that it's just because that Low album is so good. Now I am going to listen to Low.

tessalasset
11-04-2007, 01:23 AM
I finally just saw Murder By Numbers and liked it a lot. How they thought to make Michael Pitt play Kurt Cobain, I have no idea. He was creepily great in this. And the Gos... of course he nailed it again. Altho I don't like seeing him be the bad bad guy. Tryin to get all up into Sandy's steeze and shit. But yeah that was a very good movie. I think Mystic River is up next on the flix.

schoolofruckus
11-04-2007, 06:31 AM
I like Murder by Numbers specifically for the performances of Gosling and Pitt. The rest of it is decent enough, but those two kick fucking ass.

You should see "Gone Baby Gone", Tessizzle.

HowToDisappear
11-04-2007, 07:28 AM
We watched The Lives of Others a few nights ago. Really, really good. Sort of like The Conversation meets The Unbearable Lightness of Being. Sort of.

Even my husband, who dislikes movies with subtitles, loved it. We definitely recommend.

schoolofruckus
11-04-2007, 07:30 AM
Yeah, that is an absolutely outstanding movie.

The guy who played the surveillance expert died a few months ago. It makes me sad, but Jesus did he go out on a high note.

HowToDisappear
11-04-2007, 07:38 AM
Really??? That is sad. His performance was amazing.

When he stands in the bookstore and says, "no it's for me"...the look in his eyes...what a moment.

wmgaretjax
11-04-2007, 09:04 AM
i loved that film as well. the sound design was unreal.

KungFuJoe
11-04-2007, 10:16 AM
Saw American Gangster last night. Quality film. Denzel Washington & Russel Crowe are great in this film. I'm not the biggest fan of either of them, but think they're both great actors. This is probably my favorite role by Russel Crowe since The Insider, even though it's a bit Serpico. Josh Brolin turns in a terrific performance as well. He certainly gets the comeback actor / sleazeball of the year award. And what can I say about RZA? Cool as shit. Love that man.

tessalasset
11-04-2007, 12:12 PM
12/14 - RZA at El Rey bitches!

PotVsKtl
11-04-2007, 12:26 PM
I found Lives of Others unpleasantly cloying in its tail bits.

schoolofruckus
11-04-2007, 04:43 PM
Not untrue, but I didn't mind it. The meat of it was so damn good that it earned the right to flirt with sentimentality.

wmgaretjax
11-04-2007, 07:21 PM
Not untrue, but I didn't mind it. The meat of it was so damn good that it earned the right to flirt with sentimentality.

i had the same response. hated the end at first, but ended justifying it as I stepped away. I need to watch it again.

schoolofruckus
11-04-2007, 07:33 PM
I'm watching Tarantino's "Death Proof" right now. I'm about halfway through and I'm bored to tears, but I'm trying like hell to last until the supposedly-awesome finale. Holy shit I'm glad I didn't pony up to watch the full double bill of "Grindhouse" in theaters.

UPDATE: Yeah I finished it....wow. What a colossal waste of time and talent for all involved. I mean, Zoe Bell was pretty kick-ass, but the car chase wasn't anywhere near as good as I'd heard. And it was certainly unworthy of carrying what can graciously be described as an extremely flimsy narrative consisting mostly of fourth-string Tarantino banter that goes nowhere and says nothing. In spite of all the stylistic showmanship and borrowed conventions, the key to Tarantino's work has always, always, always been his strong characters - people whose humanity would shine through ever so slightly, and just enough to care about whatever insane shit they were going through. In every other movie, he's kept it interesting by finding a soul within the genre idiosyncrasies. With this film, he has completely wanked off from even attempting that, preferring to have every female in the movie channel Samuel L. Jackson and thinking it would somehow fit the bill.

I know this is a "grindhouse" movie, and it's supposed to be low-rent and cornball and purposefully ignorant to the way the real world works. That's what angers me the most. Why anyone as gifted as Tarantino would waste his time with something that shamelessly tries to be garbage is anyone's guess. I'm sure it's a blast for him to go back to the movies he enjoyed so much as a kid. But it's a damn shame, and he - more than any other filmmaker - is in dire need of a quiet walk in the park, or a jail sentence, or any other method of solitude where he can think long and hard about what his next move should be.

HowToDisappear
11-04-2007, 09:32 PM
Huh.

We saw Death Proof a couple of weeks ago. LOVED IT.

But then, we're old enough to remember Vanishing Point and White Line Fever with fondness --- Vanishing Point especially (I loved that movie...is it available for rent somewhere?).

It definitely was a little talky and slow in places - come on already let's get on with the car chases!!! - but when it got there - damn. I thought the crashes and chases were good, shlocky, shocky fun, just like they're supposed to be. We laughed our asses off.

And I love Kurt Russell. And Rosario Dawson.

wmgaretjax
11-04-2007, 09:55 PM
I really enjoyed Death Proof.

Saw "Before the Devil Knows You Are Dead." Great acting. Heavy-handed direction. Boring story.

Not much more I can say. There were a few great scenes, but I checked my watch maybe 4 or 5 times. It was really boring, and I think it was because it was just completely unbelievable and overly dramatic. Avoid it. Check it out on video if you really like the cast (who are impressive as can be expected).

Mr.Nipples
11-04-2007, 09:59 PM
ALU7xlaTfyc&rel=1

tessalasset
11-04-2007, 11:10 PM
Into the Wild was so good.

tessalasset
11-04-2007, 11:11 PM
Oh Gabe I forgot you wanted to see that. Sorry. I'll go see it again with you if you want.