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downingthief
09-20-2007, 07:30 PM
Oh, and um......

http://hollywood-elsewhere.com/images/column/10107/thereposter.jpg

Cool as fuck.

Cannot wait for this...Everything I have heard so far about it has been extremely positive.

rage patton
09-20-2007, 08:08 PM
Oh, and um......

http://hollywood-elsewhere.com/images/column/10107/thereposter.jpg

Cool as fuck.

That actually is a really cool poster. Christian Bale and Richard Gere too eh?

Also, David Cross as Allen Ginsberg is pretty much the best casting ever.

RotationSlimWang
09-20-2007, 10:09 PM
Honestly, I feel like Kelly bit off more than he could chew with "Darko", and still did a great job with that. He also wrote the way-the-fuck-out-of-control satire that was "Domino", a film that I feel was wildly misunderstood and far better than the derision that it got (although I do understand where that derision originated from). That's Kelly's M.O. - let his imagination run wild, and make the rest of the film catch up. I think it's great having guys with his kind of go-for-broke creativity around. However, I do think he's the type that needs to be pulled back and reigned in here and there; I heard that his director's cut of "Donnie Darko" ruined the film's mystique, and that his commentary track did so even further. So I've refused to watch them both. Like most filmmakers, he probably just needs a voice to tell him when he's going overboard and when he needs to come back to earth. Such creative restrictors (usually a producer or a co-writer with a large degree of influence) come in really handy when directors want to indulge in their every last whim; can you imagine how much better of a director Steven Spielberg would be if someone with clout would slap him in the face everytime he wants to knee-cap the ending to one of his movies?

Anyway....I'm optimistic that his changes to "Southland Tales" will result in something wonderful. A film with this kind of anarchic spirit is always worth rooting for.

Wow, people really had that reaction to the full cut of Darko? I mean, he made those changes to the theatrical release for a reason, a reason he explains rather informatively and interestingly in the commentary, to tell you the truth. And of the couple of bonus scenes that were cut from the original release, there's only one that really impact the storyline, and I felt it actually put a seriously nifty twist on the entire plot. I won't mention it since you've gone out of your way to avoid them, but I'd seriously recommend checking it out, at least the commentary track. To tell the truth I'd have to rank it among the better commentary tracks I've ever watched, particularly for us aspiring independent filmmakers. There's lots of stuff about how he went about convincing his investors that he should direct this feature film even though his only previous directing experience were two admittedly dreadful short films from his days at USC, and quite a bit of insight into the difficulties of pulling together this not-quite-explicable story. Give it a shot.

PotVsKtl
09-20-2007, 11:05 PM
Somebody just drove down my street at 12 a.m. blasting Tubular Bells.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e187/trevhubb/exor1.jpg

TomAz
09-21-2007, 06:53 AM
on the flight home last night I watched something called Next with Nicholas Cage. Stupid plot, shallow under-developed characters, lots of booms and bangs. Why anyone would lay down actual money to watch this tripe is beyond me.

schoolofruckus
09-21-2007, 08:26 AM
Wow, people really had that reaction to the full cut of Darko? I mean, he made those changes to the theatrical release for a reason, a reason he explains rather informatively and interestingly in the commentary, to tell you the truth. And of the couple of bonus scenes that were cut from the original release, there's only one that really impact the storyline, and I felt it actually put a seriously nifty twist on the entire plot. I won't mention it since you've gone out of your way to avoid them, but I'd seriously recommend checking it out, at least the commentary track. To tell the truth I'd have to rank it among the better commentary tracks I've ever watched, particularly for us aspiring independent filmmakers. There's lots of stuff about how he went about convincing his investors that he should direct this feature film even though his only previous directing experience were two admittedly dreadful short films from his days at USC, and quite a bit of insight into the difficulties of pulling together this not-quite-explicable story. Give it a shot.

You make an interesting case. I may have to try the director's Darko now.

downingthief
09-21-2007, 08:38 AM
You make an interesting case. I may have to try the director's Darko now.

Gabe,
I concur with Randy on this one. I thoroughly enjoyed the D-cut. He even changed up the soundtrack a bit, too. For the better, in my opinion.

algunz
09-21-2007, 08:45 AM
Don't know if you've talked about this yet or not, but Across the Universe - Any thoughts?

schoolofruckus
09-21-2007, 10:10 AM
Kung Fu Joe loved it. I really want to see it.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 10:26 AM
I prefer the director's cut of Darko as well. That's not saying an awful lot though as I threw my copy of the theatrical cut in the garbage.

RotationSlimWang
09-21-2007, 10:29 AM
Hahaha, what the fuck, Pot... if the regular cut was bad enough to throw it away--which, by the way, is madness--why would you even bother watching the director's cut?

Jenniehoo
09-21-2007, 10:32 AM
I'm n yur trash, getting free Donnie Darko.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 10:33 AM
Because I was stuck in a cabin in the Colorado Rockies with three people who were watching it. I also saw Van Wilder's Something Or Other and Grandma's Boy during this vacation. Although I was able to subject them to Return of the Killer Tomatoes and The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension.

RotationSlimWang
09-21-2007, 10:37 AM
RETURN of the Killer Tomatoes? Holy ejacushit. That must have given you nightmares for all the wrong reasons.

For some reason when I was like six every time we went to the video store I begged my parents to rent the original, and every time they indulged me we'd get home, watch it for about fifteen minutes before even I was like, "this is fucking horrible. The tomatoes just roll?" What's mystifying is that I kept asking to rent it again and my parents must have given in at least five times without us finishing watching it once. I'm pretty sure I never even enjoyed it.

I blame most of my defects on my father not hitting me nearly enough. If my kid ever pulls some shit like that I'm gonna break his little jaw. Builds character.

mob roulette
09-21-2007, 10:40 AM
The Killing Moon>Never Tear Us Apart

I understand the stylistic change though. Both work.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 10:40 AM
Return of the Killer Tomatoes stars George Clooney. It's an excellent film.

mob roulette
09-21-2007, 10:41 AM
Also Faces of Death for the win.

RotationSlimWang
09-21-2007, 10:42 AM
Wait, Clooney was in Return? I thought he was in Attack. And if you hung on to that and threw out Darko, you are either an emissary of the tenth level of hell or you're so commited to the funny that I'm slightly intimidated.

RotationSlimWang
09-21-2007, 10:43 AM
Yup, Clooney is Return, you right.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 11:07 AM
I personally feel that Kelly was entirely full of shit when he made Donnie Darko. I don't think he knew why the things that happen in that movie were happening and he seemed to have come up with an explanation after the fact to tie everything together. So, with that outlook, the director's cut is more satisfying in that I could at least pretend that things were planned in advance. I still don't particularly enjoy the movie.

algunz
09-21-2007, 11:15 AM
The fact that you had to try to figure things out in the theatrical cut was what made Donnie interesting for me. The director's cut answered too many questions. I liked trying to come up with my own answers to the unanswerable.

Tylerdurden31
09-21-2007, 11:18 AM
Killer Tomatoes Eat France! (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0102210/)


that i'd like to see

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 11:25 AM
The fact that you had to try to figure things out in the theatrical cut was what made Donnie interesting for me. The director's cut answered too many questions. I liked trying to come up with my own answers to the unanswerable.

Trying to sort out a movies ambiguities is rewarding to me only if I believe there is either:

a) No true answer; it is purposefully left up to the viewer to rationalize the events of the film
b) A very specific explanation that is purposefully obfuscated

In the case of the theatrical cut of Donnie Darko I felt the film was truly a) but the director claimed it was b). That leaves a film that is meaningless without the benefit of the possiblity of personalization.

schoolofruckus
09-21-2007, 11:30 AM
How do you feel about "Mulholland Dr."?

downingthief
09-21-2007, 11:34 AM
The Killing Moon>Never Tear Us Apart

I understand the stylistic change though. Both work.

Love both songs, Killing Moon more, but I really liked how Never flowed with the opening sequence in the Director's cut.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 11:35 AM
The things that are left up to the viewer in Lynch's films exist mainly to evoke a mood or feeling. There are obviously multiple interpretations of why the old couple show up in the end or whatever weirdness you want to seize on, but I believe Lynch has a specific answer while simultaneously allowing for others to be correct. In Donnie Darko, we are meant to believe every action is integral to the plot itself. It's an entirely different form of storytelling.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 11:36 AM
Or the absence thereof.

downingthief
09-21-2007, 11:37 AM
How do you feel about "Mulholland Dr."?

Loved it. Every viewing, I kept coming up with different possibilties, and meanings. Plus, no one can direct a lesbian scene like Lynch. :)

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 11:40 AM
What I'm saying here is Donnie Darko in its original configuration is an incomplete/non-completable puzzle. Mulholland Dr. is a complete set of fingerpaints.

downingthief
09-21-2007, 11:47 AM
What I'm saying here is Donnie Darko in its original configuration is an incomplete/non-completable puzzle. Mulholland Dr. is a complete set of fingerpaints.

Don't know if I agree with Darko being non-completable, but your Mulholland description is spot on.

schoolofruckus
09-21-2007, 12:18 PM
The things that are left up to the viewer in Lynch's films exist mainly to evoke a mood or feeling. There are obviously multiple interpretations of why the old couple show up in the end or whatever weirdness you want to seize on, but I believe Lynch has a specific answer while simultaneously allowing for others to be correct. In Donnie Darko, we are meant to believe every action is integral to the plot itself. It's an entirely different form of storytelling.

Word. Although I remember feeling like Darko (the theatrical version) made more sense on multiple viewings.

algunz
09-21-2007, 12:36 PM
Word. Although I remember feeling like Darko (the theatrical version) made more sense on multiple viewings.

Word up. I think that was because you were able to put your own spin on things and what people got out of it was unique and personal. The Director's cut was convoluted according to my initial interpretations. His answers didn't always jive with mine and thus it just wasn't as much fun.

I'll always love the movie though and would do almost anything to get that bunny costume for Halloween.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 12:46 PM
The only reason what you got out of the theatrical version of Donnie Darko was unique and personal was because Kelly either had no story or utterly failed to tell his story. It's like playing a game of Guess Who where someone has cut out all the pictures of dudes with glasses.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 12:46 PM
Wait, I'm boring myself.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 12:55 PM
Also, this is a thread on the IMDB Donnie Darko page:

What Are Your Favorite EMO Films?

Fuck Donnie Darko.

PotVsKtl
09-21-2007, 12:56 PM
I had an ancho chicken quesadilla for lunch. It was pretty good. The edges of a quesadilla are really the only satisfying part. I recommend adding taco seasoning to your quesadillas and then bashing them with a spatula until melting cheese runs out ands fries itself to the edges.

full on idle
09-21-2007, 01:01 PM
Delish take out el pollo tho.

full on idle
09-21-2007, 01:02 PM
Like in that one movie.

schoolofruckus
09-21-2007, 05:01 PM
I'd love to see Pot host his own version of that lame-ass "Dinner and a Movie" shit that runs crappy Ben Stiller comedies on TBS.

Tonight's episode: chicken quesadilla and "Donnie Darko".

Basically, he smashes both of them with a hammer. The End.

Jenniehoo
09-21-2007, 05:20 PM
That's funny.

schoolofruckus
09-21-2007, 05:24 PM
Can I get a hell yeah?

http://hollywood-elsewhere.com/images/column/10107/noclean.jpeg

theburiedlife
09-21-2007, 05:29 PM
Is that Javier Bardem's first role outside a Spanish film?

... oh and HELL YEAH!

schoolofruckus
09-21-2007, 11:57 PM
Is that Javier Bardem's first role outside a Spanish film?

... oh and HELL YEAH!

Not at all. He was in "Collateral", for starters, and I'm fairly sure there were a few other American films over the past few years.

RotationSlimWang
09-22-2007, 02:05 PM
Hmm, interesting. I can barely stand Lynch, Mulholland Drive being a primary example. Donnie Darko really isn't supposed to make sense, Kelly himself says he doesn't make sense of it. But the bulk of Darko is more or less a straight-forward storyline, it only divulges into the inexplicable during Donnie's psychotic moments and the ending. I think I just prefer that--that Kelly delves into those sections to show how this likable, intelligent, and normally logical boy periodically slips into a mindstate of pure delusion.

With Lynch it always seems like either the storyline itself jumps us as an audience into a world that makes no sense, not just one character's perception, or he's telling a story about people who are always psychotic which I have more difficulty connecting to.

And yes, the ending to Darko is not sense. He admits that. But it does create a pretty nifty mood.

full on idle
09-23-2007, 10:36 AM
Okay so last night we went to see Eastern Promises. Within the first ten minutes I had my hands over my eyes and my fingers in my ears. It got easier though, I think watching the Sopranos is helping me handle bloody violence. A little bit. Anyways a plot sprung up that was pretty good, Naomi Watts' character was not impressive but Viggo Mortenson is an incredible actor and you get to see his wee. There are lots and lots of knives and no guns. There is a lot of blood and a blond Russian Fabio playing an accordion. It gets really heart-poundingly exciting in parts. That's about all I got. I'd like to read Pot's review of it so I can be all "yeah, that's what I mean."

Also I'm reading No Country for Old Men. I'm going to belong in this thread just wait.

mountmccabe
09-23-2007, 11:01 AM
Second of all, you better see "Zodiac" immediately. All of you.

...

That's all I've got for now. John, I can't make you go, and I couldn't make you like it if you did. But I can't imagine this wouldn't make you rethink your opposition to detective movies, as I feel like it's one that was made specifically for people like you who have no interest in such things.

OK, I finally saw Zodiac last night. I had forgotten about most of this conversation since it was over six months ago. But I'm gonna talk about it anyway.

One thing this movie reminded me of is "The Wire." The few episodes of that show that I've seen are among the strangest television I've seen. There's no hugging and bold clashes and wildness; just slow, naturalistic genius.

We took a break about halfway through Zodiac which was probably a good thing because it gave me a chance to think about it. Other folks watching commented that, wow, there're a lot of time jumps. This was before it really got going, even. This isn't what one expects; this isn't what I was projecting when I said I figured this'd be worthless.

This is a movie about people, you watch them age and change and see what their obsessions do to their relationships. You watch phone styles change. You watch clothes and cars while everyone becomes alcoholic. It's kinda stunning.

I think it falls a few steps short of great but I am rethinking Fincher and am going to look into who else was involved here and also I am realizing that I need to see it again. Since it is a slow-paced two and a half hours that probably won't happen too soon, though.

thinnerair
09-23-2007, 12:08 PM
OK, I finally saw Zodiac last night. I had forgotten about most of this conversation since it was over six months ago. But I'm gonna talk about it anyway.

One thing this movie reminded me of is "The Wire." The few episodes of that show that I've seen are among the strangest television I've seen. There's no hugging and bold clashes and wildness; just slow, naturalistic genius.

We took a break about halfway through Zodiac which was probably a good thing because it gave me a chance to think about it. Other folks watching commented that, wow, there're a lot of time jumps. This was before it really got going, even. This isn't what one expects; this isn't what I was projecting when I said I figured this'd be worthless.

This is a movie about people, you watch them age and change and see what their obsessions do to their relationships. You watch phone styles change. You watch clothes and cars while everyone becomes alcoholic. It's kinda stunning.

I think it falls a few steps short of great but I am rethinking Fincher and am going to look into who else was involved here and also I am realizing that I need to see it again. Since it is a slow-paced two and a half hours that probably won't happen too soon, though.

I have 'Zodiac' on my Netflix. I had originally seen it in the movies, but really feel like I'd like to see it again to really let parts sink in. I saw it a while ago, but I remember liking that the movie was slow paced and realistic in the sense that when there was nothing really going on in the case, the movie and the characters weren't really doing anything. I think Robert Downey Jr. was excellent in the movie too. I like David Fincher. I also like ice cream.


Okay so last night we went to see Eastern Promises. Within the first ten minutes I had my hands over my eyes and my fingers in my ears. It got easier though, I think watching the Sopranos is helping me handle bloody violence. A little bit. Anyways a plot sprung up that was pretty good, Naomi Watts' character was not impressive but Viggo Mortenson is an incredible actor and you get to see his wee. There are lots and lots of knives and no guns. There is a lot of blood and a blond Russian Fabio playing an accordion. It gets really heart-poundingly exciting in parts. That's about all I got. I'd like to read Pot's review of it so I can be all "yeah, that's what I mean."

I saw Eastern Promises last night and I really enjoyed. It made me want to go buy a bunch of suits and smoke cigarettes all the time. There were a few scenes that had camera work that confused me. There is one shot of Viggo and this other dude talking for a few minutes in a sort of bath house. The shot had a slight flicker and slight movement. If you focused on the background, especially tiles, you could tell that there was a bit of movement. I m not sure if it was shot with a handheld or if the projector at the theater was shotty. Its quite possible that it's the latter, as the sound was kinda shitty (doubled sound clips giving it a slight delay at times made it less enjoyable.)

I thought the dialogue was great and will probably go see it again.

HowToDisappear
09-23-2007, 12:11 PM
OK, I finally saw Zodiac last night. I had forgotten about most of this conversation since it was over six months ago. But I'm gonna talk about it anyway.

One thing this movie reminded me of is "The Wire." The few episodes of that show that I've seen are among the strangest television I've seen. There's no hugging and bold clashes and wildness; just slow, naturalistic genius.

We took a break about halfway through Zodiac which was probably a good thing because it gave me a chance to think about it. Other folks watching commented that, wow, there're a lot of time jumps. This was before it really got going, even. This isn't what one expects; this isn't what I was projecting when I said I figured this'd be worthless.

This is a movie about people, you watch them age and change and see what their obsessions do to their relationships. You watch phone styles change. You watch clothes and cars while everyone becomes alcoholic. It's kinda stunning.

I think it falls a few steps short of great but I am rethinking Fincher and am going to look into who else was involved here and also I am realizing that I need to see it again. Since it is a slow-paced two and a half hours that probably won't happen too soon, though.


We watched it last weekend and thought it was great. From an historical standpoint, I found it especially interesting because I have vague memories from my childhood of the letters/cipher being published in the newspapers. So it was intriguing to see the entire chain of events played out from beginning to end.

We rented The Lookout, too. A very slow moving, thoughtful film. And a revelation to see Joseph Gordon-Levitt as someone other than his Third Rock From the Sun persona. He plays a high school athlete who suffers a brain injury after a catastrophic car accident. He's seduced into acting as lookout for a group of bank robbers who intend to rob the bank where he works as janitor. We really enjoyed it and do recommend it --- just be aware you're definitely not in for a slam-bang action movie with this one.

schoolofruckus
09-23-2007, 03:01 PM
We watched it last weekend and thought it was great. From an historical standpoint, I found it especially interesting because I have vague memories from my childhood of the letters/cipher being published in the newspapers. So it was intriguing to see the entire chain of events played out from beginning to end.

We rented The Lookout, too. A very slow moving, thoughtful film. And a revelation to see Joseph Gordon-Levitt as someone other than his Third Rock From the Sun persona. He plays a high school athlete who suffers a brain injury after a catastrophic car accident. He's seduced into acting as lookout for a group of bank robbers who intend to rob the bank where he works as janitor. We really enjoyed it and do recommend it --- just be aware you're definitely not in for a slam-bang action movie with this one.

Ethery, if you want to see some serious Joseph Gordon-Levitt awesomeness - and if you're in the mood for something really heavy - you simply must check out "Mysterious Skin". It's an extraordinary film about child abuse - so, like I said, you kind of have to be in a certain frame of mind for that - and Gordon-Levitt is an absolute force of nature. One of my favorite performances of recent times.

He was also the shit in "Brick", a high school film that uses 40's film noir ethos to tell the story of a loner trying to solve a murder.

KungFuJoe
09-23-2007, 04:37 PM
Listen to School. "Mysterious Skin" is a great film. Joseph Gorden Levitt is arguably the most exciting actor to watch from his generation. I still have yet to see "Brick" & "The Lookout", but have been a fan since the "10 Things I Hate About You" days.

On another note, for those that care and haven't heard "Across the Universe" is the same cut I saw back in March (or was it April?). so, it appears Julie Taymor won the battle & got her cut. I went to see the film again the other day to give it my support. I still very much enjoyed it. It definately has it's flaws, as I found myself realizing there were a couple of trimmings that could have been made. Overall though I think it's an outstanding spectacle. I'm sure they will eventually push the film into even more theaters, but you should check it out as soon as you can.

HowToDisappear
09-24-2007, 10:43 AM
if you want to see some serious Joseph Gordon-Levitt awesomeness - and if you're in the mood for something really heavy - you simply must check out "Mysterious Skin". It's an extraordinary film about child abuse - so, like I said, you kind of have to be in a certain frame of mind for that - and Gordon-Levitt is an absolute force of nature. One of my favorite performances of recent times.

He was also the shit in "Brick", a high school film that uses 40's film noir ethos to tell the story of a loner trying to solve a murder.

I'll check those out. We've be seeing a lot more films lately now that the girls are out of the house.

We saw Eastern Promises yesterday. I am not a big fan of Cronenberg - in fact, to this day Videodrome remains on my list of Most Loathed Films of All Time - but I really liked A History of Violence and was hoping this would be just as good. I thinks it falters somewhat - I didn't care for Naomi Watts character and frankly wish she wasn't there - but the men WOW. Naked tattooed Viggo fighting in the bath house? Holy crap. What a scene. Worth the price of admission right there.

I have to add, I was warned in advance that the movie was very violent. That being said, one of the reasons I've always disliked Cronenberg so much was his over-fondness for excesses of all kinds. In my opinion, in these last two films of his, he's actually showing a lot of uncharacteristic restraint in that regard. I think he's mellowing as he gets older.

RotationSlimWang
09-24-2007, 10:51 AM
Only thing I really liked about Brick was the crispness of the shots and the dude punching him several times in the parking lot. That was funny. Aside from that, they just built up a distracting concept to cover up the fact that they were making a movie that's already been made to death.

Mr.Nipples
09-24-2007, 01:23 PM
We saw Eastern Promises yesterday. I am not a big fan of Cronenberg - in fact, to this day Videodrome remains on my list of Most Loathed Films of All Time -

if i may ask...why(besides the gore)?
jyPVOrga9FA

PotVsKtl
09-24-2007, 05:14 PM
Only thing I really liked about Brick was the crispness of the shots and the dude punching him several times in the parking lot. That was funny. Aside from that, they just built up a distracting concept to cover up the fact that they were making a movie that's already been made to death.

All genre films have been made to death. Everything you like about every movie that can be slotted into any category derives from its "distracting concept."

schoolofruckus
09-24-2007, 05:41 PM
Indeed. It's always about the singer, not the song.

HowToDisappear
09-24-2007, 06:06 PM
if i may ask...why(besides the gore)?

I saw it when it first came out, and I remember wishing I could erase all memory of viewing it from my mind, out of fear I'd develop some horrible, film-induced brain tumor myself.

Sick, deranged, perverse film.

RotationSlimWang
09-24-2007, 06:11 PM
All genre films have been made to death. Everything you like about every movie that can be slotted into any category derives from its "distracting concept."

Yeah yeah yeah, there's only fourteen stories, I know, I write the shit. But to say that there's not a way to work within a genre and still be original negates any point in making movies. I also have a distaste for movies that are played intentionally blankly. No one in the flick emotes, except J-Lev (as I like to call him) on a few rare occasions. You can pull that off sometimes, but usually you have to be the Coens.

But Brick just straight jacked a forgettable noir formula storyline (anybody remember what happened? Some girl missing or something? Why were we supposed to care?) and made it teenagers, and made them talk like 1940s noir characters. That they were teenagers added nothing to it except the gimmick. If you're gonna make a neo-noir then fucking make one--don't just play out a script exactly like the movies they made 6 decades ago and change them all to teenagers and call that doing something.

PotVsKtl
09-24-2007, 07:43 PM
You could be the Coens. Preferably, you could be Altman, Huston, Polanski, Lang. Whatever.

PotVsKtl
09-24-2007, 07:46 PM
Wait, I'm boring myself.

algunz
09-24-2007, 08:21 PM
You do that a lot.

RotationSlimWang
09-24-2007, 08:32 PM
You could be the Coens. Preferably, you could be Altman, Huston, Polanski, Lang. Whatever.
Wait, I'm boring myself.I can't tell whether or not you're making fun of me. But there's not any creative profanity, so normally that would indicate no... but I still don't follow.

full on idle
09-24-2007, 09:21 PM
I loved Brick.

wmgaretjax
09-25-2007, 07:44 AM
i saw across the universe. I was bored. although there were some great visual moments, it was stupid and silly.

i also saw A Mighty Heart, which was good, but could have done without the emotional baggage.

EDIT: my dept at school just bought all of the criterions (for the most part, they passed on a few). So I have some burning and watching to do.

RotationSlimWang
09-25-2007, 01:35 PM
An extra on the new Indy movie leaked the plot. Steven Spielberg is pissed.

SPOILERS:http://www.nypost.com/seven/09252007/gossip/pagesix/pagesix.htm

Tylerdurden31
09-25-2007, 01:44 PM
i started looking, then I smacked myself in the brain and stopped

RotationSlimWang
09-25-2007, 01:57 PM
Frankly, both that plot and the title are really weak compared to Indy 1 and 3.

wmgaretjax
09-25-2007, 02:39 PM
was the Southland Tales trailer discussed? if not:

http://us.rd.yahoo.com/movies/trailers/1809233751/1809936368/?http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1809233751/video/4164037/20070920/150/4164037-1000-flash-s.44247659-,4164037-1000-wmv-s.44247604-,4164037-300-wmv-s.44247594-,4164037-300-flash-s.44247613-,4164037-700-flash-s.44247646-,4164037-100-flash-s.44247608-,4164037-700-wmv-s.44247599-,4164037-100-wmv-s.44247575-,4164036-10300-qtv-s.44247706-,4164036-6800-qtv-s.44247686-,4164036-2700-qtv-s.44247679-


tee hee...

well... it looks good.

menikmati
09-25-2007, 07:37 PM
the title to Indy IV, and the plot (which isn't really that spoiled IMO) both suck ass....this whole thing is a mistake.

RotationSlimWang
09-25-2007, 08:09 PM
Glad to see we're in agreement, Eric. That extra had better have been withholding the parts that make this quest remotely comparable to going after the Ark of the Covenent (Covenant?) and the Holy Grail.

schoolofruckus
09-25-2007, 08:21 PM
They're filming the new one at my lot as of today. Apparently, the set they built in our stage is where the climax of the film takes place. Spielberg ain't letting shit in there. I may get to go take a look if I can borrow the one stage pass that has been issued to our department.

Down Rodeo
09-26-2007, 10:56 AM
I wonder if the writers for Indy IV knew that Mastodon's last album, Blood Mountain, is about the main character climbing this mountain to find a Crystal Skull and encountering mythical beasts such as the Cysquatch and Birchmen along the way. Mastodon better be on the soundtrack at least.

algunz
09-26-2007, 02:45 PM
I watched the Science of Sleep last night and really enjoyed it. I found the distortion of time & space, language & words, dream & reality rather refreshing despite the fact that it can be a rather common theme in cinema. The movie had a great sense of humor, and the sets looked like so much fun to create. Gael Garcia Bernal is absolutely lovable, and the characters were very easy to relate with for me. It made me rather nostalgic. The relationship between the two main characters, Stephane and Stephanie, was reminiscent of me and my friends in college. I dearly miss those unique minds that through silliness, imagination, and fierce intelligence were able to happily cross over the expected standards of society and jump headlong into the exhilarating world of the fucked up, to “leap forward into absurdity.” I completely understand what it means to be drawn to people who are creative. It is what keeps me tied to Coachella and the community it attracts. But more significantly I was intrigued by the dream stuff.

I’ve always been a fucked up sleeper. It was at its worst in junior high when I would find myself every few months waking up in various awkward places – such as my neighbor’s doorstep with a bag of marshmallows or the backseat of my mom’s car in my Girl Scout uniform. It slowed down in high school, so my parents and I just figured I was growing out of it. Unfortunately, as a result of my excessive experimentation in college, it picked up again - big time. The dormitory was very close quarters and we often shared our sleeping space, among other things. Of course, as soon as my “creative” friends discovered that they could fuck with me - it was game on. The expected occurred with random drawings and words found on my face in the morning or my clothes altered or completely changed. The oddest thing though was that I was actually involved in the process, but I was asleep – it was like a blackout, but these were nights that I would fall asleep sober. It all made me feel very vulnerable, very “schizometric.” My friends loved it, and yes these were my friends, so I am confident that they never did anything inappropriate. I became just another toy to play with for them. I tried to stop falling asleep in other places besides my bed, but then I started doing the wandering again. Everyone was very patient and did what they could to insure that I was safe, but they still had their fun. They discovered that they could lead my dreams by talking to me, make me say things over the phone and send out messages, and the worst was when they discovered that I would suck and nibble on things. No, they never put their dick in my mouth, but I woke up with everything from a finger, to a pickle, to a shiny, black dildo between my lips or gripped within my fingers. In simplest terms, I could completely relate to how lost and out of control Stephane felt.

Eventually I shared with my friends how vulnerable it made me feel, even though I had feigned that it was ok and just a joke. They stopped, but the "sleeping Alessandra" stories probably never will and the pictures will definitely haunt me forever. I haven’t slept walked since just after I hooked up with my husband. Apparently, love really does cure all. Jim says that I still talk in my sleep and have shared quite a few amusing stories from my dreams while still in them.

So, needless to say, the movie really connected.

J~$$$
09-27-2007, 01:55 PM
Here ya go, you perverts.

http://hotelchevalier.com/

or most of it here....

e1x7-l5EAXo&eurl

TomAz
09-27-2007, 02:06 PM
hey you film snobs, I mean cultural elite, help me out here. I really like John Boorman's Excalibur a lot, its probably a top 50 movie for me. I also liked The Emerald Forest and Hope and Glory. but I sort of forgot about Boorman after that, is any of his stuff like Tailor of Panama any good?

Yablonowitz
09-27-2007, 02:21 PM
hey you film snobs, I mean cultural elite

Why are you talking to yourself?

bballarl
09-27-2007, 02:23 PM
Zing.

TomAz
09-27-2007, 02:26 PM
I like movies but I am not nearly as knowledgable as people here.

This just seems to be my day doesn't it?

amyzzz
09-27-2007, 02:29 PM
I got you, Tom.

schoolofruckus
09-27-2007, 10:33 PM
hey you film snobs, I mean cultural elite, help me out here. I really like John Boorman's Excalibur a lot, its probably a top 50 movie for me. I also liked The Emerald Forest and Hope and Glory. but I sort of forgot about Boorman after that, is any of his stuff like Tailor of Panama any good?

Boorman's signature film is Deliverance. I haven't seen it - yet - but I hear the new DVD that just came out has an inferior transfer to the older disc that was issued in like 2001. Either way, you should see that just for the sake of being proper.

Also, Point Blank, which has the same source material as Mel Gibson's Payback (and I realize I'm doing it no favors by bringing that up).

KungFuJoe
09-27-2007, 10:47 PM
Ok. I went and saw "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford" this evening. After Gabe's reaction I wasn't really sure what to expect. I've noticed we generally share the same feelings about most films, but I wasn't as in love with "Zodiac" as you were, so I wasn't sure I would be as in love with this one as well. All I can say is that after three hours watching this glorious film I can't honestly say I've seen a better film all year. You were dead on with your review. This was a truly remarkable film. Gorgeous cinematography, wonderful editing, beautiful score & fantastic performances. I was captivated from beginning to end. This is the film "3:10 to Yuma" could only dream to be. Brad Pitt was great. Casey Affleck gave the performance of his career. And for crist sake can someone give Sam Rockwell a freakin' award already?! There's nothing I can say that Gabe didn't already put in much better words. Brilliant film!


my only minor complaint with the film was that the narrator's voice irritated me a bit. I enjoyed the narration, but there was something about the mans voice that didn't sit well with me. This is only personal taste, but by the end I warmed up to it.

tessalasset
09-27-2007, 10:49 PM
i will at some point call/write you back i promise. i suck right now.

wmgaretjax
09-28-2007, 12:16 AM
damn, good to hear. I was excited for this movie via the trailer. I love Casey Affleck and was disappointed to read some negative reviews. But these two have lifted my spirits. It opens tomorrow here.

schoolofruckus
09-28-2007, 10:06 AM
damn, good to hear. I was excited for this movie via the trailer. I love Casey Affleck and was disappointed to read some negative reviews. But these two have lifted my spirits. It opens tomorrow here.

Jared - There's no way in hell you don't love this movie to pieces.

In other news, "There Will Be Blood" had its first public screening last night (http://www.cinematical.com/2007/09/28/fantastic-fest-review-there-will-be-blood/) at Fantastic Fest. Word has it the first 18 minutes of the movie feature no dialogue, and Daniel Day-Lewis gives one of his finest performances. I'm going to bust what Ronnie likes to call.....ANUT!!!!!....when I get to finally see this.

PotVsKtl
09-28-2007, 10:08 AM
When are you going to leak Where the Wild Things Are? Why do you hate children and love?

TomAz
09-28-2007, 10:09 AM
Boorman's signature film is Deliverance. I haven't seen it - yet - but I hear the new DVD that just came out has an inferior transfer to the older disc that was issued in like 2001. Either way, you should see that just for the sake of being proper.

Also, Point Blank, which has the same source material as Mel Gibson's Payback (and I realize I'm doing it no favors by bringing that up).

I had no idea he did Deliverance. I've seen that movie several times. It's a quite different style than the others I've mentioned. Squeal like a pig for me.

PotVsKtl
09-28-2007, 10:11 AM
Tom, why do you suppose Gabriel hates children and love?

schoolofruckus
09-28-2007, 10:40 AM
Pot, as one who takes great pleasure in the evisceration of all that brings happiness, I happily inform you that "Where the Wild Things Are" will complete its answer print in December, but I personally am witholding its release until 10.3.08.

PotVsKtl
09-28-2007, 10:44 AM
That's straight up treacherous. You're a foul lump on a splintered shillelagh.

KungFuJoe
09-28-2007, 11:11 AM
i will at some point call/write you back i promise. i suck right now.

why yes, yes you do!

And go see Across the Universe!! I know you won't enjoy it as much as Once, but I'm interested to see if you like it none the less.

wmgaretjax
09-28-2007, 12:10 PM
Jared - There's no way in hell you don't love this movie to pieces.

In other news, "There Will Be Blood" had its first public screening last night (http://www.cinematical.com/2007/09/28/fantastic-fest-review-there-will-be-blood/) at Fantastic Fest. Word has it the first 18 minutes of the movie feature no dialogue, and Daniel Day-Lewis gives one of his finest performances. I'm going to bust what Ronnie likes to call.....ANUT!!!!!....when I get to finally see this.

yeah. I'm having panic attacks just getting excited to hear the score (jonny greenwood).

Courtney
09-28-2007, 12:21 PM
http://www.filter-mag.com/bigtime/images/bigtime-OCT-2.jpg

Jealous. Want to see. Now.

J~$$$
09-28-2007, 12:23 PM
That looks cool. It would have been over the top if PJ harvey was actually there.

wmgaretjax
09-28-2007, 12:29 PM
i went by scarecrow for my first movie rental in 4 months... felt really good.

nabbed:
Satantango by Bela Tarr - Artificial Eye Release
The Mirror by Tarkovsky
Ivan's Childhood by Tarkovsky - new Criterion print
If... - new Critertion print

mob roulette
09-28-2007, 12:41 PM
(HEAR THE NEW ALBUM BY)

Yeah, that's just mean.

schoolofruckus
09-28-2007, 01:31 PM
i went by scarecrow for my first movie rental in 4 months... felt really good.

nabbed:
Satantango by Bela Tarr - Artificial Eye Release
The Mirror by Tarkovsky
Ivan's Childhood by Tarkovsky - new Criterion print
If... - new Critertion print

Satantango's on DVD? Is it a Region 2?

I'm seeing The Darjeeling Limited at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica on Wednesday w/ Wes Anderson Q & A. I think it's sold out; check Fandango if you want to go.

Also, Control (the Joy Division biopic) is playing the following Sunday.

wmgaretjax
09-28-2007, 01:51 PM
Satantango's on DVD? Is it a Region 2?

I'm seeing The Darjeeling Limited at the Aero Theatre in Santa Monica on Wednesday w/ Wes Anderson Q & A. I think it's sold out; check Fandango if you want to go.

Also, Control (the Joy Division biopic) is playing the following Sunday.

yes, Artificial Eye.

I'm excited for Control. It opened in Paris the day after I left.

schoolofruckus
09-28-2007, 02:43 PM
In case anybody cares, I found out that Guy Ritchie's Revolver will finally be getting a US theatrical release in December.

Yablonowitz
09-28-2007, 02:52 PM
i went by scarecrow for my first movie rental in 4 months... felt really good.

nabbed:
Satantango by Bela Tarr - Artificial Eye Release
The Mirror by Tarkovsky
Ivan's Childhood by Tarkovsky - new Criterion print
If... - new Critertion print

I am very proud of you and admire your avante guardednesitude.

RotationSlimWang
09-28-2007, 02:53 PM
In case anybody cares, I found out that Guy Ritchie's Revolver will finally be getting a US theatrical release in December.

Have we discussed that on here yet? I'm going to hold back my opinion until I hear yours, if you have one, Gabe, just in case there's an argument waiting on the other side of the answers. =)

wmgaretjax
09-28-2007, 02:55 PM
Have we discussed that on here yet? I'm going to hold back my opinion until I hear yours, if you have one, Gabe, just in case there's an argument waiting on the other side of the answers. =)

i care. and will be going to see it again. if gabe is on my side, it will be a nice little row for sure.

Yablonowitz
09-28-2007, 02:55 PM
Have we discussed that on here yet? I'm going to hold back my opinion until I hear yours, if you have one, Gabe, just in case there's an argument waiting on the other side of the answers. =)

Why on god's green earth does a flippant, crude, assholish, druggie, misanthrope like yourself employ smilee characters? It fucks with my mind when you do that. Knock it off.

wmgaretjax
09-28-2007, 02:57 PM
Why on god's green earth does a flippant, crude, assholish, druggie, misanthrope like yourself employ smilee characters? It fucks with my mind when you do that. Knock it off.

i laughed really hard. i never really noticed that before, but it's pretty fucking out of character.

wmgaretjax
09-28-2007, 02:58 PM
I am very proud of you and admire your avante guardednesitude.

i was out of the country.... so I did not abstain out of any kind of deliberate withdrawal. but i appreciate your support, as always mom.

RotationSlimWang
09-28-2007, 03:04 PM
Why on god's green earth does a flippant, crude, assholish, druggie, misanthrope like yourself employ smilee characters? It fucks with my mind when you do that. Knock it off.

I smile with almost everything I say. Something my dad told me once: "Boy, you can call me a cocksucker if you want... but you better be smiling when you say it." I, pretentiously, like to think of grinning as a personal symbol.

RotationSlimWang
09-28-2007, 03:05 PM
i care. and will be going to see it again. if gabe is on my side, it will be a nice little row for sure.

No, I'm trying to avoid the argument, actually. So you're on the pro side?

wmgaretjax
09-28-2007, 03:09 PM
No, I'm trying to avoid the argument, actually. So you're on the pro side?

we already had this discussion. you told me you would watch it again, if I remember it right.

I am on the pro side. I think it is his best film. but I was on a lot of pain killers at the time, maybe I'm way off the mark. that's the main reason I would like to see it again.

schoolofruckus
09-28-2007, 03:10 PM
I believe "Revolver" was discussed; I think Randy hates it and Jared and Joe both loved it. I want to see it, as I enjoyed "Snatch" and "Lock, Stock" in my youth.

One thing I just noticed is that Randy's avatar appears to be two Homer Simpsons sucking two cocks. Correct me if I'm wrong?

RotationSlimWang
09-28-2007, 03:14 PM
There is no way I said I would see that again. I remember agreeing to do that with something, but definitely not that.

Gabe, you are right on the money. MY cocks.

KungFuJoe
09-28-2007, 03:21 PM
I believe "Revolver" was discussed; I think Randy hates it and Jared and Joe both loved it. I want to see it, as I enjoyed "Snatch" and "Lock, Stock" in my youth.

One thing I just noticed is that Randy's avatar appears to be two Homer Simpsons sucking two cocks. Correct me if I'm wrong?

I am the one who said I would watch it again. I have not done so yet. My first impression was that it was a god awful mess of a film. I would not pay to see it in the theater. Already wasted my cash on the dvd. Only thing I liked about the film was Statham's performance. I will watch it again at some point though, being that I own the shite.

RotationSlimWang
09-28-2007, 03:35 PM
Seriously, one of the least enjoyable movies I've ever watched. I don't want to argue about it, but for real--fucking painful to sit through.

schoolofruckus
09-28-2007, 03:51 PM
I'm going to see "Transformers" tomorrow in IMAX. I couldn't bring myself to throw down $11 on it even at the Arclight dome, but in IMAX? If it's going to kick-ass anywhere, it's going to be there.

Then the goal is to catch "Across the Universe" and "Eastern Promises" within the next week, along with the aforementioned "Darjeeling" and "Control". If I have time, I plan on seeing "Into the Wild" (trailer won me over) and maybe "The Kingdom" (big "Friday Night Lights" fan). I'd like to catch "In the Valley of Elah" (preferably for free, but I hear it's a Haggis film for Haggis haters) and "Great World of Sound" (supposedly killed at Sundance, although the trailer sucks) somewhere as well, but I know that in such a top-heavy fall season, several films are going to have to eat shit.

algunz
09-28-2007, 08:42 PM
Less Than Zero has just started on TV, my evening has been redeemed. I was actually contemplating going to bed.

RotationSlimWang
09-28-2007, 08:50 PM
Less Than Zero has just started on TV, my evening has been redeemed. I was actually contemplating going to bed.

That is one of the most disappointing translations in film. Catch-22 being the worst.

algunz
09-28-2007, 09:06 PM
Frickin' party pooper. That was one of my issues with film school and the study of film. Often it ruins your ability to appreciate movies for just what they are at times - mindless entertainment.

RotationSlimWang
09-29-2007, 11:59 AM
Has nothing to do with film school--read the book. They fucking butchered it.

wmgaretjax
09-29-2007, 12:09 PM
Frickin' party pooper. That was one of my issues with film school and the study of film. Often it ruins your ability to appreciate movies for just what they are at times - mindless entertainment.

Danielle Steele has a couple of really good books that I would like to make into movies.

Jenniehoo
09-29-2007, 03:31 PM
I think Rules of Attraction was a better adaptation to film from the book than Less than Zero. Which is weird because I feel like the book was hitting hot on a lot of fallout from cultural trends of the 80s that are represented well in the time period of the movie - but it felt like the characters didn't connect the bleak sense of despair as well and things were a little too tied up with a bow. I feel like when adapting something so well known, it's owed more allegiance to the original flow and story. I didn't hate it, but since I saw it after I read the book, I think I was a little disappointed. Robert Downey Jr. was really good in it, though.

RotationSlimWang
09-29-2007, 03:43 PM
The problem is that you can't make Less Than Zero into a movie. There's no actual plot--it's just kinda snapshots of that time and place and people and it's all about mood. So they invented a storyline for the movie and left out a lot of the things that were actually affecting about the book--of course you can't really throw in too much kiddie porn and other shit like that to a major motion picture--and based everything around Blair and Julian and it just wasn't the book at all. It was like an after school special.

Rules Of Attraction was an amazing adaptation. Still deviated from the book in some ways that I dislike but totally understand why Avary did it that way, and it actually managed to do some things BETTER than the book. Best Ellis adaptation IMO, which is saying a lot because I love American Psycho. I wish Avary would finally do Glamorama, although I have no idea how you would make that. I would never attempt it myself.

wmgaretjax
09-29-2007, 04:21 PM
The problem is that you can't make Less Than Zero into a movie. There's no actual plot--it's just kinda snapshots of that time and place and people and it's all about mood.


What a stupid thing to say. You can argue the adaptation was misguided, but don't say you can't make a movie out of something that doesn't have a plot.

RotationSlimWang
09-29-2007, 04:36 PM
What a stupid thing to say. You can argue the adaptation was misguided, but don't say you can't make a movie out of something that doesn't have a plot.

Correction: you can't make a good movie without a plot. We've had this argument before, I don't want to get into it again. Like you, Jared, but hate your tastes. =)

PotVsKtl
09-29-2007, 05:14 PM
Like a Disneyland ride, for instance.

RotationSlimWang
09-29-2007, 05:18 PM
As always, Pot v. Skittles has the smartest answer in the room (thread).

Jenniehoo
09-29-2007, 06:17 PM
http://www.adiumxtras.com/images/pictures/zoolander_dock_icons_20630_img_692.png

algunz
09-29-2007, 09:20 PM
If it comes out a book first, most of the literate and "cinematically" educated will find the faults. Try to separate that, and the movie (Less Than Zero, which I did read by the way - it kills me that I feel the need to defend my self) is entertaining and well constructed. Rarely does a movie improve on the book - although Lord of the Rings came pretty damn close. My original point was simply that knowing how to read and analyze a film sometimes prevents one from appreciating them at their simplest form - and frankly that sucks.

mob roulette
09-29-2007, 10:18 PM
Across The Universe is a fucking trainwreck. Stated. One. Hot. Mess. Taymor needs to go back to Broadway and that right quick. This is barely even a film.

mob roulette
09-30-2007, 12:29 AM
Also I maintain that There Will Be Blood looks to be the best film of the year from where I'm sitting. Based solely on the initial reviews trickling in, I don't think anything's going to be able to hold a candle to it.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 03:28 AM
If it comes out a book first, most of the literate and "cinematically" educated will find the faults. Try to separate that, and the movie (Less Than Zero, which I did read by the way - it kills me that I feel the need to defend my self) is entertaining and well constructed. Rarely does a movie improve on the book - although Lord of the Rings came pretty damn close. My original point was simply that knowing how to read and analyze a film sometimes prevents one from appreciating them at their simplest form - and frankly that sucks.

You don't need to learn about film to know that Less Than Zero, as a movie, is fucking trite. I knew it when I was 14, and I hadn't learned shit about movies then. What is a good story isn't something you have to study to know.

And LOTR were all fucking garbage. And that's not because I'm a movie buff--it's because they were fucking garbage. A nine-hour long road movie. I've played editions of Final Fantasy (the video game) that had stories just as good if not better than that.

full on idle
09-30-2007, 03:37 AM
but that part where the trees come to help the people made me so happy.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 03:50 AM
They nervously blinking eye as the tower in Mordor falls trumps the happy trees, though. That was the lamest shit ever, and I called it from the very first LOTR.

schoolofruckus
09-30-2007, 05:53 AM
Transformers in IMAX was a ton of fun. They could - and should - have easily lost half of the movie's first hour. But once the Autobots make their appearance at about the 70 minute mark, the rest of the movie is a blast.

So much for being cinematically educated.

KungFuJoe
09-30-2007, 11:28 AM
You don't need to learn about film to know that Less Than Zero, as a movie, is fucking trite. I knew it when I was 14, and I hadn't learned shit about movies then. What is a good story isn't something you have to study to know.

And LOTR were all fucking garbage. And that's not because I'm a movie buff--it's because they were fucking garbage. A nine-hour long road movie. I've played editions of Final Fantasy (the video game) that had stories just as good if not better than that.

That's pretty harsh. I love the LOTR trilogy! I can understand if you don't enjoy them, but it's crazy to call the films garbage. I'm not a fan of a lot of Spielbergs work, but would never call his films garbage (except for the Flinstones). They are certainly some of the best films ever adapted from books. Also, Final Fantasy and a lot of fantasy films would probably not exist if it were not for the work of J.R.R. Tolkien.

also, not that this has anything to do with LOTR, but I think Stan Brakhage proved long ago that you can make interesting "films" that don't have a story.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 12:12 PM
No story=video art. You can't call a book of poetry a novel. J.R.R. Tolkien has nothing to do with why the LOTR films are crap, although I don't buy that the books are so much better. There is nothing to care about, there is nothing remotely emotionally complicated, and there's 45 minutes of people saying "goodbye."

PotVsKtl
09-30-2007, 12:50 PM
Experimental film.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 01:01 PM
Conjectural jerking off.

PotVsKtl
09-30-2007, 01:04 PM
Slavery to convention.

full on idle
09-30-2007, 01:07 PM
geek fight!

PotVsKtl
09-30-2007, 01:11 PM
It's more of a tussle.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 01:27 PM
It's not a tussle unless there's rolling around. And a story.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 01:30 PM
And I never said that poetry isn't good too. But you have to separate what is essentially audio-visual poetry from what is audio-visual novel.

wmgaretjax
09-30-2007, 03:47 PM
But you have to separate what is essentially audio-visual poetry from what is audio-visual novel.

genre junkie.

schoolofruckus
09-30-2007, 04:01 PM
And I never said that poetry isn't good too. But you have to separate what is essentially audio-visual poetry from what is audio-visual novel.

No - you have to separate them. Just because you wouldn't know what to do with a film that doesn't have easily-discerned plot points doesn't mean it's not a movie.

wmgaretjax
09-30-2007, 04:04 PM
No story=video art. You can't call a book of poetry a novel.

Why a novel? Since when are stories only found in explicit narratives?

I watched Tarkovsky's Ivan's Childhood on Criterion. It's a great film that is unlike Tarkovsky's other features. The Criterion print is beautiful.

I also saw "The Italian Stallion" last night for a midnight movie. It was the porno that Stallone starred in before Rocky to make some money. It was funny, creepy, and downright bizarre. The best scene was when Stallone gets mad because he lost money playing cards, he breaks a window with his hand, and some girl licks it off for like 4 minutes. Awesome.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 04:49 PM
Stop saying I'm insisting on genres or plot points. I'm just talking about a STORY. And I'm not having this argument again, goddammit. You win, be arty.

schoolofruckus
09-30-2007, 05:06 PM
The argument isn't about anyone being "arty". It's about you not declaring with your typical overcompensation-for-misinformation certainty that anything that doesn't have a conventional beginning, middle, and end, with characters that go through some arbitrary amount of completely-unambiguous change, doesn't have a story. You keep starting this shit - not me, Jared, Pot, or anyone else - and you will keep getting the same argument until you stop.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 05:47 PM
The argument isn't about anyone being "arty". It's about you not declaring with your typical overcompensation-for-misinformation certainty that anything that doesn't have a conventional beginning, middle, and end, with characters that go through some arbitrary amount of completely-unambiguous change, doesn't have a story. You keep starting this shit - not me, Jared, Pot, or anyone else - and you will keep getting the same argument until you stop.I made my assessment of a particular movie--Jared first and then you are the ones who started turning the argument personal, attacking my opinion not just as it relates to the material but as an overall wrong-headedness in my view of film. Not like I give a shit, but for the record I started nothing--you like to make it personal. I don't.

schoolofruckus
09-30-2007, 06:08 PM
The problem is that you can't make Less Than Zero into a movie. There's no actual plot--it's just kinda snapshots of that time and place and people and it's all about mood.

(Jared chastises you for this sentiment)

Correction: you can't make a good movie without a plot. We've had this argument before, I don't want to get into it again. Like you, Jared, but hate your tastes. =)

I'll say it again:

YOU made another in a long line of absolutist, tunnel-visioned statements about needing a "plot" - which I think we can all agree implies a pretty standardized, easy-to-grasp sequencing of events - to have a good movie. Then you got disagreed with. Then you get all sore and wounded puppy because you're in the minority (among those who engage in these discussions), and you try to beg off the argument.

Once again, it's just typical, predictable Randy melodrama...making statements that you know will invite dissension and then ducking and covering when you get called out.

PotVsKtl
09-30-2007, 06:16 PM
Tuff love y'all.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 06:39 PM
I'll say it again:

YOU made another in a long line of absolutist, tunnel-visioned statements about needing a "plot" - which I think we can all agree implies a pretty standardized, easy-to-grasp sequencing of events - to have a good movie. Then you got disagreed with. Then you get all sore and wounded puppy because you're in the minority (among those who engage in these discussions), and you try to beg off the argument.

Once again, it's just typical, predictable Randy melodrama...making statements that you know will invite dissension and then ducking and covering when you get called out.

"Standardized" and "easy-to-grasp" are connotations you apply to the term, not me. This is why I'm tired of having this discussion, not because I'm outnumbered. Because you can't separate what I advocate from an insistence on strictly formulaic cookie-cutter crap, despite repeatedly seeing that my tastes are far from that.

Accuse me of whatever you want. I'm not going to join you in banging our heads against this wall yet again just because you call me chicken. I just don't see any way to maintain a semblance of maturity while launching personal attacks just because our philosophies differ.

schoolofruckus
09-30-2007, 06:57 PM
I didn't call you chicken for not wanting to get into this age-old issue once more. I called you chicken for whining about "personal attacks" when all you do is attack attack attack everyone else's opinions. You can call David Lynch a meat-rope-smoker, and say Vincent Gallo deserves daily beatings, but I can't say that your tastes are narrow?

The irony is that the topic that started the debate this time - the failings of LOTR - is one in which I do largely agree with you. Not that I think they suck entirely, but they are a bit boring, far-too-easy emotionally/morally/thematically, and definitely insulting in the implication that we needed to watch Queer Eye for the Straight Hobbits say goodbye at sunset several times in a row in order to feel satisfied.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 07:19 PM
My attacks on filmmakers who are not participating in this thread are hardly the same thing as your attacks on my character because of said opinions. You have said all kinds of similarly insulting things about filmmakers, Brett Ratner for example. I'm far from thin-skinned, Gabe--it's not that I can't stand the heat of your criticism. I back out of these discussions, and for a while I backed out of this thread entirely, because I don't want to talk shit back to you, because before this shit started we were friendly. So I keep my mouth shut to perserve the cordial discussions we manage to have whenever the fact that the priority I place on narrative doesn't incense you. Still don't understand why it does, but if it must be then I'll just keep on swallowing my pride on the matter.

PotVsKtl
09-30-2007, 07:31 PM
Your face is an insult to filmmaking.

RotationSlimWang
09-30-2007, 08:08 PM
My face lacks story.

Also, it's too Jewish.

You are correct.

mountmccabe
09-30-2007, 08:55 PM
I finally saw Tideland. I love Gilliam. This was his fantasy side but not really his funny side. Actually it was mostly his creepy and disturbing side... on many fronts. Though, somehow, the fantasy aspects kept it light. I'mn't sure how he did that and it was amazing just for that.

wmgaretjax
09-30-2007, 11:51 PM
I finally saw Tideland. I love Gilliam. This was his fantasy side but not really his funny side. Actually it was mostly his creepy and disturbing side... on many fronts. Though, somehow, the fantasy aspects kept it light. I'mn't sure how he did that and it was amazing just for that.

I hated this film. The acting was terrible. The themes were incredibly heavy handed. And the dark imagery added nothing to the trite character analysis that Gilliam was attempting, it seemed a gimmick that never fulfilled it's purpose. God, that girl is one of the worst actors I have ever seen. Honestly, ever since the Don Quixote project failed, Gilliam has been a shell.

PotVsKtl
10-01-2007, 02:22 AM
Disagree.

Yablonowitz
10-01-2007, 06:48 AM
I like the LOTR movies. Fuck y'all who think differently. Not to stoop to a personal attack or anything....

full on idle
10-01-2007, 07:07 AM
http://www.squidge.org/~penemuel/Frodo.jpg

J~$$$
10-01-2007, 07:17 AM
Dildo Baggins.

schoolofruckus
10-01-2007, 08:03 AM
I just read that "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days" - the Romanian film that won the Palme D'Or at Cannes this year - is playing the AFI fest in Los Angeles this fall. The festival takes place November 1-11. This is where I saw "The Fountain" premiere last year - it's a pretty cool little festival. I'm hoping the line-up is sound.

KungFuJoe
10-01-2007, 08:16 AM
I just read that "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days" - the Romanian film that won the Palme D'Or at Cannes this year - is playing the AFI fest in Los Angeles this fall. The festival takes place November 1-11. This is where I saw "The Fountain" premiere last year - it's a pretty cool little festival. I'm hoping the line-up is sound.

I caught "Pan's Labyrinth" at last years AFI Fest. I really liked the festival, much more than the Los Angeles Film Festival. In fact, I'd say this is probably the best film festival in Southern California.

wmgaretjax
10-01-2007, 08:16 AM
I just read that "4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days" - the Romanian film that won the Palme D'Or at Cannes this year - is playing the AFI fest in Los Angeles this fall. The festival takes place November 1-11. This is where I saw "The Fountain" premiere last year - it's a pretty cool little festival. I'm hoping the line-up is sound.

It was playing Paris when I was there, unfortunately dubbed in french. I'm excited to see it, I have heard nothing but great things about it.

Yablonowitz
10-01-2007, 08:20 AM
It was playing Paris when I was there, unfortunately dubbed in french. I'm excited to see it, I have heard nothing but great things about it.

You haven't picked up French yet with all the foreign films you watch?

Yablonowitz
10-01-2007, 08:24 AM
Dildo Baggins.

“In the Shire, we don’t have homosexuals like in your country. We don’t have this phenomenon. I don’t know who told you this.”

wmgaretjax
10-01-2007, 08:55 AM
You haven't picked up French yet with all the foreign films you watch?

unfortunately my french is not good enough to read subtitles in it yet.

when I lived in Indonesia, a huge part of my learning the language was watching english tv shows or movies with subtitles in Bahasa.

RotationSlimWang
10-01-2007, 09:06 AM
I think I've probably said this in this thread before, but City Of God was so amazing to me that I practically wanted to learn Portugese just so I could experience it properly.

mob roulette
10-01-2007, 09:13 AM
Overrated. It's good but not as good as what these Pop Tart chomping, Red Bull swilling IMDB phanboys would have you believe. Saying.

RotationSlimWang
10-01-2007, 09:35 AM
Overrated. It's good but not as good as what these Pop Tart chomping, Red Bull swilling IMDB phanboys would have you believe. Saying.

Wait, what are you referring to? It had better not be City Of God, dude. We've been on homie status for a couple weeks now, but if you're gonna honestly say that's not an AMAZING piece of filmmaking, I may have to drive to Arizona and have a sit down with you.

I take that back--expressing a strong opinion in this thread is a fucking death trap. But seriously? Or were you talking about one of the other flicks? Cause if not... SERIOUSLY?

schoolofruckus
10-01-2007, 09:39 AM
Booooo. HISSSSSS. "City of God" is a tremendous movie.

For saying that, you almost don't deserve this. But here you go anyway:

ml2Ae2SIXac

Bud Luster
10-01-2007, 09:44 AM
I think I've probably said this in this thread before, but City Of God was so amazing to me that I practically wanted to learn Portugese just so I could experience it properly.

Agreed! I have Brazilian friends that say learning Portugese wouldnt help you to understand that "mushed up shit" that is spoken in the movie / many parts of Brazil. Have you seen the "City of Men" show on IFC? Same directors for both projects. Some of the same actors as well. The tv series isnt quite as over the top as the movie, but is still very good. I think they released or will release a feature length movie based on the tv series this year...

Bud Luster
10-01-2007, 09:48 AM
Booooo. HISSSSSS. "City of God" is a tremendous movie.

For saying that, you almost don't deserve this. But here you go anyway:

ml2Ae2SIXac

DanielDayLewis = WIN!

mob roulette
10-01-2007, 10:14 AM
Booooo. HISSSSSS. "City of God" is a tremendous movie.

For saying that, you almost don't deserve this. But here you go anyway:

ml2Ae2SIXac


Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

Also,

Central Station>City Of God>Amores Perros

It's not the other way around like some would have you believe. But whatever, all three are wonderful films.

wmgaretjax
10-01-2007, 10:53 AM
Randy, check out Carandiru.

Courtney
10-01-2007, 11:09 AM
I saw Mafioso, the 1962 Italian film directed by Alberto Lattuada, last night. It ruled a lot. I guess it was just subtitled in English for the first time in 2006, so now it's getting some film festival play over here.

I'm not sure if you'd even call it a comedy or a drama. A bit of both maybe. It features Alberto Sordi, a terrific actor who was also used by Fellini in a few of his early films (The White Sheik and also I Vitelloni). Sordi's character, Nino, is a middle-aged man who works in Milan as a supervisor at a Fiat manufacturing plant. The plot revolves around the trip that Nino takes with his wife and two young daughters to his small Sicilian hometown to visit his family. Before leaving Milan, the boss of his factory gives Nino a mysterious package to deliver to Don Vincenzo, the patriarch figure of Nino's hometown. With this package, Nino quickly discovers that a trip back home can become much more complicated than anticipated.

Much of comedy of the film revolves around the stereotypes of Sicilians, as demonstrated early in the film when Nino's boss comments on how as a Sicilian he is proving that he can do his job "just as well as any Italian or even Swiss man!" This theme is continued once Nino reaches his hometown, through the tensions that exist between Nino's dark-haired, olive-skinned parents and siblings and his blonde-haired, northern wife and daughters.

Visually, the film is strongly rooted within Italian Neorealism, especially as demonstrated through the stunning opening and closing sequences which pan across the work floor of the Fiat manufacturing plant in addition to the tendency of the camera to open or close scenes by resting on small exchanges of everyday rural life amongst the poor Sicilians of Nino's hometown. The influences of French New Wave are also present in some dynamic driving sequences as well as 360 degree+ shots of the cityscape.

What surprised me most about the film was just exactly how contemporary it feels. It precedes The Godfather by at least a decade, but feels very much on the same wavelength. It doesn't have any of the overt violence and bloodbath characteristics that we have now come to often associate with mafia-type movies, but instead relies on the actors and camerawork to demonstrate psychological effects. It's a wonder how the film managed to remain hidden for 45 years before being subtitled. Definitely worth seeing.

algunz
10-01-2007, 03:41 PM
I just heard that Dark is Rising is being made in to a movie and John Hodges is the screenwriter. Has anybody heard anything about this project? I enjoyed those books and would be interested in Hodges adaptation.

schoolofruckus
10-01-2007, 10:10 PM
I thought "Carandiru" sucked badly.

Jennie and I just watched "Eraserhead". It was pretty amazing....I'd be lying if I said I understood it all, but I wasn't confused by it. It added up, even if I'd be fucked trying to explain it.

RotationSlimWang
10-01-2007, 10:22 PM
I've seen some of City of Men (Cidade Des Hommes--credit goes to Gabe for making us reckonize--material of that quality deserves to not be translated) but you're right, it's just not the... god, I'm not even going to bother to put it into words. City Of God has everything that is the human struggle in there somehow. I think it might have bumped Citizen Kane out of my top three, and I know if I knew Portugese it would for sure.

Carandiru I found interesting although I don't remember a lot of it. What kept me intrigued was just what a different portrayal of prison it is from the grittiest, grimiest shit we get here in the states. Fucking Brazilians are so badass it's just frightening. And the widespread gayness within the jail was kinda fascinating, again just because of the cultural difference. Didn't seem like there was any semblance of homophobia--they had a wedding and everything, right? And everybody celebrated?

In the end it felt a little empty, but Gabe you gotta admit the last 10-15 minutes of that flick are fucking nuts. All the things that come flying out the windows (don't want to give it away).

LONG LIVE THE RIOT SQUAD! LONG LIVE THE RIOT SQUAD! LONG LIVE THE RIOT SQUAD!

How badass is that?

Jenniehoo
10-01-2007, 10:32 PM
OK, yeah, we just watched Eraserhead and I think I understood it in my own way. I realize that Lynch doesn't ever really tell you what he means with his movies or his intentions, and that makes my interpretation just as good as anyone else's. It's like my college poetry class where "your interpretation is just as good as the poets" even though we all knew that was a load. Anyway...

Here's what I'm thinking. The movie is essentially a strange dude getting a strange girl pregnant in a pre-apocalyptic, industrial landscape. Her family is bizarre and so is she. The whole tone of the movie is bleak and eerie. The movie is timeless in the sense that the black and white, desolate landscape that they actually show could be Gary, Indiana or Flint, Michigan and the movie is truly centered on the main character. It's related to time in the sense that because the girl is pregnant, her mother insists that the boy and girl get married to raise the baby.

The baby ends up being some sort of E.T. looking alien, mutant child. The mother resents and hates it because it looks slimy and cries all the time. She gets to her wits end and storms out because it won't stop crying, leaving the guy to take care of the mutant baby.

He eventually grows to hate the mutant baby. He's plagued with images and fantasies of a man with reptilian skin pulling levers on an unidentified planet and a girl with large cheeks (think the mumps) singing songs about heaven. I won't get too into the plot because I'm not 100% great at plot description. I basically just think that the movie was, in some way, about the human condition of reproduction and the fear that lives within that act.

It seems like the main character is always nervous. I believe that he's afraid of the good and evil dueling within him, and he sees the baby as a representation of this evil. This presents itself in both the fantasies he has (the girl with the mumps stomping out things that look like his child - then singing a lovely song - when he touches her, the screen turns bright. I think she represents heaven. Then the reptilian man who, in the beginning, turn cranks and levers to decide whether or not the man has the evil/deformed child, represents hell.)

I think it's about the duality that exists in all of us of good and bad - and the fear that we might pass that on to our children. Then, if we pass bad genes on to a child that makes it a mutant - how hard would we have to work to trump the desire to kill it. Or would we love it in some way. The main character seems to love the child - but then the child becomes sick. Then, when the man has sex with a woman across the hall and the woman turns out to be a whore, that's when the baby laughs at him and he ends up stabbing it until it dies - thus proving the evil in himself. The movie ends with the good (the woman who sang the lovely song) embracing him. That's either ultimate forgiveness or his perception.

I know that's a babbling rant - but that's what I thought was going on in that movie.

This is my 1,000th post. Whoop.

schoolofruckus
10-01-2007, 10:49 PM
I don't know what Lynch intended to say with it - does anyone ever, really? - but I think Jennie's interpretation is right on. I generally go for Lynch's films when I want that unique atmosphere and sense of dread, along with the unforgettable imagery, that only he can provide; any understanding of the themes and subtext is a bonus.



I've seen some of City of Men (Cidade Des Hommes--credit goes to Gabe for making us reckonize--material of that quality deserves to not be translated) but you're right, it's just not the... god, I'm not even going to bother to put it into words. City Of God has everything that is the human struggle in there somehow. I think it might have bumped Citizen Kane out of my top three, and I know if I knew Portugese it would for sure.

Carandiru I found interesting although I don't remember a lot of it. What kept me intrigued was just what a different portrayal of prison it is from the grittiest, grimiest shit we get here in the states. Fucking Brazilians are so badass it's just frightening. And the widespread gayness within the jail was kinda fascinating, again just because of the cultural difference. Didn't seem like there was any semblance of homophobia--they had a wedding and everything, right? And everybody celebrated?

In the end it felt a little empty, but Gabe you gotta admit the last 10-15 minutes of that flick are fucking nuts. All the things that come flying out the windows (don't want to give it away).

LONG LIVE THE RIOT SQUAD! LONG LIVE THE RIOT SQUAD! LONG LIVE THE RIOT SQUAD!

How badass is that?

The riot scene in "Carandiru" was pretty good. My primary problem with the movie was that it was depicting a jail about 5,000 thugs deep....yet each of the 20-odd characters we were introduced to knew one another. I automatically felt that the epic nature of the prison was improperly portrayed, and thus was taken out of the story. And even though each prisoner's story was linked to all the others, the transitions still felt choppy and awkward. Throw in what I recall to be a volume of gay sitcom scenarios more befitting of a soap opera than a prison saga, and the whole thing just felt phony. By the time shit started getting hectic in the film's finale, I was quite a ways removed from giving a fuck. I was disappointed, too - after "City of God", I had high hopes that this one would be at least in the same ballpark, but it turned out to not even be the same fucking sport.

RotationSlimWang
10-01-2007, 10:53 PM
I agree with a great deal of what you said, although I don't know that we can speculate on what the truth of gay relationships in Brazilian prisons are. It was almost touching in a way, although, you know, gayer than all hell. Instead of a prison movie where they raped each other or made each other bitches, they just kinda accepted it and dealed. If that's how it really is, fucking cool for them. And it seems like it might be possible because I'm guessing all those cats were serving LONG time, but that's again just an assumption.

But yeah, that fucking riot scene could've made up for an entire Brokeback Carandiru leading up to it. That shit ruled SO much.

wmgaretjax
10-01-2007, 11:32 PM
Interesting. I might have to go back and watch it again. It has been a long while, I just remember thinking of it when I saw City of God.

I'll watch Eraserhead again and throw up any additions I have to the interpretations. It's been a while, and that movie deserves multiple viewings for sure.

I watched "If..." tonight and it was absolutely fantastic. Some of the allegorical elements are silly, but you can't help but love the anarchic fun.

Jenniehoo
10-01-2007, 11:48 PM
Dude. I'm sooooo Yoko in this thread.

RotationSlimWang
10-02-2007, 12:08 AM
I want my band to some day have a song called Oh No You're No Yoko

schoolofruckus
10-02-2007, 06:29 AM
I agree with a great deal of what you said, although I don't know that we can speculate on what the truth of gay relationships in Brazilian prisons are. It was almost touching in a way, although, you know, gayer than all hell. Instead of a prison movie where they raped each other or made each other bitches, they just kinda accepted it and dealed. If that's how it really is, fucking cool for them. And it seems like it might be possible because I'm guessing all those cats were serving LONG time, but that's again just an assumption.

But yeah, that fucking riot scene could've made up for an entire Brokeback Carandiru leading up to it. That shit ruled SO much.

You're right - I do have no way of knowing what kind of relationships (gay, straight, beastial, or otherwise) are found in the average Brazillian mega-jail. It wasn't that the prisoners were seemingly all gay, but just that many of the scenes (the wedding party??) felt really campy. Maybe this is one-sided of me, but I feel like a prison movie should strike fear in one's heart, at least somewhat. Whereas "Carandiru" felt like it could have had a laugh track. I'm not opposed to prison comedy; I liked the Eddie Murphy/Martin Laurence movie alright. But if I walk into a movie about the biggest, baddest prison in the world, and then all of a sudden it's portrayed as not that big and not so bad.......

Stefinitely Maybe
10-02-2007, 06:45 AM
I agree pretty much with Jennie's interpretation of Eraserhead. It's a shame you guys couldn't go to the Lynch exhibition in Paris. It was amazing.

I was just wondering, has anyone else her seen both cuts of "Death Proof"? I saw "Grindhouse" when I was in LA in April, and then this weekend I watched the UK release of "Death Proof", which is a much longer edit. It has some nice extra dialogue and a couple of cool scenes, but most of it seemed superfluous and lazy, having seen the shorter cut.

schoolofruckus
10-02-2007, 06:58 AM
Unless the UK release is well over 2 hours, I think that's probably the same full version of "Death Proof" that's available everywhere. Tarantino and Rodriguez both cut their films down to be able to book them as one big "Grindhouse" thing in cinemas, but on DVD the films are being released separately and in their full versions.

I never saw either one. I plan on catching the Tarantino sometime soon, but if I don't have to sit through Rodriguez's version to get to it, then that one probably won't make it into my queue.

J~$$$
10-02-2007, 08:52 AM
Lynch....does gucci.DOGNyV9ngMk&eurl

atom heart
10-02-2007, 11:31 AM
I just heard that Dark is Rising is being made in to a movie and John Hodges is the screenwriter. Has anybody heard anything about this project? I enjoyed those books and would be interested in Hodges adaptation.

Ugh. Just by the trailers it looks awful. It looks like the adaptation completely missed the point. The books were dark, medieval, and creepily understated. The movie just looks gaudy and tacky.

PotVsKtl
10-02-2007, 12:12 PM
I watched a bit of Maya Deren's erstwhile travelogue edited into Divine Horsemen: The Living Gods of Haiti the other day. It was depressing because it was so obvious that the Haitians were laughing at her even as they made their scraps pantomiming old voodoo rituals for the camera. Every time someone busted into a "I'm possessed by spirits" stutterstep, you could see a few people in the background trying to contain their amusement. The fact that Deren took what appears to be nothing more than a tourist attraction so seriously and proceeded to pass herself off at house parties as some kind of adopted Hoodoon priestess makes me wish I'd never seen it.

wmgaretjax
10-02-2007, 01:26 PM
I watched a bit of Maya Deren's erstwhile travelogue edited into Divine Horsemen: The Living Gods of Haiti the other day. It was depressing because it was so obvious that the Haitians were laughing at her even as they made their scraps pantomiming old voodoo rituals for the camera. Every time someone busted into a "I'm possessed by spirits" stutterstep, you could see a few people in the background trying to contain their amusement. The fact that Deren took what appears to be nothing more than a tourist attraction so seriously and proceeded to pass herself off at house parties as some kind of adopted Hoodoon priestess makes me wish I'd never seen it.

She should have stopped while she was ahead. Choreography for Camera and Meshes in the Afternoon were brilliant films...

mob roulette
10-02-2007, 01:55 PM
fwNMkCBjbdM

bballarl
10-02-2007, 01:58 PM
I watched Persona the other day for my creative writing class. I need to see it again. Unsettling.

wmgaretjax
10-02-2007, 02:08 PM
I watched Persona the other day for my creative writing class. I need to see it again. Unsettling.

That's one of my favorite films. You should check out "Cries and Whispers" if you want to see more Bergman.

atom heart
10-02-2007, 02:52 PM
I saw Cries and Whispers at a Bergman/Antonioni film fest at school and it felt like being run over by a train very very slowly. Also, necrophilia and genital mutilation = bad idea for a good night out. Later I watched The Passenger and that sort of cleared my mind.

algunz
10-02-2007, 03:03 PM
Ugh. Just by the trailers it looks awful. It looks like the adaptation completely missed the point. The books were dark, medieval, and creepily understated. The movie just looks gaudy and tacky.

Yea, and the main character has been turned into an American. They must be afraid of connecting it too much to the Potter series.

But, I like some of Hodges work. Trainspotting, I thought was a pretty good adaptation. I read the book after seeing the movie though.

Mr.Nipples
10-02-2007, 04:28 PM
mydQajaQXkA

HAHVZHHAHAHAHIPUWHF)#@*Q*)!Y)*#&_!#_(*$_!!!!!!!!!

RotationSlimWang
10-02-2007, 04:35 PM
You're right - I do have no way of knowing what kind of relationships (gay, straight, beastial, or otherwise) are found in the average Brazillian mega-jail. It wasn't that the prisoners were seemingly all gay, but just that many of the scenes (the wedding party??) felt really campy. Maybe this is one-sided of me, but I feel like a prison movie should strike fear in one's heart, at least somewhat. Whereas "Carandiru" felt like it could have had a laugh track. I'm not opposed to prison comedy; I liked the Eddie Murphy/Martin Laurence movie alright. But if I walk into a movie about the biggest, baddest prison in the world, and then all of a sudden it's portrayed as not that big and not so bad.......

Okay, I dig where you're coming from. My recollection is a bit sparse, I don't remember too much about it, and in particular I guess there wasn't much actual violence going on until the end. But the way the prisoners talked about the things they had done, like in the beginning when some dude wants to fight the dude with the pet rat because pet rat guy had killed his brother or something, and the leader of the prisoners (they all policed themselves somehow, remember? That was funky too. It was up to them to keep the peace inside the jail because otherwise the long-lived riot squad would be called in--that was pretty cool too) immediately shut down the guy whose brother had been murdered. Then rat dude said something, fuck I wish I could remember the wording, but it was just so matter-of-fact: (paraphrasing) "Yes I murdered your brother. I don't need to explain why I did it. It's what I do. It's what we all did. So grow up and accept it. Your brother did."

There was a much stranger hardness to the movie than like in Oz or shit like that where everybody's trying to be a badass. In Brazil (well, in the favelas and similar lower-class areas) what's so impressive about their tough guy bullshit is that there doesn't seem to be the posturing. They learn young that killing and being killed is just a fact of life, like they couldn't imagine another way. Ever watch the documentary that comes with the City Of God DVD? It moves pretty slow, but it's fucking astounding. They interview this 14 year old who waxes nostalgic about how the first time he murdered someone at the age of 12 he set this informant on fire with several large truck tires and 10 gallons of gasoline. And the interviewer asks the kid how he felt after having killed another boy, and the kid looks at him as if it was just a stupid fucking question. "What do you mean, 'how did I feel?' I feel the same way I feel now. How should I have felt?" THAT'S the attitude that's truly fearsome.

schoolofruckus
10-02-2007, 08:58 PM
Quite true all around. I guess "Carandiru" may have had more going for it than I give it credit for, but it just didn't go to town on me the way I thought it should.

One of my favorite scenes in "Cidade de Deus" is when the little kids pick up Ze's gun at the end and just walk away matter-of-factly. It's primarily the story of Rocket's childhood and mmediate acquaintances, but the most disturbing part is that every character in the movie has a similar one, and there's never an end to any of it.

Down Rodeo
10-02-2007, 11:02 PM
I like this dialogue going on about City of God and Carandiru, both of which were excellent movies. Obviously, City of God was the better of the two, but I really enjoyed Carandiru as well. I think the thing that struck me the most when I first saw it was the way the prisoners lived, almost as if the prison was an apartment complex instead. They were allowed to decorate their rooms and come and go as they pleased, which was way different than any prison in America.

bmack86
10-02-2007, 11:40 PM
I saw Darjeeling Limited tonight. I really enjoyed it. It's a continuation of the Wes Anderson style of film-making, and it worked well for me.

PotVsKtl
10-03-2007, 12:00 AM
I require significantly more detail than that.

schoolofruckus
10-03-2007, 09:48 AM
I'm seeing "Darjeeling" tonight. I'm so fucking excited.

Benis23
10-03-2007, 04:22 PM
I just watched wes anderson's short hotel chevalier. I love that peter sarstedt song - i'd never heard it before. i thought it was pretty good, but i'm starting to wish he would move away from the slow motion shots and the quirky, absurd dialogue. I still love it, but it's starting to be a little repetitive and predictable for me.

full on idle
10-03-2007, 04:48 PM
When does that Darjeeling movie come out for the rest of us?

wmgaretjax
10-03-2007, 10:26 PM
http://www.apple.com/trailers/newline/bekindrewind/medium.html

Benis23
10-03-2007, 10:33 PM
I'm seeing "Darjeeling" tonight. I'm so fucking excited.

please let us know how it is. i cant wait to see it.

schoolofruckus
10-03-2007, 11:05 PM
It starts rolling out this Friday in Los Angeles and maybe some other cities. It'll be in most major cities by the end of the month.

And for those who may be growing tired of Wes-world - in spite of respect for his previous films as well as his overall skill set - The Darjeeling Limited should be right in your wheelhouse. Don't get me wrong, the film still has its fair share of slow motion dollies and 60's pop songs and immaculately-composed static shots that are production-designed within an inch of life. But Wes has also shed some of his more superfluous idiosyncrasies this time out, and the result is maybe his strongest visual narrative, as well as his most earnestly emotional film since Rushmore. Now, I grant that maybe some people don't go to Wes Anderson films for emotional substance, particularly when it stands in for distant, dryly-rendered comedy, but I've always felt that there was far more heart and humanity to his films than he gets credit for - which is part of what I love about them. And this one is more than worthy of that canon.

After the sweeping ensembles of The Royal Tennenbaums and The Life Aquatic, Darjeeling is a welcome return to the more intimate style of storytelling that Wes used earlier in his career - the scope is small, the running time is quick (a brief-but-not-criminally-so 91 minutes), the funny bits are more knowingly amusing than laugh-out-loud raucous. The film focuses exclusively on the three brothers - Francis (Owen Wilson), Peter (Adrian Brody), and Jack (Jason Schwartzman) - who are brought together somewhat against their wills to take the purposeful journey across India on the film's titular locomotive. They've drifted apart over the course of the previous year due to family tragedy and the circumstances of their own lives, the causes of which are sometimes explored, sometimes left mysterious, and - in Jack's case, with the "Hotel Chevalier" short - sometimes dramatized elsewhere. Francis, being the older brother and ringleader, has pre-organized the trip to an almost suffocating degree, and it's clear right away that it's being performed by the other two brothers out of a sense of obligation rather than any real desire to be there. The way the film establishes the characters and their dynamics is a model of efficiency, and each actor brings a distinct voice and a diversity of personality to his character; love them or hate them, you can't always say that about all of Wes Anderson's films.

Anyway - I'm going to cut the plot synopsis off before it gets going. The point is - this may be familiar Wes territory as far as subject and many of the usual style elements, but it's also a strong new direction for him in other ways. I mentioned earlier the production design, always the #1 harbinger of Wes' authorship in his films. It's still as heavily orchestrated as ever here, but for the first time since Bottle Rocket, it doesn't feel the slightest bit like a movie set. I've never been to India, couldn't tell you shit about it, but as presented here - it feels authentic. I also loved the multitude of passages with no dialogue. Again, I feel like this film terrifically does away with expository dialogue in as many situations as possible, preferring instead to let the exotic surroundings and the actions of the characters peel away the emotional layers.

I've compared the film to every one of Wes' other films in the course of this review, but the truth is, I don't know where it stands in relation to his erstwhile output. It could be, by default, my least favorite of his five films due to my love for the other four; it could be as high as #2 (I can't imagine he'll ever top Rushmore). Only years of further viewings - the benefit of which all his other stuff has - will tell. But I do know that this is both a satisfyingly recognizable member of his familial filmography, and a unique child in its own right.

One last thing - make sure you do see Hotel Chevalier in conjunction with this movie, preferably right before heading out to the theater. You could get Darjeeling without it, absolutely....but when you see it, and the way it enhances the film, you'll know you would have been missing something to do so. If any of you haven't seen it, go on the iTunes store and search for it. It's free and it should be easy to find.

PotVsKtl
10-03-2007, 11:19 PM
This dude's angling for Roeper's spot.

wmgaretjax
10-03-2007, 11:32 PM
This dude's angling for Roeper's spot.

bitch needs to eat a cheeseburger.

nice to hear gabe. got a week before it comes out here. should be seeing the assasination of jesse james... tomorrow. i'll let you know what i think.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-04-2007, 05:32 AM
Last night my girlfriend and I went to see Kenny (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenny_(2006_film)), an Australian indie flick filmed in the style of a mockumentary (a la The Office), following the exploits of a plumber.

Ostensibly, the film follows the day-to-day life of a charming loser named Kenny who works for a portable toilet company. And as such, you'd be forgiven for expecting the film to simply be a Farrelly Brothers style comedy, full of slapstick (literally) toilet humour and jokes about crap, which it is, to some extent - we do get to see Kenny at work, and having to deal with shit, and a lot of these scenes are hilarious - but it's a lot more than that, too. The central character is warm and likeable, and as we get to know more about him we learn about his divorce, and the way he deals with being a single father, and his father's disappointment with him, and his relationships with his brother, and his friends, and the women in his life. It's all genuinely heartwarming stuff, and the film is constantly fast-moving and watchable, with snappy dialogue throughout. Clearly filmed on a budget and with limited production values, it reminded me a lot of "Clerks", where the dialogue was so well-written and the slacker characters were so enjoyable to watch that none of that mattered. In fact, I'd go as far as to say that this is an even better movie than "Clerks" in many ways. It has wittier one-liners, and the characters and scenarios are far more believable, and you're left wondering just how much of this mockumentary might actually be real - Kenny's father and son in the movie are in fact played by the actor's real father and son - plus the movie deals with emotion and pathos a lot better than Kevin Smith's movies do, where they devolve into cliches or overly sappy speeches to get their point across. It's all very convincing, and a compelling insight into someone else's life; albeit the life of an Australian plumber.

I wouldn't say this is one of the most laugh-out-loud hilarious movies you're ever going to see, but it's an amusing, gentle look into the life of a really compelling, lovable character, unlike anything else I've seen in cinema in a while. It reminded me of films like "Junebug" or "The Straight Story", where nothing much happens, but you come away from the movie grateful that you got to spend a couple of hours in the lives of the characters you were watching. Plus it has some great one-liners. Definitely worth seeing when you fancy an alternative to all the epic CGI-ridden flicks out there, and, once you've seen this film, I guarantee that you'll never think of the Coachella toilets in the same way again. I'd give it a 7/10.

RotationSlimWang
10-04-2007, 06:13 AM
I'm always surprised that so many people choose Rushmore over Tenenbaums. Rushmore would definitely be no. 2 on my list, but maybe it's cause I'm a sucker for amusingly bastard father storylines and awesomely scored suicide scenes. Yeah, that's probably it. Oh, and I really want to pull a stunt like Owen Wilson's character does on that talk show some day.

This was not intended to start a big brouhaha about which is Anderson's best movie, it just surprises me that 75 percent of people not my immediate close friends prefer Rushmore.

schoolofruckus
10-04-2007, 06:57 AM
I initially wasn't crazy about Rushmore. I saw it in theaters in early '99 or whenever it came out and was somewhat put off by its mannered quirkiness. It was Royal Tennenbaums that brought me into Wes Anderson's way of doing things, partially on the strength of Gene Hackman's unforgettable performance. As I rewatched it, I began to appreciate the film's style and decided to give Rushmore another shot. It has since shot into my ten favorite movies ever.

I like Rushmore the best because - kind of like Stef's plumber movie (which sounds good, by the way - I'll be keeping my eye out for its release over here) - I just enjoy the characters the most. I don't know whether or not Max Fischer is a better character than Dignan, Royal, or Steve, but he's a goddamn great protagonist. And there are so many subtle moments of sadness amongst all the shenanigans - like when Blume goes to visit Max and finds out his dad is a barber - that continue to resonate every time I watch it.

Anyway, this also isn't intended to start a brouhaha about which is Anderson's best movie. I love each of them dearly and I can understand why any would rank as one's favorite.

schoolofruckus
10-04-2007, 07:00 AM
bitch needs to eat a cheeseburger.

nice to hear gabe. got a week before it comes out here. should be seeing the assasination of jesse james... tomorrow. i'll let you know what i think.

Pfft. It's Siskel's spot; Roeper's just keeping it warm (and failing miserably, at that). Therefore, bitch needs to grow the worst haircut in history.

Jared, if you don't like Jesse James, I'm going to have a seizure.

RotationSlimWang
10-04-2007, 07:41 AM
I admit to being a total sucker for the following lead actors practically no matter what they do: Bill Murray, Gene Hackman, Jack Nicholson, Paul Newman. Hackman is always gold.

KungFuJoe
10-04-2007, 11:14 AM
Call me crazy but Bottle Rocket will always be my favorite Wes Anderson film. I don't necessarily think it's his best, but I saw it when it first came out and remember being in instant glee the moment Dignin shined his mirror at Anthony and "kakawed". It was a whole new world I was introduced to and I knew I would be looking foward to his films for a long time. Every time I watch it I remember that feeling and it truly inspires me. Yeah, it's a corny story, but it's kinda of like an old t-shirt you just can't let go. Can't wait to see Darjeeling. Did you get to meet Wes gabe? didn't you go to the screening at the Aero? I was upset I couldn't make that.

schoolofruckus
10-04-2007, 01:04 PM
I was at the Aero screening. I did not, however, meet Wes Anderson.

Sigh.......


Truth be told, the least thrilling part of the night was his Q & A. I'm not going to make judgements on a dude who's made 5 of my favorite movies of the past 12 years based on 15 minutes of panel talk, but at the same time, there was something about him in person that was extremely off-putting. When answering questions, he had an absolutely stunning lack of conviction in what he was saying. Like, he was up there with Roman Coppola (who co-wrote Darjeeling, along with Wes and Jason Schwartzman) and Wally Wolodarsky (who plays Owen's assistant in the film), and he literally didn't field one question without turning to the other two to ask their opinions of what he was saying. And not just asking them to tell stories from the shoot; I'm talking questions like "What movies influenced you when you were a teenager?", and he would turn to them and ask what answer he should give. For a guy whose films are so meticulously composed, it was incredible to see him as indecisive as he is. Couple that with what his detractors have accused as being a habit of trying to overly-cultivate his public image and....it was just kind of hard to take.

I honestly didn't know how to read it. He was pretty damn funny in some of his answers, and it was enjoyable to see him talking about the movies for the most part (I won't reveal the parts I didn't like). And even though it was such a love-in that every question-asking audience member thanked him for his "beautiful, amazing movies" out loud, and there was literally a girl outside the theater with a sign promising "minor sexual favors" in return for a ticket to the sold-out screening, he very well could have just been nervous in front of the crowd. Some people don't handle those situations with grace because they get a bit of stage fright, and that's perfectly understandable. And I really, sincerely hope that's what was behind his odd behavior. But yeah, after the Q & A wrapped, he pretty much left out the back door and got in a car in the alley and drove away.

schoolofruckus
10-04-2007, 02:04 PM
The trailer for Tim Burton's new musical - Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1809834155/video/4367764).

I don't know what to think. It could be on my top 10 at the end of the year or it could be the worst film of the decade. As much as I hate it, Tim Burton's work has neither a floor nor a ceiling anymore.

chrislasf
10-04-2007, 07:45 PM
Christ he is really channeling Edward in this one.

Echoing your sentiments, this could be a really good thing or insanely devastating.

mountmccabe
10-04-2007, 08:20 PM
The Scottsdale International Film Festival (http://www.scottsdalefilmfestival.com/) runs tomorrow through Tuesday. I am going to Jesu on Saturday night so I'm busy then but has anyone seen/would recommend any of these movies?

Adrift In Manhattan - USA
Bad Faith - France
Beauty in Trouble - Czech Republic
Belle Toujours - France
Border Café - Iran
Cinerama Adventure - USA
The Diving Bell And The Butterfly (Closing Night Film) - France
The Education of Fairies - Spain
Hollywood Dreams - USA
How To Cook Your Life - Germany
Hula Girls - Japan
Intervention - UK
The Kite Runner (Opening Night Film) - China/USA
Lars and the Real Girl - Canada
Love & Dance - Israel
The Missing Star - Italy/China
OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies - France
The Rocket - Maurice Richard - Canada
Time - South Korea
The Walker - USA
The West Wittering Affair - UK


Now I am going to watch that Sweeney Todd trailer. And then I am going to post this in the Phoenix thread.

PotVsKtl
10-04-2007, 08:23 PM
I've read that Diving Bell movie is amazing.

mountmccabe
10-04-2007, 08:29 PM
Whoah! That's a Julian Schnabel film! Score!

mountmccabe
10-04-2007, 08:30 PM
I guess I should confess that I haven't even looked into these films at all. Though that's probably obvious.

thefunkylama
10-04-2007, 10:18 PM
Tonight we watched clash of the titans in my humanities class. hilarious and awesome. and a mechanical bird named bubo. that's about all.

Benis23
10-04-2007, 11:32 PM
Call me crazy but Bottle Rocket will always be my favorite Wes Anderson film. I don't necessarily think it's his best, but I saw it when it first came out and remember being in instant glee the moment Dignin shined his mirror at Anthony and "kakawed". It was a whole new world I was introduced to and I knew I would be looking foward to his films for a long time. Every time I watch it I remember that feeling and it truly inspires me. Yeah, it's a corny story, but it's kinda of like an old t-shirt you just can't let go. Can't wait to see Darjeeling. Did you get to meet Wes gabe? didn't you go to the screening at the Aero? I was upset I couldn't make that.

man, and i thought i was the only one. i completely agree about bottle rocket. i think bottle rocket is maybe less refined, less stylish, or maybe less sophisticated in terms of the cinematography, but i absolutely love the characters and the humor in that movie. For me, Dignan is easily the best and funniest character owen wilson played so far. bob mapplethorpe, and luke wilson and james caan's characters are great too.

bmack86
10-04-2007, 11:39 PM
Wes Anderson came to our screening as well, and he started out his speech by saying that he gets incredibly nervous in front of groups like that. Apparently he's not a fan of the Q&A either.

Stefinitely Maybe
10-05-2007, 01:34 AM
Honestly - this is what I said to Gabe, "he's not in his element."

"Donnie, you're out of your element!"

schoolofruckus
10-05-2007, 05:35 AM
This is what I know:


The Scottsdale International Film Festival (http://www.scottsdalefilmfestival.com/) runs tomorrow through Tuesday. I am going to Jesu on Saturday night so I'm busy then but has anyone seen/would recommend any of these movies?

Adrift In Manhattan - USA - I remember reading decent things about this title at Sundance, but I don't know shit about it beyond that.
Bad Faith - France
Beauty in Trouble - Czech Republic
Belle Toujours - France
Border Café - Iran
Cinerama Adventure - USA
The Diving Bell And The Butterfly (Closing Night Film) - France You already looked this one up. I've heard that it's got a lot of communication via eye blinking. If you're down with that, then definitely hit it.
The Education of Fairies - Spain
Hollywood Dreams - USA
How To Cook Your Life - Germany
Hula Girls - Japan
Intervention - UK
The Kite Runner (Opening Night Film) - China/USA
Lars and the Real Girl - Canada - This movie is about Ryan Gosling playing a socially-inept, small town loner who eventually starts dating a blow-up doll. With a concept that out-there, as well as Gosling's track record of picking interesting films, I'm guessing it would have to be pretty good in order to get made. Again, it's one that could either be great or terrible.
Love & Dance - Israel
The Missing Star - Italy/China
OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies - France
The Rocket - Maurice Richard - Canada
Time - South Korea I looked this one up because it's from South Korea. Apparently it's from Kim Ki-Duk, who's one of the bigger worldwide names in Korean cinema. He did 3 Iron, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter...Spring, and The Isle. If you're into that kind of thing.
The Walker - USA
The West Wittering Affair - UK


Now I am going to watch that Sweeney Todd trailer. And then I am going to post this in the Phoenix thread.

wmgaretjax
10-05-2007, 06:08 AM
The Kite Runner is great.

Time is good, albeit heavy handed.

roberto73
10-05-2007, 06:20 AM
Speaking of Q & A, I'm seeing David Cronenberg next Friday after a screening of Eastern Promises. I'm hoping for a lively time.

Mr.Nipples
10-05-2007, 06:42 AM
you fortunate bastard...

schoolofruckus
10-05-2007, 12:09 PM
Speaking of Q & A, I'm seeing David Cronenberg next Friday after a screening of Eastern Promises. I'm hoping for a lively time.

Really? Where is that?

bmack86
10-05-2007, 12:11 PM
Speaking of Q & A, I'm seeing David Cronenberg next Friday after a screening of Eastern Promises. I'm hoping for a lively time.

That'd be awesome. Cronenberg is a balla.

roberto73
10-05-2007, 03:13 PM
UC Santa Barbara. Campbell Hall. Tix are $6.

Click me. (https://artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu/Details.aspx?PerfNum=976)

It's not a great venue to watch a movie, but I'll sacrifice comfort to hear Cronenberg.

mountmccabe
10-05-2007, 03:25 PM
Thanks for the advice/pointers on the SIFF. I am planning on trying to see The Missing Star (Saturday 11:15 am or Sunday 1:25 pm) and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (Tuesday 8:15 pm.)

I would see Time but one showing conflicts with Jesu and the other conflicts with me finishing work.

bmack86
10-05-2007, 04:36 PM
i just watched Mike Leigh's Naked. It was a fantastic and stark movie. The cinematography was dark and dreary, which fit perfectly with the uncomfortable characters. I'm not too good at writing what I think about films, but this one was great, and I'd recommend it.

jtovar21
10-05-2007, 04:42 PM
BLADE RUNNER: THE FINAL CUT out today at the Landmark in West LA. If you've never seen it, do yourself a favor and check it out.

wmgaretjax
10-05-2007, 10:50 PM
you called it gabe. The Assasination of Jesse James... is the best movie I have seen this year.

not only was the acting absolutely phenomenal, the cinematography was the best I have seen this year as well. while it will undoubtedly be compared to Terrance Mallick, it is superior in several ways. First, the composition is far more meaningful and multi-faceted than the simple, lingering beauty of his work. The film is incredibly multi-layered, and the characters are laid out flawlessly. The narration bothered me at first, but it tied in perfectly by the end.

I have a few mild complaints... The editing seemed rough in a couple spots. The middle section had a couple unnecessary strings (which is normally forgiveable, but with a 3 hour movie it can be slightly frustrating), and there were a couple moments that could have been slightly more subtle. In the end, these paled in comparison to what was a strikingly beautiful and wonderfully told story.

schoolofruckus
10-06-2007, 08:09 AM
jtovar - Have you seen the final cut? Or are you just speaking of the film's greatness in general? I can't remember which version I've seen - it's been so unbelievably long - but I do remember thinking it's tremendous. I plan on buying the 4-disc set with the theatrical, director's, and final cuts all on it (it's being released on December 18) so I can figure out which one is the best.

Jared - I'm pleased - but of course, completely unsurprised - that you liked Assassination so much. The rest of you - go see this movie soon! As I also predicted (apparently I'm Negrodamus when it comes to this movie), it's performing abysmally in theaters, with less than $500K through 2 weeks of release. Granted, it's rolling out very slowly, but it's only averaging $2,000 a print - in other words, it's not going to be around very long.

mountmccabe
10-06-2007, 09:24 AM
One last thing - make sure you do see Hotel Chevalier in conjunction with this movie, preferably right before heading out to the theater. You could get Darjeeling without it, absolutely....but when you see it, and the way it enhances the film, you'll know you would have been missing something to do so. If any of you haven't seen it, go on the iTunes store and search for it. It's free and it should be easy to find.

I just tried getting it from iTunes but apparently you need iTunes on your computer to do that and fuck that. I will find other ways.



jtovar - Have you seen the final cut? Or are you just speaking of the film's greatness in general? I can't remember which version I've seen - it's been so unbelievably long - but I do remember thinking it's tremendous. I plan on buying the 4-disc set with the theatrical, director's, and final cuts all on it (it's being released on December 18) so I can figure out which one is the best.

Blade Runner is one of my favorite movies of all time. And I had not heard that this set of glory is being released. Also I have yet to upgrade to DVD so yay.

Yablonowitz
10-06-2007, 09:32 AM
Blade Runner Director's Cut >x100,000 Blade Runner theater cut

wmgaretjax
10-06-2007, 09:33 AM
Jared - I'm pleased - but of course, completely unsurprised - that you liked Assassination so much. The rest of you - go see this movie soon! As I also predicted (apparently I'm Negrodamus when it comes to this movie), it's performing abysmally in theaters, with less than $500K through 2 weeks of release. Granted, it's rolling out very slowly, but it's only averaging $2,000 a print - in other words, it's not going to be around very long.

The screening I went to sold out. It was at a multi-plex as well. I know it got a lot wider distribution this weekend, maybe it will pick up that way.

I highly recommend seeing this in theaters, it's too beautiful to miss out on for the big screen.

wmgaretjax
10-06-2007, 09:35 AM
Blade Runner Director's Cut >x100,000 Blade Runner theater cut

I agree, but isn't there also a new "final cut" coming out? I think in december?

we'll see how it stacks up.

canexplain
10-06-2007, 09:37 AM
i just watched Bandits with bruce willis and billy bob .. i really like that movie ... i like the costal shots because it brings back memories, plus it is quirky and fun ... canx**

Yablonowitz
10-06-2007, 09:40 AM
BLADE RUNNER: THE FINAL CUT out today at the Landmark in West LA. If you've never seen it, do yourself a favor and check it out.

What is the difference between the Final Cut, the cut that was released originally to the theaters and the director's cut? Gee, there's an internet out there, isn't there? Maybe I should zip my zzz mouth and go look for it.

wmgaretjax
10-06-2007, 09:53 AM
What is the difference between the Final Cut, the cut that was released originally to the theaters and the director's cut? Gee, there's an internet out there, isn't there? Maybe I should zip my zzz mouth and go look for it.

longer... the directors cut with a mix of extending some scenes and adding deleted ones. you know... the usual.

jtovar21
10-06-2007, 11:12 AM
I saw the FINAL CUT last night at the Landmark in West LA. It's playing there in digital projection for one month only I believe. So this is a great chance to catch it on the big screen before it makes it dvd debut in december. Here's a couple links that explains the differences between cuts.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blade_Runner#Versions

http://www.thedigitalbits.com/reviews3/bladerunnerfinalfilm.html

http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/movies/ny-etmovie5401200oct05,0,2577987.story

schoolofruckus
10-06-2007, 12:34 PM
During the process, a new digital print of the film was created from the original negatives, special effects were updated and cleaned, and the sound was remastered in 5.1 Dolby Digital surround sound.

Great. In other words....

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b126/schoolofruckus/BladeRunner.jpg

mountmccabe
10-06-2007, 03:01 PM
Great. In other words....

Scott != Spielberg a/o Lucas.


So I just saw The Missing Star (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0448131/) at the SIFF. I would consider it an Italian film but most of the film takes place in China. In fact one of the very interesting things about the film was that all you see of Italy is around a closed, gutted factory. For China, however, you see huge fields and the Yangtze river and factories and tenements, cities and rural dwellings.

Segio Castellitto plays a maintenance worker (Vincenzo) that is nearing the end of his job at a Italian factory/steel mill that shut down a few months ago. He has been working on the equipment even after the shutdown to bring it back to good working order. Chinese brokers buy a giant blast furnace. They don't know anything about Italy and don't care when Vincenzo comes in and says that they must take it apart slowly and carefully and allow him to fix a defect in the machine so that it will not cause more accidents. He fabricates the new parts necessary but to no avail, the blast furnace is gone the next day.

He flies to China on a quest to find where the blast furnace went and to fix it. The brokerage firm doesn't care what he has to say and he doesn't trust them to deliver the new part so he sets out looking for the blast furnace himself. He convinces the translator that lost her job after the trip to Italy (which she blames on him) on his quest.

It is a quiet and oftentimes subtle film, gorgeously shot. The interaction between the two leads is quite interesting, very restrained. They briefly laugh and bond (a little) over food ("this is rather bland" "it is plain white rice") and give each other directions but these, like Vincenzo's concerns over the safety of the blast furnace, are largely ignored.

This is a film about the industrialization, the Westernization of China. It is a film about vultures and children, bureaucracy and innocence. It is a film about Vincenzo, the discarded maintenance worker that fixes things everywhere he sees them broken and expresses a childlike excitement when discussing the engineering marvel of a dam on the Yangtze and Liu, a young Chinese woman who hasn't fit the required molds for Chinese society, who took Italian before she left university because she didn't come from a good enough high school to take a more useful second language.

Some may find it somewhat slow and there are no guns and the occasional shots of molten steel and showers of sparks will have to stand-in for explosions but if you can live with that this is highly recommended.

It was directed by Gianni Amelio. And I'm putting his earlier films - it looks like he has around 10 feature length films; none of them sound familiar - on my to watch list.

wmgaretjax
10-07-2007, 03:32 PM
anyone excited for Haneke's remake of his own film:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ec-70W_K77U

the original was great, albeit flawed, and this one looks even better.

schoolofruckus
10-07-2007, 03:41 PM
I'd like to see it. I've never seen any of Heineke's stuff, but that one looks good. Michael Pitt is awesome in just about everything he does.

I'm seeing "Control" in about 3 hours. So fucking jacked up.

wmgaretjax
10-07-2007, 03:42 PM
i'm jealous. let me know how it is.

as far as haneke goes, you should check out "Time of the Wolf" and "Cache" first. Basically everything is worth seeing by him.