PDA

View Full Version : The Pitchfork review of Pearl Jam @ Lolla



nothingman00
08-07-2007, 10:59 AM
Since I've seen various sides of the PJ-Lolla argument (they sucked vs. they were fantastic), I thought I'd share this little tidbit from the fine folks at pitchfork who, surprisingly, didn't wax poetic about how "un-indie" PJ are...

Pearl Jam [AT&T Stage; 8 p.m.]

I won't pretend; I've barely thought about Pearl Jam, let alone listened to them, in this century. And so it was with a mix of morbid curiosity and nostalgia that I approached this, Lollapalooza 2007's culminating moment. Nostalgia ultimately won over, but first came the awe: There were A TON of people gathered on the south end of Grant Park, a panoramic sea of heads and colors, a spectacle unto itself. A steady stream of people left throughout this two-hour-plus set, but that vast mass of bodies never seemed to shrink. Tens and tens of thousands, numbers which, in my experience, only turn out at major sporting events-- a somewhat horrifying realization from which sprung a question: Can music really have meaning in a setting such as this?

As Eddie Vedder and band tore into "Why Go", it triggered for me a chain of Pearl Jam memories and associations: The band's unsuccessful attempt to trump Ticketmaster, Vedder's refusals to accept awards on principle, that kick-ass Todd McFarlane-animated video for "Do the Evolution", and so on. And when Eddie began "Elderly Woman Behind the Counter in a Small Town" and everyone around me started singing along, I found myself singing too, surprised to find I knew and remembered pretty much all the lyrics. This would happen again with "Not For You", "Alive", and "Better Man". As a child of alternative rock radio, there are some things you'll just never shake.

Eddie's still a man of indie ethics too. He twice paid his respects to fellow Lollapalooza performers Patti Smith and Iggy Pop, two figures he described as "teachers." Mid-set he called attention to the campaign to save nearby Lake Michigan from BP Amoco's nefarious waste-dumping practices and suggested we think twice before buying BP gas. And then, um, Pearl Jam played a little song that went "Don't go/ To BP Amoco!" Goofy for sure, but also charming in its way.

Later Eddie morphed the outro to "Daughter" into "Another Brick in the Wall", which he further spun into some sort of indictment against our sitting president. And the second and final encore no doubt had the conservative Pearl Jam fans out there (I suspect there were more than a few) squirming: Eddie first called a wheelchair-bound Iraq War veteran onstage to say a few words against the war, then joined Friday night headliner Ben Harper for a (pretty lifeless, I'm sorry to say) acoustic protest tune. With the rest of Pearl Jam and Harper, Vedder capped it all off with-- what else-- a cover of "Rockin' in the Free World". Some 30 people soon joined the onstage orgy, although I wasn't close enough to discern precisely whom (word is Dennis Rodman was among them?!). Hell, Eddie even danced for a bit with the sign language interpreter.

I could tell you Pearl Jam have lost their edge with age (and they probably have, but is that at all surprising?). I could tell you their best songs remain their earliest songs, from that astoundingly fertile period when this band put out albums that spawned four or five radio hits apiece. I could tell you I was a tiny bit disappointed Eddie didn't climb the scaffolding during "Even Flow" like his does in the video, but that Mike McCready playing an entire solo with the guitar slung behind his head was pretty damned bad-ass (as were the fireworks that ignited the nearby sky soon after).

But when things reach this cultural level, nothing I say is going to matter in the least. This isn't music as art, or music as expression, or even music as spectacle (indeed, the complete lack of visual accoutrements, for one, contrasted sharply with Muse and Daft Punk, who had closed out this same stage the two previous nights). When it reaches this level, this is, fundamentally, music as ritual. Music for a bunch of once-or-twice-a-year concert-goers to mingle to, music for diehards to pump their firsts to, music for people who don't get out much to marvel at, music for lifelong and casual fans alike to sing along to. And there ain't nothing wrong with that. Let the Pearl Jam fans have their Pearl Jam

nothingman00
08-07-2007, 11:01 AM
http://www.pitchforkmedia.com/page/news/44680-lollapalooza-report-sunday-matthew-solarski

here's the link...

kreutz2112
08-07-2007, 11:03 AM
I have said it before and I will say it again...Pearl Jam are the the greatest live band on earth.

good review.

J~$$$
08-07-2007, 11:04 AM
*LOL*

kreutz2112
08-07-2007, 11:05 AM
j-mon have you seen PJ?

rage patton
08-07-2007, 11:08 AM
Did they play Do the Evolution at Lolla?

J~$$$
08-07-2007, 11:08 AM
2ndIXwtcnak


greatest live band in the world?

kreutz2112
08-07-2007, 11:09 AM
yes

thinnerair
08-07-2007, 11:10 AM
I HEARD MUSE WAS EXCELLENT. IM YELLING AT YOU.

kreutz2112
08-07-2007, 11:10 AM
2ndIXwtcnak


greatest live band in the world?

I cannot watch that right now, but I am assuming something goes wrong, or someone fucks up...either way, I stand by my statement.

J~$$$
08-07-2007, 11:11 AM
no just them at redrocks in '95 it made me yawn......again.

superfiction
08-07-2007, 12:12 PM
ya know, i was there. they wernt bad. i mean, if i knew more of their material and if i wasnt dead tired from it being the end of the weekend it probably woulda been better. but that said, pearl jam fans are douche bags. seriously.

pewter14
08-07-2007, 01:03 PM
but that said, pearl jam fans are douche bags. seriously.

thanks. :rolleyes

nothingman00
08-07-2007, 04:10 PM
ya know, i was there. they wernt bad. i mean, if i knew more of their material and if i wasnt dead tired from it being the end of the weekend it probably woulda been better. but that said, pearl jam fans are douche bags. seriously.

As are people who over-generalize...

canexplain
08-07-2007, 04:35 PM
i remember the days when pj came here in co and i was actually here lol ... saw them at fiddlers, (lolla ?) and eddie climed from the stage to the top of the awning at fiddlers just using the curtain, i would guess at least 40 feet, right J$$$$$?, and at the cu fieldhouse where he jumped from the balcony to the floor to crowd surf for a while, is that old past eddie? i guess only he can say, but in their day, PJ put on one of best shows i have seen ... i know i saw him at least two times at the bridge show in the bay, not with the band, but eddie by himself or with neil, and they could bring you to tears ... so i am a pj fan, not a fanatic, but they did pay their dues ... cr****

nothingman00
08-07-2007, 05:16 PM
i remember the days when pj came here in co and i was actually here lol ... saw them at fiddlers, (lolla ?) and eddie climed from the stage to the top of the awning at fiddlers just using the curtain, i would guess at least 40 feet, right J$$$$$?, and at the cu fieldhouse where he jumped from the balcony to the floor to crowd surf for a while, is that old past eddie? i guess only he can say, but in their day, PJ put on one of best shows i have seen ... i know i saw him at least two times at the bridge show in the bay, not with the band, but eddie by himself or with neil, and they could bring you to tears ... so i am a pj fan, not a fanatic, but they did pay their dues ... cr****

Yeah, time catches up to us all, and while Ed's nutty scaffolding days may be over, it doesn't mean they can't put on a damn fine show. I guess the only thing that kinda irks me is people lumping PJ in with Grunge or judging them off of Ten, that type of shit... The thing is, they've been consistently good/great for 20 years now and don't flaunt it, but it's not as cool to say "I like Pearl Jam" as it is to say "I like Arcade Fire" or even "I like Animal collective" (by the way, I love both of those bands, too, but neither are in the same class as PJ---yet---). Anyway, in stark contrast to some other headliners, Ed was extremely gracious during the Lolla set, referencing Iggy and Patti Smith and genuinely sounding awed by their presence. I'm a fan, and yeah, probably borderline fanatic, but I hadn't listened to a single PJ song in the last year or so until this past weekend. Then I remembered why I always held them so dearly. Dunno... Everyone has "that" band... The one that helped define their adolescence/young adulthood and PJ was that band for me. I went through my "Steel Pole Bathtub", "Jawbreaker", "Jesus Lizard", "Samiam", "Treepeople", et al phase, then my electronica phase (which of course coincided with my "eat x tabs like they're tic-tacs phase" but PJ was always in the mix.

J~$$$
08-09-2007, 12:25 PM
Pearl Jam censored by AT&T, calls for a neutral 'Net

By Nate Anderson | Published: August 09, 2007 - 12:42PM CT

A bit of heavy-handed censorship of a Pearl Jam concert by AT&T this weekend led the band to fire off an open letter to fans—a letter in which Pearl Jam railed against media and ISP consolidation and called for readers to support network neutrality.

The incident happened during a Lollapalooza webcast over at AT&T's "Blue Room" media showcase. Pearl Jam's performance of their big 90's hit "Daughter" morphed into the melody from Pink Floyd's "The Wall," and Eddie Vedder served up a pair of anti-Bush lyrics to the tune. "George Bush, leave this world alone," he sang. "George Bush, find yourself another home."

Fans at the event got to hear the words in all their glory, but in the webcast, the lines were censored—AT&T made the decision to silence them, apparently believing that they would prove offensive to listeners. When Pearl Jam found out about the censorship, the band posted a strongly-worded message on its web site.

"This, of course, troubles us as artists but also as citizens concerned with the issue of censorship and the increasingly consolidated control of the media," wrote the band. "What happened to us this weekend was a wake-up call, and it's about something much bigger than the censorship of a rock band."

In Pearl Jam's view, it's a wake-up call for network neutrality advocates. The same sort of censorship could take place on any Internet content, and what could be done about it an a world where the only real option is... the cable company?
The fallout

Public interest groups agree and are already chiming in on the incident. Public Knowledge points out all the ways that AT&T has gotten into the content filtering business. "AT&T is really getting into its role as content nanny in a big way. First, it starts monitoring all sorts of conversations for the National Security Agency," writes Art Brodsky. "Then it promises to work with the movie studios and NBC to come up with some super software to tag copyrighted material that flows through its network, regardless of how that content is used. Now it puts 'content monitors' on its Webcasts."

Save the Internet, a vocal proponent of network neutrality in DC, sent a statement to Ars that reads, in part, "The moral of this story is put Net Neutrality permanently into law and never trust AT&T at their word. The company acts in bad faith toward the public interest and will do whatever it can to pad it's bottom line—including sacrificing its users' freedom to choose where they go, what they watch, and whom they listen to online."

AT&T sees things a bit, well, differently. Company spokesperson Brad Mays tells Ars Technica that the company does monitor broadcasts for profanity, as Blue Room is available to all ages, but that the censorship was a "mistake by a webcast vendor and contrary to our policy. We have policies in place with respect to editing excessive profanity, but AT&T does not edit or censor performances."

The company especially objects to making this incident part of a larger rallying cry for network neutrality, and we can see their point. This wasn't the company monitoring, degrading, or censoring someone else's content flowing across its IP networks; it was an act of content censorship of AT&T's own programming. It's much like the censorship that routinely takes place on television, and "network neutrality" enters the picture only because this particular show was streamed over the 'Net.

But as the Internet becomes a vital communications pipe into the home, network neutrality and traditional concerns over media concentration are becoming intertwined. FCC Commissioner Michael Copps recently drew a parallel between media consolidation and network neutrality because both traditional media and Internet access lines are increasingly owned by a few massive corporations. Given that level of control, Copps believes that safeguards are needed to make sure that people can continue to access a wide variety of viewpoints and information.

Pearl Jam appears to feel the same way. "AT&T's actions strike at the heart of the public's concerns over the power that corporations have when it comes to determining what the public sees and hears through communications media," they write.

kreutz2112
08-09-2007, 12:25 PM
from tenclub.net...bullshit.

After concluding our Sunday night show at Lollapalooza, fans informed us that portions of that performance were missing and may have been censored by AT&T during the "Blue Room" Live Lollapalooza Webcast.

When asked about the missing performance, AT&T informed Lollapalooza that portions of the show were in fact missing from the webcast, and that their content monitor had made a mistake in cutting them.

During the performance of "Daughter" the following lyrics were sung to the tune of Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall" but were cut from the webcast:

- "George Bush, leave this world alone." (the second time it was sung); and

- "George Bush find yourself another home."

This, of course, troubles us as artists but also as citizens concerned with the issue of censorship and the increasingly consolidated control of the media.

AT&T's actions strike at the heart of the public's concerns over the power that corporations have when it comes to determining what the public sees and hears through communications media.

Aspects of censorship, consolidation, and preferential treatment of the internet are now being debated under the umbrella of "NetNeutrality." Check out The Future of Music or Save the Internet for more information on this issue.

Most telecommunications companies oppose "net neutrality" and argue that the public can trust them not to censor..

Even the ex-head of AT&T, CEO Edward Whitacre, whose company sponsored our troubled webcast, stated just last March that fears his company and other big network providers would block traffic on their networks are overblown..

"Any provider that blocks access to content is inviting customers to find another provider." (Marguerite Reardon, Staff Writer, CNET News.com Published: March 21, 2006, 2:23 PM PST).

But what if there is only one provider from which to choose?

If a company that is controlling a webcast is cutting out bits of our performance -not based on laws, but on their own preferences and interpretations - fans have little choice but to watch the censored version.

What happened to us this weekend was a wake up call, and it's about something much bigger than the censorship of a rock band.

The complete version of "Daughter" from the Lollapalooza performance will be posted here soon for any of you who missed it. We apologize to our fans who were watching the webcast and got shortchanged. In the future, we will work even harder to ensure that our live broadcasts or webcasts are free from arbitrary edits.

If you have examples of AT&T censoring artist performances around political content, it's a good thing for everyone to know about. Feel free to post examples on the official Pearl Jam Message Pit.

J~$$$
08-09-2007, 12:26 PM
http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=04b_1186686033

J~$$$
08-09-2007, 12:27 PM
echo.

kreutz2112
08-09-2007, 12:28 PM
wierd.

kreutz2112
08-09-2007, 12:28 PM
echo.

kreutz2112
08-09-2007, 12:29 PM
switch those last two.

J~$$$
08-09-2007, 12:29 PM
Att blue room kinda sucks so I could see where it was just clogged in the pipes.

kreutz2112
08-09-2007, 12:31 PM
I have not ever watched att blue room. did they ever put coachella performances in the archives?

canexplain
08-09-2007, 12:35 PM
Att blue room kinda sucks so I could see where it was just clogged in the pipes.


ya, i have had some troubles with the blue room ... i like the idea and all, but they need to upgrade a bit for the volumn ...cr****

J~$$$
08-09-2007, 12:37 PM
but after watching the video it was clearly edited out because the video did not stop.

luckyface
08-09-2007, 12:38 PM
Let me be the first to say, "who gives a fuck?" about this AT&T story. People at the PJ websites are acting like their first born was sodomized by Crispin Glover. It's not like the government is doing it. It's a corporation who chose to broadcast content over the Internet. That would be like me getting mad at Comedy Central for not showing nudity on their station. Deal with it, is what I say.

J~$$$
08-09-2007, 12:43 PM
I <3 my internet providers thoughtful censorship over what I can see and what I cant.

pewter14
08-09-2007, 12:51 PM
Let me be the first to say, "who gives a fuck?" about this AT&T story. People at the PJ websites are acting like their first born was sodomized by Crispin Glover. It's not like the government is doing it. It's a corporation who chose to broadcast content over the Internet. That would be like me getting mad at Comedy Central for not showing nudity on their station. Deal with it, is what I say.

I agree in the sense that there are some pople taking this WAY too seriously (and personally) ... AT&T is a corporation and it has the right to air/cut off what ever they feel on their site ... this isn't a 1st ammendment issue ... the governement didn't crack down on Pearl Jam .. they said their peace ... and everyone there was allowed to hear it ... and there are no legal ramifications against Pearl Jam ... that's the 1st ammendment.

AT&T choose not to air it ... and yes, they 'fessed up to it, and are claiming it was a mistake by the hosting company, and are contemplating airing the entire song, unedited in the blue room archives.

I will say this, it would be crappy if PJ agreed to let AT&T air everything and a deal was struck between those two entities ... then, against PJ's feelings, AT&T then edited the content. But, that's not a 1st ammendment issue ... ease up people.

Nothingman, your views on PJ are spot on ... I'm probably more aof a fanatic ... but, man, I get a lot more "praise" so to speak when I say I went and saw the Arcade Fire then I do when I say I saw Pearl Jam ... just .... odd ...

It's our A.D.D. environment, everyone needs to be on top of the newest thing ... over expose it ... then toss it aside. How long until the Arcade Fire are passé?

pewter14
08-09-2007, 12:58 PM
I have not ever watched att blue room. did they ever put coachella performances in the archives?


They only had about 8 artists up there, and only about 4 songs from each ... Andrew Bird, CSS, others ... they were up there for a while, but, I cannot find them now ...

J~$$$
08-09-2007, 12:59 PM
Just as you love "PJ" some dislike......I dont like Arcade Fire either if that helps.YtFtcp4mNzA

kreutz2112
08-09-2007, 12:59 PM
shitty...thanks anyway.

algunz
08-09-2007, 01:30 PM
Eddie has always been about passion - passion of heart and body. Yes maybe his "body" passion has slowed down a bit, (I can't fault him, my stage diving days are over too.) but the passion of his heart is always clearly portrayed on stage.

And I love how he never opens his mouth.

nothingman00
08-11-2007, 08:53 AM
You know, Cr**** is right. The Blue Room is a great idea. They just need to tweak it a little.